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Science Podcast Episodes

A composite list of episodes from the past 90 days of general science podcasts. Also see episode list for physics, math, and astronomy podcasts.

Updated: 2024-Feb-21 13:40 UTC. Episodes: 686. Minimum length: 5 minutes. Hide descriptions. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

Episodes
podcast image2024-Feb-21 • 43 minutes
Could it be magic?
Brian Cox and Robin Ince conjure up scientific explanations for magical goings on. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2024-Feb-21 • 24 minutes
A universal virus-killer?
Airborne diseases kill millions of people a year, despite available antibiotics and vaccines. (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Feb-21 • 12 minutes
When The Sun Erupts
We are at the height of the Sun's activity in its eleven year cycle, known to astronomers as the solar maximum. This means that over the next several months there's going to be a lot of solar activity. It's got us thinking back to 1859. That's when astronomer Richard Carrington was studying the Sun when he witnessed the most intense geomagnetic storm recorded in history. The storm, triggered by a giant solar flare, sent brilliant auroral displays across the globe causing electrical sparking and fires in tel... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 23 minutes
Which Feathered Dinosaurs Could Fly? | Some French Cheeses At Risk Of Extinction
Researchers found that a specific number and symmetry of certain feathers can indicate whether a bird (or dinosaur) could fly. Plus, a lack of diversity in the microbes that make Camembert, brie, and some blue cheeses could mean we bid adieu to some French varieties. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 8 minutes
Los Angeles Just Proved How Spongy a City Can Be
As relentless rains pounded LA, the city’s “sponge” infrastructure helped gather 8.6 billion gallons of water—enough to sustain over 100,000 households for a year. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 25 minutes
How deep does the sand go on the beach?
Sand! We use it to make all kinds of things, from spectacular sandcastles to roads and bridges. But where does it come from? And why is the sand on so many beaches disappearing?In this episode, Molly and co-host Leon head to the beach to explore the secrets of sand. They run into the ultimate sand STAN Sanden Totten and discover what it's made of. Then, they chat with producer Nico Gonzalez Wisler about why beaches are running out of sand. All that, plus a stumper of a new mystery sound!Do you have your Sma... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 43 minutes
Hormones
Oops, all science this episode! Erstwhile editorial assistant Deboki Chakravarti steps in for erstwhile everyman Sam Schultz as we parse through fundamental puzzles about humanity: what makes us, us, and if it is hormones, does that make us cocktails or cauldrons? (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 17 minutes
Nitazenes and xylazine: what’s behind the rise of dangerous synthetic drugs?
Social affairs correspondent Robert Booth tells Madeleine Finlay why a class of synthetic opioids called nitazenes, first developed in the 1950s, is leading to a worrying number of fatal overdoses in the UK. And she hears from toxicology and addiction specialist Dr Joseph D’Orazio about a tranquilliser called xylazine that has been showing up in alarming volumes in the US illegal drug supply and is now starting to appear in toxicology reports in the UK (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 32 minutes
Microplastics and forever chemicals: here to stay?
What are the effects of these pervasive and invasive substances? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-20 • 18 minutes
Escape Pod #5 Sound: Prepare to feel relaxed, tingly and amazed, in the space of 20 minutes
This is a re-airing of a podcast originally released in February 2021.Prepare to feel relaxed, tingly and amazed all in the space of 20 minutes. This episode is all about sound.We start with the musical tones of an elephant trumpeting, followed by a recording from Cornell University’s Elephant Listening Project, showing how they communicate at an infrasonic frequency, which humans can’t ordinarily detect.The team then attempts to send shivers down your spine by recreating ASMR, explaining why some people en... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 27 minutes
The Life Scientific: Michael Woolridge
Michael Wooldridge, professor of Computer Science at the University of Oxford, talks AI (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 18 minutes
Climate Scientist Michael Mann Wins Defamation Case
Michael Mann discusses what the victory means for the public understanding of climate science—and for bad-faith attacks on scientists. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 80 minutes
266 | Christoph Adami on How Information Makes Sense of Biology
I talk with physicist/biologist Chris Adami about how to use information theory to understand biology. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 10 minutes
Kyiv Is Using Homegrown Tech to Treat the Trauma of War
Millions of Ukrainians are suffering the mental health implications of two years of Russian bombs and shells. The country’s recovery depends on building systems to help treat the trauma. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 55 minutes
Lithium Valley
The discovery of a massive amount of lithium under the Salton Sea could make the U.S. lithium independent. The metal is key for batteries in electric vehicles and solar panels. But the area is also a delicate ecosystem. We go to southern California to hear what hangs in the balance of the ballooning lithium industry, and also how we extract other crucial substances – such as sand, copper and iron– and turn them into semiconductors, circuitry and other products upon which the modern world depends. | Guests: ... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 39 minutes
748: Figuring Out the Functional Organization and Development of Cortical Circuits in the Brain - Dr. David Fitzpatrick
Dr. David Fitzpatrick is Chief Executive Officer, Scientific Director, and Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience. The brain is important for so many aspects of our daily experiences, including what we perceive,... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Feb-19 • 14 minutes
The Life And Death Of A Woolly Mammoth
Lately, paleoecologist Audrey Rowe has been a bit preoccupied with a girl named Elma. That's because Elma is ... a woolly mammoth. And 14,000 years ago, when Elma was alive, her habitat in interior Alaska was rapidly changing. The Ice Age was coming to a close and human hunters were starting early settlements. Which leads to an intriguing question: Who, or what, killed her? In the search for answers, Audrey traces Elma's life and journey through — get this — a single tusk. Today, she shares her insights on ... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-18 • 75 minutes
Why There’s No Such Thing as Free Will w/ Robert Sapolsky
Whether or not there is free will has tortured scientists from many fields since philosophers in ancient Greece started wondering about it. But for one scientist, there’s no question about it… (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Feb-17 • 54 minutes
How Chinese science was revealed to the world
A great range of scientific and technical achievements were made in China hundreds of years earlier than in Europe. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-17
The Skeptics Guide #971 - Feb 17 2024
Quickie with Bob - Metalenses; News Items: Flow Batteries, Green Roofs, LEGO MRI scanner, The Future Circular Collider, Mayo Clinic and Reiki; Who's That Noisy; Name That Logical Fallacy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Feb-17 • 25 minutes
Smologies #38: CARNIVORES with Rae Wynn-Grant
Ah, charismatic megafauna! Teeth, claws, fur, poop, hibernation, hiking, nature preserves, and living your childhood dreams with Alie’s longtime -ologist crush, Dr. Rae Wynn-Grant. The large carnivore ecologist, researcher and TV presenter tells us all about her field work, what it’s like to stuff a baby bear in your coat, carnivore microbiomes, how well carnivores can taste and smell their food (and yours), how smart the average bear really is and more. Also: Is there such thing as a vegetarian carnivore?!... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Feb-17
FQxI February 17, 2024 Podcast Episode
The Universal Constructor: A Conversation with David Deutsch (@FQXi)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 14 minutes
Dominatrices Are Showing People How to Have Rough Sex Safely
Research shows rough sex is becoming more common. Dominatrices are helping the general public catch up. (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 27 minutes
What time was the first clock set to?
From sundials to atomic clocks via Big Ben, a quest into the history of timekeeping. (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 21 minutes
Odysseus Lander Heads To The Moon | Ohio Chemical Spill, One Year Later
If successful, Odysseus will be the first U.S. spacecraft to land on the moon since the Apollo mission. And, in East Palestine, Ohio, the stream that flows under residents’ houses is still polluted following a train derailment and chemical spill. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 169 minutes
A Dialogue with Label-Defying Journalist Jonathan Kay
I first became aware of Jonathan Kay through his writing for the online magazine, Quillette. And for full disclosure, I got to know him better because he is one of their editors, and he has edited several of my own pieces for that magazine. Before that, however, I had been a fan of his writing, and was happy to be able to have an extended conversation with him about writing, journalism, false news, and politics, to name a few of the topics we discussed. Our dialogue occurred shortly after the appearance o... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 24 minutes
Weekly: Reversing blindness; power beamed from space; animal love languages
#237Glaucoma, which can cause blindness by damaging the optic nerve, may be reversible. Researchers have managed to coax new optic nerve cells to grow in mice, partly restoring sight in some. How the treatment works through an eyeball injection and why, for humans, prevention and early detection are still the best options.Black holes, just like planets and stars, spin. But they may be spinning a lot slower than we thought. When black holes gobble up matter around them, they start spinning faster and we’ve l... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 61 minutes
Future of Science & Technology Q&A (June 16, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: What's there to say about the future of neural nets? - Neural nets could evolve to be able to be trainers? What are the limits? - It seems like every decade I've been alive scientists keep saying "We just realized that brains/DNA are actually a lot more complicated than we realized, but... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 81 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (June 14, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include: How do you balance work and life? Do you have advice for maintaining a healthy lifestyle while working? How do you find time for socializing and exercising? - When will you retire and devote all of your time to your Physics Project, or is retiring out of the question? - Have yo... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 50 minutes
G: The World's Smartest Animal
This episode begins with a rant. This rant, in particular, comes from Dan Engber - a science writer who loves animals but despises animal intelligence research. Dan told us that so much of the way we study animals involves tests that we think show a human is smart ... not the animals we intend to study. Dan’s rant got us thinking: What is the smartest animal in the world? And if we threw out our human intelligence rubric, is there a fair way to figure it out? Obviously, there is. And it’s a live game sho... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 54 minutes
A post valentine’s look at humpback mating songs and a marsupial that’s sleepless for sex
Atlantic ocean circulation edging closer to potentially catastrophic climate tipping pointThe stability of much of the world’s climate depends on ocean currents in the Atlantic that bring warm water from the tropics north and send cool water south. New research in the journal Science Advances confirms what scientists have long feared: that we are on course to this tipping point that could cut off this important circulation pattern, with severe consequences. René van Westen from Utrecht University, said if w... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 7 minutes
The Leading Lab-Grown-Meat Company Just Paused a Major Expansion
Upside Foods is putting plans for its Illinois-based cultivated-meat factory on hold and laying off staff to focus on its existing plant. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 24 minutes
Reversing blindness; power beamed from space; animal love languages
#237Glaucoma, which can cause blindness by damaging the optic nerve, may be reversible. Researchers have managed to coax new optic nerve cells to grow in mice, partly restoring sight in some. How the treatment works through an eyeball injection and why, for humans, prevention and early detection are still the best options.Black holes, just like planets and stars, spin. But they may be spinning a lot slower than we thought. When black holes gobble up matter around them, they start spinning faster and we’ve l... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 13 minutes
The U.N.'s First-Ever Analysis Of World's Migratory Species Just Dropped
Every year, billions of animals across the globe embark on journeys. They fly, crawl, walk or slither – often across thousands of miles of land or water – to find better food, more agreeable weather or a place to breed. Think monarch butterflies, penguins, wild Pacific salmon. These species are crucial to the world as we know it. But until this week, there has never been an official assessment of the world's migratory animals. So today on the show, correspondent Nate Rott shares the first-ever report on sta... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 82 minutes
What's Love Got to do with Science?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Interview W/Dr. Allison Coffin, Be Irresistible, Unexpected Love Songs, Female Freedom, Erecting Erections, And Much More Science! Become a Patron! Check out the full unedited episode of our scien... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 28 minutes
Dengue, decaying dead bodies, and a stone age deer trap
Plus, teasing orangutans reveal potential insights into why we like monkeying around... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-16 • 25 minutes
Love Story: Stories with a happily ever after
Featuring Bruce Hungate and Ari Daniel (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 18 minutes
One Crisis After Another: Designing Cities For Resiliency
The leaders of a global architecture and design firm discuss how design can help communities adapt to global crises. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 26 minutes
Climate scientist wins defamation case
Will this serve as a warning against politically motivated attacks on climate scientists? (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 46 minutes
What makes blueberries blue, and myth buster Adam Savage on science communication
On this week’s show: Why squeezing a blueberry doesn’t get you blue juice, and a myth buster and a science editor walk into a bar (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 28 minutes
A New Volcanic Era?
Are we entering a new volcanic era in Iceland? (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | February 15, 2024
Karim Aly of NOZE, a medical technology company that identifies, captures, and interprets odors released from our breath and skin to detect disease, shares how they use “digital odor perception” technology.Then, Reuters journalist Ernest Scheyder, who has written extensively about the green energy transition, discusses his newly released book "The War Below: Lithium, Copper and the Global Battle to Power Our Lives." (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: Robots, AI and the future of human connection
There is precedent for humans connecting with other living things, like getting attention, love, and companionship from dogs and cats and a few other animals that have been domesticated to provide partnership. Now, there’s a new option for meeting this need — social robots — who may end up being even better at fulfilling the human desire for connection. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 5 minutes
Why Fake Caviar Could Be the Solution to Plastic Pollution
An alternative to environmentally harmful plastic is already within reach: seaweed. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 50 minutes
Not so random acts of kindness
Are African spiders behind the ultimate act of kindness in nature? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 34 minutes
How Did Altruism Evolve?
We often talk about evolution in terms of competition, as the survival of the fittest. But if it is, then where did the widespread (and widely admired) impulse to help others even at great cost to ourselves come from? In this episode, Stephanie Preston, a professor of psychology and head of the Ecological Neuroscience Lab at the University of Michigan, talks about the evolutionary, neurological and behavioral foundations for altruism with our new co-host, the astrophysicist and author Janna Levin. (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 13 minutes
The Industrial Designer Behind the N95 Mask
Sara Little Turnbull used material science to invent and design products for the modern world. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-15 • 15 minutes
What apes can tell us about the origins of teasing
Ian Sample talks to prof Erica Cartmill about her work on apes and teasing and asks, given how annoying teasing is, why do apes, and humans, do it? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 34 minutes
How do we identify life?
In this episode, Chris and Abha explore how life originated here on earth and how we might identify it in other parts of the universe. They ask two researchers about the signature characteristics of life and what common dynamics we might see among organisms outside our planet. They’ll also delve into assembly theory, a recent concept that looks at the construction of objects as a way to universally quantify life, which has ignited debate within the scientific community. (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 18 minutes
Using Sound To Unpack The History Of Astronomy
A new podcast series examines sonified space data to explore pivotal moments throughout the history of astronomy. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 77 minutes
Hydrochoerology (CAPYBARAS) with Elizabeth Congdon
CAPYBARAS! Blocky faces. Chill vibes. Spa days. Finally. Hydrochoerologist, Dr. Elizabeth Congdon, leads us into the muddy pond of Rodents of Unusual Size, weird feet, pet questions, interspecies snuggles, capybara cafes, natural habitats, escaped capybara, a fossil record that will rock you, and what the Pope thinks of them. An instant classic that you’ll want to enjoy on repeat. Y’all, CAPYBARAS. I repeat: Capybaras. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 14 minutes
How to Explore Your Sexuality, according to Science
Part one of a four-part series on the science of pleasure, hosted by Meghan McDonough. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 22 minutes
Smoking changes your immune system, even years after quitting
The lingering effect of cigarettes on T cell responses, and the Solar System's new ocean. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 10 minutes
Farming Prioritizes Cows and Cars—Not People
Farmers and scientists are getting better at growing more crops on less land, but they’re not focusing on plants that people eat. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 42 minutes
Egyptian Mummies
Brian Cox and Robin Ince unwrap the science of Egyptian mummies. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 24 minutes
Why do we cry?
Humans seem to be the only animals that cry from emotion. This Valentine’s Day, we’re wondering: What makes our tears so special? (Updated from 2022) For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Feb-14 • 12 minutes
Celebrate Valentine's Day With These Queer Animals
In a Valentine's Day exclusive report, NPR has learned there is currently a gay anteater couple at Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Washington D.C.But this couple is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg when it comes to queerness in the animal world – it's been documented in hundreds of species. We spoke with wildlife ecologist Christine Wilkinson of the "Queer is Natural" TikTok series to uncover the wildest, queerest animals of the bunch. Questions, comments or thoughts o... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 24 minutes
Colorectal Cancer Rates Rising In Young People | What An AI Learns From A Baby
Colorectal cancer is becoming increasingly common among adults in their 20s, 30s, and 40s. Plus, associating images and sounds from a child’s daily life helped teach a computer model a set of basic nouns. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 48 minutes
Should We BELIEVE In Science? DemystifySci & Brian Keating
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Should we believe in science? Is there any room to scrutinize the scientific method? And does Eric Lerner have a point? Recently, my dear colleagues, Dr. Anastasia Bendebury and Dr. Michael Shilo DeLay joined me at UCSD to discuss how scientists come to conclusions about the world, the role of belief in science, and what we can learn from modern controversies in cosmology. Dr. Anastasia Bendebury and Dr. Michael Shilo D... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 10 minutes
Did Climate Change Help This Skier Achieve the Impossible?
A slalom skier just achieved a remarkable result in the Alpine Ski World Cup—coming from last place to win. As mountains get warmer and conditions less predictable, expect more freak occurrences like this. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 20 minutes
CultureLab: Where billionaires rule the apocalypse: Naomi Alderman’s ‘The Future’
Real tech billionaires are reportedly building secret bunkers in case of post-apocalyptic societal collapse. It’s a frightening prospect, a world where only the super rich survive catastrophe. But it’s a world one author is exploring in her latest novel.Naomi Alderman is the prize-winning and best-selling author of The Power. Her latest book The Future imagines a world where billionaires survive a world-shaking cataclysm, only to find out they’re not as in charge of events as they think they are. The F... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 30 minutes
Is hypnosis real?
Hypnosis. You’ve seen it in movies, cartoons, and maybe even on stage! But is it real? And if so, what is it? Join Molly and co-host Jasmine as they uncover the truth about hypnosis and its power to heal. They’ll hear from pediatrician and hypnosis expert, Dr. Daniel Kohen, about what it is and isn’t. (Spoiler alert – it isn’t mind control!) They’ll also chat with 13-year-old Joshua who uses hypnosis to overcome anxiety! Plus, a special appearance from the ghost of Franz Mesmer, a famous practitioner and th... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 56 minutes
Christopher Reddy, "Science Communication in a Crisis: An Insider's Guide" (Routledge, 2023)
An interview with Christopher Reddy (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 15 minutes
Retinol, acids and serums for kids? A dermatologist’s guide to age appropriate skincare
Dermatologists warn children as young as eight years old are using potentially damaging anti-ageing skin care products. Madeleine Finlay discusses this trend, and alternative skincare, with Dr Emma Wedgeworth (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-13 • 31 minutes
Healing war wounds
Both physical and mental... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 11 minutes
You Can't Fix Burnout With Self-Care
Individual interventions for burnout don’t work. Researchers explain why. Hosted by Shayla Love. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 18 minutes
A Black Physician’s Analysis Of The Legacy Of Racism In Medicine
In a new book, Dr. Uché Blackstock reflects on her experiences as a Black physician and the structural racism embedded in medicine. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 27 minutes
The Life Scientific: Mercedes Maroto-Valer
Mercedes Maroto-Valer on making carbon dioxide useful. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 205 minutes
AMA | February 2024
Monthly Ask Me Anything episode. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 10 minutes
Adult talk and children’s speech
Alex Cristia and Elika Bergelson explain the factors influencing speech in children. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 8 minutes
Why Is Our Solar System Flat?
It started as a big old ball of dust, so how did it end up like a giant pancake? Get the true story using fake forces. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 55 minutes
Alien Says What?
Whales are aliens on Earth; intelligent beings who have skills for complex problem-solving and their own language. Now in what’s being called a breakthrough, scientists have carried on an extended conversation with a humpback whale. They share the story of this remarkable encounter, their evidence that the creature understood them, and how the experiment informs our Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. After all, what good is it to make contact with ET if we can’t communicate? Guests: Brenda McCowan – ... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 40 minutes
747: Conducting Research to Conserve Colorado's Rare Plants - Dr. Jennifer Ramp Neale
Dr. Jennifer Ramp Neale is Director of Research and Conservation at the Denver Botanic Gardens. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Biology at the University of Northern Colorado and the University of Colorado Denver. The Denver Botanic Gardens is an... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Feb-12 • 13 minutes
The Shared History Of The Chinese And Gregorian Calendars
Happy Lunar New Year! According to the Chinese lunisolar calendar, the new year began Saturday. For many, like our host Regina G. Barber, this calendar and its cultural holidays can feel completely detached from the Gregorian calendar. Growing up, she associated the former with the Spring Festival and getting money in red envelopes from relatives, and the other with more American traditions. But the Chinese calendar has a deep, centuries-long shared history with the Gregorian calendar. To learn more about t... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-10 • 54 minutes
Improved photosynthesis may increase crop yields
More efficient molecules inside plants could bring a big increase in crop yields. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-10
The Skeptics Guide #970 - Feb 10 2024
What's the Word: Cardinal; News Items: New Virus-Like Microbes Found, SLIM Lunar Lander, Misinformation and Wellness Influencers, Super Earth in Habitable Zone, Climate Change and Storms; Who's That Noisy, Name That Logical Fallacy, Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Feb-10 • 67 minutes
Michael Devitt, "Biological Essentialism" (Oxford UP, 2023)
What makes a species a species? Aristotle answered the species question by positing unchanging essences, properties that all and only members of a species shared. Individuals belonged to a species by possessing this essence. Biologists and philosophers of biology today are either not essentialists at all, or if they are think there are essences they are relational, historical properties. In his provocative book Biological Essentialism (Oxford UP, 2023), Michael Devitt argues for a new form of biological es... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 27 minutes
When will the next earthquake hit?
Will we ever be able to predict earthquakes? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 20 minutes
Faraway Planets With Oceans Of Magma | The Art And Science Of Trash Talk
Hycean planets were thought to be covered by oceans of water, but a new study suggests it could be magma instead. And, author Rafi Kohan explains the psychological and physiological responses to trash talk, ahead of Super Bowl Sunday. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 15 minutes
Why we need to rethink how we talk about cancer
Naming metastatic cancers after parts of the body could be holding up research and preventing people from accessing the best treatment (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 42 minutes
Cheating Death
In this episode, Maria Paz Gutiérrez does battle against the one absolute truth of human existence and all life… death. After getting a team of scientists to stand in for death (the grim reaper wasn’t available), we parry and thrust our way through the myriad ways that death comes for us - from falling pianos to evolution’s disinterest in longevity. In the process, we see if we can find a satisfying answer to the question “why do we have to die” and find ourselves face to face with the bitter end of everyth... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 23 minutes
Weekly: Record-breaking fusion experiments inch the world closer to new source of clean energy
#236This week marks two major milestones in the world of fusion. In 2022 a fusion experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory created more power than was required to sustain it – now, the same team has improved this record by 25 per cent, releasing almost twice the energy that was put in. Meanwhile, the UK’s JET reactor set a new world record for total energy output from any fusion reaction, just before it shut down for good late last year. Why these two milestones inch us closer to practical, ... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 77 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [June 9, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Could the expansion of the universe affect biological evolution? - ​How much does the sky weigh? How much does the Earth weigh? - What would happen if gravity on Earth changed to that of the Moon? What if gravity suddenly got stronger? - So a full data memory card vs. a new, empty data memory ca... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 69 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (June 7, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: How did scientific disciplines originate and evolve through the centuries? - Do you think Apple's new VR headset will be much different than previous releases of other VR headsets? What do past releases of similar products predict? - VR kind of reminds me of video game systems. Your product ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 108 minutes
Michael Saylor: The Thermodynamics of Bitcoin EXPLAINED (2021)
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Remastered from our interview in 2021. There is a lot of talk about how to make money with Bitcoin… But how does it actually work? What are the physics behind it? And can Bitcoin replace the US dollar? Here today to answer all of these questions and more is Michael Saylor. Michael J. Saylor is an American entrepreneur and business executive who co-founded and led MicroStrategy, which provides business intelligence, m... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 11 minutes
How April’s Eclipse Will Solve Solar Mysteries
On April 8, we’re in for a treat. A total solar eclipse will be visible across a broad swath of North America, giving us a view of the edges of the sun as the moon passes in front of its face. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 10 minutes
NASA’s New PACE Observatory Searches for Clues to Humanity’s Future
They may be tiny, but phytoplankton and aerosols power pivotal Earth systems. Scientists are about to learn a whole lot more about them at a critical time. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 9 minutes
Clownfish Might Be Counting Their Potential Enemies' Stripes
At least, that's what a group of researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University thinks. The team recently published a study in the journal Experimental Biology suggesting that Amphiphrion ocellaris, or clown anemonefish, may be counting. Specifically, the authors think the fish may be looking at the number of vertical white stripes on each other as well as other anemonefish as a way to identify their own species. Not only that — the researchers think that the fish are not... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 100 minutes
Why Are Blueberries Blue?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Rewriting Astronomy, Curing Cancer, Building Highways, Concussion Protein Protocol, Blue Berries?, Ancient Swedish mystery grave, Sexy Psychedelics, Childlike Learning, Night Walkers, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 31 minutes
King Charles' cancer, and a new particle supercollider
And how certain pollutants are hiding plants from pollinators (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 54 minutes
Scientists explore which came first, the chicken or the egg, and more…
Blue whales are genetically healthy but are breeding with fin whales, study suggests (1:03) Researchers have sequenced the genome of a blue whale that washed up in Newfoundland in 2014, and used it to do a comparative study of North Atlantic blue whales. A team led by Mark Engstrom, curator emeritus at the Royal Ontario Museum found that despite their small population, the whales are genetically diverse and connected across the north Atlantic, but that on average blue whales from this group are, genetically... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Feb-09 • 26 minutes
Peer Review: Stories about other people's opinions
In science, peer review plays a critical role in figuring out if research is good enough, robust enough. In this week’s episode, both of our storytellers find themselves looking for outside feedback on if they’re good enough. Part 1: At her NASA summer internship, Kirsten Siebach feels completely out of place among the Mars mission scientists. Part 2: Alison Spodek’s need to be seen as smart takes over her life. Kirsten Siebach is an Assistant Professor in the Rice University Department of Earth, Environmen... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 19 minutes
Is Each Fingerprint On Your Hand Unique? | In This Computer Component, Data Slides Through Honey
A new study uses artificial intelligence to show that each of our ten fingerprints are remarkably similar to one another. Plus, honey could be the secret ingredient in building a more eco-friendly “memristor,” which transmits data through malleable pathways. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 27 minutes
Particle physics v climate change
Should we spend $17 billion on a new atom smasher whilst the world literally burns? (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 31 minutes
A new kind of magnetism, and how smelly pollution harms pollinators
More than 200 materials could be “altermagnets,” and the impact of odiferous pollutants on nocturnal plant-pollinator interactions First up on the show this week, researchers investigate a new kind of magnetism. Freelance science journalist Zack Savitsky joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about recent evidence for “altermagnetism” in nature, which could enable new types of electronics. Next on the show, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Jeremy Chan, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Naples F... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 28 minutes
Understanding Flood Forecasting
Understanding how flood forecasting and warning systems work, plus a mission to Europa. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | February 8, 2024
John Wells speaks with George Musser about his new book titled "Putting Ourselves Back in the Equation Why Physicists Are Studying Human Consciousness and AI To Unravel The Mysteries of The Universe."Then, Eric Siegel, author of the new book “The AI Playbook, Mastering the Rare Art of Machine Learning Deployment," talks about how machine learning can enhance business operations. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 7 minutes
These States Are Basically Begging You to Get a Heat Pump
You need a heat pump, ASAP. Now nine states are teaming up to accelerate the adoption of this climate superhero. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: Should species be named after horrible people?
