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Science Podcast Episodes (Chronological)

A composite list of episodes from the past 90 days of physics, math, and astronomy podcasts. Also see episode list for general science podcasts.

Updated: 2022-May-23 12:02 UTC. Episodes: 632. Minimum length: 5 minutes. Hide descriptions. Switch to ranked view. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

Episodes
podcast image2022-May-23 • 54 minutes
End of Eternity (rebroadcast)
Nothing lasts forever. Even the universe has several possible endings. Will there be a dramatic Big Rip or a Big Chill­–also known as the heat death of the universe–in trillions of years? Or will vacuum decay, which could theoretically happen at any moment, do us in? Perhaps the death of a tiny particle – the proton – will bring about the end. We contemplate big picture endings in this episode, and whether one could be brought about by our own machine creations. Guests: Anders Sandberg – Researcher at t... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-May-23 • 52 minutes
657: Sizing Up Species’ Brains to Understand Nervous System Diversity and Development - Dr. Suzana Herculano-Houzel
Dr. Suzana Herculano-Houzel is a Professor of Psychology and Biological Sciences at Vanderbilt University. In the lab, she compares brains to find out what they are made of and what difference that makes for the organism in terms of its abilities. She... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-May-23 • 6 minutes
A Powerful ISS Instrument Will Hunt for Minerals in Dusty Lands
NASA’s EMIT mission will better analyze the grime from dust-spewing regions, a critically understudied factor in climate change. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-23 • 15 minutes
The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part Two): Forming Chien-Shiung Wu's Story
Growing up, Jada Yuan didn't realize how famous her grandmother was in the world of physics. In this episode, Jada talks to Emily about the life of physicist Chien-Shiung Wu, whom Jada got to know much better while writing the article Discovering Dr. Wu for the Washington Post, where she is a reporter covering culture and politics.Check out part one in which Emily talks to Short Wave's scientist-in-residence about how Chien-Shiung Wu altered physics. She made a landmark discovery in 1956 about how our unive... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-22 • 71 minutes
Philip Goff: Consciousness and Galileo's Error
Philip Goff is a philosopher and consciousness researcher at Durham University, UK. His research focuses on how to integrate consciousness into a scientific worldview. Goff argues that the traditional approaches of materialism (consciousness explained in terms of physical processes in the brain) and dualism (consciousness is separate from the body and brain) face insuperable difficulties. He therefore defends a form of panpsychism, the view that consciousness is a fundamental and ubiquitous feature of the p... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-May-22 • 10 minutes
The 'science donut'
There are some moments you can look back on and go 'yep – that’s when I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up.' The moment your ambition really crystallised. This week, we’re hearing from Emily Finch about when that moment happened for her – on a family field trip to what she calls the “science donut”. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-May-21 • 59 minutes
Death in the rainforest
Tree mortality in tropical moist forests in Australia has been increasing since the mid 1980s. The death rate of trees appears to have doubled over that time period. According to an international team of researchers, the primary cause is drier air in these forests, the consequence of human-induced climate change. According to ecologist David Bauman, a similar process is likely underway in tropical forests on other continents. Also in the programme: the outbreaks of monkeypox in Europe and North Amer... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-May-21 • 81 minutes
Ricardo Hausmann & J. Doyne Farmer on Evolving Technologies & Market Ecologies (EPE 03)
As our world knits together, economic interdependencies change in both shape and nature. Supply chains, finance, labor, technological innovation, and geography interact in puzzling nonlinear ways. Can we step back far enough and see clearly enough to make sense of these interactions? Can we map the landscape of capability across scales? And what insights emerge by layering networks of people, firms, states, markets, regions? We’re all riding a bucking horse; what questions can we ask to make sure that we ca... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-May-21 • 54 minutes
Where did the Universe come from?
* Science needs to develop trust for links to grow * Kids space adventure combines human fight for survival with planetary science * Where did the universe come from? * There’s more to geoscience than mining (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-May-21
The Skeptics Guide #880 - May 21 2022
News Items: Health Benefits of Clean Energy, SIDS, Growing Plants in Lunar Soil, Milky Way Black Hole, Gullible Acupuncture Article; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Language and AI, Raw Food Diet; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 30 minutes
Why does ancient stuff get buried?
Digging and excavating are bywords for archaeology. But why does history end up deep under our feet? This question struck CrowdScience listener Sunil in an underground car park. Archaeological remains found during the car park’s construction were displayed in the subterranean stairwells, getting progressively older the deeper he went. How had these treasures become covered in so much soil over the centuries? CrowdScience visits Lisbon, the capital of Portugal – and home to the above-mentioned multi-storey... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 48 minutes
Seabird Poop, ‘Prehistoric Planet’ TV Show, Dry Great Plains, Six Foods For A Changing Climate. May 20, 2022, Part 2
We Need To Talk About Bird Poop Seabird poop—sometimes called guano—was the “white gold” of fertilizers for humans for millennia. Rich in nitrogen and phosphorus from birds’ fish-based diets, the substance shaped trade routes and powered economies until c (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 48 minutes
Miscarriage Care, End of Astronauts, COVID Deaths Milestone. May 20, 2022, Part 1
A Grim Milestone, As Cases Continue This week, COVID-19 case trackers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hit a grim milestone, logging over one million deaths in the country from the pandemic. The true total is likely to be much higher, a (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 58 minutes
La Mancha Screwjob
All the world’s a stage. Or, sometimes it feels that way, especially these days. In this episode, originally aired in 2015, we push through the fourth wall, pierce the spandex-ed heart of professional wrestling, and travel 400 years into the past to unma (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 31 minutes
Obsession: Stories about scientific fixations
Science has a way of inspiring obsession. In this week’s episode, both our storytellers spiral deep into a personal all-consuming preoccupation. Part 1: Curtis Chou becomes dogmatic in his quest to correct a person’s incorrect fact on the internet. Part 2: Richard Cardillo is determined to uncover a priest’s secret to keeping a thriving cactus collection. Curtis Chou is a science communicator, puzzle enthusiast, and all-around adventure seeker. Curtis’s preferred bubble tea order is half-sweet strawberry m... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 15 minutes
#11 George Monbiot: The "blight" of farming
In our extended interview with George Monbiot, the writer and environmental activist talks about his book Regenesis: Feeding the World Without Devouring the Planet. In the book he argues that farming is the most destructive human activity ever to have blighted the Earth. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 8 minutes
Researchers Grew Tiny Plants in Moon Dirt Collected Decades Ago
The seedlings sprouted in the regolith scooped up in the 1960s and ’70s, but astronauts won’t be harvesting lunar spuds anytime soon. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 54 minutes
Losing sleep over climate change, growing plants in lunar soil, trilobite sex, the sound of biodiversity loss, carbon emissions and medical care and a question of blowing air.
Study says climate change could cause us to lose sleep – in more ways than one; Scientists successfully grow plants in moon dust; Fossil preserves critical evidence for how trilobites had sex half a billion years ago; A scientist recreates avian soundscapes so we can hear what we’re missing; How the medical system needs to – and is – engaging with its climate impacts; Quirks Question: Why does my breath feel warm when I exhale with an open mouth, and cool when I blow through tight lips? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-May-20 • 13 minutes
The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery
In the 1950's, a particle physicist made a landmark discovery that changed what was known about how the universe operates. Chien-Shiung Wu did it while raising a family and an ocean away from her relatives in China. Short Wave's Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber joins host Emily Kwong to talk about that landmark discovery—what it meant for the physics world, and what it means to Regina personally as a woman and a Chinese and Mexican American in physics. Email the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 30 minutes
Death in the rainforest
Tree mortality in tropical moist forests in Australia has been increasing since the mid 1980s. The death rate of trees appears to have doubled over that time period. According to an international team of researchers, the primary cause is drier air in these forests, the consequence of human-induced climate change. According to ecologist David Bauman, a similar process is likely underway in tropical forests on other continents. Also in the programme: the outbreaks of monkeypox in Europe and North Amer... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 91 minutes
Galactic Navel Gazing
This Week: Tabula Sapiens, Denisovan tooth, Tiny dentists, NeuroMechFly, Renewables Lifeline, Rocket Realism, Eat your vegetables, Conservation Wins!, Cockroaches, Spiders, Headbutting Muskoxen, Medical contact lens for glaucoma, Video Game Smarts, Stimulate The Circuits, And Much More! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 103 minutes
Jonathan Rauch: Free Thought, Democracy, and the Nature of Science
Jonathan Rauch was 30 years ahead of the curve. In his book Kindly Inquisitors, written in 1993, he described the very mechanisms by which ideology can undermine both the search for truth, and the democratic ideal of free thought—mechanisms which have now become endemic in our society. But more than that, in that book, and in The Constitution of Knowledge, written in 2021 he lays out more clearly than anyone I have ever read, the philosophical and sociological basis of science. The search for trut... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 41 minutes
Seeing the Milky Way’s central black hole, and calling dolphins by their names
On this week’s show: The shadow of Milky Way’s giant black hole has been seen for the first time, and bottlenose dolphins recognize each other by signature whistles—and tastes It’s been a few years since the first image of a black hole was published—that of the supermassive black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy came about in 2019. Now, we have a similar image of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way—our very own galaxy. Staff Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss why these im... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 34 minutes
Building Better Engagement
Victoria Gill and guests ask why does scientific communication matters in society and how it might be done better, with Sam Illingworth, Berry Billingsley and Ozmala Ismail. The climate crisis and Covid-19 have shown over the recent years the importance of reliable, relatable, transparent and trusted science communication. But just like science itself, it comes in different forms and takes different approaches. Always keen to keep you up to date, BBC Inside Science takes a moment to discuss good practice a... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 26 minutes
#119: How to tackle the global food crisis; rainforest animal orchestra; George Monbiot on humanity’s biggest blight
We’re in the middle of a global food crisis, brought on by a combination of the coronavirus pandemic, climate change and the war in Ukraine. As food prices rise and the world faces “hunger on an unprecedented scale”, the team looks for solutions.The health of an ecosystem can be measured through sound alone. The team discusses a new field of study called ecoacoustics which is being used to assess biodiversity, sharing sounds of an ‘animal orchestra’ recorded in the Brazilian rainforest.Rosie the Rocketeer (... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 5 minutes
If Sea Ice Melts in the Arctic, Do Trees Burn in California?
A new study links sea ice decline with increasing wildfire weather in the Western U.S. (@sciam)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 53 minutes
Cool Science Radio | May 19, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, John Wells and Lynn Ware Peek's guests are Sophie Bushwick and Chris Cashwell. We start the show by discussing (01:36) why is it that for many of us cryptocurrency just seems so... cryptic? Sophie Bushwick, senior technology editor at Scientific American, helps us understand how crypto has become a mass-market product advertised to everyday buyers. But the risk of volatility that could bankrupt untold numbers of people is still high.Then, (28:20) artificial intelligence is ubi... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: how stable are Utah's famous red rock formations?
A Utahn research team generated predictions about the seismic stability of famous red rock formations with the help of experienced mountain climbers. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 50 minutes
Jim Al-Khalili, "The Joy of Science" (Princeton UP, 2022)
Today’s world is unpredictable and full of contradictions, and navigating its complexities while trying to make the best decisions is far from easy. The Joy of Science (Princeton UP, 2022) presents 8 short lessons on how to unlock the clarity, empowerment, and joy of thinking and living a little more scientifically. In this brief guide to leading a more rational life, acclaimed physicist Jim Al-Khalili invites readers to engage with the world as scientists have been trained to do. The scientific method has ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 8 minutes
An Elusive Gravity Signal Could Mean Faster Earthquake Warnings
Tiny wobbles in Earth’s gravitational field could help detect big tremors faster, but they’re hard to tease out from the planet’s seismic noise. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 13 minutes
The destruction of Gran Chaco, forgotten sister of the Amazon rainforest
It’s a wake-up call for the world’s forests. Madeleine Finlay hears from biodiversity reporter Patrick Greenfield about what his trip deep inside Argentina’s precious region showed him and what’s needed to end deforestation by 2030, as promised at Cop26 (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 50 minutes
Lucien Hardy on quantum gravity and (apparent) paradoxes
Lucien Hardy is a theoretical physicist working at the intersection of the two pillars of modern physics – general relativity and quantum mechanics – in the quest for a single unifying theory: quantum gravity. Hardy joins co-hosts Lauren and Colin for a ... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-May-19 • 13 minutes
TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some
Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to biochemist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health. To listen to more episodes about how we taste, check out our TASTE BUDDIES series: https://n.pr/3LkXOh7 (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 28 minutes
How galaxies could exist without dark matter
How dark-matter-free galaxies may have formed, the scientists surviving the war in Ukraine, and imaging the black hole Sagittarius A*. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 27 minutes
Is telepathy real?
A groundbreaking study claims to have found a way for a fully paralyzed person to communicate entirely via thought. Today, Explained breaks down the science and asks: Is it too good to be true? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit ... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 54 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 11: The Covid Pandemic and Learning about Learning
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to renowned cognitive psychologist Stephen Kosslyn about how the COVID-19 pandemic influenced, or didn't influence, our understanding of the learning process. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmaker's journey in 10 essays) and a series of 24 detailed podcasts with many of the fi... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 10 minutes
These Nanobots Can Swim Around a Wound and Kill Bacteria
Researchers have created autonomous particles covered with patches of protein “motors.” They hope these bots will tote lifesaving drugs through bodily fluids. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 63 minutes
Conotoxinology (CONE SNAIL VENOM) with Joshua Torres & Sabah Ul-Hasan
Predatory. Sneaky. Deadly. Lifesavers? You think you don’t care about cone snails. But that’s about to change. Conotoxinologists Dr. Sabah Ul-Hasan and Dr. Joshua Torres study these spiral-shelled hunters of the sea. Why all the fuss? Because their venom -– and the microbes that live in it — may hold medical magic that can help us solve problems related to pain and insulin and much more. Also: how long can you live after a cigarette snail strikes you? What happens to researchers who get stung? How is venom ... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 15 minutes
Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?
Apps can be a great way to stay on top of your health. They let users keep track of things like exercise, mental health, the quality of their skin, and even menstrual cycles.But health researchers Giulia De Togni and Andrea Ford have found that many of these health apps also have a dark side — selling your most personal data to third parties like advertisers, insurers and tech companies. Emily talks to the researchers about the commodification of data, and their suggestions for increasing the security of y... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-18 • 50 minutes
Will the James Webb Space Telescope Reveal Another Earth?
With the December 2021 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, one of the most expensive and ambitious scientific initiatives ever attempted commenced operations. Now that the telescope has been successfully deployed in its unique position in space, its advanced instruments will be able to gather data on questions that scientists once could only dream of answering. Is there life on other planets? How do supermassive black holes mold the mass in their galaxies? JWST may soon be able to tell us. In this epi... (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 36 minutes
Dreams: The science of a sleeping brain
You dream every night, even if you don't remember them. But why? We'll hop on a wild ride to go inside the brain and see which parts help create these often fantastical images and storylines. We'll also learn how to take control of our dreams and how they make us more creative. Plus: a new mystery sound and a Moment of Um answers the question "How do octopuses make ink?" | Today’s episode is sponsored by | | Insectlore.com | Shopify.ca/brainson – for a free 14 day trial and full ac... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 7 minutes
Atmospheric rivers
A discovery in weather in the 1990s was the Atmospheric River. They've been around for pretty much ever though - one of them bankrupted California in 1862, and another dumped lots and lots of water onto Brisbane, in February 2022. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 42 minutes
Worms
SciShow Tangents is on YouTube! Go to www.youtube.com/scishowtangents to check out this episode with the added bonus of seeing our faces! From big, slimy earthworms to microscopic C. elegans, worms are everywhere... or are they? It turns out, as is often the case on Tangents, that everything you thought you knew about worms is a lie, up to and including their very existence!Head to www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 43 minutes
David M. Peña-Guzmán, "When Animals Dream: The Hidden World of Animal Consciousness" (Princeton UP, 2022)
Are humans the only dreamers on Earth? What goes on in the minds of animals when they sleep? When Animals Dream: The Hidden World of Animal Consciousness (Princeton UP, 2022) brings together behavioral and neuroscientific research on animal sleep with philosophical theories of dreaming. It shows that dreams provide an invaluable window into the cognitive and emotional lives of nonhuman animals, giving us access to a seemingly inaccessible realm of animal experience. David Peña-Guzmán uncovers evidence of an... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 11 minutes
Ticks Are Spreading in the US—and Taking New Diseases With Them
The vast majority of tick-borne disease goes unrecorded, meaning life-threatening pathogens are traveling under the radar to new locations. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 13 minutes
Is the world keeping Cop26’s climate promises?
Six months on from Cop26, Ian Sample speaks to environment correspondent Fiona Harvey about progress made and how much the war in Ukraine could derail efforts to achieve climate goals (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 59 minutes
Forensics
How archeology and anthropology are pivotal in cases of wrongdoing, mystery and war crimes (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-May-17 • 9 minutes
How Vaccine Misinformation Spread Through The Parenting World
Any hour now, the U.S. is expected to officially mark one million lives lost to the COVID-19 pandemic. Health correspondent Allison Aubrey shares how this misinformation first entered the parenting world--and how some are fighting back. Email the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 10 minutes
How bias impedes women’s ascent to political leadership
Christianne Corbett and Robb Willer explore perceptions of electability of female political candidates. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 68 minutes
197 | Catherine Brinkley on the Science of Cities
I talk with Catherine Brinkley about the structure and growth of cities, and how humans life in them. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 8 minutes
How to Care for COVID at Home, and Is That Sniffle Allergies or the Virus? COVID Quickly, Episode 30
How to Care for COVID at Home, and Is That Sniffle Allergies or the Virus? COVID Quickly, Episode 30 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 50 minutes
Will Kinney, "An Infinity of Worlds: Cosmic Inflation and the Beginning of the Universe" (MIT Press, 2022)
In the beginning was the Big Bang: an unimaginably hot fire almost fourteen billion years ago in which the first elements were forged. The physical theory of the hot nascent universe--the Big Bang--was one of the most consequential developments in twentieth-century science. And yet it leaves many questions unanswered: Why is the universe so big? Why is it so old? What is the origin of structure in the cosmos? In An Infinity of Worlds: Cosmic Inflation and the Beginning of the Universe (MIT Press, 2022), phy... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 54 minutes
Neanderthal in the Family (rebroadcast)
Back off, you Neanderthal! It sounds as if you’ve just been dissed, but maybe you should take it as a compliment. Contrary to common cliches, our Pleistocene relatives were clever, curious, and technologically inventive. Find out how our assessment of Neanderthals has undergone a radical rethinking, and hear about the influence they have as they live on in our DNA. For example, some of their genes have a strong association with severe Covid 19 infection. Plus, how Neanderthal mini-brains grown in a lab will... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 50 minutes
656: Expressing His Passion for Science and Bacterial Genetics - Dr. Stanley Maloy
Dr. Stanley Maloy is Dean of the College of Sciences, Associate Director of the Center for Microbial Sciences, and Professor in Biology at San Diego State University. Stanley’s lab is working on a new approach for delivering vaccines that may be... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 8 minutes
Delegates at the United Nations Have Begun Forging New Rules for Space
International experts are using earthly policies as models to hash out regulations for orbiting spacecraft, from preventing conflict to limiting trash. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-16 • 14 minutes
The Importance Of The Vaginal Microbiome
Today on Short Wave, researcher Fatima Aysha Hussain talks to host Emily Kwong about how microbes in the vagina can impact health and how transplanting vaginal microbiomes from one vagina to another could help people managing bacterial vaginosis. To learn more about the vaginal microbiome transplant study, visit https://motifstudy.org/. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-15 • 28 minutes
Shep Doeleman: How the Event Horizon Telescope caught the Milky Way’s MONSTER Black Hole!