When an Austrian bug collector discovered a new species of beetle in the 1930s, he bestowed upon it the name of a person he greatly admired. He called it Anophthalmus hitleri — and sent Adolf Hitler a note announcing the onomastic tribute. After nearly 90 years, should species still be named after horrible people? (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 50 minutes
Deep in thought
News of a microchip implanted in a human brain sends our imagination running wild (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 29 minutes
The Universe in Radio Vision
Ruby Payne-Scott helped unlock a new way of seeing the universe, but to keep her job, Ruby had to keep a big secret. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-08 • 16 minutes
Why are we still waiting for a male contraceptive pill?
Ian Sample speaks to bioethicist Prof Lisa Campo-Engelstein of the University of Texas and Prof Chris Barratt from the University of Dundee to find out why male contraceptives have been so difficult to develop, and what kind of options are in the pipeline (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 18 minutes
The FDA Approved The First CRISPR-Based Therapy. What’s Next?
The first CRISPR gene-editing treatment is a cure for sickle cell disease. Are we on the cusp of a gene therapy revolution? (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 14 minutes
When Will We Finally Have Sex In Space?
We're talking about the big bang—but not in the way you might think. (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 35 minutes
Cancer's power harnessed — lymphoma mutations supercharge T cells
Genetic changes that help tumour cells thrive can be co-opted to improve immunotherapy’s effectiveness, and looking at the electric vehicle batteries of the future. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 24 minutes
What Makes Life Tick? Mitochondria May Keep Time for Cells
Every species develops at its own unique tempo, leaving scientists to wonder what governs their timing. A suite of new findings suggests that cells use basic metabolic processes as clocks. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is “Pulse” by Geographer. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 7 minutes
Dr. Dara Norman Wants to Bring More People Into Science
From data access to scientific merit, Dr. Norman is working to make astronomy—and all STEM fields—more inclusive. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 26 minutes
Should you quit Diet Coke?
Safety questions have haunted aspartame — the no-calorie sweetener used in many diet soft drinks and other low-calorie products — since its invention. Some answers exist, but should we trust them if they were influenced by the beverage industry? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/gi... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 57 minutes
Theoretical & Creative Ecology (SCIENCE & ECOPOETRY) with Madhur Anand
Environmental models! Poetry! Scientists who are poets! Novelists who are scientists! Art + science = an actual -ology. Creative Ecologist, climate scientist, theoretical ecologist, author and celebrated poet Dr. Madhur Anand sits on a porch with me on an island to chat about storytelling, narratives in science, forest beetles, carbon stability, human motives, hip waders, technology meets nature, absurdity, identity, overcoming writer’s or scientist’s' block, and how accepting ourselves can be contagious. ... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Feb-07 • 12 minutes
After 20 Years, This Scientist Uncovered The Physics Behind The Spiral Pass
If you've ever watched part of a professional football game, you've probably seen a tight spiral pass. Those perfect throws where the football leaves the player's hand and neatly spins as it arcs through the air. But those passes? They seem to defy fundamental physics. And for a long time, scientists couldn't figure out exactly why — until experimental atomic physicist Tim Gay cracked the case just a few years ago. His answer comes after two decades of hobby research and more than a couple late night shout... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 18 minutes
Protecting The ‘Satan’ Tarantula | If Termites Wore Stripes, Would Spiders Still Eat Them?
A team of scientists in Ecuador is on a mission to describe new-to-science tarantula species to help secure conservation protections. And, undergraduate researchers pasted striped capes onto termites’ backs to see if a well-known warning sign would fend off predators. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 45 minutes
Discover the Joy of Science w/ Jim Al-Khalili
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Remastered from our interview in 2022. What can science learn from poetry? Can you teach someone to become a scientist? And what’s the biggest source of hype in science right now? In 2022, I had the pleasure of discussing these topics with the amazing Jim Al-Khalili. Jim is a theoretical physicist at the University of Surrey, where he holds a Distinguished Chair in physics as well as a university chair in the public en... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 7 minutes
I Tested a Next-Gen AI Assistant. It Will Blow You Away
WIRED experimented with a new form of voice assistant that can browse the web and perform tasks online. Siri, Alexa, and other virtual helpers could soon be much more powerful. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 30 minutes
Why do we get cavities?
Your teeth are like a squad of superheroes inside your mouth. They help you crunch on carrot sticks, nibble popcorn and chew bubblegum. You’ve probably heard it’s important to brush your teeth to prevent cavities. But what is a cavity? And how do dentists fix them?Join Molly and cohost Aya on a terrifically toothy adventure, as they explore what causes these pesky little holes in our teeth. They’ll meet a group of rowdy, party-loving bacteria and find out how sometimes, troublemaker bacteria in our mouths c... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 48 minutes
Cheese
It's the long-awaited cheese-stravaganza! And it's every bit as melty, crumbly, stretchy, and stinky as hoped for. We dip into some fetamology, we stretch our nokkeledge of cheese applications, and we unwrap the shocking tartrutho about a cheese we thought we knew!* *Here are the real cheese names I butchered into puns: feta, nokkelost, tartuffo. All delicious, go try some! (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 14 minutes
What happens now bird flu has reached the Antarctic?
The Guardian’s biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, tells Ian Sample why the spread of bird flu through the Antarctic’s penguin colonies would be so catastrophic (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 28 minutes
Is it time to change the law on assisted dying?
Weighing up the many strands of the debate... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-06 • 17 minutes
Escape Pod: #4 Mass: from lightest creates on earth, to the heaviest things in the cosmos
This is a re-airing of a podcast originally released in February 2021.From some of the lightest creatures on earth, to the heaviest things in the cosmos, this episode is all about mass.It’s a magical opening to the show as the team discusses a group of insects called fairy wasps which are so light it’s near impossible to weigh them.They then turn to matters of massive proportions, discussing a little thing called dark matter.Finally the team wraps up by looking at the surprising, and slightly hilarious ways... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 14 minutes
How Is This Ancient Cattle Breed Fighting Wildfires in Portugal?
Portugal is one of the most vulnerable countries in Europe to climate change. Straddling the Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic regions, it’s part of a climate change hot spot. Some of the biggest fuels are shrubs. One study found that shrubland covers 1.6 million hectares in Portugal—about 18 percent of the nation’s land area. And those shrubs are gaining ground. That’s because, for decades, people have been moving out of rural communities such as the one Tommy Ferreira lives in. Most leave to pursue bette... (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 29 minutes
The Life Scientific: Sir Harry Bhadeshia
Sir Harry Bhadeshia on his work in metallurgy and choreographing crystalline structures. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 18 minutes
Scientists Are Uncovering A World Of ‘Dark Matter’ Carcinogens
New findings about how substances like air pollutants can trigger cancer may help reveal carcinogens we were unaware of. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 12 minutes
Breaking Newsve About Zoozve
Less than two weeks since we released Zoozve, and we have BIG NEWS about our quest to name the first-ever quasi-moon! And that’s only the half of it! *Listen to the episode “Zoozve” before you listen to this update! (https://radiolab.org/podcast/zoozve) E... CREDITS - Reported by - Latif Nasser with help from - Ekedi Fausther-Keeys Produced by - Sarah Qari Original music and sound design contributed by - Sarah Qari with mixing help from - Arianne Wack Fact-checking by - Diane Kelley and Edited by - Be... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 80 minutes
265 | John Skrentny on How the Economy Mistreats STEM Workers
I talk with sociologist John Skrentny about how the post-graduation careers of STEM majors aren't generally what they were led to expect. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 15 minutes
The Government's Former UFO Hunter Has a Lot to Say
For the last decade, reports of UFO sightings have filled headlines and news broadcasts, and some of these have from a surprising place—the Pentagon. Former defense officials have made a number of claims about, and released videos of, strange sightings made by military pilots. These days, the objects are officially called “UAPs”—unidentified anomalous phenomena. But regardless of the new branding, Congress has demanded answers on them, especially after one former official this summer claimed that he believe... (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 8 minutes
A Startup Has Unlocked a Way to Make Cheap Insulin
Houston-based rBIO has invented a new process to churn out insulin at higher yields using custom-made bacteria. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 60 minutes
The Wrong Stuff
By one estimate the average American home has 300,000 objects. Yet our ancient ancestors had no more than what they could carry with them. How did we go from being self-sufficient primates to nonstop shoppers? We examine the evolutionary history of stuff through the lens of archeology beginning with the ancestor who first picked up a palm-sized rock and made it into a tool. Guest: Chip Colwell - archeologist and former Curator of Anthropology at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, editor-in-chief of the... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 50 minutes
746: Investigating the Intersection of Nutrition and Bacterial Infection and Pathogenesis - Dr. Eric Skaar
Dr. Eric Skaar is Director of the Institute for Infection, Immunology and Inflammation, Director of the Division of Molecular Pathogenesis, the Ernest W. Goodpasture Chair in Pathology, and Vice Chair for Research and a University Distinguished... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Feb-05 • 14 minutes
Wolves Are Thriving In The Radioactive Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, releasing radioactive material into northern Ukraine and Belarus. It was the most serious nuclear accident in history. Over one hundred thousand people were evacuated from the surrounding area. But local gray wolves never left — and their population has grown over the years. It's seven times denser than populations in protected lands elsewhere in Belarus. This fact has led scientists to wonder whether the wolves are genetically either resistant or resilien... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-04 • 17 minutes
Cervical cancer could be eliminated: here's how
Two experts lay out the steps that need to be taken, and the challenges facing low- and middle-income countries. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Feb-04 • 59 minutes
How the Hypothesis Means
Listen to Episode No.6 of All We Mean, a Special Focus of this podcast. All We Mean is an ongoing discussion and debate about how we mean and why. The guests on today's episode are Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis, professors at the University of Illinois, and today as well, Bradley Alger, Professor Emeritus, Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine. In this episode of the Focus, our topic is How the hypothesis means. What does out knowledge mean after it’s been hypothesized and teste... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-03 • 54 minutes
Climate forces change to traditional lifestyles in PNG
Failing crops and dwindling water supply are forcing change to the traditional lifestyles of PNG highlanders. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Feb-03
The Skeptics Guide #969 - Feb 3 2024
Interview with Dustin Bates of Starset; News Items: Neuralink Implant, Love on the Brain, Amelia Earhart Plane Evidence, Hiding Sickness, Cicada Double Brood; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Moon Timeline, Long Acting Insulin; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Feb-03 • 25 minutes
Smologies #37: PROTEINS + DNA with Raven “The Science Maven” Baxter
This one’s got it all: teeny tiny cellular factories, mitochondrial relevancy, what big smelly vats of poop have to do with curing cancer, how many trips to the sun your unravelled DNA could make, and mysteries of the brain. Dr. Raven The Science Maven has a background in molecular biology and a Ph.D in Science Communication, which she puts to work while Alie generally does her best to suppress high pitched noises of excitement. Learn to appreciate your proteins and pick up some noodle analogies while you’r... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 82 minutes
A dialogue with Brian Keating, at the San Diego Air and Space Museum
In mid October the Origins Project Foundation ran two public events in California. The second event was held at the Air and Space Museum in San Diego. I had asked my colleague Brian Keating, who teaches at UCSD and is a Trustee of that museum, whether he might be interested in doing a public dialogue together that we could later both broadcast on our respective podcasts. He and I have each appeared before on each other’s podcasts, and I knew that we could have the kind of comfortable, informative, and fu... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 31 minutes
Why do we daydream?
Meandering into your wandering mind, why can’t we stay present? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 25 minutes
Syphilis Cases Up 80% Since 2018 | The Largest Deep-Sea Coral Reef In The World
There has been a boom of syphilis cases, including a 180% increase in congenital syphilis cases, despite other STI levels staying stable. Also, the world's largest deep-sea reef stretches for hundreds of miles in near-freezing waters and total darkness, but it’s bustling with life. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 78 minutes
Future of Science & Technology Q&A (June 2, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Do you think the latest electric car is worth buying these days? What is the future of cars? - With technology integration, would we be able to do away with having to sleep in the future? - As far as human evolution, do you believe the human race is still evolving or have we peaked as a spec... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 86 minutes
Future of Science & Technology Q&A (May 19, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Aside from faster processing speeds, what are some other ways computers may be improved in the future? - Will we still use books in 5-10 years, or will they be replaced by chatting with an AI? - It's moving toward narrative-driven, AI-powered, procedural generated VR environments with metahu... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 22 minutes
Weekly: Alzheimer’s from contaminated injections; Musk's Neuralink begins human trials; longest living dogs
#235In very rare cases, Alzheimer’s disease could be transmitted from person to person during medical procedures. This finding comes as five people have developed the disease after receiving contaminated human growth hormone injections in the late 1950s to early 1980s – a practice that is now banned. What this finding means for medical settings and why most people don’t need to be concerned.  Elon Musk’s mind-reading brain implant company Neuralink is carrying out its first human trial. The volunt... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 75 minutes
G: Relative Genius
Albert Einstein asked that when he died, his body be cremated and his ashes be scattered in a secret location. He didn’t want his grave, or his body, becoming a shrine to his genius. When he passed away in the early morning hours of April, 18, 1955, his family knew his wishes. There was only one problem: the pathologist who did the autopsy had different plans. In the third episode of “G”, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, first aired back in 2019 we go on one of the strangest scavenger hunts for geniu... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 54 minutes
An ancient tree’s crowning glory and more…
Shark declines: finning regulations might have bitten off more than they can chew In recent years governments around the world have attempted to slow the catastrophic decline in shark numbers with regulations, including on the practice of shark finning. But a new study led by marine biologist Boris Worm and published in the journal Science suggests that these regulations have backfired and shark mortality is still rising. The reason is that shark fishers responded by keeping all of the shark, and developing... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 51 minutes
New COLD WAR Over Computer Chips? w/ Chris Miller
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 If there's one key factor securing America's economic prosperity and military superiority, it's not oil; it's chips. No, not the chips we all love to snack on during movies, but highly efficient computer chips. Chips that power pretty much everything from our military machinery to our iPhones. The United States held the top spot in crafting the fastest chips on Earth for a long time. But countries like Taiwan and China ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 10 minutes
Inside the Beef Industry’s Campaign to Influence Schoolchildren
Big Beef is wooing science teachers with webinars and lesson plans in an attempt to change kids’ perceptions of the industry. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 25 minutes
Use of Bacteriophages as Natural Antimicrobials to Manage Bacterial Pathogens in Aquaculture in Vietnam and Australia
Aquaculture is the fastest-growing protein production industry globally, with Vietnam one of the top producers and exporters of seafood products. In Vietnam, aquaculture is seen as a means of protecting rural livelihoods threatened by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. But climate change also drives the emergence of marine bacterial pathogens, causing considerable losses to aquaculture production. Traditionally, pathogen blooms have been treated with antimicrobials – but this has resulted in... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 13 minutes
This Scientist Figured Out Why Your Appendix Isn't Useless
Back in the day, many of us heard that the appendix is a vestigial organ — at best, a body part that lost its purpose all those many years ago. At worst, an unnecessary clinger-on to the human body that, when ruptured, could be life threatening. But what if that narrative is wrong?Heather Smith became obsessed with the appendix after hers was removed at age 12. After years of anatomy research, she's found that the appendix is not, in fact, useless. Reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin is in the host chair today t... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 79 minutes
Why is The Ocean Venting?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Interview W/Sarah Treadwell, Genome Maps, Muscle Bots, Against The Light, Squeaky Mice, Laundry Recycling?, The Planetarium Show, Joides Resolution Ship, Ocean Vents, Scuba Diving, Mount Everest, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 29 minutes
Neuralink implant, and a brief history of spine
Plus, why fasting reduces inflammation in the body... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Feb-02 • 30 minutes
Postpartum: Stories about postpartum depression
CDC research shows about 1 in 8 women with a recent live birth experience symptoms of postpartum depression. In this week’s episode, our storytellers share their experience with postpartum depression. Part 1: With a new kid and her husband moving to Iowa for a job, Angie Chatman’s mental health begins to suffer. Part 2: Anna Agniel’s romantic notions of married life with a child are broken when her husband relapses and her son is born with a cleft palate. Angie Chatman is a Pushcart Prize nominated writer, ... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 17 minutes
Expanding Our Umwelt: Understanding Animal Experiences
Writing about animals’ sensory experiences in ‘An Immense World’ changed author Ed Yong’s own worldview—and hobbies. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 29 minutes
Unethical data gathering in China
Papers containing DNA data gathered from Chinese ethnic minorities are under scrutiny. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 30 minutes
A new way for the heart and brain to ‘talk’ to each other, and Earth’s future weather written in ancient coral reefs
A remote island may hold clues for the future of El Niño and La Niña under climate change, and how pressure in the blood sends messages to neurons First up, researchers are digging into thousands of years of coral to chart El Niño’s behavior over time. Producer Kevin McLean talks with Staff Writer Paul Voosen about his travels to the Pacific island of Vanuatu to witness the arduous task of reef drilling. Next on the show, host Sarah Crespi talks with Veronica Egger, a professor of neurophysiology at the... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 29 minutes
Space Exploration
Inside Science explores the planned missions to the Moon in 2024. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 50 minutes
Cool Science Radio | February 1, 2024
John Wells speaks with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson who has co-written "To Infinity and Beyond: A Journey of Cosmic Discovery" with StarTalk senior producer Lindsey Walker. (0:45)Then, as much as you might think it’s just a craving – sugar is an addiction! We speak with neuroscientist Dr. Nicole Avena, who pioneered research on sugar addiction and has a new book on the subject called "Sugarless." (25:42) (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: Can you still travel the roads that Julius Caesar built?
Long before Julius Caesar became one of the most powerful rulers in the world, he was a relatively unknown curator of the Via Appia, a road stretching from Rome on the Tyrrhenian Coast to the Salento Peninsula on the Adriatic Sea. Our guest John Keahey traversed the Via Appia, and he joins us to talk about it. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 62 minutes
Neil Turok on the simplicity of nature
Neil Turok is a professor at the University of Edinburgh where he holds the Higgs Chair of Theoretical Physics. He acted as the director of Perimeter Institute from 2008 to 2019 and now holds the Carlo Fidani Roger Penrose Distinguished Visiting Rese... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 8 minutes
Fiber Optics Bring You Internet. Now They’re Also Listening to Trains
“Distributed acoustic sensing” looks for disturbances in fiber to detect earthquakes and even insects. Can it also improve rail safety? Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 51 minutes
How plankton made mountains
The world’s largest cruise ship has set sail – but what stowaways are hiding onboard? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 36 minutes
What Makes for 'Good' Math?
We tend to think of mathematics as purely logical, but the teaching of math, its usefulness and its workings are packed with nuance. So what is “good” mathematics? In 2007, the mathematician Terence Tao wrote an essay for the “Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society” that sought to answer this question. Today, as the recipient of a Fields Medal, a Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics and a MacArthur Fellowship, Tao is among the most prolific mathematicians alive. In this episode, he joins Steven Strogatz... (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 15 minutes
From Our Inbox: Forgotten Electrical Engineer’s Work Paved the Way for Radar Technology
Sallie Pero Mead made major discoveries about how electromagnetic waves propagate, which allowed objects to be detected at a distance. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Feb-01 • 17 minutes
A fasting prime minister and a mind-reading billionaire: the week in science
Ian Sample and science correspondent Hannah Devlin discuss the big science stories of the week – from news that Elon Musk’s Neuralink has implanted its first chip into a human, to research suggesting Alzheimer’s can pass between humans in rare medical accidents, and the revelation that Rishi Sunak begins each week with a 36-hour fast (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 35 minutes
What can physics tell us about ourselves?
Humans can live up to age 100, and not 1000 – why? Are there limits in how much our brains can think and compute? The laws of physics can help explain a lot, both about our own human bodies and how we are connected to life all around us. (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 18 minutes
How Signing Characters Help Deaf Children Learn Language
A lab at Gallaudet University is creating television shows with signing characters to increase literacy in both English and ASL. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 29 minutes
Ancient DNA solves the mystery of who made a set of stone tools
Analysis of stone tools and DNA reveals when modern humans reached northern Europe, and why human brain cells grow so slowly. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 12 minutes
Quantum Computers Might Make All of Your Private Data Less Secure
Experts are starting to plan for the moment when a quantum computer large enough to crack the backbone of the math that keeps things secret will be turned on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 5 minutes
Elon Musk Says a Human Patient Has Received Neuralink’s Brain Implant
Details are scarce, but Elon Musk says initial results are “promising.” Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 61 minutes
Science Is a Creative Human Enterprise: A Discussion with Natalie Aviles
Listen to this interview of Natalie Aviles, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Virginia. We talk about how organizations shape people, and how people shape science. Natalie Aviles : "I think, in general, the more self-conscious that scientists can be about what motivates them, about what makes them happy, about what drives them — the more, then, they can try to imagine a future that satisfies not only their intellectual curiosity but helps them navigate, too, the very sort of prosaic conditions... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 28 minutes
The case for cursing
Can swearing make you stronger? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 84 minutes
Evolutionary Anthropology (METABOLISM) with Herman Pontzer
Let’s explore our human machinery. And talk about Brazilian butt lifts. Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology and metabolism researcher Dr. Herman Pontzer gives us the data on mitochondrial backstories, muscle mass and hormones, our expanding brains, the flaws of the Body Mass Index, humans’ relationships with nutrition, why crash dieting can change your metabolism, perspectives on sticky medical terms, isotope magic, how much exercise hunter gatherers get, carnivore diets, scales, and what to do if you're... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-31 • 15 minutes
Murder, Mayhem At The Zoo: A Naked Mole Rat Succession War
An all-out "naked mole rat war" has broken out at Smithsonian's National Zoo, after the queen of the colony was mortally wounded by one of her own children. Short Wave's Pien Huang and Margaret Cirino visit the battleground – a series of deceptively calm-looking plexiglass enclosures at the Zoo's Small Mammal House. There, the typically harmonious, eusocial rodents are now fighting their siblings with their big front teeth to determine who will become the new queen. Pien and Marge talk with zookeeper Kenton... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 18 minutes
‘Mysterious’ Canine Illness: What Dog Owners Should Know
Veterinary experts discuss what is known about the potential respiratory pathogen—or pathogens—and which dogs are most at risk. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 9 minutes
For 60+ years, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines have evaded scientists. But now that's changed [Sponsored]
This year, healthcare providers have tools to help prevent lower respiratory tract disease caused by RSV for older adults. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 26 minutes
CultureLab: Earth’s Last Great Wild Areas – Simon Reeve on BBC series ‘Wilderness’
Very few places on our planet appear untouchedby humans, but in those that do, nature is still very much in charge – and the scenery is breathtaking. In the new BBC series Wilderness with Simon Reeve, journalist Simone Reeve takes us into the heart of Earth's last great wild areas, including the Congo Basin rainforest, Patagonia, the Coral Triangle and the Kalahari desert in Southern Africa.In this episode of CultureLab, TV columnist Bethan Ackerley asks Simon about the series and his many exciting expediti... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 10 minutes
Two Nations, a Horrible Accident, and the Urgent Need to Understand the Laws of Space Right Now
Welcome to the world’s foremost training ground for saving space from disasters, disputes, and—perhaps one day—colonizers named Musk. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 29 minutes
Decarbonising shipping, and the Ship of the Future
The unseen sector that fuels our daily lives... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 30 minutes
How did ferns survive the dinosaur extinction?
Listener Gideon sent in this brilliant question: “How did ferns survive the dinosaur extinction and are they the same ferns we see now?” Our search for the answer will introduce us to James Frond, international fern of mystery, and take us flying through the air on an airplane’s wing. We’ll also meet a scientist who’s trying to understand how ferns are such strong survivors — by recreating the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs! All that, plus a fern-tastic new mystery sound!Do you have your Smar... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Jan-30 • 16 minutes
Secrets of the microbiome: the skin
Ian Sample meets professor in cutaneous biology Julie Thornton who tells him how it helps with everything from wound healing to immunity (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 28 minutes
The Life Scientific: Cathie Sudlow
Jim Al-Khalili discusses population-wide health research with Professor Cathie Sudlow. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 18 minutes
An App For People Of Color To Rate Their Birthing Experiences | How Different Animals See
Irth is a “Yelp-like” app to help expectant parents make informed decisions by exposing bias and racism in healthcare systems. Also, a new video camera system shows the colors of the natural world as different animals see them. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 10 minutes
New IVF Test Could Increase Chances of Pregnancy Success
Today’s episode covers a topic that many parents-to-be have struggled with: fertility. In vitro fertilization offers a path to pregnancy for people fortunate enough to be able to access it. But predicting the success of an implanted embryo is hard. Now researchers are developing a test that could make it easier. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 54 minutes
Skeptic Check: Hypnosis*
You are getting sleeeepy and open to suggestion. But is that how hypnotism works? And does it really open up a portal to the unconscious mind? Hypnotism can be an effective therapeutic tool, and some scientists suggest replacing opioids with hypnosis for pain relief. And yet, the performance aspect of hypnotism often seems at odds with the idea of it being an effective treatment. In our regular look at critical thinking, Skeptic Check, we ask what part of hypnotism is real and what is an illusion. Plus, we... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 10 minutes
Modeling illuminates pitcher plant evolution
Chris Thorogood and Derek Moulton explain how mathematical modeling of carnivorous pitcher plants can lend insights into their evolution. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 70 minutes
🎉 Celebrating 200K Subscribers: Q&A with Brian Keating 🥳
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 I can’t believe it. We’ve reached 200K subscribers! Thank you so much for joining me on this exciting journey. It is an immense pleasure to engage with all of you and to share my passion every day. In this celebratory episode, I'll answer all your questions from the comment section, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, you name it. So, buckle up! Today, we’re diving deep Into The Impossible. — Additional resources: 📢 Ow... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 72 minutes
264 | Sabine Stanley on What's Inside Planets
I talk with planetary scientist Sabine Stanley about how we know what's inside planets in the Solar System and elsewhere. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 9 minutes
6 Deaf Children Can Now Hear After a Single Injection
Several gene therapies aim to restore a protein necessary for transmitting sound signals from the ear to the brain. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 38 minutes
745: Astrophysicist Radiating Enthusiasm for Research on Plasma Physics and Cosmic Rays - Dr. Ellen Zweibel
Dr. Ellen Zweibel is the W. L. Kraushaar Professor of Astronomy and Physics, and the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Ellen is a theoretical astrophysicist who specializes in plasma astrophysics. Her... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Jan-29 • 12 minutes
Choose Your Lightning Protection: Lasers, Rockets or Rods?