European Southern Observatory (ESO) released groundbreaking new Milky Way results from the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration (EHT). Today I speak to Shep Doeleman Founding Director of the Event Horizon Telescope about. what it all means! You can watch the press conference on ESO's YouTube channel https://youtu.be/rIQLA6lo6R0 and watch my breakdown of everything you need to know! Astronomers have unveiled the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy. This resul... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-May-15 • 11 minutes
Pandemic preparation and the data pyramid
Priyanka Pillai combines computer science skills and a background in biomedical sciences to take on complex challenges in health data, particularly for pandemic preparedness research. You know, just in case we ever need that sort of thing … (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-May-15 • 65 minutes
Portrait of the monster black hole at our galaxy’s heart
The heaviest thing in the Galaxy has now been imaged by the biggest telescope on Earth. This is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy – a gas and star-consuming object, a 4 million times the mass of the Sun. The Event Horizon Telescope is not one device but a consortium of radio telescopes ranging from the South Pole to the Arctic Circle. Their combined data allowed astronomers to focus in on this extreme object for the first time. Astronomer Ziri Younsi from University Col... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-May-14 • 54 minutes
Musk promises brain implants for spinal injuries and AI and help for Australian sea lions
* A call for more controls over possible brain manipulation and monitoring * Global risks require new approach to governance * Consumption linked to biodiversity and extinction risk * Missouri Botanical Gardens moves its annual orchid show online * Australian sea lions in an ongoing decline (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-May-14
The Skeptics Guide #879 - May 14 2022
Dumbest Thing of the Week: Best UFO Picture; News Items: AI Artists, Molten Salt Battery, Trolling Science Journalism, Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Action Bias vs Omission Bias; Science Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 35 minutes
Does photographic memory exist?
Most people are great at remembering key points from important events in their lives, while the finer details - such as the colour of the table cloth in your favourite restaurant or the song playing on the radio while you brushed your teeth - are forgotten. But some people seem to have the power to remember events, documents or landscapes with almost perfect recall, which is widely referred to as having a photographic memory. Crowdscience listeners Tracy and Michael want to know if photographic memory act... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 47 minutes
Abortion Medication, Rat Island, Access To Parks, Climate And Seafood. May 13, 2022, Part 2
Abortion Pills Are Used For Most U.S. Abortions. What Are They? The draft Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade means abortion access is once again in jeopardy. Nearly half of U.S. states will immediately ban abortion upon a Roe v. Wade overturn. (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 47 minutes
Second Black Hole Image, Last Days Of The Dinosaurs, Rising COVID Cases. May 13, 2022, Part 1
As COVID Cases Rises, Effectiveness Of Vaccines Lessens In Kids As parts of the country continue to see waves of infection from the omicron variant of COVID-19, parents of children over age five have taken heart at the availability of vaccines—while paren (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 36 minutes
Proton Prom: Stories from our Proton Prom storytellers
In anticipation of our upcoming Proton Prom, this week we’re re-airing the first Story Collider stories from two of the storytellers who will be performing at the event. Part 1: When Aparna Nancherla's science fair project goes awry, she and her fellow students make some unethical choices. Part 2: After a reluctant start, mathematician Ken Ono makes an unexpected discovery. Aparna Nancherla is a comedian and general silly billy. Her sense of humor is dry, existential, and absurd, with notes of uncalled-for ... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 14 minutes
Coronapod: 'viral ghosts' support idea that SARS-CoV-2 reservoirs could be behind long COVID
Millions of people around the world have been left managing the complex and amorphous syndrome that is long COVID. But the underlying cause of this myriad of symptoms is not clear. One hypothesis is that the virus is able to find a safe haven in the body from which it can bide its time and potentially re-emerge - a viral reservoir. Now researchers studying long COVID have found evidence of SARS-CoV-2 in a series of organs around the body, most notably the gut, months after the infection appears to have been... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 36 minutes
Frailmales
This week, we bring you two stories about little guys trying to do big big things. First, self-proclaimed animal grinch producer Becca Bressler introduces us to perhaps the one creature that has warmed her heart: a cricket. And more specifically, a male (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 10 minutes
Burning Crops to Capture Carbon? Good Luck Finding Water
The technique uses plants as fuel and sequesters the emitted CO2, removing it from the atmosphere. But scaling up would use gobs of water and land. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 54 minutes
Ancient oyster mounds, seagrass’ sweet secret, saving the Mekong delta, reading minds to produce sound and next-gen COVID-19 vaccines
Oyster shell mountains show history of sustainable Indigenous fisheries; Seagrass is hiding a submerged sweet CO2 secret; Saving the Mekong delta in six (not) easy steps; Researchers can read a bird’s brain to tell what it’s about to sing; The first COVID-19 vaccines were a medical miracle – the next ones could be even better. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-May-13 • 12 minutes
Who Would Be Most Affected By Roe Reversal
If the U.S. Supreme Court rules in line with the draft decision leaked in early May, the decision to reverse Roe v. Wade affect a much broader group than people who get pregnant. But research shows abortion restrictions have a disproportionate impact on young women, poor women and especially those in communities of color. NPR health correspondent Yuki Noguchi talks to Short Wave scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber about how this ruling would affect those women and how groups helping them get abortions a... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 29 minutes
Portrait of the monster black hole at our galaxy’s heart
The heaviest thing in the Galaxy has now been imaged by the biggest telescope on Earth. This is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy – a gas and star-consuming object, a 4 million times the mass of the Sun. The Event Horizon Telescope is not one device but a consortium of radio telescopes ranging from the South Pole to the Arctic Circle. Their combined data allowed astronomers to focus in on this extreme object for the first time. Astronomer Ziri Younsi from University C... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 99 minutes
Why is Helium Rising?
This Week: Atmospheric Rise, Viva La Virus, Concussions, One In 10, California, Fungal Fitness, Stress and fertility, Ominous Omicron, COVID Creativity, Good news, Dolphins with the Snake, Bee like Bats, Ancient indigenous Uruguay DNA, Healthy tattoos, Brain Fluid Boost, Brain Squirts, Brain Berries, And Much More! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 27 minutes
Fixing fat bubbles for vaccines, and preventing pain from turning chronic
On this week’s show: Lipid nanoparticles served us well as tiny taxis delivering millions of mRNA vaccines against COVID-19, but they aren’t optimized—yet, and why we might need inflammation to stop chronic pain The messenger RNA payload of the mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 is wrapped up in little fatty packets called lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). These fat bubbles were originally designed for something much different—carrying molecules into cells to silence genes. But they were useful and we were in a hu... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 35 minutes
A Trip-Switch for Depression?
Could magic mushrooms be the key to a revolution in treating depression? Professor David Nutt, director of the Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research, thinks so. He tells Vic Gill about recent research suggesting that psilocybin - the psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms - triggers rewiring of the brain in people with treatment-resistant depression. Vic Gill speaks with trial participant Steve Shorney who was diagnosed with depression 30 years ago. Nanobodies. That's the name scientists have gi... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 216 minutes
AMA | May 2022
Ask Me Anything episode of Mindscape for May 2022. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 53 minutes
Cool Science Radio | May 12, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn and John speak with (01:29) Susan Tyler Hitchcock, has just written INTO THE FOREST: The Secret Language of Trees. Writing for National Geographic, Hitchcock combines legendary photography with cutting-edge science to show exactly how trees influence the life of planet Earth―from our personal lives to the weather cycle.Then, (26:28) Tim Menard joins the show. He asks the question: Why is it that our smartphones have so many capabilities, but it seems like the technology d... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: birds are shrinking due to climate change, especially small-brained ones
A new study – based on the analysis of over 70,000 individual birds – found bigger brained birds have been able to withstand shrinkage due to climate change. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 51 minutes
Homo erectus
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss one of our ancestors, Homo erectus, who thrived on Earth for around two million years whereas we, Homo sapiens, emerged only in the last three hundred thousand years. Homo erectus, or Upright Man, spread from Africa to Asia and it was on the Island of Java that fossilised remains were found in 1891 in an expedition led by Dutch scientist Eugène Dubois. Homo erectus people adapted to different habitats, ate varied food, lived in groups, had stamina to outrun their prey; and d... (@BBCInOurTime)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 56 minutes
Avery Broderick on a black hole breakthrough from the EHT
On May 12, 2022, the global Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration unveiled the landmark first image of the black hole at the heart of our own Milky Way galaxy, called Sagittarius A* (or Sgr A*). On this special episode of Conversations at the Perim... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 29 minutes
#118: Heatwaves push limits of human tolerance; chemical computer to mimic brain; first non-human to practice medicine
It feels like temperature records are being broken almost daily. We’ve seen heatwaves already this year in Texas and Mexico, with forecast highs of 50oC set to hit Pakistan and India. As we edge closer to breaking 1.5 degrees of global warming in the next 5 years, Rowan speaks to climate scientist Vikki Thompson from the University of Bristol, to find out how heatwaves are pushing at the limits of what humans can cope with.Chemical computers have taken a step up. Lee Cronin and his colleagues at the Univers... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 78 minutes
Urology (CROTCH PARTS) with Fenwa Milhouse
We’ve done Nephrology, Gynecology, and Phallology — but nothing prepared us for this. Penis implants. Road trip pees. Kegels. Bidets. Squirting. UTIs. Clitoral flim-flam. Elephant bladders. Everyone’s favorite Urologist, Dr. Fenwa Milhouse, makes chatting about the uh, juicy stuff effortless and easy. Like peeing should be. She humbly describes herself as a crotch plumber, but she’s so much more: a surgeon, a mentor and an inspiration. Dr. Fenwa Milhouse on TikTok @yourfavoriteurologist or Instagram @DrMilh... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 9 minutes
The Desert’s Fragile Skin Can’t Take Much More Heat
Climate change and human activity are destroying the layers of fungi, lichen, and bacteria that protect deserts from erosion. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 15 minutes
Why aren’t women getting diagnosed with ADHD?
Madeleine Finlay speaks to Jasmine Andersson about her experience of getting a late ADHD diagnosis, and Prof Amanda Kirby on why the condition is so often missed in women and girls (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-12 • 13 minutes
A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight
In 1992, diplomats and scientists at the United Nations negotiated the first-ever treaty intended to tackle the climate change. This brought the issue to the forefront and led to a series of conferences that have occurred almost every year for the next 30 years. Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks to freelance climate reporter, Dan Charles about how those at the conference wrote a clear and ambitious goal that they didn't even fully understand. Plus — why it rattled the fossil fuel industry. This is part 2 of... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 25 minutes
Retinas revived after donor's death open door to new science
A new method for reviving retinal cells, and the likelihood that life originated as RNA. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 20 minutes
New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memory
Researchers have mapped hundreds of semantic categories to the tiny bits of the cortex that represent them in our thoughts and perceptions. What they discovered might change our view of memory. The post New Map of Meaning in the Brain Changes Ideas About Memory first appeared on Quanta Magazine (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 69 minutes
The State of The Universe With Eric Weinstein: Part 2 0f 2 - Trust in Science, Optimism About the Future and Eric's Crystal Ball
Eric Weinstein and I go for a wide-ranging quarterly catch-up on all sorts of goings-on in our Universe. We'll chat about Elon Musk and Twitter, censorship and control, abortion and leaks, a possible solution to the Fermi Paradox on intelligent aliens, Galileo Galilei, and more! Topics Include: Does Elon Musk have Buyer’s Remorse over Twitter? Roe vs Wade and the immorality of leaks Trust in science is at an all-time low. What can we do? Advice to Elon Musk RESOURCES MENTIONED: Previous Videos with Er... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 24 minutes
Why do we dream?
Dreams are weird, but can they be a scientific tool? Can they teach us anything about humanity? About ourselves? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 58 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 10: Covid and the Art of Science Communication
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to John Tregoning, Imperial College respiratory infections researcher and author of the acclaimed book Infectious: Pathogens and How We Fight Them. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmaker's journey in 10 essays) and a series of 24 detailed podcasts with many of the film's expert... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 8 minutes
A Vast Underground Water System Helps Drive Antarctica’s Glaciers
Scientists have finally found Antarctica’s missing groundwater, which will help them predict ice flows on the continent. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-11 • 14 minutes
A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight
In 1992, diplomats and scientists at the United Nations negotiated the first-ever treaty intended to tackle the scientific phenomenon now known as climate change. This brought the issue to the forefront and led to a series of conferences that would occur almost every year for the next 30 years. Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks to freelance climate reporter, Dan Charles, about how those at the conference wrote a clear and ambitious goal that they didn't even fully understand.Email the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 32 minutes
Tongue twisters: Terribly terrific and truly tantalizing
Why is it so hard to say sentences like: she sells sea shells at the sea shore? This episode cracks the code of tongue twisters. Check out the role mouth shapes and vocal folds play in tongue twisters. Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel will share her research into tongue twisters and how she came up with some of the hardest sentences for people to say. We also have a report on “the late eight,” a group of sounds that can be tough to say — and quite confounding when combined. | | Also, be sure to check out our lis... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 65 minutes
State of the Universe with Eric Weinstein: Part 1 of 2 - Elon Musk and Roe vs. Wade
Eric Weinstein and I go for a wide-ranging quarterly catch-up on all sorts of goings-on in our Universe. We'll chat about Elon Musk and Twitter, censorship and control, abortion and leaks, a possible solution to the Fermi Paradox on intelligent aliens, Galileo Galilei, and more! Topics Include: Does Elon Musk have Buyer’s Remorse over Twitter? Roe vs Wade and the immorality of leaks Trust in science is at an all-time low. What can we do? Advice to Elon Musk RESOURCES MENTIONED: Previous Videos with Er... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 6 minutes
Why are whales so big?
Whales are the giants of the marine realm, and here's why they get that way. This episode was originally published in May 2018 (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 6 minutes
Two-Headed Worms Tell Us Something Fascinating about Evolution
Two-Headed Worms Tell Us Something Fascinating about Evolution (@sciam)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 32 minutes
SciShow Tangents Classics - Pee
We're hard at work on a cool new project, but we needed a little extra time to work on it! So this week, please enjoy a rerun of the all-time classic Pee episode!And did you know there's a video version of this episode? You can check it out here!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your ver... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 59 minutes
Primates, Pi and (unconscious) Ponderings
Expert spotlights and May-themed madness in our monthly panel show... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 11 minutes
‘It’s a hellfire!’: how are India and Pakistan coping with extreme heat?
India and Pakistan have experienced their hottest April in 122 years. Temperatures are nearing 50C. Ian Sample talks to Shah Meer Baloch about what such extremes do to the body and how south Asia is adapting to inevitable heatwaves. (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-10 • 14 minutes
Stephanie's Story: How COVID Misinformation Affected One Family
Stephanie was usually careful about her health and regular vaccinations. But then she got into sharing conspiracy-filled videos and fringe ideas. When COVID hit, misinformation put her and her husband at risk. Science correspondent and editor Geoff Brumfiel shares with Emily Kwong what he learned in reporting Stephanie's story. You can follow Emily on Twitter @EmilyKwong1234 and Geoff at @GBrumfiel. Email Short Wave at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-09 • 77 minutes
196 | Judea Pearl on Cause and Effect
I talk to Judea Pearl, a founder of the "causal revolution" that is shaking up the social sciences, artificial intelligence, and philosophy. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-May-09 • 56 minutes
Catching Fire
We have too much “bad fire.” Not only destructive wildfires, but the combustion that powers our automobiles and provides our electricity has generated a worrying rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. And that is driving climate change which is adding to the frequency of megafires. Now we’re seeing those effects in “fire-clouds,” pyrocumulonimbus events. But there’s such a thing as “good fire.” Indigenous peoples managed the land with controlled fires, reaped the benefits of doing so, and they’re bringing them... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-May-09 • 39 minutes
655: Researching how the Brain Changes with Vision Rehabilitation - Dr. Tara Alvarez
Dr. Tara Alvarez is Professor of Bio-Medical Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology and Chief Scientific Officer at OculoMotor Technologies. Tara’s research focuses on how we move our eyes, how visual information is brought in through our... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-May-09 • 9 minutes
Australia Moves Ahead Cautiously With '3-Parent IVF'
The nation follows the UK in permitting mitochondrial donation, which aims to prevent the transmission of rare but often fatal conditions. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-09 • 15 minutes
The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion
A leaked draft opinion in the Supreme Court case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization has placed uncertainty on the future of abortion rights in the United States. As written, the opinion would overturn Roe v. Wade protections. We at Short Wave were immediately curious about the data behind abortions: What happens when pregnant people are denied abortions? For answers, we turned to Dr. Diana Greene Foster, the lead researcher on the interdisciplinary team behind The Turnaway Study. For over a decade... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-08 • 10 minutes
Sex in a changing world
Sexual selection is a potent evolutionary force responsible for much of the weird and wonderful diversity of life on our planet. So what happens when it's disturbed by human-induced environmental change? (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-May-08 • 61 minutes
Mekong Delta will sink beneath the sea by 2100
The Mekong Delta is home to 17 million people and is Vietnam’s most productive agricultural region. An international group of scientists warn this week that almost all of the low lying delta will have sunk beneath the sea within 80 years without international action. Its disappearance is the result of both sea level rise and developments such as dams and sand mining, as Matt Kondolf of the University of California, Berkeley explains to Roland Pease. Also in the programme: Seismologist Laura Emert on usin... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-May-07 • 54 minutes
Young scientists forced abroad for work and the twelve experiments that helped make the modern world
* Thankyou Australia and goodbye * Lyrebird song a possible indication of population health * Twelve experiments that changed our world – the story of how we came to understand the universe * Science Media Centres – linking the media to scientists (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-May-07
The Skeptics Guide #878 - May 7 2022
SGU 17 Year Anniversary; Quickie with Bob: Follow Up Solar Lens; News Items: Sustainable Jet Fuel, Dog Personality, COVID and Cognitive Function, Fertilizer Shortage, Cosmic Expansion; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Lemuria; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 51 minutes
Eric Beinhocker & Diane Coyle on Rethinking Economics for A Sustainable & Prosperous World (EPE 02)
In the digital era, data is practically the air we breathe. So why does everybody treat it like a product to be hoarded and sold at profit? How would our world change if Big Tech operated on assumptions and incentives more aligned with the needs of a healthy society? Are more data — or are bigger models — really better? As human beings scamper around like prehistoric mammals under the proverbial feet of the new enormous digital monopolies that have emerged due to the Web’s economies of scale, how might we t... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 32 minutes
How far could gene editing go?