Every year, lightning is estimated to cause up to 24,000 deaths globally. It starts forest fires, burns buildings and crops, and causes disruptive power outages. The best, most practical technology available to deflect lightning is the simple lightning rod, created by Benjamin Franklin more than 250 years ago. But lightning rods protect only a very limited area proportional to their height. In today's encore episode, we explore why a group of European researchers are hoping the 21 century upgrade is a high-... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-27 • 54 minutes
The Science Show’s Top 100 Australian Scientists
People know their sports stars, and their rock stars. Why don’t they know the stars of science who have helped shape our world? The Science Show’s Top 100 Australian Scientists hopes to generate discussion and raise the profile of Australia’s world class scientists. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-27
The Skeptics Guide #968 - Jan 27 2024
Swindler's List: Deep Fake Robot Call; News Item: Oxygen Bottleneck, NASA Opens Osiris Rex Canister, Learning and Longevity, DNA Directed Assembly, Bleach Peddler Sentenced; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Nuclear Batteries; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Jan-27 • 16 minutes
Lessons on the limits of ecosystem restoration from the Everglades
When the U.S. government and state of Florida unveiled a new plan to save the Everglades in 2000, the sprawling blueprint to restore the wetlands became the largest hydrological restoration effort in the nation's history. Two decades later, only one project is complete, the effort is $15 billion over budget and the Everglades is still dying. The new podcast Bright Lit Place from WLRN and NPR heads into the swamp to meet its first inhabitants, the scientists who study it and the warring sides struggling to f... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-27 • 12 minutes
How to Save Indigenous Languages
From Papua New Guinea to the Andaman Islands, Indigenous languages are under threat. An Indian linguist helped preserve one language family. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 26 minutes
How should we measure cleverness?
The CrowdScience team are tested to the limit to see how brainy they are. (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 25 minutes
NASA Opens Canister With Asteroid Sample | ADHD Prescription Rates Spiked During The Pandemic
Engineers had to design bespoke tools to open the OSIRIS-REx capsule nearly four months after it arrived back on Earth. Also, prescription rates for ADHD drugs rose by 30% from 2020-2022, with large increases among women and young people. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 64 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (May 31, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include: Do you think LLMs will give everyone something akin to a personal McKinsey consultant? - How much efficiency is lost by needing to explain things to a team vs. doing a whole design alone? - With schools ending for the year, what are some ways to continue teaching kids over the ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 84 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [May 26, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Is it possible to create more universe? - Why does running my Waterpik interrupt Bluetooth connections? - In third grade, I had an argument with a teacher. She said, "Before humans had language, they thought just like us." I argued that couldn't be true–instead, language gave way to co... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 41 minutes
Zoozve
As co-host Latif Nasser was putting his kid to bed one night, he noticed something weird on a solar system poster up on the wall: Venus had a moon called … Zoozve. But when he called NASA to ask them about it, they had never heard of Zoozve, and besides that, they insisted that Venus doesn’t have any moons. So begins a tiny mystery that leads to a newly discovered kind of object in our solar system, one that is simultaneously a moon, but also not a moon, and one that waltzes its way into asking one of the... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 24 minutes
Weekly: Why AI won’t take your job just yet; how sound helps fungi grow faster; chickpeas grown in moon dust for first time
#234Is AI really ready to take our jobs? A team looked at whether AI image recognition could replace tasks like checking price tags on items or looking at the pupils of patients in surgery.  The researchers found only a small fraction of these vision-reliant tasks could be cost-effectively taken over by AI – for now, anyway.There’s an old myth that singing to your plants helps them grow – apparently this actually works with fungus. A pair of experiments has found that fungus grows much more quickly whe... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 28 minutes
Retinas reveal future health, and the first cells on Earth
Plus, how do pond skaters avoid raindrops? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 12 minutes
Audio long read: Long COVID is a double curse in low-income nations — here’s why
A dearth of research means the condition is often ignored by physicians. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 10 minutes
The Extreme Sport of Ice Climbing Is at Risk of Extinction
The winter sport is becoming more treacherous as the world warms and icefalls become less and less stable. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 40 minutes
Ludovic Slimak, "The Naked Neanderthal: A New Understanding of the Human Creature" (Pegasus Books, 2023)
What do we really know about our cousins, the Neanderthals? For over a century we saw Neanderthals as inferior to Homo Sapiens. More recently, the pendulum swung the other way and they are generally seen as our relatives: not quite human, but similar enough, and still not equal. Now, thanks to an ongoing revolution in paleoanthropology in which he has played a key part, Ludovic Slimak shows us that they are something altogether different -- and they should be understood on their own terms rather than by com... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 9 minutes
When Tiny, Invasive Ants Go Marching In...And Alter An Ecosystem
At the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, a wildlife preserve in central Kenya, lions and cheetahs mingle with zebras and elephants across many miles of savannah – grasslands with "whistling thorn" acacia trees dotting the landscape here and there. Twenty years ago, the savanna was littered with them. Then came invasive big-headed ants that killed native ants — and left the acacia trees vulnerable. Over time, elephants have knocked down many of the trees. That has altered the landscape — and the diets of other animals ... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 138 minutes
Filling in the Gaps with Science
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: RNA Outside, Mammoth Travels, HIV Entry, Early Hunters Gathering, Bone Switch, White Rhinos, Justin Rants, Kiki Hopes, Penguin Poop, Old Fossils, And Much More! Become a Patron! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 54 minutes
The aftermath of a record-smashing volcano: Hunga Tonga–Hunga Haʻapai two years later, and more...
Oil sands produce more air pollution than industry’s required to report, study says (0:54) | The volume of airborne organic carbon pollutants — some of the same pollutants that lead to smog in cities — produced by Alberta’s oil sands have been measured at levels up to 6,300 per cent higher than we thought. John Luggio, a research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada, said their cutting edge techniques in their new study picked up many pollutants industry hasn’t been required to track. Mark C... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Jan-26 • 40 minutes
Faith: Stories about religion and science
Throughout history, the relationship between faith and science has been complex – a delicate interplay between the spiritual and the empirical, where questions of existence, purpose, and the unknown have often intersected. In this week’s episode, our storytellers examine the delicate balance between religious convictions and the pursuit of empirical truths. Part 1: Comedian John Fugelsang doesn’t want to get married just to appease his Catholic parents. Part 2: When Chris Mustafa Gray’s daughter is born, hi... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 18 minutes
AI Helps Find Ancient Artifacts In The Great Lakes | An Artist Combines Indigenous Textiles With Modern Tech
Researchers in Michigan modeled a prehistoric land bridge and used AI to predict where caribou–and humans–might have traveled along it. Also, artist Sarah Rosalena uses Indigenous weaving, ceramics, and sculpture practices to create art that challenges tech’s future. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 32 minutes
Drilling into the past
How scientists can drill into the seabed to find out more about the planet’s deep past (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 28 minutes
A hangover-fighting enzyme, the failure of a promising snakebite treatment, and how ants change lion behavior
On this week’s show: A roundup of stories from our daily newsletter, and the ripple effects of the invasive big-headed ant in Kenya First up on the show, Science Newsletter Editor Christie Wilcox joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about snake venom antidotes, a surprising job for a hangover enzyme, and crustaceans that spin silk. Next on the show, the cascading effects of an invading ant. Douglas Kamaru, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Zoology & Physiology at the University of Wyoming, discusses how th... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 28 minutes
12 days of Christmas - science version
A festive special in the style of the 12 days of Christmas. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: What have we learned from 50 years of the Endangered Species Act?
A new book by Lowell Baier is not just a history of The Endangered Species Act, but an explanation of what’s gone right and what’s gone wrong in the implementation of this historic federal statute. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 9 minutes
The World’s Essential Aquifers Are in Deep Trouble
New research finds that the groundwater systems that hydrate your life are in rapid, sometimes accelerating decline around the globe. Here’s how to stop the retreat. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 50 minutes
Populations of people, frogs and microbes
With China’s population declining, would decreasing populations be better for the planet? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 37 minutes
Best of: A Complicated Woman, Leona Zacharias
A blindness epidemic among premature babies, and a brilliant biologist whose story hits close to home here at Lost Women of Science. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-25 • 16 minutes
Secrets of the microbiome: the vagina
Madeleine Finlay meets Ina Schuppe Koistinen, associate professor at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, and author of the book Vulva: Facts, Myths and Life-Changing Insights. Ina explains what makes the vaginal microbiome special, why it could hold the key to understanding pregnancy complications, and how we can better care for and protect it (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 31 minutes
When The ‘Personal’ Computer Turned 30
In a conversation from 2014, Ira and guests looked back on the early days of personal computing, talk about how the Macintosh came to be, and reflect on what the anniversary of the Mac meant after 30 years. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 25 minutes
Toxic red mud could be turned into 'green' steel
Researchers extract useful metal from industrial waste, and how analysis of blood-proteins could help unravel the mystery of long COVID. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 17 minutes
An Old Conjecture Falls, Making Spheres a Lot More Complicated
The telescope conjecture gave mathematicians a handle on ways to map one sphere to another. Now that it has been disproved, the universe of shapes has exploded. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is “Slow Burn” by Kevin MacLeod. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 102 minutes
Mo Gawdat: “Life is a Video Game!” | The Shocking Case for Intelligent Design
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Will AI destroy humanity? Can we bring the dead back to life? And is there any convincing evidence for intelligent design? Joining me today to explore these fascinating topics is none other than Mo Gawdat! Mo is the founder of the non-profit organization One Billion Happy and host of the #1 mental health podcast Slo Mo. He is the author of the bestselling books Solve for Happy and Scary Smart and used to work as chief b... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 10 minutes
The World's First Malaria Vaccine Program for Children Starts Now
On Monday, Cameroon became the first nation to establish routine childhood malaria immunizations. The race is on to give protection to as many people as possible. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 39 minutes
The math problem that could break the internet
Today's internet is built on a series of locks and keys that protect your private information as it travels through cyberspace. But could all these locks be broken? (Updated from 2022) For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastcho... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 51 minutes
Carcinology (CRABS) Part 2 with Adam Wall
Hairy crabs! Shell swaps! Carcinization! Will we all evolve to be crabs? What’s with having one giant claw? Why would a crab stab you? Adam Wall, a carcinologist at the Natural History Museum of LA covers all of this and more in this thrilling conclusion of our two-part episode on crabs. Also: did the Little Mermaid get it right, and does Adam enjoy being interviewed? Listen to the end to find out. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-24 • 14 minutes
Experiencing Racism May Physically Change Your Brain
Scientists know that Black people are at a greater risk for health problems like heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease than white people. A growing body of research shows that racism–in health systems and the effects of experiencing racial discrimination–contributes to these long-standing health disparities for Black communities. Now, some researchers are asking whether part of the explanation involves how racism changes the brain. Today on the show, science correspondent Jon Hamilton speaks with ... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 11 minutes
Can AI Predict When You Die?
A new study used machine learning on 6 million Danish people to "autocomplete" their life trajectories –— and when they might kick the bucket. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 27 minutes
How The Moon Transformed Life On Earth, From Climate to Timekeeping
A new book explores how the moon changed us—and how we’ve changed the moon. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 8 minutes
Scientists Will Test a Cancer-Hunting mRNA Treatment
Strand Therapeutics has figured out a way to turn the molecule on and off in certain tissues to more precisely treat tumors. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 16 minutes
Escape Pod: #3 Music: the jazz swing of birdsong and the sonification of the orbits of planets
This is a re-airing of a podcast originally released in February 2021.This episode is all about music, so today’s journey of escapism comes complete with odd, relaxing, soothing and interesting sounds to guide you through.The team opens with the sounds of animals, specifically the singing - if you can call it that - of gorillas, and the jazzy birdsong of the thrush.They then treat you to the sounds of data sonification, courtesy of Milton Mermikides, who translates motion into music, like the swinging of a ... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 30 minutes
What happened to the Neanderthals?
Dig in with Molly and co-host Audrey as they learn about our extinct ancient relatives, the Neanderthals! With archaeologist and Brains On producer Anna Goldfield as their guide, they’ll learn how Neanderthals were once misunderstood, and how scientists are learning more about them. Explore the wondrous NeanderHALL at Brains On HQ and unearth the truth about these prehistoric humans with Anna and her talkative NeanderDOLL, Paul! Plus, discover the origins of a tricky new mystery soundDo you have your Smarty... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 41 minutes
Darkness
The question plaguing us this episode is, how dark can it really get? Turns out (according to some), not that dark! Unless you're at the bottom of the ocean or floating in the all too-eerie void of deep space, you're always gonna have some photons hitting your face. (I'm pretty sure I accidentally stole this rhyme right out of Hank's poem, but you'll just have to listen to know for sure...) (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 21 minutes
Secrets of the microbiome: the gut
Ian Sample speaks to colorectal surgeon and researcher, James Kinross, about the miraculous world of our gut microbiome, and what we can all do to look after it (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-23 • 27 minutes
Titans of Science: Julie Williams
The leading Alzheimer's expert shares the latest developments in understanding the disease... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 27 minutes
The Life Scientific: Sir Michael Berry
Professor Jim Al-Khalili meets one of Britain's greatest physicists, Sir Michael Berry. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 34 minutes
From Scans To Office Visits: How Will AI Shape Medicine?
Scientists are testing artificial intelligence’s ability to read imaging results, make diagnoses, and more. Listeners call in. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 86 minutes
263 | Chris Quigg on Symmetry and the Birth of the Standard Model
I talk with physicist Chris Quigg about how the Standard Model of particle physics came to be. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 10 minutes
A Scandal Is Tearing the World of Record-Breaking Dogs Apart
After doubts were raised about a 31-year-old dog, Guinness World Records has paused its records for the world’s oldest dogs, leaving one super-old dog in limbo. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 43 minutes
744: Innovating Drug Discovery with Novel Approaches to Target Disease-Causing Proteins - Dr. Ryan Potts
Dr. Ryan Potts is VP of Research and Head of the Induced Proximity Platform at Amgen that works on ways to bring two or more molecules in close proximity to each other to tackle drug targets that are currently considered “undruggable.” Ryan... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 13 minutes
This Wild Bird Will Lead You To Honey On Command
Honeyguides are wild birds that team up with humans and then lead them to honey. Researchers recently found that the calls these birds respond to are unique and tied to their location. NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce talks about this relationship and shares how researchers followed honeyguides to learn about their call behaviors. Read Nell's full story here. Hear about an amazing wildlife phenomenon? Email us at [email protected]. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/a... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-22 • 54 minutes
Inside Planets
With planets and moons, it’s what’s inside that counts. If we want to understand surface features, like volcanoes, or their history, such as how the planet formed or whether it’s suitable for life, we study their interiors. Astronomer Sabine Stanley takes us on a journey to the centers of Venus, Saturn’s large moon Titan, Jupiter’s moon Io, and of course Earth, to help us understand how they, and the solar system, came to be. Guest: Sabine Stanley - Planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University and the a... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Jan-21 • 23 minutes
Science Extra: Aspects of psychology: ADHD diagnosis explosion—and singing to babies
Aspects of mental health and psychology.Diagnoses of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) doubled over the past year, and the cost of doing that increased substantially too.And why do parents take so readily to singing to their babies—especially when it's time to change the nappy?With Presenter of All in the Mind Sana Qadarand Investigative Journalist Ange LavoipierreHosted by Science Editor Jonathan Webb (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-20 • 54 minutes
H. G. Wells – father of science fiction
He imagined the atomic bomb, believed in a world government, wrote books about science and science fiction and was the first popular communicator of scientific ideas. Today we commemorate the life and achievements of Herbert George Wells. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-20
The Skeptics Guide #967 - Jan 20 2024
Interview with Robert Sapolsky; News Items: Betavolt 50 Year Battery, Moon Landing Delayed, Cloned Monkeys, Converting CO2 into Carbon Nanofibers, Bad Fen Shui; Who's That Noisy; From TikTok: Jellyfish UFO; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Jan-20 • 57 minutes
Harry van der Hulst, "A Mind for Language: An Introduction to the Innateness Debate" (Cambridge UP, 2023)
How does human language arise in the mind? To what extent is it innate, or something that is learned? How do these factors interact? The questions surrounding how we acquire language are some of the most fundamental about what it means to be human and have long been at the heart of linguistic theory. Harry van der Hulst's book A Mind for Language: An Introduction to the Innateness Debate (Cambridge UP, 2023) provides a comprehensive introduction to this fascinating debate, unravelling the arguments for the... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-20 • 35 minutes
The Future of Images of Human Evolution
We are all familiar with the “march of progress” image - the representation of evolution that depicts a series of apelike creatures becoming progressively taller and more erect before finally reaching the upright human form. It’s a powerful image. In his book Monkey to Man: The Evolution of the March of Progress Image (Yale UP, 2024), Professor Gowan Dawson examines its origins and its influence on the public understanding of evolution. Listen to him in conversation with Owen Bennett Jones. Owen Bennett-Jon... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-20 • 26 minutes
Smologies #36: FEATHERS with Allison Shultz
Plumage! Dance battles! Possible holographic disco birds? Natural History Museum of LA ornithology curator Dr. Allison Shultz is a professional plumologist aka feather expert. We visit the museum’s collection of rare specimens and chat about everything from fossilized dinosaur feathers to peacock tails, the fanciest roosters, quill pens, pigments, flight feathers, the blackest black birds, and why birdwatching is like seeing tiny purple raccoons zoom overhead. Birds: like Pokemon Go but weirder. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 13 minutes
Rhesus Monkey Cloned With Modified Approach Has Survived Into Adulthood
In China, a cloned rhesus monkey has lived for over two years, signifying advances in cloning and reproductive gene editing technology. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 27 minutes
Were humans ever semi-aquatic?
Was there a semi-aquatic period for humans as we’ve evolved? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 36 minutes
Paper mills bribe editors to pass peer review, and detecting tumors with a blood draw
Investigation shows journal editors getting paid to publish bunk papers, and new techniques for finding tumor DNA in the blood First up on this week’s episode, Frederik Joelving, an editor and reporter for the site Retraction Watch, talks with host Sarah Crespi about paper mills—organizations that sell authorship on research papers—that appear to be bribing journal editors to publish bogus articles. They talk about the drivers behind this activity and what publishers can do to stop it. Next, producer Za... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 10 minutes
The Best Way to Use Home COVID Tests Right Now
In today’s episode, we want to talk about some of the current challenges with using home COVID tests. When you first have symptoms, a change in how your body reacts to the virus could lead to a test result showing you’re negative when you’re actually infected. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 86 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (May 24, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Are the stars and constellations we see today the same that were seen by the ancient civilizations who first studied them? Do star positions ever change? - What do you make of the relationship between rhetoric and math? They are held in contradistinction, but I am thinking of the relation b... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 23 minutes
Weekly: Cloned rhesus monkey lives to adulthood for first time; fermented foods carry antibiotic resistant bugs; an impossible cosmic object
#233A cloned rhesus monkey named ReTro is said to be in good health more than three years after his birth – a landmark achievement, as no other rhesus clone has lived to adulthood.. However, the method used to clone ReTro used fetal cells, a method that cannot create identical clones of adult primates. The method could still be useful for medical research. Fermented foods are meant to be healthy and good for our guts, but there’s a problem. Researchers have found antibiotic resistant bacteria in a smal... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 76 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (May 17, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include: From a leadership standpoint, what are your best teachings on how to lead with purpose? What is your leadership style? - How do you handle making mistakes? - It is impressive to see you (in a livecoding session) pull open a 20-year-old Mathematica document to refer to an earlie... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 26 minutes
The Living Room
We're thrilled to present a piece from one of our favorite podcasts, Love + Radio (Nick van der Kolk and Brendan Baker). Producer Briana Breen brings us the story: Diane’s new neighbors across the way never shut their curtains, and that was the beginning of an intimate, but very one-sided relationship. Please listen to as much of Love + Radio as you can (loveandradio.org). And, if you are in Seattle Area, or plan to be on Feb 15th, 2024 come check out Radiolab Live! and in person (https://zpr.io/fCDUTEYju7... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 54 minutes
Can diet and exercise be replaced by pills and more…
A controversial fishing method may release CO2 from the sea floor Bottom trawling is a widely-used fishing method that involves dragging weighted nets that scrape along the seafloor. It’s sometimes been criticized for damaging marine ecosystems. Now a new study in Frontiers in Marine Science suggests that it also can release significant amounts of carbon trapped in seafloor sediments into the atmosphere. Trisha Atwood, an associate professor at Utah State University and a marine researcher with National Geo... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 97 minutes
Did Stephen Wolfram Finally Prove the Second Law of Thermodynamics?
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Has the second law of thermodynamics finally been proven? The second law of thermodynamics has been shrouded in mystery for a century and a half. Now, after building on the recent breakthroughs in the foundations of physics, Stephen Wolfram has finally provided a resolution to the mystery. Stephen Wolfram is a computer scientist, physicist, and businessman. He is the founder and CEO of Wolfram Research and the creator ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 9 minutes
A Gene-Edited Pig Liver Was Attached to a Person—and Worked for 3 Days
Researchers want to use genetically engineered pig organs to help support people with liver failure. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 11 minutes
After Domestic Abuse Ends, the Effects of Brain Injuries Can Persist
At least one in four women — and a much smaller proportion of men — experiences intimate partner violence in their lifetime. For people in violent relationships, brain injuries are unfortunately common. But little is known about what exactly happens inside the brains of people dealing with domestic violence — and how these kinds of traumatic brain injuries may be different from those that come out of contact sports like football. Host Regina G. Barber talks with NPR brain correspondent Jon Hamilton about ne... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 34 minutes
Plague in the population, and preventing potholes
Plus, could taking large glasses of wine off the menu change drinking habits? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-19 • 28 minutes
Failure: Stories about failing in science
In science, failure is as important as success. In this week’s episode, our storytellers share times when they failed at science or science failed them. Part 1: Samuel Scarpino is convinced that the paper he wrote about how hard it is to predict infectious diseases should win a Nobel Prize. Part 2: It’s grad student Moronke Harris’ turn with the deep-sea robot that no one can find, and she needs to conduct her research.. Samuel V. Scarpino, PhD, is the Director of AI + Life Sciences at Northeastern Universi... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 19 minutes
3,000 Types Of Brain Cells Categorized In Massive Brain Cell Atlas
The new atlas catalogs cell types by the genes they express, which could help medical researchers tailor treatments. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 28 minutes
Swine fever in South East Asia
Swine fever has reached Borneo, devastating the local wild pig populations (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 28 minutes
The Science of the South Pole
On board the RSS Sir David Attenborough for the vessel’s first big science season (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: Were Utah’s pioneers slave owners?
Slavery in the United States is often thought to be an institution of the American South, but western states played a part as well. In Utah, a law passed in 1852 made slavery and the slave trade legal, and this law was passed under the urging of the first territorial governor, Brigham Young. Historian Paul Reeve joins the program to discuss newly unearthed documents about Brigham Young and Utah's history. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | January 18, 2024
Thomas Laakso is a former engineer in many different industries that focus on composites science and technology, and is now the Senior Vice President at DPS Skis. He talks about the ski technology industry.Then, Thomas Quayle of the Clark Planetarium shares astronomical highlights we can look forward to in 2024. From a total solar eclipse visible in parts of the US, to comets, to meteor showers, and hopefully northern lights, 2024 will be delivering quite the show in the night sky. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 9 minutes
Scabies Is Making a Comeback
Cases of scabies, a highly contagious parasitic skin disease, are on the rise across Europe. The UK in particular is struggling with a shortage of treatments. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 50 minutes
Rulers and the rules of ageing
Under the stress and strains of leadership, how might power affect youthfulness? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-18 • 17 minutes
How to stop doomscrolling and reclaim your brain
The author Catherine Price tells Madeleine Finlay how her own excessive phone use inspired her to investigate the science behind our relationships with our devices, and what we know about how to break the cycle. And Prof Barbara Sahakian of Cambridge University explains why many of us are drawn to looking at bad news on our phones, and what it’s doing to us (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 14 minutes
Brain ‘Organoids’: Lab-Grown Cell Clusters Model Brain Functions
Scientists can coax stem cells into clusters that mimic the functions of brain regions, which could help us understand brain disorders. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 32 minutes
This AI just figured out geometry — is this a step towards artificial reasoning?
How 'AlphaGeometry' solves Mathematical Olympiad-level problems, and what happens to an ecosystem after a mass predator die-off. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 11 minutes
From Drunken Stupor to Sober with One (Hormone) Shot
We all have our tricks for sobering up after a night of drunken revelry: maybe a pot of black coffee or an ice-cold shower. But for mice in a certain lab in Texas, all it takes is a shot. No, not more alcohol—it’s an injection of a hormone called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 61 minutes
Did the Big Bang Happen More Than Once? Brian Keating, Paul Davies & Maulik Parikh
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Watch the video of this conversation and see the presentation here; https://youtu.be/QFLgyCkfYCA Imagine a scenario in which the Big Bang happened twice. Imagine a scenario in which it happened numerous, maybe even an infinite number of times. Imagine a scenario in which it never even happened at all. It may sound crazy, but all these scenarios are possible. Recently, several astronomers and physicists have called into q... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 8 minutes
The Surprising Things That Helped Make 2023 the Hottest Year Ever
The numbers are in: 2023’s global temperatures not only soared, but smashed the previous record set in 2016. This year could be even hotter. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 20 minutes
Garbage patch kids
Scientists didn’t think it was possible for life to thrive in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Then, they found some anemones ... and some huge questions about entire new ecosystems built on plastic. If you want to hear more about plastic in the ocean, we have another episode about how 99% of ocean plastic is missing: http://bit.ly/3HnW9b2 For even more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! unexplainable@vo... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Jan-17 • 11 minutes
What You Need To Know About The Current Tripledemic
Winter is upon us – and with the holiday travel and time spent indoors comes a triple threat of respiratory diseases: RSV, flu and COVID-19. Most of the country has been experiencing high or very high respiratory virus levels, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Host Regina G. Barber talks with NPR health correspondent Pien Huang about the annual 'tripledemic': what makes this winter different from winters past, who's most at risk and whether or not we're over the seasonal surge. Wa... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 19 minutes
The Lasting Allure Of Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’
In a conversation from March 2023, the maritime archeologist who found the storied wreck discusses the mission and his new book. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 10 minutes
The Real Problem With the Boeing 737 Max
Two tragic crashes over the past six years, then a third plane with loose bodywork—the aircraft designed to send Boeing’s reputation soaring has sent it into a tailspin. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 33 minutes
Where does lightning come from?