Humans now have the ability to directly change their DNA, and gene-editing tool CRISPR has led to a new era in gene-editing. CrowdScience listener ‘Bones’ wants to know how gene-editing is currently being used and what might be possible in the future. Gene-editing offers huge opportunities for the prevention and treatment of human diseases, and trials are currently underway in a wide range of diseases like sickle cell anaemia. CrowdScience presenter Caroline Steel finds out about some of the most promising... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 6 minutes
The Harmful Effects of Overturning Roe v. Wade
A landmark study of women who were turned away from getting the procedure found that being forced to have a child worsened their health and economic status. (@sciam)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 30 minutes
DNA: Stories about genetics
It’s almost magical how a combination of just A, C, T, and G entirely determine who we are. In this week’s episode both our storytellers look at how their genes impact their lives. Part 1: Kristen Williams unexpectedly finds herself attending a family reunion after taking a DNA test. Part 2: After several miscarriages, Joanne O’Meara turns to genetic testing for answers. Kristen Williams is a Navy veteran and a Senior Business Manager. She loves storytelling because it allows her to relive the most impactfu... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 47 minutes
Revisiting The Titanic, STEM Drag Performers As Science Ambassadors. May 6, 2022, Part 2
The Seafaring Life Of ‘Modern-Day Captain Nemo,’ Robert Ballard In 1985, oceanographer Robert Ballard was sent on a secret deep-sea search operative with a very specific mission: to seek two sunken nuclear submarines. Ballard, who by then had explored the (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 47 minutes
How The Brain Deals With Grief, Listening To Noisy Fish Sounds. May 6, 2022, Part 1
How Grief Rewires The Brain Being a human can be a wonderful thing. We’re social creatures, craving strong bonds with family and friends. Those relationships can be the most rewarding parts of life. But having strong relationships also means the possibili (@scifri)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 61 minutes
Debatable
In competitive debate future presidents, supreme court justices, and titans of industry pummel each other with logic and rhetoric. Unclasp your briefcase. It’s time for a showdown. Looking back on an episode originally aired in 2016, we take a good long (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 150 minutes
Alan Guth: Inflation of The Universe & More
In 1979 Alan Guth, then a postdoc at Cornell, made what is perhaps the most important contribution to our theoretical understanding of the evolution of the Universe in the past half century. His realization that the early universe could have undergone a brief period of what he dubbed as “Inflation” provided the first and to date the only explanation of the large scale properties of the Universe compatible with observations, and based on well-defined, calculable, microphysical physics principles... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 54 minutes
Endangered tiny porpoise, Mars-quakes, thermal batteries, bloodworms metal fangs, finding alternatives to animal experimentation and why does coal release mercury?
With only 10 left, scientists say this tiny porpoise could survive – if we let it; Mars probe detects a whole lot of shaking going on; New heat-to-electricity device could make large thermal batteries a reality; A venomous marine worm with metal teeth reveals its secrets; Meet the Canadian researcher determined to take the animals out of lab testing; Question - Why does burning coal release mercury? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-May-06 • 12 minutes
Lessons From HIV On Ending The COVID Pandemic
The world has come a long way since the COVID-19 pandemic began. There are now vaccines, at-home tests, masks and treatments. With all of these tools available, why is COVID still here?Health policy correspondent Selena Simmons-Duffin talks to Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber about what we can learn from the public health advocates working to end the HIV epidemic, how those lessons may translate to ending COVID and why having the scientific tools isn't enough. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 30 minutes
Mekong Delta will sink beneath the sea by 2100
The Mekong Delta is home to 17 million people and is Vietnam’s most productive agricultural region. An international group of scientists warn this week that almost all of the low lying delta will have sunk beneath the sea within 80 years without international action. Its disappearance is the result of both sea level rise and developments such as dams and sand mining. Also in the programme: using the rumbling of traffic in Mexico City to monitor earthquake hazard, record-breaking quakes on Mars and a recor... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 99 minutes
May the Fourth be with us!
This Week: Black Hole Sound, Poo Pills, Abortion, Global warming will kill all the fish, Coral Coves, Sweet CO2, What's that? A tired bird?, Bats, Vegetarian kids, Bioreactor burgers, Eye Screen, Factory Resets, Reset Diseases, And Much More! (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 21 minutes
Staking out the start of the Anthropocene, and why sunscreen is bad for coral
On this week’s show: Geoscientists eye contenders for where to mark the beginning of the human-dominated geological epoch, and how sunscreen turns into photo toxin We live in the Anthropocene: an era on our planet that is dominated by human activity to such an extent that the evidence is omnipresent in the soil, air, and even water. But how do we mark the start? Science Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how geoscientists are choosing the one place on Earth that best shows the adve... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 12 minutes
When Our Star Erupts - The 1859 Solar Storm And More
In 1859, astronomer Richard Carrington was studying the Sun when he witnessed the most intense geomagnetic storm recorded in history. The storm, triggered by a giant solar flare, sent brilliant auroral displays across the globe and causing electrical sparking and fires in telegraph stations.Short Wave's scientist-in-residence Regina G. Barber talks to solar physicist Dr. Samaiyah Farid about what's now known as the Carrington event and about what may happen the next time a massive solar storm hits Earth. Yo... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 36 minutes
Declining Data, Climate Deadlines and the Day the Dinosaurs Died
Covid-19 infections in the UK are at an all-time high. But most people in England can no longer access free Covid-19 tests, and the REACT-1 study, which has been testing more than 100,000 individuals since the pandemic began, ended last week after its funding stopped. Martin Mckee, Prof of European Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, shares his insights on what these changes might mean for ambitions to 'live with the virus'. This week, the UN's latest Intergovernmental Panel on C... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: why you should be scared about the spread of 'ghost forests'
Researchers documented some coastal forests are now inundated by water they can’t use because it contains high levels of salt, a consequence of sea levels rising due to climate change. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 26 minutes
#117: US threat to women’s health; saving the world with bacteria; Darwinian feminism and primate gender; invasion of the earthworms
Women’s abortion rights are under threat in the US. Leaked documents suggest the Supreme Court is on the verge of overturning the landmark Roe v Wade decision that protects the right to abortion. The team discusses the dramatic impact this move could have on women’s health.Eating microbes could save the world. The team examines a new study which found that substituting just a fifth of the meat in our diets with microbial proteins would more than halve global deforestation rates and related carbon emissions.... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | May 5, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek is doing a replay of some of her favorite recent interviews: (01:56) Writer, scientist and human Christopher Kemp. He is the author of Dark and Magical Places:The Neuroscience of How We Navigate. The book is a journey to discover the remarkable extent of what our minds can do. They talk with Chris about how we carry around an infinite and endlessly unfolding map of the world and about how navigation is one of the most ancient neural abilities we have - older eve... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 9 minutes
Everyone Wants to Build Green Energy Projects. What's the Holdup?
Proposals for wind, solar, and battery storage projects are running into a logjam of paperwork and grid connection issues. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 10 minutes
Why is the UK suffering HRT shortages?