Grab your raincoat, and join Molly and co-host Lily as they float into the clouds to learn about lightning! They’ll explore how lightning is made and what it takes to stay safe during thunderstorms. To close with a bang, Molly will slip on her Thunderpants and host an electrifying lightning-themed game show. But don’t bolt too soon. We’ve got a mystery sound reveal that promises to shock!Do you have your Smarty Pass yet?? Get yours today for just $4/month (or $36/year) and get bonus episodes every month, an... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 68 minutes
Free to Investigate: Dr. Scott Atlas on the Freedom in the Sciences
Can we have science without freedom of speech? Dr. Scott Atlas's professional work and personal experiences bring to light an important and often under-discussed element of speech: freedom of speech in the hard sciences. The COVID-19 pandemic ushered in a host of new questions and concerns surrounding our medical system and government health agencies: as Special Advisor to the President and a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force from July to December 2020, Dr. Atlas was at the forefront of such ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 68 minutes
Carcinology (CRABS) Part 1 with Adam Wall
Claw hands! Beady eyes! Pinching forces that could crack your skull! Gentleman, scholar, curator of the Natural History Museum’s crustacea collection and Carcinologist Adam Wall takes us on a tour of the museum’s crab bunker to discuss everything from the tiniest to the most hauntingly giant crabs, discovering new species, crabs that are NOT crabs, sea monkeys, hairy crabs, hermit crabs, crab dongs, crab butts, crab butters, the secret history of secret Maryland spices, Amelia Earhart rumors, giant invasive... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 17 minutes
Is guilt-free flying on the horizon?
In November, a plane powered by 100% ‘sustainable’ jet fuel took off from London to New York. It was hailed by some as a milestone in reducing the carbon footprint of air travel, which accounts for about 2.5% of global CO2 emissions. Could this be the start of a greener way to fly? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Guy Gratton, associate professor of aviation and the environment at Cranfield University, to find out if the future of aviation can ever truly be guilt-free. (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 28 minutes
Titans of Science: Martin Rees
Cambridge University's Astronomer Royal shares his insights... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-16 • 22 minutes
CultureLab: Breaking space records, human bowling and a trip to the Moon with astronaut Christina Koch
NASA astronaut Christina Koch not only took part in the first ever all-female spacewalks, but she also holds the record for the longest single spaceflight by a woman, after spending 328 days on board the International Space Station.So what does it take to live in space for such a long time, what does it mean to be a record-breaking astronaut – and how do you get used to gravity again when you finally come back home? New Scientist space reporter Leah Crane asks Chrstina all of these questions and more in a s... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 27 minutes
The Life Scientific: Sarah Harper
Jim Al-Khalili talks to Professor Sarah Harper about societal ageing and falling fertility (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 33 minutes
How Close Are We To Answers About Aliens?
Dr. Adam Frank discusses the human fascination with extraterrestrial life—and the scientific search for it—in his new book. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 9 minutes
How children perceive gendered division of household work
Allegra Midgette and Nadia Chernyak describe when young children begin to perceive and accept unequal and gendered division of household labor. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 80 minutes
262 | Eric Schwitzgebel on the Weirdness of the World
I talk with philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel about how and why the universe seems irreducibly weird to us. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 11 minutes
Norway’s Deep-Sea Mining Decision Is a Warning
Politicians claim the move could provide vital minerals for the green transition. Critics say opening up exploration creates geopolitical headaches and is environmentally unsound. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 40 minutes
743: Advancing Tissue Engineering, Drug Discovery, and Drug Delivery - Dr. Pankaj Karande
Dr. Pankaj Karande is an Associate Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Pankaj was trained as a chemical engineer, and his research aims to apply engineering approaches and technology to solve problems... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 14 minutes
Our Lives Are Ruled By The Illusion Of Time
Time is a concept so central to our daily lives. Yet, the closer scientists look at it, the more it seems to fall apart. Time ticks by differently at sea level than it does on a mountaintop. The universe's expansion slows time's passage. "And some scientists think time might not even be 'real' — or at least not fundamental," says NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel. In this encore episode, Geoff joins Short Wave Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber to bend our brains with his learnings about the tru... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-15 • 54 minutes
Tech in Check
Worried that AI will replace you? It may not seem like the Hollywood writers’ strike has anything in common with the Luddite rebellion in England in 1811, but they are surprisingly similar. Today we use the term “Luddite” dismissively to describe a technophobe, but the original Luddites – cloth workers – organized and fought Industrial Revolution automation and the factory bosses who were replacing humans with cotton spinning machines and steam powered looms. Find out what our age of AI can learn from texti... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Jan-14 • 21 minutes
Science Extra: falling antimatter, chimps, Beethoven's hair, Jupiter, and that telescope
Clearly, there's no such thing as too much AI, you can't escape it; and we can't ignore avian 'flu, or 2023 being the hottest year on record; But, meanwhile ... CERN measured the dynamics of falling antimatter; primatologists measured menopause in chimps; Jupiter got new moons, Beethoven's hair gave up genetic intel, and the James Webb telescope filled in some knowledge gaps.We're with Science Journalist Genelle Weule and Science Reporter Belinda Smith (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-13 • 54 minutes
Portrait of Isaac Newton
He developed laws of motion, gravitation and mathematical calculus. But with his genius came myths and legends. Sharon Carleton presents a portrait of Isaac Newton. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-13
The Skeptics Guide #966 - Jan 13 2024
Dumbest Thing of the Week; News Items: Dual Sympathetic Response, Peregrine Moon Mission, Solar Eclipse, Boy Beats Tetris; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Dimensional Weight; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Jan-13 • 12 minutes
Body Electric: The Body Across The Ages
If you work at home or in an office, you might spend a lot of your day sitting down and staring at a computer screen. That can have lots of negative effects – but it's hard to carve out significant time in the day to counteract that.Our friends at NPR's TED Radio Hour wanted to know if small, frequent movement breaks might do the trick instead. Along with Columbia University Medical Center, they conducted a study of over 20,000 listeners and asked them to incorporate these movement breaks into their day. To... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-13 • 93 minutes
2024 TWIS Science Predictions!
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Predictions from 2023, Predictions for 2024, Supernovae, Ancient Archery, Grizzlies, Wing Source?, Giants of Southern China, Bats could cure diabetes, And Much More Science! Become a Patron! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 26 minutes
Can planting trees solve the climate crisis?
Can we plant enough trees to soak up all the extra carbon we put into the atmosphere? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 25 minutes
NASA Delays Crewed Moon Missions | Top Technologies To Watch In 2024
With this week’s delays to Artemis II and III, astronauts likely won’t walk on the moon until 2026 at the earliest. Also, weight-loss drugs, AI, clean-energy tech and more: digging into MIT Technology Review’s annual list with executive editor Amy Nordrum. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 10 minutes
How Does the World’s Largest Seabird Know Where to Fly?
Imagine for a moment that you’re a very hungry bird soaring over 30-foot ocean swells in high winds, with no land for thousands of miles. How do you know where you’re going? If you’re a wandering albatross, you listen. But listen to what, exactly? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 83 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [May 12, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Why is it important that the periodic table is structured as a table rather than a list of elements? - Is the periodic table just the table for the current state? Since there weren't heavy atoms from the start (Big Bang), maybe in the far future everything decays and just the electrons survive. ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 100 minutes
Stephen Wolfram on Observer Theory
Stephen reads a blog from https://writings.stephenwolfram.com and then answers questions live from his viewers. | Read the blog along with Stephen: https://writings.stephenwolfram.com/2023... | Watch the original livestream on YouTube: https://youtu.be/VDGyZUfL1BA (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 23 minutes
Weekly: Brain regions shrink during pregnancy; oldest and largest Amazon cities discovered; corals that change their sex like clockwork
#232During pregnancy the brain undergoes profound changes – almost every part of the cortex thins out and loses volume by the third trimester. It’s such a big change that you can tell if someone’s pregnant just by looking at a scan of their brain. How researchers discovered these changes and why they might be occurring.A massive, ancient group of cities has been discovered in the Amazon rainforest using lasers. It’s the biggest pre-Columbian urban area ever found in the Amazon and parts of it date back furt... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 56 minutes
Our Little Stupid Bodies
Sometimes a seemingly silly question gets stuck in your craw and you can’t shake the feeling that something big lies behind it. We are constantly collecting these kinds of questions from our listeners, not to mention piling up a storehouse of our own “stupid” questions, as we lovingly call them. And a little while back, we noticed a little cluster of questions that seemed to have a shared edgy energy, and all led us to the same place: Our own bodies. So, today on Radiolab, we go down our throats and get und... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 27 minutes
Are We On Borrowed Time? Canadian Prepper & Brian Keating
Remastered from our interview in June 2023. Have you ever wondered why people become preppers? Well, you're in luck because today you're going to find out from one of the most famous preppers in the world, Nate Polson, also known as the Canadian Prepper! Canadian Prepper is an educational YouTuber who talks about self-defense, survival, and all things preparedness. He analyzes current events, reviews innovative equipment, and theorizes about the demise of civilization as we know it. In this interview,... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 54 minutes
Could buried hydrogen help save the world, and more…
*** How history’s largest ape met its end *** | For nearly two million years, a gigantic ape, three meters tall and weighing a quarter of a tonne, lived in what is now southern China, before mysteriously disappearing. Exactly why the Gigantopithecus Blacki went extinct has been a huge mystery for paleontologists, especially because other apes were able to thrive at the time. Now a massive study, co-led by geochronologist Kira Westaway of Macquarie University, reveals their size was a disadvantage, and left ... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 11 minutes
Why Humans Are Putting a Bunch of ‘Coal’ and ‘Oil’ Back in the Ground
Startups are processing plant waste into concentrated carbon to be buried or injected underground. It’s like fossil fuels, but in reverse. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 9 minutes
Odd Radio Circles Are glowing Around Some Galaxies. Now We Know Why
Since they were discovered in 2019, strange, glowing circles of light in space have mystified researchers. Now called odd radio circles, or ORCs, these rings of light sit in the radio portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. They pulse out of the centers of some galaxies – and until now, no one knew why.In this episode, host Regina G. Barber talks to Alison Coil, a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at University of California San Diego, about her latest research. They break down what ORCs are, where t... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 123 minutes
TWIS Top 11 Science News of 2023
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: What does This Week in Science think were the year’s top science stories? This end-of-year episode counts down the Top 11 science news stories of 2023 and much more science! Become a Patron! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 34 minutes
Depression drugs, deepfakes, and fingerprint discoveries
Plus, a tribute to legendary surgeon Sir Roy Calne (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-12 • 30 minutes
Hallucinogenics: Stories about tripping
In this week’s episode, our storytellers delve into their personal encounters with psychedelics—moments where reality became a blur, perceptions began to shift, and the boundaries of consciousness expanded. Part 1: While tripping on acid, Michael Czajkowski goes into anaphylaxis. Part 2: Dust Cwaine sees their body differently while experimenting with magical mushrooms. Michael Czajkowski is an origami physicist, fashion redesigner, experimental science communicator and amateur bicycle pilot. Their research... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 18 minutes
To Get Ready For Mars, NASA Studies How The Body Changes In Space
Spending time in space affects everything from eyesight to bone health. NASA’s CIPHER program will measure these changes and more. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 31 minutes
Seeking supernovas
How supernovas – the colossal explosions of stars – can help us decipher the Universe (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 44 minutes
The environmental toll of war in Ukraine, and communications between mom and fetus during childbirth
Assessing environmental damage during wartime, and tracking signaling between fetus and mother First up, freelance journalist Richard Stone returns with news from his latest trip to Ukraine. This week, he shares stories with host Sarah Crespi about environmental damage from the war, particularly the grave consequences of the Kakhovka Dam explosion. Next, producer Kevin McLean talks with researcher Nardhy Gomez-Lopez, a professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and pathology and immunology... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 28 minutes
Biggest COP in history
Some of the biggest stories from COP28: oceans, food security and fossil fuel dependence. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | January 11, 2024
Gabe Bowen, professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Utah, discusses how geoscientists have mapped changes in atmospheric CO2 over past 66 million years.Then, John Wells, co-founder and co-host of Cool Science Radio, talks about the last decade hosting this science and technology show — what he has learned and loved as he departs the show for new endeavors. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 78 minutes
Engineering Synthetic Life With Craig Venter
Get 30% off unlimited access to Ground News, giving you full coverage of breaking news and allowing you to navigate media bias seamlessly 👉 https://www.ground.news/drbrian It may sound like science fiction, but it's true. Biologists are already creating synthetic life from scratch. Of course, this raises many questions: what is life? What are the possible applications? And are we on to something here, or are we just playing God? Here today, to answer all of these questions and more is one of the most infl... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: Navigating the future of the global water crisis
Water crises are nothing new. Indeed they’ve influenced the very course of human history again and again but we’ve never had a planet with 10 billion people on it before, and so can we solve the water crisis at a global scale? (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 8 minutes
There’s a Huge Covid Surge Right Now and Nobody Is Talking About It
The US is in the midst of the largest Covid surge since Omicron, but with minimal testing and good population immunity, the wave is largely being ignored. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 50 minutes
Super corals and science diplomacy
Could tensions around the Red Sea affect research into heat-resistant super corals? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 13 minutes
From Our Inbox: Vera Peters - The Doctor Who Helped Spare Women From Radical Mastectomy
Vera Peters began her career studying treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. She used techniques that had seen positive outcomes on Hodgkin’s to treat breast cancer patients, and she discovered a treatment that was equally effective and much less invasive than the radical mastectomy, saving hundreds of thousands of women from that life-altering surgery. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-11 • 17 minutes
Our science predictions for 2024
Ian Sample and science correspondent Hannah Devlin discuss the big stories likely to hit the headlines and share their predictions for 2024 (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 18 minutes
Science Journalism Is Shrinking–Along With Public Trust In Science
In 2023, a flood of science journalists lost their jobs. At the same time, public trust in science continues to decline. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 30 minutes
The science stories you missed over the holiday period
We highlight some of the Nature Briefing’s stories from the end of 2023, including a polar bear fur-inspired sweater, efforts to open OSIRIS-REx’s sample canister, and a dinosaur’s last dinner. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 15 minutes
Even Synthetic Life Forms With a Tiny Genome Can Evolve
By watching “minimal” cells regain the fitness they lost, researchers are testing whether a genome can be too simple to evolve. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is “Hidden Agenda” by Kevin MacLeod. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 12 minutes
How Your Body Adapts to Extreme Cold
Scientists are finding a dynamic story in human physiology linked to frigid temperatures—a story that climate change may rewrite. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 27 minutes
A stethoscope for the rainforest
Researchers planted microphones in a forest and walked away. Listening back could help heal rainforest ecosystems. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices ... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Jan-10 • 14 minutes
Preserving Our Humanity In The Age Of Robots
Human beings are hardwired for social connection – so much so that we think of even the most basic objects as having feelings or experiences. (Yup, we're talking to you, Roomba owners!) Social robots add a layer to this. They're designed to make us feel like they're our friends. They can do things like care for children, the elderly or act as partners. But there's a darker side to them, too. They may encourage us to opt out of authentic, real-life connections, making us feel more isolated. Today on the show... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 19 minutes
(Part 2) Endangered Species Act At 50: Orchids And Red Wolves
It's been 50 years since the Endangered Species Act established protections for plant and animal species at risk of extinction. Conservationists discuss ongoing efforts to protect orchids and red wolves. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 8 minutes
Yes, the Climate Crisis Is Now ‘Gobsmacking.’ But So Is Some Progress
This is the year that “absolutely gobsmackingly bananas” summed up the climate emergency. But dramatic descriptors extend to the huge gains humanity has made too. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 79 minutes
Ethnoecology (ETHNOBOTANY/NATIVE PLANTS) with Leigh Joseph
The what, where, and who of native plants is … ethnobotany! Which is under the umbrella of Ethnoecology! The wonderful botanist Leigh Joseph shares what steered her to this field, how she includes her Squamish First Nation community in her research, and how we relate to plants – both native and invasive. She’ll chat about how to identify plants, Latin names vs. traditional names, how knowledge is passed down or silenced, the chilling history that inspired some of her work, uses for barks and berries and sap... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 45 minutes
Refrigeration
In this not-so-chill episode, everybody gets a little unsettled by the concepts around refrigeration. Quantum computers, thermoacoustics, molecular chemistry, elephants, the phantom letter "d" that gets added to the shortening of refrigeration...it's all just. So much. (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 27 minutes
Titans of Science: Deborah Prentice
The first American-born vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 16 minutes
What the science says about how to get active (and make it stick)
As parks and gyms fill with people hoping to make 2024 their year of fitness, Ian Sample speaks to Martin Gibala, professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Canada, about how much exercise we should be doing, the benefits of interval training, and how to make a new regime stick (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-09 • 17 minutes
Escape Pod: #2 Alliances in matters biological, mathematical and atomical
This is a re-airing of a podcast originally released in January 2021.The theme of this episode is alliances - human, biological and atomic. We start by celebrating the amazing properties of lichen, the symbiotic relationships it forms, how it shaped the earth and simply how beautiful it is to look at.Then we explore how carbon is able to create such an incredibly diverse range of materials, including soot, diamonds and graphite.We wrap up by delving into the life of renowned Hungarian mathematician Paul Erd... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 26 minutes
The Life Scientific: Sarah Blaffer Hrdy
Jim al-Khalili discusses monkey infanticide and human parenting with Sarah Hrdy (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 17 minutes
(Part 1) Endangered Species Act at 50: Hawaiian Land Snails
It's been 50 years since the Endangered Species Act established protections for plant and animal species at risk of extinction. Two conservationists discuss the effort to save Hawaiian land snails. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 15 minutes
Without the Moon, You Wouldn't Exist (Probably)
The moon has guided our movements and cultures, and though we may think we know it well, it still guards some of its deepest secrets from us. A new book from Rebecca Boyle take us on a deep dive into our sister celestial orb. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 67 minutes
261 | Sanjana Curtis on the Origins of the Elements
I talk with nuclear astrophysicist Sanjana Curtis about the origin of the chemical elements. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 9 minutes
Critical Infrastructure Is Sinking Along the US East Coast
Up and down the Atlantic Coast, the land is steadily sinking, or subsiding. That’s destabilizing levees, roads, and airports, just as sea levels are rising. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 42 minutes
742: Studying Hair Follicles and Skin to Better Understand Tissue Development and Regeneration - Dr. Claire Higgins
Dr. Claire Higgins is a Reader (faculty) in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine in the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial College London. She is also President of the European Hair Research Society and Vice President of the Institute of... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 11 minutes
The Record For World's Largest Snowflake Might Not Count
A winter storm brought heavy rain and snow to parts of the East Coast this weekend, which got us thinking about snowflakes. Those intricate, whimsical crystals are a staple of magical wintry scenes, but how big can they really get? Well, according to the Guinness World Record keepers, the "largest snowflake" ever recorded was a whopping 15 inches in diameter. It was spotted near Missoula, Montana in 1887. But Kenneth Libbrecht, a physicist at Caltech, has long been skeptical of that record. So he set out to... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-08 • 54 minutes
Your Mind on Movies
By one estimate we spend a fifth of our lives watching movies or TV. In fact, we consume entertainment almost as habitually as we eat or sleep, activities that receive scientific scrutiny and study. So why not consider the effects that watching movies and TV have on our minds and bodies too? When we do, we find that they are not mere escapism. A data scientist reveals why we are what we watch, and how scientists and filmmakers work, often with competing agendas, to create sci-fi entertainment. Guest: Walt H... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2024-Jan-07 • 19 minutes
Science Extra: One semaglutide please
If there’s one medication that’s got everyone talking it’s the antidiabetic medication semaglutide. The drug is often better known by one of its brand names, Ozempic, and it’s exploded in popularity mainly because of its weight loss effects. So what’s happened due to the popularity and what could be coming next?Also, while COVID has become less relevant in everyday discussions it certainly hasn’t gone away. We haven’t seen the rise of a major new variant, but SARS-CoV-2 hasn’t been sitting still. This week ... (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-06 • 54 minutes
What to do when science doesn’t cut through
Tim Flannery and Robyn Williams discuss how to communicate in a world of denialism, disinformation, and deep fakes. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-06
The Skeptics Guide #965 - Jan 6 2024
Psychic Predictions for 2023 and Rogue Predictions for 2024; News Items: Dosing Gene Expression, Solar Tower, Alzheimer's Virus, Quark Matter, Scientology RICO; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2024-Jan-06 • 70 minutes
Thom van Dooren, "The Wake of Crows: Living and Dying in Shared Worlds" (Columbia UP, 2019)
Crows can be found almost everywhere that people are, from tropical islands to deserts and arctic forests, from densely populated cities to suburbs and farms. Across these diverse landscapes, many species of crow are doing well: their intelligent and adaptive ways of life have allowed them to thrive amid human-driven transformations. Indeed, crows are frequently disliked for their success, seen as pests, threats, and scavengers on the detritus of human life. But among the vast variety of crows, there are al... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 28 minutes
Will electric cars help solve noise pollution?
Will electric cars solve noise pollution? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 25 minutes
Solar Activity Flares Up In 2024 | Underground Hydrogen Reserves And Clean Energy
Look out for a total solar eclipse, more solar flares, and the Parker Solar Probe’s closest approach to the sun. Also, underground hydrogen stores have raised renewable energy hopes, but can the industry overcome the logistical hurdles of distributing it? (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 16 minutes
The Strange and Beautiful Science Of Our Lives
Nell Greenfieldboyce discusses her new book Transient and Strange, the intimacy of the essays and the science that inspired them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 87 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (May 10, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: When researching, do you find it's more helpful to stay close to modern times in terms of content, or do findings from hundreds of years ago also prove valuable? - ​Can you talk about the history of theories of cognition and consciousness? What did the ancients think? Did Gödel or Turing thi... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 62 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [May 5, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Congrats on the new blog post! Are there any dangers to these "custom" plugins? Allowing ChatGPT access to your computer seems like asking for an AI takeover. - Is current tech like ChatGPT going to be able to answer every question imaginable? - Are you worried about being replaced by ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 52 minutes
Stochasticity
First aired way back in 2009, this episode is all about a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness, Stochasticity, and how it may be at the very foundation of our lives. Along the way, we talk to a woman suddenly consumed by a frenzied gambling addiction, hear from two friends whose meeting seems to defy pure chance, and take a close look at some very noisy bacteria. EPISODE CITATIONS: Videos - Stochasticity Music Video (https://zpr.io/uZiH9j9ZU6be) Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday.... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 55 minutes
Philip Goff: Is There Cosmic Purpose Without God?
What is the purpose of the Universe? Why do we exist? And does the truth lie beyond traditional religion and secular atheism? Here today, to discuss all these fascinating questions with me is leading philosopher of mind and returning guest Philip Goff! Philip is a British author, renowned philosopher, and professor at Durham University. In his recently published book, "Why? The Purpose of the Universe", he explores meaning and purpose beyond Western thought, which is precisely what we’re doing today in ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 8 minutes
A Gel Injected Into the Scrotum Could Be the Next Male Contraceptive
Biotech company Contraline has safely implanted a sperm-blocking hydrogel in 23 men. It’s designed to be a fully reversible vasectomy. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 13 minutes
Snow Flies Pay An Arm And A Leg For Love
The winter is usually when insects die or go into a state of paused development, but for tiny specks on the white snow called snow flies, it's time to run around, find a lover and make baby snow flies. Neuroscientist John Tuthill has been studying these creatures since he first came across them in 2016. He's found that not only can they survive in the cold, but if one of their limbs starts to freeze, they can self-amputate and pop it right off. That buys the snow fly time to find a mate and make sweet, swee... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 28 minutes
Measles outbreaks, and terrorist chatbots
Plus, what caused the earthquake in Japan? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 54 minutes
A Cave of bones could rewrite the history of human evolution, and more…
Hurricanes carry microplastic pollution in the oceans back to land | Humans communicate in several ways with birds who lead them to honey | Bird brains have evolved to tolerate a high-speed impact into water | How to make people more easy to hypnotize | Unearthing a small-brained hominid species that challenges human exceptionalism (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 30 minutes
Weekly: What’s next for science in 2024? A year of moons; weight-loss drugs; and a massive new supercomputer for Europe
#231It’s a new year and that means new science. But what (that we know so far) does 2024 hold? On the space front, agencies around the world have as many as 13 missions to Earth’s moon, while Japan’s MMX mission will launch to take samples from the Martian moon Phobos. NASA will finally launch the Europa Clipper mission to explore Jupiter’s ocean-bearing moon. On the technology front, Europe’s first ever exascale supercomputer, capable of performing billions of operations per second – only the thi... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-05 • 35 minutes
Life and Death: Stories about our relationship with death
Happy New Year! In this week’s episode, our storytellers ponder the big questions about life and death. Part 1: When Shannon Turner’s high school friend passes away from a rare virus from a monkey, she contemplates her sense of purpose. Part 2: After a traumatizing experience with a dead body leaves journalist Erica Buist agoraphobic, she embarks on a journey to understand how other cultures handle death in hopes of healing. Shannon M. Turner is a professional storyteller and story coach, as well as a write... (@storycollider)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 37 minutes
SciFri Reads ‘The Alchemy Of Us’
In November 2023, the SciFri Book Club met with author Ainissa Ramirez to talk about how our values are baked into our creations—and the people who helped bring them into reality. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 30 minutes
Tackling tuberculosis in South Africa
Fighting a disease that has become South Africa's biggest killer (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 34 minutes
The top online news from 2023, and using cough sounds to diagnose disease
Best of online news, and screening for tuberculosis using sound This week’s episode starts out with a look back at the top 10 online news stories with Online News Editor David Grimm. There will be cat expressions and mad scientists, but also electric cement and mind reading. Read all top 10 here. Next on the show, can a machine distinguish a tuberculosis cough from other kinds of coughs? Manuja Sharma, who was a Ph.D. student in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of ... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 28 minutes
Vagrant Birds
Why are non-native species of birds arriving in the UK? (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 146 minutes
Max Tegmark & Eric Weinstein: AI, Aliens, Theories of Everything, & New Year’s Resolutions! (2020)
Win a $100 Amazon Gift Card! Help me help you get great guests on the Into the Impossible podcast and spread the message throughout the universe. Fill out this listener https://jf1bh9v88hb.typeform.com/to/FGPU... for your chance to win! Enjoy this classic episode from the vault: Max Tegmark & Eric Weinstein, New Years Eve 2020! Don't forget to join my mailing list for your chance to win a real meteorite: briankeating.com Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/U... Get... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | January 4, 2024
Physicist, professor, and author Shohini Ghose illuminates the unsung heroines of math, physics, and science in her new book “Her Space, Her Time: How Trailblazing Women Scientists Decoded the Hidden Universe.”We have all seen the images FROM the James Webb Space Telescope — the galaxies, stars, and nebulas — but we haven’t really seen images OF the telescope. Science writer Chris Wanjek and NASA photographer Chris Gunn talk about their time documenting the building of the James Webb Space Telescope. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: How bugs may help us get to Mars
If we are going to go to Mars, we’re going to need to bring a lot of things that we need to live that the red planet, so far as we can tell, just doesn’t have... and that includes bugs. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 7 minutes
Former NBA Star Rick Fox Is Making a Play for Carbon-Neutral Concrete
Carbon-neutral concrete could transform construction’s footprint—if it can scale in time. At Partanna Global, Bahamian basketball star and actor Rick Fox is trying to speed things up. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 50 minutes
Timing is everything
Can you visualize time? We don’t all see it the same way (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 32 minutes
Adventures of a Bone Hunter
Annie Montague Alexander went on paleontology expeditions most women could only dream of in the early 1900s. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 25 minutes
Smologies #35: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING with Iddris Sandu
At just 22, Iddris Sandu’s life story was already legendary. This Architectural Technologist learned to program at the age of 11 and has worked with everyone from Kanye West to Nipsey Hussle to Space X. In this episode from 2020 we talk coding, holograms, what ancient flutes have to do with computers, how programming works and why it's important. The designer and entrepreneur also shares his favorite programming languages, philosophies on future technology and why we should all strive to be dynamic rather t... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2024-Jan-04 • 35 minutes
Revisited: Weight of the world, the climate scientists who hold out hope
The Australian climate scientists Lesley Hughes, Ove Høegh-Guldberg and Graeme Pearman take stock as they look back on their life’s work. How does it feel for them to carry this burden of knowledge? Could they have done more? And what hope do they hold for the future? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 47 minutes
SciFri Reads ‘The Kaiju Preservation Society’
In August 2023, the SciFri Book Club talked with author John Scalzi about what it takes to write a believable monster onto the page. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 13 minutes
The Surprising Health Benefits of Dog Ownership
Dogs are good for you, science says Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 14 minutes
Science in 2024: what to expect this year
In this episode, reporter Miryam Naddaf joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2024. We'll hear about the mass of the neutrino, the neural basis of consciousness and the climate lawsuits at the Hague, to name but a few.News: the science events to look our for in 2024 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 9 minutes
Your Eco-Friendly Lifestyle Is a Big Lie
Eating organic and switching to low-energy light bulbs feels like the green thing to do, but are people missing the bigger opportunities right in front of them? Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 30 minutes
Which came first, the chicken or the egg?