The UK is short of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) products, medications that make a big difference to those going through menopause. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Nicola Davis about why demand isn’t being met and what impact this is having on people’s lives (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 72 minutes
Ghazal Geshnizjani and Niayesh Afshordi: Cosmologically Coupled
They often debate the working black holes and the big bang at Perimeter Institute’s blackboards -- and sometimes at the breakfast table too. Ghazal Geshnizjani and Niayesh Afshordi split their time between investigating the mysteries of the cosmos and ra... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-May-05 • 62 minutes
Acoustic Ecology (NATURE RECORDINGS) with Eddie Game
Insects humming. Birds squawking. Chainsaws buzzing? What does the rainforest sound like? Or the oceans outside of port cities? Is the world getting louder? And what can recording devices detect that our ears – especially mine, Alie’s – can’t? Acoustic Ecologist Dr. Eddie Game of the Nature Conservancy has asked conservation questions over decades of work in 20 countries, and even though his microphone for this interview sucked, his stories and wisdom are a pleasure to hear. Also: is it okay to talk to owls... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 25 minutes
Swapping in a bit of microbial 'meat' has big eco-gains
A forecast of the environmental benefits of switching to microbial protein, and the neurons that help mosquitoes home in on humans. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 42 minutes
Where Do Space, Time and Gravity Come From?
Einstein's description of gravity as a curvature in space-time doesn't easily mesh with a universe made up of quantum wavefunctions. Theoretical physicist Sean Carroll (of the "Mindscape" podcast) tells Steven Strogatz about the mind-bending implications of the quest for quantum gravity. (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 29 minutes
Should I take a DNA ancestry test?
What are the scientific, family, and privacy implications? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 61 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 9: Covid, 'Scientism,' and the Betrayal of the Enlightenment
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to bestselling author and University of Oxford law professor Charles Foster on how the coronavirus pandemic reveals how so many of us—including so many scientists—have replaced rigorous scientific skepticism with an alarming cult of "scientism." Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A fil... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 8 minutes
Give Fitbits (of Sorts) to the Trees
You can tell a lot about a tree by its sway, so scientists are outfitting them with accelerometers. That could help the West better manage its water. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-04 • 12 minutes
Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans
Scientists have discovered the underpinnings of animal emotions. As NPR brain correspondent Jon Hamilton reports, the building blocks of emotions and of emotional disorders can be found across lots of animals. That discovery is helping scientists understand human emotions like fear, anger — and even joy. Express your joy, fear and fine — even your scientific rage to us. We're at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 56 minutes
Who Was James Webb? An honest conversation with Hakeem Oluseyi
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is NASA’s next great flagship observatory. It’s set to continue — and extend — the illustrious scientific tradition established by the Hubble Space Telescope, while peering deeper into the universe and observing what Hubble could not. But who was James Webb? Considering the controversy surrounding his legacy, I wanted to explore the allegations against him with my friend Hakeem Oluseyi and answer the question: Why was the James Webb Space Telescope named after him? Hake... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 26 minutes
How does a caterpillar become a butterfly?
Caterpillars go through a striking transformation from a crawly, tube-like creature into a soaring, beautifully-winged butterfly. This process is called metamorphosis and it’s no wonder our listeners have lots of questions about it. We’ll find out exactly how a caterpillar transforms (spoiler alert: it doesn’t just grow a pair of wings), and we’ll go on a house-hunting journey with two caterpillars searching for their pupation stations. Plus, a pretty tricky mystery sound for you to guess! | | This episode... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 8 minutes
Most distant star ever found
The star Earendel came into existence a long time ago, and is now famous as the most distant single star that astronomers have been able to obtain an image of. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 42 minutes
Asteroids
Last week we talked about boring old rocks on the ground. This week, we're again talking rocks, but these are rocks... from SPACE!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangents sticker!A big thank you to Patreon subscribers Garth Riley and Tom Mosner for helpin... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 10 minutes
Hepatitis Cases in Kids Have Scientists Hunting for Answers
Young children across the world are inexplicably coming down with the liver illness, putting parents and doctors on alert. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 60 minutes
Madvertising
The plethora of pop-ups jostling for our emotional engagement. (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 15 minutes
Will the Large Hadron Collider find a new fifth force of nature?
Madeleine Finlay speaks to Hannah Devlin and Prof Jon Butterworth about a mysterious finding at the Large Hadron Collider that could be pointing to the existence of a fifth fundamental force of nature (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-May-03 • 13 minutes
Why You Should Give A Dam About Beavers!
Beavers have long been considered pests by landowners and government agencies. But now, many are starting to embrace them. Today on the show, Host Aaron Scott tells Host Emily Kwong how these furry ecosystem engineers are showing scientists a way to save threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. Watch the video Aaron filmed with Oregon Field Guide about beavers and stream restoration. For more videos check out Oregon Field Guide.You can follow Aaron on Twitter @AaronScottNPR and Emily @EmilyKwong123... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 6 minutes
Safer Indoor Air, and People Want Masks on Planes and Trains: COVID Quickly, Episode 29
Safer Indoor Air, and People Want Masks on Planes and Trains: COVID Quickly, Episode 29 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 79 minutes
195 | Richard Dawkins on Flight and Other Evolutionary Achievements
I talk with Richard Dawkins about the origin of flight, as well as conceptual issues at the heart of evolutionary biology. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 56 minutes
Skeptic Check: Dr. Oz
Dr. Oz’s personable and folky approach when talking about difficult health subjects has made him a trusted source for medical information. But some of the claims offered on The Doctor Oz Show are clearly questionable, such as the existence of miracle diet pills. Now the show is on hiatus so that “America’s Doctor” can run for the U.S. Senate. In our regular look at critical thinking, Skeptic Check, we evaluate Mehmet Oz’s record on presenting evidence-based health and medical information in light of his ru... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 32 minutes
654: Cool Research on Plant Responses to Temperature Stress - Dr. Malia Gehan
Dr. Malia Gehan is an Assistant Member at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center. Her research examines how to improve crops in terms of their response to temperature stress and other abiotic stresses. She is does this through examining natural... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 13 minutes
This Blood Test Detects Cancer in Dogs. But Do You Want to Know?
A startup just showed that its OncoK9 test accurately sounds the alarm for aggressive and advanced cancers. The catch? These often have no cure. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-May-02 • 14 minutes
Why Did The Scientist Cross The Road?...To Meet Kasha Patel!
When Kasha Patel decided to try out stand-up comedy, she was told to joke about what she knew. For her, that was science. Today on Short Wave, Kasha talks to host Emily Kwong about how she developed her sense of humor, how she infuses science into her comedy and why on Earth she analyzed 500 of her jokes. Listen to the end for bonus audio! (@NPR)
podcast image2022-May-01 • 10 minutes
Australia's future in space
What’s Australia best known for? Venomous creatures? Football with weird rules? What about… space exploration? (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-May-01 • 66 minutes
The Indian subcontinent’s record-breaking heatwave
Deadly heat has been building over the Indian sub-continent for weeks and this week reached crisis levels. India experienced its hottest March on record and temperatures over 40 degrees Celsius (and in some places approaching 50 degrees) are making it almost impossible for 1.4 billion people to work. It’s damaging crops and it’s just what climate scientists have been warning about. Roland Pease talks to Vimal Mishra of the Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar about the impact and causes of the unp... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Apr-30 • 54 minutes
Celebrating Gregor Mendel the father of genetics
Celebrating Gregor Mendel the father of genetics (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-30
The Skeptics Guide #877 - Apr 30 2022
The Skeptics Guide to the Future Book Preorder; News Items: Redefining the Second, NFT Medicine, LHC Restart, Energy Psychology, Researching the Paranormal; Who's That Noisy; Corrections: Native vs Endemic; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 10 minutes
Coronapod: COVID and diabetes, what the science says
The true disability cost of the COVID-19 pandemic is still unknown, but more and more studies are adding to the list of potential fallout from even mild COVID 19 infection. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss a massive association study which links COVID-19 cases with an increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We delve into the numbers to ask how big the risk might be? Whether any casual relationship can be drawn from this association? And what might be in store from future researc... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 34 minutes
How do you balance on a bicycle?