What’s up with the weird golden egg at the bottom of the ocean? How do eggs actually choose sperm? Hit sports podcast host Pablo Torre tries to guess which of these mysteries has actually been solved on our latest episode of Unexplainable or Not. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable ... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 12 minutes
Why Big Numbers Break Our Brains
In celebration of our 1000th episode, we're wrapping our heads around big numbers. Educational neuroscientist Elizabeth Toomarian talks about why humans' evolutionarily-old brains are so bad at comprehending large quantities–like the national debt and the size of the universe–and how to better equip ourselves to understand important issues like our finances and the impacts of climate change.Interested in other ways our brains make sense of the world? Email us at [email protected]. Learn more about sponsor ... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-03 • 42 minutes
Weight of the world revisited: the climate scientists who copped it
In part two of Weight of the world, three Australian climate scientists reveal the professional and personal toll of their predictions. Lesley Hughes tells us about the axing of the country’s Climate Commission, a group tasked with educating the public about climate science and the need to cut carbon emissions; Graeme Pearman talks of the pushback from government and industry; and Ove Hoegh-Guldberg speaks of the personal attacks and death threats that followed his warnings (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 29 minutes
Star Trek’s Science Advisor Reveals The Real Astrophysics On Screen
In a conversation from May 2023, astrophysicist Dr. Erin Macdonald talks about consulting on the famous series and the real (and fictional) science on screen. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 11 minutes
Reversing hearing loss in mice
Karen Steel explains a proof of concept for restoring hearing loss in mice. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 31 minutes
Lee McIntyre, "The Scientific Attitude: Defending Science from Denial, Fraud, and Pseudoscience" (MIT Press, 2019)
What can explain the success of science as an endeavor for getting closer to truth? Does science simply represent a successful methodology, or is it something more? In The Scientific Attitude: Defending Science from Denial, Fraud, and Pseudoscience (MIT Press, 2019), Lee McIntyre addresses recent attacks on science in areas such as climate change, vaccination, and even belief that the world is flat by explaining why science is a culture built around a “scientific attitude” that embraces evidence and a willi... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 36 minutes
Revisited: Weight of the world – the climate scientists who saw the crisis coming
In part one of this three-part series, three climate change scientists reveal the moment they realised the planet was heading for certain catastrophe. What did they do when they found out? How did they think the world would respond? And how do they feel today, looking back on that moment of cognisance? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 31 minutes
What science has in store for 2024
How might AI, public health, and space travel fare over the next 12 months? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2024-Jan-02 • 22 minutes
Escape Pod: #1 Understanding the self-awareness of dolphins
This is a re-airing of a podcast originally released in January 2021.An episode of Escape Pod all about understanding. We start by discussing the self-awareness of dolphins and whales, and the intricacies of their language and vocalisations. Then we marvel at the seemingly impossible abilities of gymnasts and ballerinas, most notably Simone Biles who performed a legendary triple double. And then we take a look at the Chinese board game Go - a game with more possible moves than there are atoms in the univers... (@newscientist)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 26 minutes
The Life Scientific: Edward Witten
Physicist Edward Witten on M-Theory, the leading contender for a 'theory of everything' (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 34 minutes
A Mathematician Asks ‘Is Math Real?’
When math is based on abstract concepts, how do we know it’s correct? In a conversation from October 2023, Dr. Eugenia Cheng takes on that question in a new book. (@scifri)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 70 minutes
260 | Ricard Solé on the Space of Cognitions
Talking about liquid brains and other novel architectures. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 9 minutes
A Demographic Time Bomb Is About to Hit the Beef Industry
A tiny proportion of Americans—particularly boomers—eat the majority of the nation’s beef. Can clever framing sway a younger generation? Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 43 minutes
741: Engineering Microbes to Improve Equity in Human and Environmental Health - Dr. Ariel Furst
Dr. Ariel Furst is the Paul M. Cook Career Development Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In her research, Ariel has been using microbes to address problems surrounding human health,... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 14 minutes
Asian Glow Might Have A Major Upside
Ever gotten a scarlet, hot face after drinking? Or know someone who has? Many people felt it as they ring in the New Year with champagne toasts. That's because this condition, commonly called "Asian flush" or "Asian glow," affects an estimated half a BILLION people, who can't break down aldehyde toxins that build up in their bodies. But what if there's a benefit to having Asian glow? Katie Wu, a staff writer for The Atlantic, has looked into the research a theory as to why the condition might have been a po... (@NPR)
podcast image2024-Jan-01 • 54 minutes
Eclectic Company
We present a grab bag of our favorite recent science stories – from how to stop aging to the mechanics of cooking pasta. Also, in accord with our eclectic theme – the growing problem of space junk. Guests: Anthony Wyss-Coray – Professor of neuroscience at Stanford University Oliver O’Reilly – Professor of mechanical engineering, University of California Berkeley. Moriba Jah – Professor of aerospace and engineering mechanics, University of Texas Originally aired March 1, 2021 Featuring music by Dewe... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Dec-31 • 19 minutes
Science Extra: The rise of the thinking machines
The hottest tech story in 2023 has been the rise of artificial intelligence. ChatGPT burst onto the scene and became the fastest-growing internet app of all time, reaching more than 100 million users in only a few months. So what has been the result of ChatGPT and other generative AI? (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-31
FQxI December 31, 2023 Podcast Episode
The Year in Physics Review 2023 Part 3 (@FQXi)
podcast image2023-Dec-30 • 26 minutes
Q&A with John Mather on the James Webb Space Telescope
The James Webb Space Telescope is a monumental step forward in our pursuit of understanding the Universe and its origins. Here today, to answer the most frequently asked questions about the telescope, is the senior project scientist himself, John Cromwell Mather! John is an astrophysicist and cosmologist of the highest rank. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite COBE along with his colleague George Smoot. Now, he’s exploring the early Universe v... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-30 • 54 minutes
The Anglo-Australian Telescope – approaching 50 years
Robyn Williams visited the telescope site prior to its completion in 1974. In 2014 he returned as astronomers celebrated 40 years. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-30
The Skeptics Guide #964 - Dec 30 2023
2023 Year in Review; Best Science of the Year; Best SGU Moments; Best Interviews; Skeptical Heroes and Jackasses of the Year; In Memorium; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 27 minutes
2023 Year End Extravaganza, Part 2
Welcome to Part 2 of our year-end extravaganza, full of bonus content and stories (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 21 minutes
Unmasking Owls’ Mysteries | Why It Feels So Good To Eat Chocolate
In conversations from 2023, Jennifer Ackerman’s delves into owls' mysteries, and an artificial tongue helps researchers understand how texture impacts what people like about chocolate. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 14 minutes
Podcasts of the Year: Cleo, the Mysterious Math Menace
In 2013 a new user named Cleo took an online math forum by storm with unproved answers. Today she’s an urban legend. But who was she? 2023 editor's pick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 72 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (May 3, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include: Do you like philosophy? Do you see math as a part of it? - Is it better to get a college degree in something practical like business and save interests as extracurricular classes or side hobbies? - It just seems like being in a university allows you to spend more time learning,... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 34 minutes
Zeroworld
Karim Ani dedicated his life to math. He studied it in school, got a degree in math education, even founded Citizen Math to teach it to kids in a whole new way. But, this whole time, his whole life, almost, he had this question nagging at him. The question came in the form of a rule in math, NEVER divide by zero. But, why not? Cornell mathematician, and friend of the show, Steve Strogatz, chimes in with the historical context, citing examples of previous provocateurs looking to break the rules of math. And ... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 72 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [April 28, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: In quantum chromodynamics, what is color confinement? - How did we discover strong nuclear force? - Is there a finite number of sub-atomic particles? Or will we forever find new unique ones? - How do detectors sense the presence of these particles? For example, if a microphone has a diaphragm de... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 24 minutes
Audio long read: A new kind of solar cell is coming — is it the future of green energy?
Perovskite–silicon ‘tandem’ photovoltaic panels could lead to cheaper electricity production. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 8 minutes
This Year's Top Science Stories, Wrapped
2023 was filled with scientific innovation, exploration and new discoveries. A few of the biggest threads we saw unraveling this year came from the James Webb Space Telescope, the changing climate and artificial intelligence. Today, host Regina G. Barber wraps up these three areas of science news with the help of correspondent Geoff Brumfiel and All Things Considered host Ari Shapiro. Got more science news? Email us at [email protected]. Listen to Short Wave on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts.Le... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | December 28, 2023
Co-hosts John Wells, Katie Mullaly, and Lynn Ware Peek look back at some of their favorite interviews from the year:Can quantum computing solve humanity's biggest problemsTheoretical physicist Michio Kaku talks about his new book, “Quantum Supremacy: How The Quantum Computer Revolution Will Change Everything.” (0:57)Writer Paul Bogard explains impact of darkness on all forms of lifeWriter Paul Bogard discusses the importance of the night sky and the impact of darkness on all forms of life in his book "The E... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 55 minutes
The best of 2023!
Our picks for some of the best scientific interviews of the past 12 months (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 54 minutes
Our annual holiday question show
Questions ranging from moths to mustard, moonlight to migraines (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 27 minutes
Best of 2023, part 2: India lands on the moon; the orca uprising; birds make use of anti-bird spikes
What was your favorite science story of 2023? Was it the rise of orca-involved boat sinkings? Or maybe the successful landing of India’s Chandrayaan-3 mission at the moon’s south pole? This week, it’s the second and final part of our annual event about the best science stories of the year, with a roundup of some of the good news, animal news and all-around most important stories of 2023. Like how researchers discovered the high-tech material called graphene can also occur naturally…and did, deep in the... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-29
FQxI December 29, 2023 Podcast Episode
The Year in Physics Review 2023 Part 2 (@FQXi)
podcast image2023-Dec-29 • 35 minutes
Fresh Start: Stories about new beginnings
As we say goodbye to 2023 and ring in the New Year, this week’s classic episode is all about the novel. Part 1: Feeling isolated in her new job as a particle accelerator operator at Fermilab, Cindy Joe finds comfort in the friendship of her unconventional pet. This story originally aired on July 27, 2018 in an episode titled “Loneliness: Stories about finding friends”. Part 2: Actor Gail Thomas is invited to take part in a study testing mushrooms as treatment for depression in cancer survivors. This story o... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 54 minutes
SciFri Reads ‘The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2023’
Earlier this year, the SciFri Book Club met to reflect on our favorite stories from last year and the future of scientific discovery and journalism. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 28 minutes
Following in the footsteps of ancient humans
Roland Pease travels to South Africa to gain a deeper understanding of human origins (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 28 minutes
Finding Tunnels
The geophysics at work to locate tunnels. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 50 minutes
The Best of Unexpected Elements
Marnie Chesterton and Caroline Steel look back at some of the best bits of the show. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 11 minutes
A year in music science: wonder, volume and animals that groove
As 2023 comes to a close, Short Wave teamed up with our friends at All Things Considered to round up some of our favorite stories of the year — this time, about the science behind music. First, science correspondent Rob Stein talks to researchers (and Phish's Mike Gordon) about what happens to our brains on music. Then, All Things Considered host Juana Summers and investigations correspondent Sacha Pfeiffer share a study about why lead singers, like Jeff Beck, have gotten quieter over the years. And finally... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 27 minutes
Best of 2023, Killing the Skydancer: episode three, An Open Secret
In this special Age of Extinction mini-series from Science Weekly, which first aired in 2023, the Guardian’s biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, explores the illegal killing of birds of prey on grouse moors (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-28 • 31 minutes
BOOK LAUNCH - Mauricio Suárez on 'Inference and Representation'
Today on the podcast, Mauricio Suárez talks with Samara about his new book - Inference and Representation: A study in Modelling Science.Mauricio is Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, a life member at Clare Hall Cambridge and research associate at the London School of Economics. Mauricio has a long standing interest in the ways scientists represent the phenomena they study, in particular, through modelling, and his book seeks to answer the question: How sho... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-28
FQxI December 28, 2023 Podcast Episode
The Year in Physics Review 2023: Part 1 (@FQXi)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 118 minutes
Greg Lukianoff: : The Canceling of the American Mind. Free Speech and Academia
Greg Lukianoff is a First Amendment lawyer by training. During his education he began to see how, even among organizations ostensibly created to help protect free speech, how actual free speech was improperly being conflated with harassment or bullying. When he went to work as a legal director of the nascent Foundation for Individual Rights in Education in around 2000, he quickly discovered that in academia, the one place where free speech and open inquiry should be valued above all else, actual free spe... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 30 minutes
The Unseen World Of Seaweeds | Should 'Dark Fungi' Species Get Names?
In a conversation from 2023, an author celebrates the beautiful and underappreciated seaweeds shaping coastlines around the world. Also, scientists have recovered the DNA of thousands of new species of fungi from the environment, but they aren’t eligible for scientific names. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 45 minutes
The Nature Podcast highlights of 2023
The team select some of their favourite stories from the past 12 months. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 12 minutes
Podcasts of the Year: Talking to Animals using Artificial Intelligence
Advanced sensors and artificial intelligence could have us at the brink of interspecies communication Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 13 minutes
Life Could Be Different ... And Maybe Better?
Are people ever satisfied? Two social psychologists, Ethan Ludwin-Peery and Adam Mastroianni, fell down a research rabbit hole accidentally answering a version of this very question. After conducting several studies, the pair found that when asked how things could be different, people tend to give one kind of answer, regardless of how the question is asked or how good life felt when they were asked. Short Wave's Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber digs into the research—and how it might reveal a fundame... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 108 minutes
Alieology (YOUR HOST): an Ask-Me-Anything Goofy Hang
It’s like a whole episode of secrets. And your questions. And your podmom, Jarrett, hanging out in a guest room answering all kinds of inquiries. This week between the holidays I thought I’d take it easy and dip into the mail bag to explain my free-range childhood, the goth days, podcasting tips, favorite bugs, hair dye, yellow sweaters, episodes that have never aired, how I find my guests, how many hours each episode takes, and who our dog loves the most. Cozy up and let’s become goofy together. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-27 • 27 minutes
Best of 2023, Killing the Skydancer: episode two, The Perfect Crime
In this special Age of Extinction mini-series from Science Weekly, which first aired in August 2023, the Guardian’s biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, explores the murky world of the illegal killing of birds of prey on grouse moors, and asks why it is so difficult to solve these crimes. In episode two, Phoebe speaks to the people trying to protect these rare birds but, as she digs deeper, she encounters a surprising silence around the killing of a hen harrier’s chicks (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 30 minutes
How 'Panda Diplomacy' Led To Conservation Success
For decades, panda policy has guided conservation advancements. Now, pandas in the US are being returned to China. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 49 minutes
Searching for ALIENS with Sarah Rugheimer
Remastered from our interview in October 2021. In this otherworldly edition of Into the Impossible, I talk to renowned astrophysicist and astrobiologist Dr. Sarah Rugheimer about microscopic aliens, the Fermi paradox, the origin of life, the Drake equation, and much more! Dr. Rugheimer is a Glasstone Research Fellow and a Hugh Price Fellow at Jesus College Oxford. Her research interests are modeling the atmosphere and climate of extrasolar planets with a particular focus on atmospheric biosignatures in E... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 26 minutes
A Naked Gaming Christmas!
What are some of the best games around in the festive season? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 43 minutes
Quiet
Do you hear what I hear? Probably not, because in this episode, we're bringing things down several notches to learn about quiet. Does it have a scientific definition? Is it all just relative? Should crickets have podcasts? Join us as we (ok, maybe not so) quietly contemplate quiet. (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 22 minutes
Best of 2023: Killing the Skydancer episode one, Susie’s chicks
In this special Age of Extinction mini-series from Science Weekly, which first aired in August 2023, the Guardian’s biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, explores the illegal killing of birds of prey on grouse moors and asks why it is so difficult to solve these crimes. In episode one, Phoebe hears about the case of Susie, a hen harrier whose chicks were killed while being monitored on camera. As she starts to investigate the case, she hears from conservationist Ruth Tingay about why hen harriers are target... (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-26 • 28 minutes
CultureLab: The best books of 2023, from joyful escapism to sobering reads
Are you looking forward to catching up on some reading over the holiday season? Or perhaps you are on the prowl for book recommendations after receiving a few literary gift cards? If so, you are in luck – this episode is all about the books we think you’ll love to read.In this episode of CultureLab, culture and comment editor Alison Flood appears in her role as professional bookworm to share some of her favorite reads of the year. From a sobering story of life in the human-polluted ocean (narrated by a dolp... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 26 minutes
What's stopping us from exercising in older age?
James Gallagher tries to understand what holds us back from exercise as we age. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 16 minutes
Music’s Emotional Power Can Shape Memories—And Your Perception Of Time
Researchers used music to elicit different emotions, then looked at how shifts in emotion influenced participants’ memory formation. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 12 minutes
Why Deleting Carbon From the Atmosphere Is So Controversial
Delegates agreed on a historic climate deal at COP28. But without more ambition, humanity will have to rely ever more on a contentious strategy: carbon removal. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 41 minutes
740: Targeting Complex Sugars on Cell Surfaces to Treat Multiple Sclerosis and Cancer - Dr. Michael Demetriou
Dr. Michael Demetriou is Director of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Designated Comprehensive Care Clinic, Professor of Neurology, and Chief of the Division of Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology at the University of California, Irvine... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 13 minutes
This Holiday, Dig Into Some Of The Hilarious Science Of Christmas BMJs Past
Would you survive as a doctor in The Sims 4? What's an appropriate amount of free food to take from a public sample station before it's greedy? And how much do clock towers affect sleep? These are the types of questions answered in the Christmas issue of The BMJ — one of the journal's most highly anticipated issues each year. And we find out the answers in this very episode. So, sit back, relax and prepare to be amused by this ghost of Christmas Past (encore).Check out what's been published so far in the 20... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-25 • 54 minutes
Iron, Coal, Wood**
Maybe you don’t remember the days of the earliest coal-fired stoves. They changed domestic life, and that changed society. We take you back to that era, and to millennia prior when iron was first smelt, and even earlier, when axe-handles were first fashioned from wood, as we explore how three essential materials profoundly transformed society. We were once excited about coal’s promise to provide cheap energy, and how iron would lead to indestructible bridges, ships, and buildings. But they also caused some... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Dec-24 • 34 minutes
Nobel Laureate Donna Strickland: Experimental Physics Is Fun!
I had the pleasure of interviewing the one and only Donna Theo Strickland for our Think Like a Nobel Prize Winner series. Donna Theo Strickland is a renowned Canadian physicist widely recognized for her groundbreaking contributions to the field of pulsed lasers. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics in 2018 with her colleague Gérard Mourou for the practical implementation of chirped pulse amplification. In this fun discussion between two experimental physicists, we talked about the Nobel Prize, the ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-24 • 21 minutes
Science Extra: It's gettin' hot in here
It’s been a big year for environment news: records broken, a new El Nino, and dire forecasts for a hot summer.In this bonus episode, we’re diving deep into what happened in environment news in 2023, including ... the next frontiers of mining and potential environmental outcomes, possible good news about Amazon deforestation, and very worrying news about black swans. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-24
FQxI December 24, 2023 Podcast Episode
Is there a Theory of Everything? Great Mysteries of Physics Part 6 (@FQXi)
podcast image2023-Dec-23 • 54 minutes
The bigger Australian story - Odyssey down under
Historian Tom Griffiths says a new kind of history is called for in the year of the Voice referendum. He wrote his essay Odyssey down under for Inside Story. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-23 • 25 minutes
Smologies #34: PENGUINS with Tom Hart
Do penguins have flippers or wings? What’s up with pebble gifts? Are they squishy or dense? And why why why are they so cute? We sit down with renowned penguinologist Dr. Tom Hart, a research fellow with Oxford University, to chat all about life on Antarctica, penguin cities, icy cuddle parties, ocean camouflage and how to become a flightless bird. Dr. Hart is your new favorite penguinologist. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-23
The Skeptics Guide #963 - Dec 23 2023
Special Guest: Eli Bosnick; Quickie with Steve: Iron Spheres are Terrestrial; News Items: Lunar Roads, Misinformation vs Disinformation, Gravitational Waves As Fast As Light, Fluoride and IQ, Dark GPT; Skeptics and Paranormal Experiences; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 36 minutes
2023 Year-End Extravaganza, Part 1
It’s Part 1 of CrowdScience’s year-end extravaganza! Say hello to some familiar faces. (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 18 minutes
Top Science News Stories of 2023 | Solar Panels In Historic Cape Cod
This year brought us new vaccines, a highly anticipated asteroid sample, and an update to T. rex’s smile. Also, local historic committees in Cape Cod are blocking some residents from installing solar panels, citing visual impact on the neighborhood. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 40 minutes
The hunt for a quantum phantom, and making bitcoin legal tender
Seeking the Majorana fermion particle, and a look at El Salvador’s adoption of cryptocurrency First up on the show this week, freelance science journalist Zack Savitsky and host Sarah Crespi discuss the hunt for the elusive Majorana fermion particle, and why so many think it might be the best bet for a functional quantum computer. We also hear the mysterious tale of the disappearance of the particle’s namesake, Italian physicist Ettore Majorana. Next in the episode, what happens when you make a cryptocu... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 38 minutes
How AI works is often a mystery — that's a problem
The inner workings of many AIs are mysterious, but with increasing use of such technologies in high stakes scenarios, how should their inscrutable nature be dealt with? (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 100 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (April 26, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Can you discuss the history of programming languages? Is programming always associated with computers or were there other forms of programming? - Didn't IBM have its own extremely labor intensive "telegraph" system? - How do you think Ada Lovelace would view the current age of AI? ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 60 minutes
Numbers
First aired back in 2009, this episode is all about one thing, or rather a collection of things. Whether you love 'em or hate 'em, chances are you rely on numbers every day of your life. Where do they come from, and what do they really do for us? This hour: stories of how numbers confuse us, connect us, and even reveal secrets about us. (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 91 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [April 21, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: If you ask the AI the exact same question several times, will it give the same answer or will it change it based on some random function? Or do the neurons change during self-learning and change the answer? - Do you think at any point we will create an AI factory? Like specialized AI algorithms ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 10 minutes
How to Avoid Holiday Hangovers
The holidays are a time for indulgence, but there are ways to drink alcohol without suffering the painful effects. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 9 minutes
Snow Sports Are Getting More Dangerous
Extreme conditions caused by climate change are making winter sports more risky. From Colorado to Washington, that’s also making mountain rescue missions even more perilous. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 14 minutes
LED Lights Make You Sick? We Found Out What Causes It
LED light bulbs are the future. They're better for the environment and the pocket book. But for some people, certain LEDs lights — particularly holiday lights—are also a problem. They flicker in a way that causes headaches, nausea and other discomfort. Today, we visit the "Flicker Queen" to learn why LEDs flicker — and what you can do about it.Wondering about other quirks of lighting and engineering? Email us at [email protected] – we might cover it on a future episode!Learn more about sponsor message choic... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 29 minutes
Naked Christmas: Presents, plonk and a pliosaur
Plus, could cola clear the food stuck in your throat? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 54 minutes
Seasonal science with reindeer, special stars and miracle babies…
Reindeer and arctic seals have complex nasal passages to keep them warm; Reindeer can eat and sleep at the same time; This penguin species sleeps by taking about 14,000 micronaps each day; ‘Naked’ stars are stripped by their partners before they explode; Miracle babies in bags: How close are we to an artificial womb?; Why don’t any deer's legs freeze? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 27 minutes
Best of 2023, part 1: Euclid telescope’s big year; AI is everywhere (for better and worse); why doctors searched their poo for tiny toys
#229Your hands are heavier than you think. Beer goggles aren’t real. And many water utilities in the United Kingdom still use dowsing to find leaks in pipes. It’s the first part of our annual best-in-show of science stories from the year, with a roundup of some of the funniest and most futuristic-feeling headlines from 2023. Like the Euclid Space Telescope’s successful start to a mission that will map the sky and offer new insights into dark matter and the very structure of the universe. And a half-syn... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-22 • 34 minutes
A Child Is Born: Stories about labor and delivery
Happy Holidays! In this week’s classic episode, both stories explore the miracle of life. Part 1: An expert in oxytocin, the hormone released during birth, Bianca Jones Marlin is determined to have a natural birth — even as the hours of labor add up… This story originally aired on Nov. 9, 2018, in an episode titled “Pregnancy”. Part 2: Ed Pritchard inadvertently becomes a leatherback turtle midwife during his first field job. This story originally aired on Mar. 4, 2022, in an episode titled “Miracle of Life... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 18 minutes
Pennsylvania Drug Laws May Limit Syringe Services | These Romance Novels Represent Black Women In Science
Pennsylvania will receive more than $1.6 billion in opioid settlement funds. But state laws may prevent that money from going to syringe services. Also, Dr. Carlotta Berry writes romance novels about Black women in the sciences to encourage more people to go into the field. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 31 minutes
Volcanic eruption lights up Iceland
Volcanic eruption lights up Iceland. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | December 21, 2023
Renowned cat behavior scientist Dr. Sarah Brown has been in the forefront of research on cat communication, studying how cats interact not only with each other, but with humans.Then, is it reasonable and responsible to talk about inhabiting other planets? Zack Weinersmith explores this question in his serious, yet hilarious, book called "A City on Mars: Can we settle space, should we settle space, and have we really thought this through?" (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 28 minutes
UK Covid-19 Inquiry
The key takeaways from the evidence of top scientists this week at the Covid inquiry. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 11 minutes
Energy Drinks Are Out of Control
Highly caffeinated drinks have become a cultural staple. But following a death allegedly related to Panera Bread’s Charged Lemonade, has our collective obsession with energy drinks become unsafe? Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 50 minutes
A very dark day
The solstice takes us on a journey through darkness and light. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 14 minutes
Once A Satirical Conspiracy, Bird Drones Could Soon Be A Reality
Millions of people in the U.S. are bird watchers. But a couple of years ago a satirical conspiracy theory gained popularity because of an absurd claim: That those birds were also watching people. Now, rather than being the stuff of internet memes, some engineers are, in fact, trying to reverse engineer how birds fly to eventually take what they learn to create more efficient bird-like drones. Today on the show, host Regina G. Barber talks to reporter Anil Oza about how scientists are using real birds to mak... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 32 minutes
S2 Ep 12 - Highlights from the 2023 AAHPSSS Conference
Welcome to the final episode of Season 2 (with a bonus ep coming next week!). We take a moment in this episode to reflect on the first year of the HPS podcast.Just a few weeks ago Sam and Indi attended the biannual AAHPSSS (The Australasian Association for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Science) conference at the University of Sydney. In this episode they reflect on their time at the conference, featuring interviews with various conference attendees and presenters.HPS Scholars featured in thi... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-21 • 20 minutes
All the buzz and no hangover? The next generation of alcohol-free drinks
Christmas can feel like one long hangover – but a new generation of alcohol-free alternatives is emerging which claim to offer the fun of alcohol without the painful morning-after. Madeleine Finlay, Ian Sample and Hannah Devlin investigate (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 18 minutes
Flame Retardant From Cocoa Pod Husks | The Oozy Physics Of Oobleck
Scientists are using leftover cocoa pod husks to extract lignin, an organic polymer that can become flame retardant, foam, or a straw. Also, Non-Newtonian fluids challenge our ideas of what’s liquid and what’s solid. We now have a better understanding of how they work. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 45 minutes
The Nature Podcast Festive Spectacular 2023
In this episode:01:55 “Oh GPT”In the first of our festive songs, we pay homage to LLMs, the generative AI chat bots which have taken 2023 by storm. 05:32 Twenty questionsIn this year’s festive game, our competitors try to guess some of the biggest science stories of the year, solely by asking yes/no questions.24:40 “Warming night”In our final song this year, we take stock as 2023 is named the hottest year since records began. As worsening climate change continues to threaten lives, can scienc... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 12 minutes
Podcasts of the Year: What Better Gift for the Holidays Than a Monstrous Mystery?
We’re looking back at 2023 for our favorite podcast shows and one about the largest bird to ever fly the skies just flew to the top of the list. | Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 13 minutes
Selfish, Virus-Like DNA Can Carry Genes Between Species
Genetic elements called Mavericks that have some viral features could be responsible for the large-scale smuggling of DNA between species. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is “Clover” by Vibe Mountain. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 12 minutes
You Know It’s a Placebo. So Why Does It Still Work?
As researchers try to make sense of “open-label” placebos—fake drugs that proudly announce their fakeness—the mysterious effect is starting to show up beyond the world of medicine. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 21 minutes
Something weird near the beginning of time
The James Webb Space Telescope launched two years ago, giving scientists a new view into the early universe. Now, it's revealed a big new cosmic mystery. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choic... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 14 minutes
Climate Talks Call For A Transition Away From Fossil Fuels. Is That Enough?
For the first time in its history, the United Nations climate conference concluded with a call to transition away from fossil fuels. But not all of the nearly 200 countries present at the meeting, known as COP28, were happy with the final agreement. Critics of the agreement had instead called for a clear path towards phasing out fossil fuels and pointed out a "litany of loopholes" in the final text. This episode, we look at the tensions and breakthroughs of the conference — and how far behind we are in limi... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 57 minutes
The Monkeys meet The Sky at Night
Brian Cox and Robin Ince team up with the Sky at Night team for some backyard astronomy. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 40 minutes
Jonathan B. Losos, "The Cat's Meow: How Cats Evolved from the Savanna to Your Sofa" (Viking, 2023)
The domestic cat--your cat--has, from its evolutionary origins in Africa, been transformed in comparatively little time into one of the most successful and diverse species on the planet. Jonathan Losos, writing as both a scientist and a cat lover, explores how researchers today are unraveling the secrets of the cat, past and present, using all the tools of modern technology, from GPS tracking (you'd be amazed where those backyard cats roam) and genomics (what is your so-called Siamese cat . . . really?) to ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-20 • 76 minutes
Lemurology (LEMURS) with Lydia Greene
How did these tree-hopping furry angels evolve to be the cutest thing in the world, objectively speaking? They have saucer eyes, wet noses, chunky tails, toe claws, matriarchies, a feature film starring role, and all the mystery of 100 species spending millions of years on a remote island. Wildlife ecologist and official Lemurologist Dr. Lydia Greene finally joins me to bust flim-flam straight out of the gate and talk about Madagascar, aye-ayes, ring tailed lemurs, Zoboomafoo, evolutionary biology, hiberna... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 18 minutes
The Military’s Carbon Footprint Is A Hidden Cost Of Defense
A recent report estimates that climate reparations of the US and UK militaries would reach $111 billion. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 45 minutes
How Will AI Change Science? | Brian Keating & Cassandra Vieten
Remastered from my discussion with Cassandra Vieten at the AI & Your Life - The Essential Summit. Will AI bring us closer to the truth or further away from it? Is it changing the way we do science? And will it eventually replace teachers and professors? I had the pleasure of discussing this with Dr. Cassandra Vieten at the AI & Your Life - The Essential Summit. The AI & Your Life - The Essential Summit aimed to provide a comprehensive guide to artificial intelligence that avoids the hype and gives you t... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 8 minutes
Oh Good, Hurricanes Are Now Made of Microplastics
When Hurricane Larry made landfall two years ago, it dropped over 100,000 microplastics per square meter of land per day. It’s another ominous sign of how plasticized the environment has become. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 37 minutes
CultureLab: A duet between music and the natural world with Erland Cooper’s playful compositions
Composer Erland Cooper is known for playful, innovative, experimental projects. For example, he buried the only audio copy of a 2021 composition – then left treasure hunt clues for people to try to find it. Which one couple, eventually, did.In this episode of CultureLab, Cooper talks to writer Arwa Haider about his newest album, Folded Landscapes, where he is deep in conversation with the environment and our changing climate. The movements of the piece were recorded with the Scottish Ensemble chamber orches... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 20 minutes
Can machines ever be like us? Prof Michael Wooldridge on the future of AI
In the year that AI was supercharged by Chat GPT, Prof Michael Wooldridge is giving the Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on the truth about AI. Madeleine Finlay hears from him and science correspondent Nicola Davis in this Science Weekly Christmas special (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-19 • 31 minutes
Titans of Science: Mark Slack
We speak with a pioneer of surgical robotics... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 27 minutes
When does sitting become bad for health?
James Gallagher delves into the science to find out exactly how much sitting is too much? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 20 minutes
High Energy Cosmic Ray Detected | These Penguins Are The Masters Of Microsleeping
While they’re nesting, chinstrap penguins take thousands of seconds-long naps a day. It adds up. Also, powerful cosmic rays like the “Amaterasu” particle are typically caused by celestial events. This one’s source is unknown. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 12 minutes
50 years of DNA cloning
Stanley Cohen reflects on the 50-year legacy of a classic PNAS paper on recombinant DNA. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 56 minutes
Holiday Message: Reflections on Immortality
A holiday reflection on the physics and humanity of living forever. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 10 minutes
Elon Musk’s New Monkey Death Claims Spur Fresh Demands for an SEC Investigation
An animal welfare advocacy group claims in a letter to the SEC that Elon Musk again made statements about the health of Neuralink test subjects that may have misled investors. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 38 minutes
739: Studying Cell Division to Better Understand and Improve Cancer Therapies - Dr. Beth Weaver
Dr. Beth Weaver is a Professor in the Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology and the Department of Oncology/McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. She is co-Leader of... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 13 minutes
Want To Be Greener This Holiday Season? Try Composting!
Does thinking about the trajectory of the climate make you have a panic spiral? If so, we have the perfect podcast for you: The Anti-Dread Climate Podcast from NPR member station KCRW. The whole conceit of the show is to move away from climate anxiety and into incremental ways you can better the planet. Today, Caleigh Wells, one of the hosts of the show, helps Regina do just that by talking through some quick tips for being greener this holiday season and then walking through how to compost year-round. If y... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 16 minutes
Are Orca Whales Friends or Foes?
The stories we tell about orcas might say more about us than about them Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-18 • 54 minutes
The Ocean's Genome
After helping to sequence the human genome more than twenty years ago, biochemist Craig Venter seemed to recede from the public eye. But he hadn’t retired. He had gone to sea and taken his revolutionary sequencing tools with him. We chatted with him about his multi-year voyage aboard the research vessel Sorcerer II, its parallels to Darwin’s voyage, and the surprising discoveries his team made about the sheer number and diversity of marine microbes and their roles in ocean ecosystems. Guests: Craig Venter -... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Dec-17 • 12 minutes
Satellites, citizen science and space
What role could you play in the fight against space junk?This week, Mars shares her thoughts on the role of citizen science in space research. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2023-Dec-17 • 23 minutes
Science of cannabis: #3 The weed of the future
Cannabis is one of the oldest products of human cultivation. And as it becomes increasingly legal for medical and recreational use around the world, its popularity is growing as well – even as researchers, limited by government prohibitions of the past and present, race to understand how the hundreds of chemicals in pot actually affect us and what the benefits and risks may be.But the object of all this research is itself changing: cannabis consumed today is more than ten times more potent than pot of the p... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-16 • 54 minutes
Transitions
At the age of 87, award-winning scientist, environmentalist and broadcaster David Suzuki has stepped down as host of CBC TV’s The Nature of Things. In May, the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre in Toronto hosted an evening with David Suzuki - Reflections of an Elder. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-16
The Skeptics Guide #962 - Dec 16 2023
Interview with Jessica McCabe of How to ADHD; Special Segment: Zelle Scams; News Items: Neuromorphic Supercomputer, Sodium Ion Batteries, Lab Grown Coffee, Lunar Anthropocene; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Nazi Synthetic Fuel; Who Said That; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Dec-16 • 38 minutes
Toward Equity in Science: A Discussion with Cassidy Sugimoto and Vincent Larivière
Listen to this interview of Cassidy Sugimoto and Vincent Larivière, co-authors of Equity for Women in Science: Dismantling Systemic Barriers to Advancement (Harvard UP, 2023). Cassidy is Professor and Tom and Marie Patton School Chair in the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is also President of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics. Vincent is Professor of Information Science at Université de Montréal, where he also serves as Associate Vice-Presiden... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-16 • 44 minutes
Lawrence Sherman and Dennis Plies, "Every Brain Needs Music: The Neuroscience of Making and Listening to Music" (Columbia UP, 2023)
Whenever a person engages with music--when a piano student practices a scale, a jazz saxophonist riffs on a melody, a teenager sobs to a sad song, or a wedding guest gets down on the dance floor--countless neurons are firing. Playing an instrument requires all of the resources of the nervous system, including cognitive, sensory, and motor functions. Composition and improvisation are remarkable demonstrations of the brain's capacity for creativity. Something as seemingly simple as listening to a tune involve... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 182 minutes
Scott Aaronson: From Quantum Computing to AI Safety
Scott Aaronson is one of the deepest mathematical intellects I have known since, say Ed Witten—the only physicist to have won the prestigious Fields Medal in Mathematics. While Ed is a string theorist, Scott decided to devote his mathematical efforts to the field of computer science, and as a theoretical computer scientist has played a major role in the development of algorithms that have pushed forward the field of quantum computing, and helped address several thorny issues that hamper our ability to crea... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 27 minutes
Are seeds alive?
How come a seed can do nothing for months, or even years, before bursting into life? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 23 minutes
COP28 Climate Conference Ends | Why Are Some People Affected By Seasonal Affective Disorder?
COP28 ended with an agreement calling for a transition away from fossil fuels, but critics say it’s too little, too late. Also, some people are more prone to develop seasonal depression. A researcher discusses the most effective treatments. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 35 minutes
Navigating planets, plays and prejudice — a conversation with Aomawa Shields
The astronomer joins us to talk about her memoir Life on Other Planets. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 88 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (April 19, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include: If you have a goal with many clearly defined milestones that are dependent on each other in order to get to the finish line, how do you generally approach that? - Do you have a bucket list? What are some things you hope you see or experience in life that you haven't yet? - What... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 25 minutes
Weekly: New climate deal at COP28; AI mathematician; a problem with the universe
#228We have a new, landmark climate deal, signalling the beginning of the end of fossil fuels. But even as the announcement at COP28 includes commitments for some of the most pressing issues, including giving money to countries most affected by climate change and setting goals for more renewables, some critics aren’t satisfied. With weak language around  “transitioning away from” fossil fuels, does the deal go far enough?The first ever scientific discoveries have been made by an artificial intelligence... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 24 minutes
Death Interrupted
As a lifeguard, a paramedic, and then an ER doctor, Blair Bigham found his calling: saving lives. But when he started to work in the ICU, he slowly realized that sometimes keeping people (and their hopes) alive just prolongs the suffering. He wrote a book arguing that a too-late death is just as bad as a too-early one, and that physicians and the public alike need to get better at accepting the inevitability of death sooner. As the book hit the bestseller list, Blair’s own father got diagnosed with a deadl... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 82 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [April 14, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include:I've been hearing of AI and LLMs in context of an "arms race" between countries. What do LLMs look like scaled up in that manner (vs. a global LLM)? - What about model interoperability? Where are we at on the research for that? Do we need to develop new and more sophisticated mathematic... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 72 minutes
Gad Saad: How to Stay Resilient and Happy After the October 7 Massacre
The last two months have been nothing short of terrifying for the Jewish community. How can we stay happy and resilient in times like these? Is it even possible or reasonable? Here to answer this question is none other than the happiness expert himself, Dr. Gad Saad! Dr. Saad is a marketing genius renowned for applying evolutionary psychology to consumer behavior. He is a professor at Concordia University, a behavioral scientist, and a bestselling author. In our hopeful interview, we discuss his latest b... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 9 minutes
How Dr. Clara Nellist Collides Art and Science
This particle physicist, science communicator, and member of the team who uncovered the Higgs Boson wants everyone to know that art and science aren’t mutually exclusive. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 10 minutes
Turns Out Undersea Kelp Forests Are Crucial to Salmon
The beloved fish that feed orcas and humans depend on kelp forests’ unique habitat. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 9 minutes
More Plant And Fungi Emojis, Please!
A team of conservation biologists from Italy recently found that current emoji options are sorely lacking when it comes to life outside of vertebrates in the animal kingdom. Sure, there are multiple dog and cat options to choose from. But when it comes to fungi, for example, the choices are limited ... to one. The study was published this week in the journal iScience argues that our emoji lexicon is in dire need of some biodiversity – which could have a real impact on the way people communicate about conse... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 115 minutes
How to Use Emojis For Science!
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Interview W/Trace Dominguez, Mapping Mouse Brains, Culture Coffee, Crusty Protection, What Big Eyes, Emoji Diversity, Geminids, Free Range Cats, Particle Physics, VR For Mice, Brain Computing, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 32 minutes
The pregnancy sickness protein, and COP controversy
Plus, the sounds of the Mozambican and Tanzanian bush... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 54 minutes
The Quirks & Quarks holiday book show!
How studying long-lived animals might give us the key to longer, healthier life; Looking deep inside planets, under our feet and out there in space; Honouring the overlooked legacies of women in science. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Dec-15 • 28 minutes
DIY: Stories about doing science oneself
Science doesn’t always have to be in fancy labs with million dollar equipment and shiny beakers. Sometimes, science can be a bit more DIY. In this week’s episode, our storytellers take a hands-on approach to scientific discovery. Part 1: Brittany Ross gets inspired when her high school physics teacher assigns a physics video project where she has to demonstrate a law of physics out in the real world. Part 2: Nothing will get in the way of Greg Pandelis’s dreams to be a zoologist, except maybe a giant cliff.... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 34 minutes
A Celebration Of The 2023 Christmas Bird Count
Birders across the world band together to record the number of birds in their communities from Dec 14 to Jan 5. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 31 minutes
The science of morning sickness
A team of researchers have uncovered what may cause morning sickness in pregnancy. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 32 minutes
Science’s Breakthrough of the Year, and tracing poached pangolins
Top science from 2023, and a genetic tool for pangolin conservation First up this week, it’s Science’s Breakthrough of the Year with producer Meagan Cantwell and News Editor Greg Miller. But before they get to the tippy-top science find, a few of this year’s runners-up. See all our end-of-year coverage here. Next, Jen Tinsman, a forensic wildlife biologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss using genetics to track the illegal pangolin trade. These scaly little guys... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 28 minutes
Iceland Volcano
How scientists are monitoring Fagradalsfjall volcano and keeping people safe. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 8 minutes
Inhaled vaccine prevents COVID in monkeys
New study suggests boosters delivered to the lungs could stop infection. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | December 14, 2023
Evans & Sutherland, the world's first computer graphics company, talks about their ground-breaking history and the cutting edge technologies in planetarium dome projections they continue to develop.Mary Hall, a Professor and the Director of the Kahlert School of Computing at the University of Utah shares the history of the computer science program and the companies and technologies that came from it like Pixar, Atari, and Adobe. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 6 minutes
A Brilliant COP Agreement? It Depends Who You Ask
The agreement at COP28 satisfies no-one. But it’s probably the best that countries could have hoped for. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 50 minutes
An exploration of empathy
On the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration Of Human Rights, we look at empathy (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 20 minutes
Emma Unson Rotor: The Filipina Physicist Who Helped Develop a Top Secret Weapon
Emma Unson Rotor worked on the proximity fuze, a groundbreaking piece of World War II weapons technology that the U.S. War Department called “second only to the atomic bomb.” (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 14 minutes
When AI Goes Wrong
Artificial intelligence is increasingly being used throughout the world to predict the future. Banks use it to predict whether customers will pay back a loan, hospitals use it to predict which patients are at greatest risk of disease and auto insurance companies use it determine rates by predicting how likely a customer is to get in an accident. But issues like data leakage and sampling bias can cause AI to give faulty predictions, to sometimes disastrous effects. That's what we get into today: the hazards ... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-14 • 35 minutes
S2 Ep 11 - Hasok Chang on Epistemic Iteration
"We get this instinct that true science must start from a firm foundation. Time and again, that's what I see NOT happening in the practice of science. We start from where we stand. The foundation is never indubitable, the foundation is provisional."Our very special guest today is Hasok Chang. Hasok is Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and his research focuses on 'taking the most obvious items of scientific knowledge and asking how we came to kn... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 17 minutes
Surfing Particles Can Supercharge Northern Lights
In a conversation from 2021, Ira and a researcher discuss how the physics of plasma, particles, and the Earth’s magnetic field combine in dazzling displays of aurora. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 14 minutes
Cop28: what just happened?
A deal has been announced at Cop28 in Dubai, and depending who you talk to, it’s either a historic achievement or a weak and ineffectual agreement full of loopholes. Ian Sample speaks to the Guardian environment editor Damian Carrington, who explains what the deal on fossil fuels will mean in practice, how small island states have responded, and whether it will help us stay within the crucial limit of 1.5C of global heating (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 88 minutes
Quasithanatology (NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCES) with Bruce Greyson
Tunnels of light. Unconditional love. Visions of dead aunts. And a lot of questions. What happens when you die… or almost die? GOOD QUESTION. Dr. Bruce Greyson chats about about brain activity during death, accounts from patients, out of body experiments, time dilation, the Swiss Alps, deathbed visions, accidental morgue visits, neurotransmitters, party drugs, religion vs. spirituality, and what matters most in life. As a world-renowned and respected psychiatrist and neurobiologist, he’s sought out answers... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 26 minutes
Cat parasite Toxoplasma tricked to grow in a dish
Cat-only life-cycle stage cultured in vitro, and the mysterious giant proteins that might turn bacteria into killers. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 70 minutes
Avi Loeb Strikes Back!
Today, Avi Loeb and I talk about the hottest topics in astronomy! We discuss interstellar travel, the Galileo Project expedition to the Pacific Ocean to retrieve spherules of the first recognized interstellar meteor, IM1, and alien life. Avi is a professor of science at Harvard University, theoretical physicist, astrophysicist, and cosmologist. He is also a bestselling author and a dear friend of mine. Tune in! — Additional resources: 📢 Ownership of your health starts with AG1. Try AG1 and get a FREE ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 12 minutes
Here’s Scientific Proof Your Cat Will Eat Almost Anything
Free-ranging domestic cats eat over 2,000 animal species across the globe, including hundreds at risk of extinction. It’s a problem with no easy solution. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 20 minutes
The tallest mountains on Earth are ... underground?
An expedition to Antarctica. Strange seismic readings. Clues to uncover a hidden part of our planet. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 9 minutes
Researchers Just Created the World's First Permafrost Atlas of the Entire Arctic
The Arctic Permafrost Atlas, which took years to create, is both beautiful and sobering, given the pace of climate change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 14 minutes
Why it's so hard to resist holiday sales (and how to try)
Malls are designed to overwhelm our brains. Add the stress of holiday shopping, and a quick trip to pick up presents could turn into an hours-long shopping spree thanks to all the ways stores use research from fields like consumer neuroscience and neuromarketing to entice you. Retailers create urgency and scarcity to push you to give into the emotional part of your brain, motivated by the release of dopamine. But we've got your back! With the help of NPR business correspondent Alina Selyukh, we get into the... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-13 • 42 minutes
Jo Brand's Quantum World
Brian Cox and Robin Ince are challenged by Jo Brand to explain quantum physics. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 33 minutes
The (Not So) Easy Guide To Getting To Space
In a new book, astronaut Mike Massimino reflects on his time in space, and what it taught him about succeeding on Earth. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 50 minutes
Putting the Mouth Back into the Body
A look at the evidence that links the health of our mouths with the rest of our bodies. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 11 minutes
This Pill Tracks Your Vitals From the Inside
An ingestible “digital pill” that measures heart rate and breathing from inside the stomach could detect the warning signs of sleep apnea, cardiac distress, and even opioid overdoses. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 33 minutes
Titans of Science: Chris Hadfield
The story of the former commander of the International Space Station (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 45 minutes
Oil
Oil: it's a ubiquitous substance humans have been relying on for longer than you might think. We cook with it, we moisturize with it, we run machines with it - it keeps slipping into places we least expect to find it, for good and for ill... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 18 minutes
The incredible world of animal perception, and what it can teach us
Ian Sample meets Ed Yong, who recently won 2023’s Royal Society book prize for An Immense World, which delves into the incredible world of animal senses. From colours and sounds beyond our perception, to the weird and wonderful ways that animals grow new ears and experience smell, Ed explains why understanding how animals perceive the world can transform our own experience of life on Earth (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-12 • 16 minutes
CultureLab: The Royal Flying Doctors - Saving lives in the Australian outback
The Australian outback is vast and the population is really spread out. This makes getting access to emergency healthcare incredibly challenging, as you may be a thousand kilometres or more from the nearest major hospital. The solution? Australia’s Royal Flying Doctor Service – one of the largest aeromedical organisations in the world, and, at nearly 100 years old, the first of its kind.In this bonus episode of the podcast, Australia reporter Alice Klein speaks to two RFDS team members about some of their i... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 27 minutes
Tooth and Claw: Cheetahs
The fastest land animal in the world – Adam Hart investigates the cheetah! (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 18 minutes
The Women Astronomers Who Captured the Stars
In a conversation from 2016, Ira and Dava Sobel discuss a team of women astronomers at the Harvard College Observatory who worked to classify the stars at the beginning of the 20th century. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 79 minutes
259 | Adam Frank on What Aliens Might Be Like
I talk with astrophysicist Adam Frank about what extraterrestrial life might be like. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 52 minutes
Peter Diamandis: Are We Moving Too Fast With AI?!