How do we stay up when we ride a bicycle? Lots of us can do it without even thinking about it, but probably very few of us can say exactly HOW we do it. Well, CrowdScience listener Arif and his children Maryam and Mohammed from India want to understand what’s going on in our heads when go for a cycle, and how we learn to do it in the first place. Presenter Marnie Chesterton is on the case, tracking down a neuroscientist studying how our brains and bodies work together to keep us balanced whether we’re walk... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 47 minutes
Covid Court Cases, Sharing Viruses for Research, Hepatitis Spike. April 29, 2022, Part 1
What’s Up With The Spike In Hepatitis Among Young Kids? This spring, there’s been a strange spike in hepatitis cases among young children. Hepatitis can leave kids with stomach pain, jaundice, and a generally icky feeling. 169 cases have been recorded glo (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 48 minutes
Dog Breeds And Dog Behavior, Polar Science Update, Decarbonizing Transportation. April 29, 2022, Part 2
Your Dog’s Breed Doesn’t Always Determine How They’ll Behave The dog world abounds with stereotypes about the personalities of different breeds. The American Kennel Club describes chihuahuas as “sassy,” and malamutes as “loyal,” while breed-specific legis (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 30 minutes
Fitting In: Stories about belonging
In this week’s episode both our storytellers struggle to find their place. Part 1: Heather Galindo studies her lab mates in hopes of understanding what it means to be a scientist. Part 2: When Rob Ulrich leaves their small town to study science, they keep waiting to feel like they belong somewhere. Heather Galindo has long combined her loves for marine science and storytelling by earning college degrees in both Oceanography and English Literature, plus working at a science communication non-profit organizat... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 72 minutes
Hello, My Name Is
As a species, we’re obsessed with names. They’re one of the first labels we get as kids. We name and rename absolutely everything around us. And these names carry our histories, they can open and close our eyes to the world around us, and they drag the w (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 44 minutes
Maia Weinstock, "Carbon Queen: The Remarkable Life of Nanoscience Pioneer Mildred Dresselhaus" (MIT Press, 2022)
Carbon Queen: The Remarkable Life of Nanoscience Pioneer Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT Press, 2022) follows Mildred Dresselhaus (or Millie, as everyone calls her) from her childhood in New York City to her final years in Cambridge. It focuses on her scientific achievements, but also rightfully presents her as a multi-hyphenate: being a resilient student, an adaptive researcher, a professor, an administrator, an advocate, a fundraiser, a patent owner, a book author. The accolades are plentiful and her involvement... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 13 minutes
All Tied Up: The Study of Knots
Climbing enthusiast and producer Thomas Lu has long wondered what makes knots such a powerful tool. Today, Thomas digs into the research with the help of Matt Berry, Quality Assurance Manager at the outdoor gear company Black Diamond Equipment, and researcher Vishal Patil.Reach the show by emailing [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-29 • 54 minutes
Avian flu outbreak, prehistoric art and firelight, the dingo genome, joggers save calories, Canada’s space tourist and what tsunamis do to marine life.
Avian flu outbreak not currently a threat to humans, but awful for our feathered friends; Prehistoric people enjoyed “moving pictures” by combining rock art and firelight; The dingo genome tells a story of an animal that’s not quite dog or wolf; Joggers may be trying to make an effort, but mostly we run as efficiently as possible; A $50 million dollar ticket bought a Canadian millionaire the dream of space travel; Quirks Question - What do underwater volcanoes and tsunamis do to marine life? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 110 minutes
This Show has Teeth!
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Death, Regeneration, Fear, All Your Base, Snot Bugs, Yamanaka factor, Locating Lupus, Lockdowns, New mRNA Vaccines, Great Tits, Teeth, Fire Control, Microbe Survivalists, Brain Ocean, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 31 minutes
The Indian subcontinent’s record-breaking heatwave
Deadly heat has been building over the Indian sub-continent for weeks and this week reached crisis levels. India experienced its hottest March on record and temperatures over 40 degrees Celsius (and in some places approaching 50 degrees) are making it almost impossible for 1.4 billion people to work. It’s damaging crops and it’s just what climate scientists have been warning about. Roland Pease talks to Vimal Mishra of the Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar about the impact and causes of the u... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 42 minutes
Using quantum tools to track dark matter, why rabies remains, and a book series on science and food
On this week’s show: How physicists are using quantum sensors to suss out dark matter, how rabies thwarts canine vaccination campaigns, and a kickoff for our new series with authors of books on food, land management, and nutrition science Dark matter hunters have turned to quantum sensors to find elusive subatomic particles that may exist outside physicists’ standard model. Adrian Cho, a staff writer for Science, joins host Sarah Crespi to give a tour of the latest dark matter particle candidates—and the t... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 28 minutes
How can the UK get to zero carbon?
Energy is essential: every living thing needs energy to survive, and today’s industrialised societies consume enormous quantities of it. At the moment, the vast majority of this comes from burning fossil fuels that emit carbon. But the government is committed to reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Meanwhile, oil and gas prices are rocketing, exacerbated by the ongoing war in Ukraine. And the energy price cap is being raised on April 1st, hitting millions of householders in the UK. While we await t... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: researchers examined ancient sheep poop and now we don't know who colonized the Faroe Islands
A recent study weaves together evidence from genetics, isotopes, and the pollen record to suggest that other people arrived there... long, long before the Vikings. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 32 minutes
#116: DNA from outer space; Devi Sridhar on covid lessons; climate change in an Oxford wood
Could life on Earth have an extraterrestrial origin? The team revisits this ancient theory as we’ve now found all four of the key building blocks of DNA on meteorites that are older than our planet.There may be a warning signal in our brains that helps us keep out unwanted thoughts. The team hears about the fascinating word-pairing method researchers used to identify this mechanism, and how the findings could help people with PTSD, OCD, and anxiety disorders.When we talk about climate change, we often think... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Apr. 28, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek and Sarah Ervin, covering John Wells, speak with: (01:10) cognitive psychologist Doctor Brian Butterworth, who works on the abilities and disabilities of our numerical processing. His new book is, Can Fish Count? What Animals Reveal About Our Uniquely Mathematical Minds.Then, (27:17) world class pediatric surgeon, social scientist, and bestselling author Dr. Dana Suskind will share her revelatory new book, Parent Nation: Unlocking Every Child's Potential. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 73 minutes
Classical Archaeology (ANCIENT ROME) Encore with Darius Arya
If you LIVE for drama, you will LOVE dead Romans. Wars, backstabbing, opulence and uprisings: a little something for everyone. Classical Archeologist and TV host Dr. Darius Arya is back for an encore of this 2018 classic to dish about priceless garbage piles, lead poisoning, ancient political scandals, pottery graveyards, unearthing sculptures, tomb discoveries, what's under European cities, and how Roman society was a little like America these days. But also a lot different. With new bonus material recorde... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 30 minutes
E5: La Jolla
After Johnny’s death, Klári becomes the keeper of his legacy. It’s an exhausting, full-time commitment that takes her out of the computing world for good. She marries her fourth husband, a physicist, and moves to a Southern California beach town. She resolves to settle down, and starts writing a memoir. We discuss her legacy in computing and beyond, and the current state of gender and programming. Note: this episode includes content that could be upsetting. We’ll be talking about depression and self-harm.... (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 9 minutes
The Surprising Climate Cost of the Humblest Battery Material
Graphite is made in blazing-hot furnaces powered by dirty energy. Until recently, there has been no good tally of the carbon emissions. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 10 minutes
What’s behind the mysterious global rise in childhood hepatitis?
Guardian science editor Ian Sample speaks to Prof Deirdre Kelly about the unusual increase in children with severe hepatitis (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 58 minutes
Carlo Rovelli on physics and philosophy
Theoretical physicist, philosopher, and international bestselling author Carlo Rovelli joins Lauren and Colin for a conversation about the quest for quantum gravity, the importance of unlearning outdated ideas, and a very unique way to get out of a speed... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-Apr-28 • 12 minutes
Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus
Probes to Uranus and to one of Jupiter's moons where conditions might support life; a better plan high-quality science on the moon--those are some of the recommendations in a new 700 page report to NASA. NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce has looked at that report and talked to the experts. Today, she sifts through all the juicy details of where NASA is headed the next few decades.Read the decadal survey. Probe the Short Wave minds by emailing [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 24 minutes
How virtual meetings can limit creative ideas
The innovation cost of video calls, and a new type of cell division found in fish skin. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 18 minutes
How mRNA medicine will change the world | Melissa J. Moore
The secret behind medicine that uses messenger RNA (or mRNA) is that it "teaches" our bodies how to fight diseases on our own, leading to groundbreaking treatments for COVID-19 and, potentially one day, cancer, the flu and other ailments that have haunted humanity for millennia. RNA researcher Melissa J. Moore -- Moderna's chief scientific officer and one of the many people responsible for the rapid creation and deployment of their COVID-19 vaccine -- takes us down to the molecular level, unraveling how mRN... (@TEDTalks)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 21 minutes
Machine Learning Gets a Quantum Speedup
Two teams have shown how quantum approaches can solve problems faster than classical computers, bringing physics and computer science closer together. The post Machine Learning Gets a Quantum Speedup first appeared on Quanta Magazine (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 25 minutes
My octopus friend?
Octopuses are largely solitary animals, but there have been rare times — notably in the movie My Octopus Teacher — where they seem to have become comfortable around humans. But is it really possible to be friends with an octopus? For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 59 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 8: Covid and the Embrace of the Biological World
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to renowned UC San Diego neurophilosopher Patricia Churchland about the importance of communicating science, the wonders of the biological world and the dangers of wishful thinking. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmaker's journey in 10 essays) and a series of 24 detailed podca... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 10 minutes
Making Science More Open Is Good for Research—but Bad for Security
The open science movement pushes for making scientific knowledge quickly accessible to all. But a new paper warns that speed can come at a cost. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-27 • 11 minutes
U.S. COVID Case Increases Unlikely To Become A Surge
COVID cases are up due to the Omicron sub-variants and masking is likely to remain optional as the courts wrangle with the transportation mask mandate that a Federal judge struck down last week. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey talks about both of these issues with host Emily Kwong, and updates listeners on what to expect with children and the vaccine. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 29 minutes
What makes tiny tardigrades tick?