Remastered from our interview at the AI & Your Life - The Essential Summit. In November, I had the privilege of interviewing Peter Diamandis at the AI & Your Life - The Essential Summit, which aimed to provide a comprehensive guide to artificial intelligence that avoids the hype and gives you practical knowledge you can apply to your everyday life. Peter is a serial entrepreneur, futurist, technologist, New York Times Bestselling Author, and the founder of over 25 companies. He was recently named one of ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 7 minutes
The First Crispr Medicine Is Now Approved in the US
The one-time gene editing fix is meant to halt debilitating pain crises for sickle cell patients, who formerly could only be cured with a risky stem cell transplant. Read the full story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 25 minutes
Smologies #33: SCORPIONS with Lauren Esposito
Scorpions: the victims of undue shade. A handful of people on planet Earth have a PhD in scorpions and Dr. Lauren Esposito is one of them. She spills the beans on how venom works, what's up with the blacklight glow effect, how dangerous they *really* are, what all the movies get wrong, the best names for scorpions, where she's traveled to look under rocks, where a scorpion's butt is, if scorpions dance (SPOILER: YES), what good mothers they are, and how big they used to be millions of years ago. Get this on... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 50 minutes
738: Combining Geology and Microbiology to Investigate Modern and Ancient Microbes - Dr. Magdalena Osburn
Dr. Magdalena Osburn is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Northwestern University. Maggie's research brings together microbiology and geology to understand biological activity in different environments in the... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 14 minutes
How Glaciers Move — And Affect Sea Level Rise
Glaciers like the ones in Greenland are melting due to climate change, causing global sea levels to rise. That we know. But these glaciers are also moving. What we don't know is just how these two processes – melting and movement – interact and ultimately impact how quickly sea levels will rise. This encore episode, Jessica Mejía, a postdoctoral researcher in glaciology at the University of Buffalo, explains what it's like to live on a glacier for a month and what her research could mean for coastal communi... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 56 minutes
Skeptic Check: Naomi Klein
Our information age is increasingly the disinformation age. The spread of lies and conspiracy theories has created competing experiences of reality. Facts are often useless for changing minds or even making compelling arguments. In this episode, author Naomi Klein and science philosopher Lee McIntyre discuss why the goal – not simply the byproduct - of spreading disinformation is to polarize society. They also offer ideas about how we might find our way back to a shared objective truth. Guests: Naomi Kle... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Dec-11 • 9 minutes
A New Type of Heart Disease is on the Rise
Problems with the heart, kidneys and metabolic health are all connected Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-10 • 67 minutes
Philip Goff, "Why? The Purpose of the Universe" (Oxford UP, 2023)
Does the universe have a purpose? If it does, how is this connected to the meaningfulness that we seek in our lives? In Why? The Purpose of the Universe (Oxford University Press, 2023), Philip Goff argues for cosmic purposivism, the idea that the universe does have a purpose – although this is not because there is an all-powerful God who provides it with one. Instead, Goff argues, fundamental physics provides us with reason to think it is probable there is a cosmic purpose – and, moreover, the best explanat... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-10 • 11 minutes
What should rewilding look like in Australia?
Scientists have lots of different ideas about how to conserve our native species. One of these ways is rewilding. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2023-Dec-10 • 24 minutes
Science of cannabis: #2 The anatomy of a high
Human beings have cultivated cannabis for thousands of years. We have been using it for its euphoric effects for at least several thousand. And as prohibition in the United States and other nations gives way to legal, recreational use, more people are picking up pot for help with sleep, pain, or simple relaxation.But as medical and recreational use become more popular and increasingly accessible, what’s actually going on inside your body and brain when you imbibe? Cannabinoids, the chemicals in cannabis, tr... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-09 • 54 minutes
The Future Is Now
Carbon dioxide emissions continue to rise. Antarctic ice shelves melt and the Amazon burns. Bob McDonald says the future is now. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-09
The Skeptics Guide #961 - Dec 9 2023
Quickie with Bob: Ceramic Storage; News Items: Quantum Gravity, X-Prize for Health Span, ECT Effects on the Brain, Building New Materials with AI and Robots; From Tik Tok: Electric Car Without Charging; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 25 minutes
Quercetin May Cause Red Wine Headaches | Worsening Wildfires Are Undoing Air Quality Progress
A new theory pins the throbbing pain of a red wine headache on quercetin, an antioxidant in grape skins. Plus, wildfires in the Western US have not only lowered air quality, but led to increased deaths between 2000 and 2020. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 26 minutes
Where does our fat go when we exercise?
What happens to the fat in our bodies when we exercise? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 26 minutes
Weekly: IBM’s powerful new quantum computers; climate wins and flops at COP28; our sweet partnership with honeyguide birds
#227Quantum computing researchers at IBM have stepped up the power of their devices by a huge amount. The company’s new device Condor has more than doubled the number of quantum bits of its previous record-breaking machine, which was released just last year. This massive increase in computational power is just one of the company’s latest achievements. It has also announced Heron, a smaller quantum computer but one that’s less error-prone – and therefore more useful – than any IBM has made.We’ve seen a lot o... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 64 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (April 12, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Do you think it will be possible to recreate historical figures as bots to interact with and get their perspective on current research areas? - Why do many great mathematicians complete their most influential work in their early 20s? - Does "prompting" (as for LLMs) have some histo... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 21 minutes
A 4-Track Mind
In this short episode that first aired in 2011, a neurologist issues a dare to a ragtime piano player and a famous conductor. When the two men face off in an fMRI machine, the challenge is so unimaginably difficult that one man instantly gives up. But the other achieves a musical feat that ought to be impossible. Reporter Jessica Benko went to Michigan to visit Bob Milne, one of the best ragtime piano players in the world, and a preternaturally talented musician. Usually, Bob sticks to playing piano for sma... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 68 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [April 7, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include:With the rise of AI, what will happen to the world of education? - Will we able to provide basic things to everyone with the use of only machines (specifically food, water and shelter)? At that point, will jobs be obsolete or not? - Are we about to reach a post-truth world due to AI-enabled misin... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 10 minutes
AI Can Now Read Your Cat's Pain
Thanks to researchers, new AI tech is delving into feline feelings to see when cats could need medical help. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 56 minutes
What Happened AFTER the Big Bang? Bruce Partridge
What happened after the Big Bang? To answer this question, I invited a true pioneer in the field of cosmic microwave background, Bruce Partridge! Bruce Partridge is an emeritus professor of astronomy in the science department at Haverford College. He has served as an Education Officer of the American Astronomical Society, president of the Commission on Cosmology, International Astronomical Union, and President of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. His research interests lie in the intersection of c... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 9 minutes
Don’t Worry, It’s Just ‘Fire Ice’
Methane hydrate is an ice-like substance you can set on fire. Now scientists have found that more of it may be in danger of melting—and releasing powerful greenhouse gas—than previously realized. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 49 minutes
Grand Finale: A Pop Song is Born
In the days of old, creating a song required a composer, a lyricist, an arranger, a recording engineer, a band or orchestra. Today, in the pop world, a single person often handles those jobs in a single studio. In this extraordinary episode, you’ll hear two-time Grammy winner Oak Felder create a new song, in real time, start to finish—and you’ll gain incredible insight into how technology and talent team up to produce art. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at htt... (@Pogue)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 15 minutes
Feeling Lonely? Your Brain May Process The World Differently
The U.S. is in the midst of a loneliness epidemic. And for a lot of people, the feeling is even more pronounced during the holidays. In addition to its emotional impact, chronic loneliness and social isolation have some dramatic health consequences: increased risk of heart disease and stroke, infections, cancer, even premature death. Recent research also suggests that loneliness can change the way people process the world. So today on the show, host Regina G. Barber talks to Rachel Carlson about the neurosc... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 30 minutes
Fentanyl, fenlands, and Boris Johnson's COVID defence
Plus, the new space telecope being used to watch satellites (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 54 minutes
A young carnivorous dinosaur’s last meal and more
A young carnivorous dinosaur’s last meal; A robot steps forward to build the wall; Canada geese families pull closer together in tough times; The great wall of China has a ‘living skin’; You say you want a Microbial revolution?; Why doesn't the temperature in the far North go up and up and up when the Sun never sets? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Dec-08 • 27 minutes
Bringing My Whole Self: Stories about being yourself in science
In this week’s episode, both of our storytellers strive to be their authentic selves in academia. Part 1: Raul Fernandez dreamed of going to university to study engineering. When he gets to Boston University, he feels unwelcome. Part 2: Cynthia Chapple was continually underestimated by her teachers and struggled with minimizing aspects of herself to be accepted. Dr. Raul Fernandez is a scholar-activist. As a Senior Lecturer at Boston University, he studies, writes, and teaches about inequities in education... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 18 minutes
Speaking Multiple Languages Changes The Way You Think
Speaking more than one language has the power to shape memory and cognition–and perhaps even delay the onset of Alzheimer’s. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 26 minutes
Can carbon capture live up to its hype?
Climate expert Richard Black discusses the good, the bad and the ugly of carbon capture. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 114 minutes
Jump on into the Science Gazpacho
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Interview W/Tom Merritt, Open Carbon Data, Biobots, Dolphins, Optimism, Unity, Goodbye Offices, Ketamine, Mice, Birds, Penguins, And Much More Science! Become a Patron! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 38 minutes
Farm animals show their smarts, and how honeyguide birds lead humans to hives
A look at cognition in livestock, and the coevolution of wild bird–human cooperation This week we have two stories on thinking and learning in animals. First, Online News Editor David Grimm talks with host Sarah Crespi about a reporting trip to the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in northern Germany, where scientists are studying cognition in farm animals, including goats, cows, and pigs. And because freelance audio producer Kevin Caners went along, we have lots of sound from the trip—so prepar... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 31 minutes
Loss and damages for vulnerable countries
Saleemul Huq, an advocate for vulnerable countries affected by climate change, has died. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | December 7, 2023
Cosmologist Roberto Trotta reveals how stargazing has shaped the course of human civilization in his new book, "Starborn: How the Stars Made Us (and Who We Would be Without Them)." (00:46) Then, planetary scientist Dr. Sabine Stanley explores the beating heart of planets and what created them — from the building blocks of swirling cosmic dust, pebbles, and gas, to the birth of planets and the worlds we see today. (26:48) (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 9 minutes
Dr. Ishwaria Subbiah Is Reimagining Cancer Care
All but raised in oncology wards, Dr. Subbiah is on a mission to make cancer care work for everyone, including those usually overlooked. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 50 minutes
Boring science
How might our future lie underground? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 26 minutes
Flapper of the South Seas: A Young Margaret Mead Travels To The South Seas
Anthropologist Margaret Mead journeyed to American Samoa in 1925 to explore adolescent development. Fame and controversy followed the publication of her book Coming of Age in Samoa. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 17 minutes
All the drama from the first week of Cop28
Madeleine Finlay hears from the biodiversity and environment reporter Patrick Greenfield, who is reporting for the Guardian from Cop28 in Dubai. He describes the rollercoaster first week of highs and lows and sets out what is still on the table as the second week of negotiations gets under way (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-07 • 23 minutes
S2 Ep 10 - Katherine Furman on the Philosophy of Public Health
"Philosophers of science are really good about thinking about causation and trying to figure out what the mechanisms are that make something work"Today we welcome Katherine Furman, who talks to Indi about the philosophy of public health. Katherine is a lecturer of Philosophy, Politics and Economics at the University of Liverpool. She is currently on research leave to work with the SOCRATES project in Hanover, Germany.Katherine explores with us the intricacies of implementing public health measures... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 18 minutes
Social Connections Keep Us Physically and Mentally Healthy As We Age
Long-term research tracking adults over 50 shows that social activity, intimacy, and personal connections are key to good health. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 31 minutes
The world’s smallest light-trapping silicon cavity
Researchers exploit intermolecular forces to create a nanoscale hole, and investigating whether poverty can be reduced without increasing emissions. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 13 minutes
Exoplanets Could Help Us Learn How Planets Make Magnetism
New observations of a faraway rocky world that might have its own magnetic field could help astronomers understand the seemingly haphazard magnetic fields in our own solar system. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is “Light Gazing” by Andrew Langdon. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 8 minutes
Ozempic Could Also Help You Drink Less Alcohol
Mounting evidence bolsters the idea that drugs like semaglutide—better known as Ozempic or Wegovy—can hamper a thirst for booze. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 25 minutes
Weaponizing uncertainty
Our show celebrates uncertainty. But as environmental reporter Amy Westervelt explains, the concept also has a dark side. For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adc... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 8 minutes
These Researchers Put Sperm Through a Kind of 'Hunger Games'
The research focused on figuring out what enables certain sperm to gain some competitive advantage over millions of others fighting for the same prize. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 15 minutes
A Star Is Born ... And Then What? Journey Through The Life Cycle of a star
Soon after the sun sets on winter nights, if you live in the northern hemisphere you can look into the sky and find the Orion constellation near the eastern horizon. Astrophysicist Sarafina El-Badry Nance has always been drawn to a particular star in Orion: Betelgeuse, a red supergiant nearing the end of it's life on the hunter's left shoulder. But what stages of life did Betelgeuse — or any star — go through before it reached this moment? Regina G. Barber talks to Sarafina about three winter constellations... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 42 minutes
Hollywood in Space
Brian Cox and Robin Ince peer review Hollywood movies set in space. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2023-Dec-06 • 51 minutes
Syndesiology (CONNECTIONS) with James Burke
He’s the guy pointing to a NASA launch behind him, in the most legendary shot in television history. He’s a science historian and Apollo Program correspondent. He’s the creator, host, and writer of the long-running program “Connections.” He is a science communication hero to millions and a global treasure. He is James Burke, and he chats about how connected historical events are, and how connection between humans is vital. We also talk about Napoleon’s toothpick, dog pee, shipworms, writer's block, TV shoot... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 13 minutes
Women Were Also Skilled Hunters In Ancient Times
New analysis of remains and burial items suggests women and men did both parts of hunting and gathering in the Paleolithic era. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 29 minutes
2FC now Radio National celebrates 100 years
We revisit a bold new Sunday night program in 1975, and coverage of the Apollo missions. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 49 minutes
Exploring Curiosity With Nobel Prize Winner Barry Barish
Remastered from our interview in May 2023 A few months ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing the Nobel Laureate, Barry Barish, for UCTV. Barry is an experimental physicist and a professor at UC Riverside. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics along with Rainer Weiss and Kip Thorne for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves. In our interview, Barry reflects on his life in science, being curious, experiencing imposter syndrome, and working in the field ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 9 minutes
Want to Store a Message in DNA? That’ll Be $1,000
French startup Biomemory is rolling out a credit-card-sized storage device that uses DNA to encode a kilobyte of text data. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 14 minutes
Brains On presents Forever Ago - Superman: An immigrant's story
The Brains On crew is hard at work on our next batch of episodes, and we'll be back in your feed on January 16, with an electrifying episode about lightning.Until then, check out our history show: Forever Ago. It's hosted by our friend Joy Dolo, and it looks into the fascinating past of things we take for granted.In this episode, Joy invites Molly on to the show to share the origin story of Superman that you've probably never heard. Take a listen!To hear the entire episode, search for “Forever Ago” wherever... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 30 minutes
Invigorating the inactive with just one step
You don't have to run a marathon to enjoy the health benefits of exercise... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 17 minutes
Why are we still struggling to get contraception right?
As the pill becomes available over the counter and free of charge in England, Madeleine Finlay talks to science correspondent Nicola Davis about the problems women in the UK face in getting access to appropriate contraception, and how unwanted side-effects and lack of support have led to a rise in the popularity of fertility awareness-based methods. She also hears from Katie about her own journey trying to find the right contraception for her body (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 8 minutes
Carbon emission benefits of remote work
Longqi Yang and Fengqi You discuss the potential reductions in carbon emissions of switching from in person to remote work. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-05 • 25 minutes
CultureLab: Teaching science through cooking with Pia Sorenson’s real life ‘Lessons in Chemistry’
Did your chemistry lessons involve baking chocolate lava cakes? Have you ever wanted to eat your biology homework? While ‘Lessons in Chemistry’ brought a fictional cooking-as-chemistry story to TV viewers this fall, real-life scientist Pia Sörensen’s students are some of the few who can actually answer “yes.”Sörensen’s directs Harvard University’s Science and Cooking program, which teaches science lessons through the culinary arts. She is the author and editor of several books, including the best-seller “Sc... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 27 minutes
Tooth and Claw: Piranhas
Adam Hart investigates, do these South American fish deserve their frenzied reputation? (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 24 minutes
An AI Leader’s Human-Centered Approach To Artificial Intelligence
Dr. Fei-Fei Li of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI discusses the promise and peril of the ground-breaking technology. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 216 minutes
AMA | December 2023
Ask Me Anything episode for December 2023. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 9 minutes
Dr. Nergis Mavalvala Helped Detect the First Gravitational Wave. Her Work Doesn’t Stop There
The dean of MIT’s School of Science embraces skepticism and failure, and she wants the next generation of scientists to jump right in. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 54 minutes
End of Eternity**
Nothing lasts forever. Even the universe has several possible endings. Will there be a dramatic Big Rip or a Big Chill­–also known as the heat death of the universe–in trillions of years? Or will vacuum decay, which could theoretically happen at any moment, do us in? Perhaps the death of a tiny particle – the proton – will bring about the end. We contemplate big picture endings in this episode, and whether one could be brought about by our own machine creations. Guests: Anders Sandberg – Researcher at the... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 55 minutes
737: Investigating the Mechanics of How Cells Move in Cancer and the Immune System - Dr. Erdem Tabdanov
Dr. Erdem Tabdanov is Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Penn State College of Medicine and also a Member of the Penn State Cancer Institute. He studies the mechanical and structural aspects of cells to better understand how... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 16 minutes
Is Too Little Play Hurting Our Kids?
A long-term decline in unsupervised activity may be contributing to mental health declines in children and adolescents. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-04 • 12 minutes
Don't Call It Dirt: The Surprising Science Of Soil
It's easy to overlook the soil beneath our feet, or to think of it as just dirt to be cleaned up. But soil wraps the world in an envelope of life: It grows our food, regulates the climate and makes the planet habitable. "What stands between life and lifelessness on our planet Earth is this thin layer of soil that exists on the Earth's surface," says Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, a soil scientist at the University of California-Merced. In honor of World Soil Day tomorrow, we're revisiting our conversation with Prof.... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-03 • 12 minutes
If DNA is the sheet music, epigenetics is the conductor
Razia Zakarya is an epigeneticist. But what does an epigeneticist do exactly? Razia is here to explain! Today, why DNA and epigenetics is important for chronic disease research. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2023-Dec-03 • 51 minutes
Services and Training for Publishing Scientists: The Current Direction of Travel
Listen to this interview of John Bond, founder and publishing consultant of Riverwinds Consulting. We talk about the breadth of services and resources now on offer to publishing scientists — while the industry only grows broader and broader. John Bond : "The one thing I would say helps specifically the middle-tier author (who'll, by the way, be most reluctant to try this) is this: Feel really comfortable sharing your early work on a more frequent and a wider basis. Because these authors tend to be quite shy... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-02 • 62 minutes
David Brin: Privacy, AI and the Values of a Transparent Society
It's no secret that almost every step we take is being tracked or recorded in some way. However, plenty of things need to be clarified about what this means for our personal freedoms and safety. Today, David Brin, a world-renowned expert on privacy and transparency, will shed light on these complex issues weighing on our society! David is an award-winning science fiction author, technical consultant, astrophysicist, and public speaker. He helped establish the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination a... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Dec-02 • 54 minutes
The Bragg Prize for Science Writing, and we remember Sir Clarence Lovejoy
Nicky Phillips has won this year’s Bragg Prize for Science Writing. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Dec-02
The Skeptics Guide #960 - Dec 2 2023
News Items: Internet Use and Mental Health, Methane Capture, Bitter Revenge, Underground Microbes, PopSci Magazine Closes; Quickie with Steve: LK-99 Debunked; Who's That Noisy, Question and E-mails: Dr. GPT; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 37 minutes
What is brainwashing?
Is it possible to control someone’s mind? (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 23 minutes
COP28 Host Had Plans to Promote Oil and Gas | Researchers Detected Cicada Emergence With Fiber-Optics
The United Nations climate summit will happen for the next two weeks in Dubai—a city known for its oil money. And, in 2021, an electronics and communications lab accidentally detected the mass emergence of Brood X with fiber-optic sensors. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 26 minutes
How Misinformation Spreads through Conflict
Three experts break down how misinformation and propaganda spread through conflict and how to debunk it yourself. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 22 minutes
Weekly: Biggest climate summit since Paris; thanking dirt for all life on Earth; what if another star flew past our solar system?
#226This year’s COP28 could be the most important climate summit since the Paris Agreement in 2015. After opening in Dubai on Thursday, this will be the first time countries will formally take stock of climate change since agreeing to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. While we can expect world leaders to make some major commitments regarding renewable energy, sceptics are concerned the location of the summit will mean that fossil fuel interests end up disproportionately shaping the meeting.You ma... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 53 minutes
Boy Man
Could puberty get any more awkward? Turns out, yes. Writer Patrick Burleigh started going through puberty as a toddler. He had pubic hair before he was two years old and a mustache by middle school. All of this was thanks to a rare genetic mutation that causes testotoxicosis, also known as precocious puberty. From the moment he was born, abnormally high levels of testosterone coursed through his body, just as it had in his father’s body, his grandfather’s body, and his great-grandfather’s body. On this week... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 88 minutes
Business, Innovation, and Managing Life (April 5, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about business, innovation, and managing life as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include:Should I become a programmer? At what age do you think kids should start learning computer-related skills? Should programming be a core class for students, like math and English? - What do you think are good ways to introduce computational thinking to kids? - But can you really ... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 75 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [March 31, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: If ChatGPT's transformer model stores the averaging of the text that regular people produced on the internet plus millions of books, is it fair to say that it's going to produce mediocre output? What if we train a model with text produced by geniuses ONLY, like Euler, Gauss, Newton, Benjamin Fra... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 9 minutes
Cicadas Are So Loud, Fiber Optic Cables Can ‘Hear’ Them
In 2021, scientists experimenting with fiber optics picked up a strange signal: the cacophony of cicadas. It could lead to a new way of monitoring insects. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 32 minutes
Coleen T. Murphy, "How We Age: The Science of Longevity" (Princeton UP, 2023)
All of us would like to live longer, or to slow the debilitating effects of age. In How We Age: The Science of Longevity (Princeton UP, 2023), Coleen Murphy shows how recent research on longevity and aging may be bringing us closer to this goal. Murphy, a leading scholar of aging, explains that the study of model systems, particularly simple invertebrate animals, combined with breakthroughs in genomic methods, have allowed scientists to probe the molecular mechanisms of longevity and aging. Understanding th... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 10 minutes
These Penguins Take 10,000 Little Naps A Day — Seconds At A Time
Sleep. It's an essential biological function that has long intrigued scientists. Researchers have studied everything from mice to fruit flies in the lab to get a better understanding of what happens when animals sleep — and why so many do it. This week, scientists finally added one piece to the elusive sleep puzzle: How wild chinstrap penguins sleep amid their noisy colony. Turns out, they do it over 10,000 times in seconds-long bursts throughout the day — totaling 11 hours when all is said and done.Learn m... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 30 minutes
COP28, Swine flu in the UK, and Bennu samples arrive
Plus, how babies begin to learn language before they're born... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 54 minutes
Cat facts — the latest science on our feline companions
Cat faces are more expressive than you think; Cats can get sick with coronaviruses – and get better with COVID-19 antivirals; Cats are built to purr; Cats can make it harder to get away with murder; Even when they're curled up in your lap, cats have "one paw in the wild". (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Dec-01 • 27 minutes
Active Participant: Stories about being a research subject
Research participants are sometimes the most important part of science. Without participants there is no data, and without data there are no findings. In this week’s episode, both of our storytellers become an active part of scientific research. Part 1: Therapist Susan Fee signs up herself and her daughter for a stress management research study. Part 2: While suffering from a panic attack, comedian Kenice Mobley reflects on a psychology experiment about the impact of race on comfort that she took part in. S... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 80 minutes
Dialogues with Richard Dawkins
Richard Dawkins and I have appeared together onstage many times, been the subject of the documentary The Unbelievers, and have collaborated on various writing projects as well. Thus it may come as a surprise to you to learn that each time we get together, we find new things to discuss and learn from each other. It surprises us as well. This fall we agreed to appear onstage together at two separate events co-sponsored by The Origins Project. The events, entitled Changing Minds in Changing Times were coor... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 120 minutes
Under the Beaver Moon
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Climate Action, Surprising Cloacal Kiss, Cysts In The Snow, Angry Lady Flies, Aging Lady Chimps, Panama Protests, WHOA-Man, Bonobos, Neuronal WiFi, Bacterial Overlords, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 26 minutes
Ralph Nader Reflects On His Auto Safety Campaign, 55 Years Later
In a conversation from 2021, Ira discusses how auto safety has drastically advanced, thanks in part to Nader’s groundbreaking investigation. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 31 minutes
All aboard the RRS Sir David Attenborough
The RRS Sir David Attenborough has reached Antarctica for its first full science season. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 35 minutes
Basic geoengineering, and autonomous construction robots
Raising the pH of the ocean to reduce carbon in the air, and robots that can landscape First up on this week’s show, Contributing Correspondent Warren Cornwall discusses research into making oceans more alkaline as a way to increase carbon capture and slow climate change. But there are a few open questions with this strategy: Could enough material be dumped in the ocean to slow climate change? Would mining that material release a lot of carbon? And, would either the mining or ocean changes have big impact... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 50 minutes
Cool Science Radio | November 30, 2023
Paleontologist Andrew Milner talks about his amazing fossil discovery at Lake Powell.Then, does Utah really have the Greatest Snow on Earth? We find out from Jim Steenburg, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Utah and author of the book “Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth.” (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 28 minutes
Metal Mines
How disused mines are having a harmful effect on our rivers. (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 9 minutes
Sanitary products made from plants could help tackle period poverty
Researchers have extracted absorbent materials from the succulent Agave sisalana for making local, low-cost period products. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 8 minutes
A Cutting-Edge Cancer Treatment Is Under FDA Investigation—for Cancer Risk
CAR-T cell therapy harnesses the immune system to attack blood cancers. Six years after approving the first treatment, the FDA is investigating whether it can give rise to secondary cancers. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 50 minutes
Meetings with intelligent worms
From worm blobs to mangoes - there’s more to meetings than you thought. (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 28 minutes
The Devastating Logic of Christine Ladd-Franklin
Christine Ladd-Franklin is best known for her theory of the evolution of color vision, but her research spanned math, symbolic logic, philosophy, biology, and psychology. Born in Connecticut in 1847, she was clever, sharp-tongued, and never shied away from a battle of wits. When she decided to go to college instead of pursuing a marriage, she convinced her skeptical grandmother by pointing to statistics: there was an excess of women in New England, so a husband would be hard to find; she’d better get an edu... (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 16 minutes
Everything you need to know about Cop28 as the summit begins
Every year the world’s leaders gather for the UN climate change conference, and after a year of record temperatures, this year’s summit has been called the most vital yet. As Cop28 begins in Dubai, Ian Sample hears from Guardian environment editor and resident Cop expert Fiona Harvey. She explains why this summit proved controversial before it even began, what the main talking points will be, and how countries can still collaborate to meet the goals set out in 2015’s Paris agreement (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Nov-30 • 28 minutes
S2 Ep 9 - Carl Bergstrom on Science and Misinformation
Today's guest is Professor Carl Bergstrom from the University of Washington. Carl has been touring Australia over the last few weeks and we were delighted when he agreed to join us while he was in Melbourne. Carl works across evolutionary biology, informatics and science studies and has become particularly well-known for his work concerning the spread of misinformation and what we can do about it. Together with his colleague Jevin West, Carl developed a university course named ‘Calling Bullshit: Data R... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 13 minutes
What’s That Smell? An AI Nose Knows
In a conversation from September 2023, Ira discusses a computer model can map the structure of a chemical to predict what it probably smells like. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 26 minutes
Why COP28 probably won't keep the 1.5 degree dream alive
We discuss the challenges of the upcoming climate change conference, and a way to make stable plasma using hairy blocks. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 40 minutes
Canadian Prepper & Brian Keating: Will Humans Soon Go EXTINCT?
Remastered from our interview in May 2023 Will humans soon go extinct? Are we already on borrowed time? I had the honor of discussing this with none other than the Canadian Prepper himself! Canadian Prepper is an educational YouTuber who talks about self-defense, survival, and all things preparedness. He analyzes current events, reviews innovative equipment, and theorizes about the demise of civilization as we know it. In our interview, we dive deep into extinction-level events. Tune in! Key Takeaways:... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 7 minutes
Dr. Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski Will Change How You Think About Space
Pioneering a new field in cosmology, Dr. Pasterski explores diverse perspectives in physics and astronomy—and whether the universe might actually be a hologram. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 33 minutes
Can we live in space?
NASA is planning for humans to live on the moon by 2040. But how much space can the human body handle? (Updated from 2022) For show transcripts, go to bit.ly/unx-transcripts For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/ad... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 82 minutes
Audiobook Mixtape 3: Gift Ideas from the Ologists’ Brains
You like Ologists. Ologists write books. You like books, so let’s dive into a new, curated sampler platter from your favorite guests’ books.. Fill your ears with dark carnivals, boney catacombs, Rocky Mountain bears and wolves, flies you should love, maggots that make you beautiful, fungus that might be evil, why you should not care what other people eat, queer dolphins, invisible moose, monkey facts, fitness/mental health tips, and how to save money at the salon. Let this melange of literary snippets serve... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 15 minutes
The International Race To Create Human Eggs And Sperm In The Lab
In which we meet the pioneers of one of the most exciting — and controversial — fields of biomedical research: in vitro gametogenesis, or IVG. The goal of IVG is to make unlimited supplies of what Hayashi calls "artificial" eggs and sperm from any cell in the human body. That could let anyone — older, infertile, single, gay, trans — have their own genetically related babies. As such, the field opens up a slew of ethical concerns. But that isn't stopping researchers from pressing forward. So, this episode NP... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 42 minutes
The Scale of Life (or were dinosaurs just too big?)
Brian Cox and Robin Ince discover why size really matters if you want to avoid extinction. (@themonkeycage@ProfBrianCox@robinince)
podcast image2023-Nov-29 • 10 minutes
Why Childhood Vaccination Rates Are Falling
Fewer kids got their routine childhood vaccines since before the pandemic. Are lack of access and a loss of trust in science to blame? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 36 minutes
Jane Goodall On Life Among Chimpanzees
In an interview from 2002, the primatologist gave Ira a lesson in how to speak with chimps. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 8 minutes
Dr. Paula Johnson Is Breaking Down the Barriers to Better Health
An accomplished cardiologist and the first Black woman president of Wellesley College, Dr. Johnson's life's work is improving quality of care for women and women of color around the world. Read this story here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 22 minutes
Science of cannabis: #1 A long history and a seismic shift
Cannabis is having a moment. Half of the US population lives in a state where marijuana is legal, and 9 in 10 people nationwide support legalisation in some form. This is a stark difference from mere decades ago, when prohibition was the norm in the entire US. Meanwhile, if you live in Malta, Uruguay, Canada – and maybe soon, Germany – your entire country is one with legal recreational pot. And access to medical marijuana extends to even more countries, including the UK and Australia.But as medical and recr... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 46 minutes
Telescopes
What's that you spy on the horizon, just out of sight? If you have a telescope handy, you can hone your gaze on...more telescopes! From pocket spyglasses to Extremely Large (a real telescope name), join us and special guest Julian Huguet as we set our sights on the far-reaching world of these incredible devices. How we wonder what they are... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 37 minutes
Weight of the world – the climate scientists who saw the crisis coming
In part one of this three-part series, three climate scientists reveal the moment they realised the planet was heading for catastrophe. What did they do when they found out? How did they think the world would respond? And how do they feel today, looking back on that moment of cognisance? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2023-Nov-28 • 28 minutes
Jet engines, hearts, and planets: the world of digital twins
You've got to be in it to twin it (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 27 minutes
Tooth and Claw: Great White Sharks
Adam Hart investigates the most famous and feared predator in all the ocean! (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 22 minutes
The ‘Wet-Dog Shake’ And Other Physics Mysteries
From 2018: In his book 'How to Walk on Water and Climb Up Walls,' David Hu explores the wonders of the animal world. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 81 minutes
258 | Solo: AI Thinks Different
Solo episode on the differences between how large language models think and how we do. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 7 minutes
It’s Time to Log Off
There’s a devastating amount of heavy news these days. Psychology experts say you need to know your limits—and when to put down the phone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 54 minutes
In Living Color
The world is a colorful place, and human eyes have evolved to take it in – from vermillion red to bright tangerine to cobalt blue. But when we do, are you and I seeing the same thing? Find out why color perception is a trick of the brain, and why you and I may not see the same shade of green. Or blue. Or red. Also, platypuses and the growing club of fluorescent mammals, and the first new blue pigment in more than two centuries. Guests: Paula Anich – Associate Professor of Natural Resources, Northland Col... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 45 minutes
736: Studying How Food Influences Our Health and Behavior - Dr. Alexis Wood
Dr. Alexis “Lekki” Wood is Associate Professor at USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center in the Division of Pediatrics-Nutrition at Baylor College of Medicine. Research in Lekki’s lab aims to better understand how food influences our... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 15 minutes
Monday Night Football And Pursuing Two Careers With John Urschel
As kids, some of us dream of multiple careers: being an astronaut AND the next president. Or digging up dinosaurs AND selling out concert stadiums. As we get older, there's pressure to pick one path. But what if we didn't have to? After all, John Urschel didn't. He's a mathematician and professor at MIT. But before that, he played football for the Baltimore Ravens. Today on the show, Monday night football! Host Regina G. Barber talks to Urschel about linear algebra and following his dream of becoming a math... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Nov-27 • 13 minutes
Climate Adaptation Can Backfire If We Aren't Careful
The choices we make in how we adapt to climate change can sometimes come back to bite us Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Nov-26 • 53 minutes
Lawrence Krauss: The Mysterious Origins of Dark Energy
✨ To try everything Brilliant has to offer—free—for a full 30 days, visit https://brilliant.org/DrBrianKeating The first 200 of you will get 20% off Brilliant's annual premium subscription. ✨ I had the pleasure of participating in an exciting onstage dialogue with the renowned theoretical physicist Lawrence M. Krauss. We had a lively discussion about the mysteries of the Universe, the latest scientific discoveries, and their implications for our understanding of existence. From the origins of dark energy t... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Nov-26 • 36 minutes
The Future of Innovation: A Discussion with Min W. Jung
Humans have been so dominant on Earth in large part because of their capacity to innovate – but how does that work exactly? Why can they innovate so much? That issue has been studied by Professor Min W. Jung from the Center for Synaptic Brain Dysfunctions at the Institute for Basic Science in South Korea. He is the author of A Brain for Innovation: The Neuroscience of Imagination and Abstract Thinking (Columbia UP, 2023). Listen to him in conversation with Owen Bennett Jones. Owen Bennett-Jones is a freelan... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Nov-26 • 12 minutes
Making science fun isn't oversimplifying it
Science doesn't have to be restricted to old white men in lab coats. Maddie reckons it's time to make science fun! Without losing it's important messages. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2023-Nov-25 • 54 minutes
The Science Show
They were close to extinction. Now seashorses in Sydney Harbour may have survived. (@ABCscience)
podcast image2023-Nov-25
The Skeptics Guide #959 - Nov 25 2023
What's the Word: Rugae; News Items: 3D Printing Soft Robots, First CRISPR Treatment Approved, Omicron Update, Lunar Library; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Trust in Science, Fashion; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2023-Nov-25 • 25 minutes
Smologies #32: CLOUDS with Rachel Storer
Cumulus! Lenticular! Venti sugar-free stratocumulus stratiformis translucidus undulatus! Those light and fluffy things that hang overhead weigh thousands of pounds and form under all kinds of conditions. Cloud doctor and nephologist Dr. Rachel Storer chats about why she loves clouds, the different varieties of them, what makes it rain, whether sailors delight at red skies at night, why clouds are never square and where we can find diamond rain. (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 28 minutes
What’s the difference between reading and listening to books?
Why our brains respond differently if we listen to books instead of reading them (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 25 minutes
Ig Nobel Prizes | Stop Flushing Your Health Data Down The Toilet
Counting nose hairs and licking rocks: Highlights from the 33rd First Annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony. Plus, in a conversation from March 2023, Ira discusses smart toilets powered by AI to give users more insight into their health. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 18 minutes
Audio long read: Apple revival — how science is bringing historic varieties back to life
Genomic studies of heirloom apples could help safeguard the future of the fruit. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 24 minutes
Weekly: Salt glaciers could host life on Mercury; brain cells that tell us when to eat; powerful cosmic ray hits Earth
#225Life on Mercury? That would be a shocking discovery. The planet is incredibly inhospitable to life… as we know it. But the discovery of salt glaciers on its surface has opened up the possibility that extremophile bacteria could be buried beneath its surface. Lucky then that the BepiColombo mission is planned to take another look at Mercury soon.Ever wondered why you can go all night without getting hungry but can’t last a few hours in the day? Well, there may be cells in our brains that tell us when it’... (@newscientist)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 48 minutes
Shrink
The definition of life is in flux, complexity is overrated, and humans are shrinking. Viruses are supposed to be sleek, pared-down, dead-eyed machines. But when one microbiologist stumbled upon a GIANT virus, hundreds of times bigger than any seen before, all that went out the window. The discovery opened the door not only to a new cast of microscopic characters with names like Mimivirus, Mamavirus, and Megavirus, but also to basic questions: How did we miss these until now? Have they been around since the... (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 73 minutes
History of Science & Technology Q&A (March 22, 2023)
Stephen Wolfram answers questions from his viewers about the history science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: What's the history of AI? What's the first recorded example of artificial intelligence? - It's amazing how well the movie 2001 still holds up. - What did pattern matching look like in the Middle Ages? - What's the relationship between "cybernetics" and AI? Is it simply a popularize... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 78 minutes
Science & Technology Q&A for Kids (and others) [March 10, 2023]
Stephen Wolfram answers general questions from his viewers about science and technology as part of an unscripted livestream series, also available on YouTube here: https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include: Suppose I wanted to store digital data in a way that would be accessible to archeologists 10,000 years in the future. How could I achieve this? The best I can come up with is the awkward thin aluminum or titanium punch cards. Obviously, there would also be sheets of metal with plain writing on t... (@stephen_wolfram@WolframResearch)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 36 minutes
Electric Planes Take Off
Planes contribute 9% of the world’s carbon pollution, but electrifying them has always seemed impossible; batteries have never been powerful or light enough to carry themselves. But in 2023, batteries reached a tipping point in power and weight. Beta Technologies, based in Vermont, is flying its six-passenger vertical-takeoff airplanes every day. David Pogue was there at takeoff. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my... (@Pogue)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 16 minutes
The Members of This Reservation Learned They Live with Nuclear Weapons. Can Their Reality Ever Be the Same?
The Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara peoples are learning more about the missiles siloed on their lands, and that knowledge has put the preservation of their culture and heritage in even starker relief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices (@sciam)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 14 minutes
What Fossilized Poop Can Teach Us About Dinosaurs
Walking into Karen Chin's office at the University of Colorado, Boulder, one of the first things you might notice is that petrified poops are everywhere. They're in shallow boxes covering every surface and filling up shelves, cabinets and drawers. She's a leading expert in the fossils, known as coprolites. They delight her because of what they reveal about the ancient eating habits and food webs of dinosaurs — rare insights for the paleontology world. This episode, she talks with Short Wave co-host Aaron Sc... (@NPR)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 39 minutes
COVID inquiry revelations, and red wine headaches
Plus, why the British Library came under cyber attack (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 54 minutes
How biodiversity contributes to human health and more…
These bats copulate for hours with enormous penises but without penetration; Jumping spiders think it matters if you’re black and white; Forewarned and three-armed; Red snow in the morning, climate scientists take warning; We need to save biodiversity to preserve billions of years of natural experiments. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2023-Nov-24 • 31 minutes
Reality: Stories about one's perception of real life
Everyone thinks they know the difference between fantasy and reality. But do we? In this week’s episode, our storytellers struggle to keep a firm grasp on the real world. Part 1: Shawn Musgrave's seizures make him feel like he's experiencing deja vu. Part 2: Shane Mauss’ bipolar disorder causes him to lose his sense of reality. Shawn Musgrave is a lawyer, journalist, lawyer-who-represents-journalists, and recent transplant to New York. His work has appeared in POLITICO, The Verge, VICE, The Intercept, and t... (@storycollider)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 18 minutes
The West’s Wild Horses | Artist Explores History Of Humans Genetically Modifying Pigs
Reporter Ashley Ahearn bought a wild horse from the federal government for $125. Also, with opera and visual art, an exhibit looks at modern genetic engineering of pigs. (@scifri)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 30 minutes
Fires in the Pantanal wetlands
Brazil’s searing temperatures have scorched the world’s largest tropical wetlands. (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 55 minutes
Exascale supercomputers amp up science, finally growing dolomite in the lab, and origins of patriarchy
A leap in supercomputing is a leap for science, cracking the dolomite problem, and a book on where patriarchy came from First up on this week’s show, bigger supercomputers help make superscience. Staff Writer Robert F. Service joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how the first exascale computer is enabling big leaps in scientists’ models of the world. Next, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with the University of Michigan’s Wenhao Sun, professor of materials science and engineering, and graduate student Joon... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 30 minutes
Forever chemicals
What goes into our water supply and never comes out? (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 81 minutes
David Chalmers: The Matrix is REAL!
Is the Matrix really real? And if so, which pill would David Chalmers take? Join us for a mind-bending journey through virtual worlds, human consciousness, technology, philosophy, and religion, and find out! David Chalmers is an Australian philosopher and cognitive scientist specializing in the areas of philosophy of mind and philosophy of language. He is a Professor of Philosophy and Neural Science at New York University and co-director of NYU's Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness (along with Ned... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 50 minutes
All about cricket(s)
The science of spitting on cricket balls, particle accelerators and insect sounds (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 76 minutes
Darwinian Accident or Divine Architect? (with Jay Richards)
Jay Richards PhD, OP discusses the new book to which he contributed a chapter, God’s Grandeur: The Catholic Case for Intelligent Design (Sophia Institute Press, 2023), edited by Ann Gauger. We take on the insufficient explanations of Darwinian orthodoxy which insists that our world—from the vast cosmos to the also vast (in its complexity) genetic code in our cells. At the end of this episode (at 55 minutes), we hear an update from Father Piotr Żelazko in Israel as we enter the second month of the Gaza War. ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 22 minutes
Best Of: The Feminist Test We Keep Failing
What are the rules of engagement when writing the stories of female scientists? We talk with the women who came up with the Finkbeiner Test, a checklist to keep sexism out of the narrative. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 17 minutes
S2 Ep 8 - Gerhard Wiesenfeldt on the Unknown Scientist
Welcome to another week of the HPS podcast. This week's guest is Gerhard Wiesenfeldt of the University of Melbourne. He joins us as he discusses the benefits and pitfalls of studying those in the history of science who are less well known. The popular narratives in the history of science tend to centre around a few key figures on whom extensive research and work has been done, those such as Galileo, Newton, Darwin. However, for every household name there were a legion of other scientists also working i... (@TheHPSPodcast)
podcast image2023-Nov-23 • 16 minutes
What have we learned from the James Webb space telescope so far?
Madeleine Finlay sits down with science correspondent Hannah Devlin to discuss the amazing discoveries the James Webb space telescope has made in the year since it became operational. From planets that rain sand, to distant galaxies, Hannah explains how some of these discoveries could fundamentally change our understanding of the universe (@guardianscience)

Questions in Podcast Episode Descriptions

(ordered as in episode list above; click/tap question to jump to episode entry)

But where does it come from?
Who, or what, killed her?
What's there to say about the future of neural nets?
... - Neural nets could evolve to be able to be trainers?
... What are the limits?
How do you balance work and life?
... Do you have advice for maintaining a healthy lifestyle while working?
... How do you find time for socializing and exercising?
... - When will you retire and devote all of your time to your Physics Project, or is retiring out of t...
What is the smartest animal in the world?
... And if we threw out our human intelligence rubric, is there a fair way to figure it out?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
But if it is, then where did the widespread (and widely admired) impulse to help others even at gre...
What makes our tears so special?
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Should we be...
... Is there any room to scrutinize the scientific method?
... And does Eric Lerner have a point?
But is it real?
... And if so, what is it?
It started as a big old ball of dust, so how did it end up like a giant pancake?
After all, what good is it to make contact with ET if we can’t communicate?
What makes a species a species?
Could the expansion of the universe affect biological evolution?
... - ​How much does the sky weigh?
... How much does the Earth weigh?
... - What would happen if gravity on Earth changed to that of the Moon?
... What if gravity suddenly got stronger?
How did scientific disciplines originate and evolve through the centuries?
... - Do you think Apple's new VR headset will be much different than previous releases of other VR hea...
... What do past releases of similar products predict?
There is a lot of talk about how to make money with Bitcoin… But how does it actually work?
... What are the physics behind it?
... And can Bitcoin replace the US dollar?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
Some answers exist, but should we trust them if they were influenced by the beverage industry?
But those passes?
What can science learn from poetry?
... Can you teach someone to become a scientist?
... And what’s the biggest source of hype in science right now?
But what is a cavity?
How did we go from being self-sufficient primates to nonstop shoppers?
Do you think the latest electric car is worth buying these days?
... What is the future of cars?
... - With technology integration, would we be able to do away with having to sleep in the future?
Aside from faster processing speeds, what are some other ways computers may be improved in the futu...
... - Will we still use books in 5-10 years, or will they be replaced by chatting with an AI?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
Can it also improve rail safety?
So what is “good” mathematics?
Humans can live up to age 100, and not 1000 – why?
... Are there limits in how much our brains can think and compute?
Can swearing make you stronger?
But is that how hypnotism works?
... And does it really open up a portal to the unconscious mind?
Why don’t they know the stars of science who have helped shape our world?
Do you think LLMs will give everyone something akin to a personal McKinsey consultant?
... doing a whole design alone?
Is it possible to create more universe?
... - Why does running my Waterpik interrupt Bluetooth connections?
#234Is AI really ready to take our jobs?
What do we really know about our cousins, the Neanderthals?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Will AI dest...
... Can we bring the dead back to life?
... And is there any convincing evidence for intelligent design?
But could all these locks be broken?
Will we all evolve to be crabs?
... What’s with having one giant claw?
... Why would a crab stab you?
... did the Little Mermaid get it right, and does Adam enjoy being interviewed?
The question plaguing us this episode is, how dark can it really get?
Hear about an amazing wildlife phenomenon?
How does human language arise in the mind?
... To what extent is it innate, or something that is learned?
... How do these factors interact?
Possible holographic disco birds?
Are the stars and constellations we see today the same that were seen by the ancient civilizations ...
... Do star positions ever change?
... - What do you make of the relationship between rhetoric and math?
From a leadership standpoint, what are your best teachings on how to lead with purpose?
... What is your leadership style?
... - How do you handle making mistakes?
Please join my mailing list here 👉 https://briankeating.com/list to win a meteorite 💥 Has the seco...
We’ve got a mystery sound reveal that promises to shock!Do you have your Smarty Pass yet??
Can we have science without freedom of speech?
Could this be the start of a greener way to fly?
NASA astronaut Christina Koch not only took part in the first ever all-female spacewalks, but she a...
Worried that AI will replace you?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
How do you know where you’re going?
... But listen to what, exactly?
Why is it important that the periodic table is structured as a table rather than a list of elements
... - Is the periodic table just the table for the current state?
Have you ever wondered why people become preppers?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
... What does This Week in Science think were the year’s top science stories?
what is life?
... What are the possible applications?
... And are we on to something here, or are we just playing God?
Those intricate, whimsical crystals are a staple of magical wintry scenes, but how big can they rea...
So why not consider the effects that watching movies and TV have on our minds and bodies too?
When researching, do you find it's more helpful to stay close to modern times in terms of content, ...
... - ​Can you talk about the history of theories of cognition and consciousness?
... What did the ancients think?
Are there any dangers to these "custom" plugins?
... - Is current tech like ChatGPT going to be able to answer every question imaginable?
What is the purpose of the Universe?
... Why do we exist?
... And does the truth lie beyond traditional religion and secular atheism?
... In his recently published book, "Why?
Next on the show, can a machine distinguish a tuberculosis cough from other kinds of coughs?
Can you visualize time?
How does it feel for them to carry this burden of knowledge?
... Could they have done more?
Eating organic and switching to low-energy light bulbs feels like the green thing to do, but are pe...
What’s up with the weird golden egg at the bottom of the ocean?
... How do eggs actually choose sperm?
Educational neuroscientist Elizabeth Toomarian talks about why humans' evolutionarily-old brains ar...
What can explain the success of science as an endeavor for getting closer to truth?
... Does science simply represent a successful methodology, or is it something more?
What did they do when they found out?
... How did they think the world would respond?
When math is based on abstract concepts, how do we know it’s correct?
Can clever framing sway a younger generation?
Ever gotten a scarlet, hot face after drinking?
... Or know someone who has?
... But what if there's a benefit to having Asian glow?
But who was she?
Do you like philosophy?
... Do you see math as a part of it?
... - Is it better to get a college degree in something practical like business and save interests as e...
But, why not?
In quantum chromodynamics, what is color confinement?
... - How did we discover strong nuclear force?
... - Is there a finite number of sub-atomic particles?
... Or will we forever find new unique ones?
... - How do detectors sense the presence of these particles?
Got more science news?
What was your favorite science story of 2023?
... Was it the rise of orca-involved boat sinkings?
Are people ever satisfied?
Do you hear what I hear?
... Does it have a scientific definition?
... Is it all just relative?
... Should crickets have podcasts?
Are you looking forward to catching up on some reading over the holiday season?
... Or perhaps you are on the prowl for book recommendations after receiving a few literary gift cards?
Would you survive as a doctor in The Sims 4?
... What's an appropriate amount of free food to take from a public sample station before it's greedy?
... And how much do clock towers affect sleep?
Is there a Theory of Everything?
Do penguins have flippers or wings?
... What’s up with pebble gifts?
... Are they squishy or dense?
... And why why why are they so cute?
Can you discuss the history of programming languages?
... Is programming always associated with computers or were there other forms of programming?
... - Didn't IBM have its own extremely labor intensive "telegraph" system?
... - How do you think Ada Lovelace would view the current age of AI?
Where do they come from, and what do they really do for us?
If you ask the AI the exact same question several times, will it give the same answer or will it ch...
... Or do the neurons change during self-learning and change the answer?
... - Do you think at any point we will create an AI factory?
Today, we visit the "Flicker Queen" to learn why LEDs flicker — and what you can do about it.Wonder...
Renowned cat behavior scientist Dr. Sarah Brown has been in the forefront of research on cat commun...
But following a death allegedly related to Panera Bread’s Charged Lemonade, has our collective obse...
How did these tree-hopping furry angels evolve to be the cutest thing in the world, objectively spe...
Will AI bring us closer to the truth or further away from it?
... Is it changing the way we do science?
... And will it eventually replace teachers and professors?
Does thinking about the trajectory of the climate make you have a panic spiral?
If you have a goal with many clearly defined milestones that are dependent on each other in order t...
... - Do you have a bucket list?
... What are some things you hope you see or experience in life that you haven't yet?
a global LLM)?
... - What about model interoperability?
... Where are we at on the research for that?
How can we stay happy and resilient in times like these?
... Is it even possible or reasonable?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
What happens when you die… or almost die?
The solution?
Does the universe have a purpose?
... If it does, how is this connected to the meaningfulness that we seek in our lives?
... In Why?
And as prohibition in the United States and other nations gives way to legal, recreational use, mor...
Do you think it will be possible to recreate historical figures as bots to interact with and get th...
... - Why do many great mathematicians complete their most influential work in their early 20s?
https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-qa | Questions include:With the rise of AI, what will happen to the wor...
... - Will we able to provide basic things to everyone with the use of only machines (specifically food...
... At that point, will jobs be obsolete or not?
What happened after the Big Bang?
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
But what stages of life did Betelgeuse — or any star — go through before it reached this moment?
Did your chemistry lessons involve baking chocolate lava cakes?
... Have you ever wanted to eat your biology homework?
Will there be a dramatic Big Rip or a Big Chill­–also known as the heat death of the universe–in tr...
... Or will vacuum decay, which could theoretically happen at any moment, do us in?
But what does an epigeneticist do exactly?
Could puberty get any more awkward?
https://wolfr.am/youtube-sw-business-qa | Questions include:Should I become a programmer?
... At what age do you think kids should start learning computer-related skills?
... Should programming be a core class for students, like math and English?
... - What do you think are good ways to introduce computational thinking to kids?
If ChatGPT's transformer model stores the averaging of the text that regular people produced on the...
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?
Could enough material be dumped in the ocean to slow climate change?
... Would mining that material release a lot of carbon?
Paleontologist Andrew Milner talks about his amazing fossil discovery at Lake Powell.Then, does Uta...
Remastered from our interview in May 2023 Will humans soon go extinct?
... Are we already on borrowed time?
But how much space can the human body handle?
Are lack of access and a loss of trust in science to blame?
What's that you spy on the horizon, just out of sight?
What did they do when they found out?
... How did they think the world would respond?
But when we do, are you and I seeing the same thing?
But what if we didn't have to?
Humans have been so dominant on Earth in large part because of their capacity to innovate – but how...
... Why can they innovate so much?
#225Life on Mercury?
... Lucky then that the BepiColombo mission is planned to take another look at Mercury soon.Ever wonder...
How did we miss these until now?
What's the history of AI?
... What's the first recorded example of artificial intelligence?
... - What did pattern matching look like in the Middle Ages?
... - What's the relationship between "cybernetics" and AI?
How could I achieve this?
But do we?
Is the Matrix really real?
... And if so, which pill would David Chalmers take?
What are the rules of engagement when writing the stories of female scientists?