You can find micro-animals just about everywhere. They’re on your face and in your hair. They’re in puddles and in soil. One of the most famous of these microscopic creatures is the tardigrade. | | This episode zooms in on these adorable little animals, also known as moss piglets and water bears. The biggest tardigrade is about the size of the tip of a sharpened pencil, but most are smaller. More like the width of a hair. They’re kinda like a squishy pillow with eight legs, four on each side, with finger-l... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 6 minutes
Grasshopper can turn into locust
The Koran, the Bible, the Sanskrit Mahabharata, and the Greek Illiad all mention plagues of locusts, and they're seen as carvings in ancient Egyptian tombs. Large numbers of locust could have come about because, in certain circumstances, grasshoppers metamorphose—into locusts. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 36 minutes
Rocks
Igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic... need I say more? Welcome to SciShow Tangents or, as I like to call it, Rock Talk. Note: The podcast ad for the IMPACT app is unscripted and being recorded live. It may contain some slight differences. Please visit https://impact.interactivebrokers.com/ for full details of products and services. Interactive Brokers, LLC member FINRA/SIPC.The projections or other information generated by IMPACT app regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 58 minutes
The Coffee Conundrum
A race is afoot to find arabica's successor... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 11 minutes
For mRNA, Covid Vaccines Are Just the Beginning
With clinical vaccine trials for everything from HIV to Zika, messenger RNA could transform medicine—or widen health care inequalities. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 14 minutes
Preventable author Devi Sridhar on how she handles Covid trolls
Ian Sample speaks to Prof Devi Sridhar about her experience as a scientist during the Covid-19 pandemic, what it was like working alongside politicians, and what we should learn from the last few years (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-26 • 8 minutes
The Environmental Cost of Crypto
Short Wave host Aaron Scott talks to producer Eva Tesfaye about the environmental impacts of cryptocurrencies. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 69 minutes
Quantum Thermodynamics: A Steampunk Adventure with Nicole Yunger Halpern
Nicole Yunger Halpern is a theoretical physicist, NIST physicist and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland. She is also currently a Fellow of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science at the University of Maryland. Nicole reenvisions 19th-century thermodynamics for the 21st century, using the mathematical toolkit of quantum information (QI) theory. She applies QI thermodynamics as a lens through which to view the rest of science, gaining new perspectives o... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 68 minutes
194 | Frans de Waal on Culture and Gender in Primates
I talk with Frans de Waal about culture, empathy, morality, politics, and gender in various primate species. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 25 minutes
Treating cystic fibrosis
A feature episode explores recent developments and future research directions in treating cystic fibrosis. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 18 minutes
Audio long-read: The quest to prevent MS — and understand other post-viral diseases
Researchers are investigating why some people infected with Epstein-Barr virus go on to develop multiple sclerosis, and what can be done to prevent it. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 54 minutes
In Living Color (rebroadcast)
The world is a colorful place, and human eyes have evolved to take it in – from vermillion red to bright tangerine to cobalt blue. But when we do, are you and I seeing the same thing? Find out why color perception is a trick of the brain, and why you and I may not see the same shade of green. Or blue. Or red. Also, platypuses and the growing club of fluorescent mammals, and the first new blue pigment in more than two centuries. Guests: Paula Anich – Associate Professor of Natural Resources, Northland C... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 41 minutes
653: Examining How Environmental Factors Can Impact Our Heart Health - Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar
Dr. Aruni Bhatnagar is the Smith and Lucille Gibson Professor of Medicine, Director of the Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute, Co-Director of the American Heart Association Tobacco Regulation and Addiction Center, and a Distinguished University... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 10 minutes
Drones Have Transformed Blood Delivery in Rwanda
The autonomous aircraft have shuttled blood to rural, mountainous areas for years. A new analysis proves they’re faster than driving. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-25 • 14 minutes
Cryptocurrency Is An Energy Drain
As cryptocurrencies become increasingly popular, the environmental impact of the technology is gaining more attention. Local, state and national governments are trying to figure out how to regulate the massive amounts of energy that some cryptocurrencies consume.Short Wave host Aaron Scott and producer Eva Tesfaye are joined by Planet Money reporter Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi who unpacks what cryptocurrencies are, how the technology works and why it all sucks up so much energy. Check out the episodes of Planet Mo... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-24 • 9 minutes
Lessons from the Para-powerlifters
Who’s the strongest person in the world? And how would you measure it? Today’s guest has a metric in mind. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Apr-24 • 68 minutes
Climate techno-fix would worsen global malaria burden
As a series of UN climate reports have warned recently, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions – a halving over the next decade – are needed if we are to keep global warming down to manageable levels. No sign of that happening. An emergency measure to buy time that’s sometimes discussed is solar geoengineering – creating an atmospheric sunscreen that reduces incoming solar heat. Sulphate compounds in volcanic gases or in industrial fumes attract water vapour to make a fine haze and have that effec... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Apr-23 • 54 minutes
Wollongong transformed, secrets of monotremes revealed, and help for Tonga
* University plays a key role as Wollongong transforms * New ideas about evolution and spread of monotremes * Space missions excite school students for STEM * High anxiety remains after Tongan tsunami (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-23
The Skeptics Guide #876 - Apr 23 2022
News Items: Vaping and Inflammation, Projectile Fusion, Facilitated Communication is Still Pseudoscience, Gamma Rays and Gravitational Waves, AI Emotion Detection; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Communicating Skepticism; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 34 minutes
Why did the ancient Maya abandon their cities?
The ancient Maya flourished in modern day Mexico and Central America for millennia. They built incredible cities and they had sophisticated knowledge of astronomy, architecture and the natural world. But although Maya culture continues to exist today, around 900 AD, many of their great settlements collapsed, and today they lie in ruins. CrowdScience listener Michael wants to know - how did the Maya sustain their populations successfully for so long? And what happened 1000 years ago that led them to abando... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 15 minutes
We can make COVID-19 the last pandemic | Bill Gates
Building a pandemic-free future won't be easy, but Bill Gates believes that we have the tools and strategies to make it possible -- now we just have to fund them. In this forward-looking talk, he proposes a multi-specialty Global Epidemic Response and Mobilization (GERM) team that would detect potential outbreaks and stop them from becoming pandemics. By investing in disease monitoring, research and development as well as improved health systems, Gates believes we can "create a world where everyone has a ch... (@TEDTalks)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 47 minutes
Plastics And Ocean Life, Building An Animal Crossing, Indigenous Restoration. April 22, 2022, Part 2
Building The World’s Largest Animal Crossing Outside of LA There’s a spot on Highway 101 in Agoura Hills, it’s pretty inconspicuous. There’s brown and green rolling hills on either side of the highway. Homes are sprinkled here and there. And then a small (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 47 minutes
Carbon Removal Technology, IPCC And Policy, Sustainability News, Listening To A River. April 22, 2022, Part 1
Celebrating Earth Day With Sustainable Action Today is Earth Day, when many people around the world are taking time to think about their relationship with the planet and to focus on activities helping to mitigate the existential problems our environment f (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 37 minutes
Near Death Experiences: Stories about close calls
It’s not often people have a brush with death, but in this week’s episode both our storytellers are sharing stories about their near misses. Part 1: When Abraham Norfleet’s dad asks him to clean an underwater pump on their family farm, he tries to do it one breath. Part 2: Hana Schank wakes up in a hospital and has no idea how she got there. Abraham Norfleet is a writer, multi-disciplinary artist, and comedian. Back when he was still trying to be respectable he worked as a commercial artist in advertising, ... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 65 minutes
The Other Latif: Cuba-ish
Almost exactly twenty years ago, detainee 244 got transferred to Guantanamo Bay. Captured by American forces at the battle Tora Bora five months previous, Abdul Latif Nasser was shaved, hooded, shackled, diapered, and flown halfway across the world. The (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 10 minutes
The Energy Crisis Is Pushing Solar Adoption—for Those Who Can Pay
Rooftop solar panels are gaining popularity as the UK faces higher energy prices. But lower-income people are being left behind once again. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 54 minutes
Shallow water on Europa, tourists making iguanas diabetic, dolphin social networking, working out how dinosaurs walked and what to do to save the world’s coral reefs.
Ridges on the surface of an icy Jupiter moon could mean water – and life; Ecotourists could be giving rare tropical iguanas diabetes; Dolphins whistle at each other to keep in touch with distant friends; Walking in the footsteps of the biggest dinosaurs; Humans have ravaged the world’s coral reefs, but some are working to fix them. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Apr-22 • 14 minutes
Fresh Banana Leaves — An Indigenous Approach To Science
Dr. Jessica Hernandez's new book Fresh Banana Leaves (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: researchers identify the visual preferences of the world's deadliest animal
An interdisciplinary research team has woven evidence from the literature, their own experiments, and wind tunnels to understand how mosquitoes hunt and find their prey. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 121 minutes
Going Cuckoo For Earth Day!
This Week: Earth Day Climate, Sound Cancer Cures, Robot Rat, Accelerating Currents, Acoustical Charging, The Oreometer, COVID Update, Cuckoo Eggs, Rhino Value, Trilobite Camera, Spicy Fuel Cells, Lying Lyres Like Drama, Imagine Aphantasia, And Much More… (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 33 minutes
Climate techno-fix would worsen global malaria burden
As a series of UN climate reports have warned recently, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions – a halving over the next decade – are needed if we are to keep global warming down to manageable levels. No sign of that happening. An emergency measure to buy time that’s sometimes discussed is solar geoengineering – creating an atmospheric sunscreen that reduces incoming solar heat. Sulphate compounds in volcanic gases or in industrial fumes attract water vapour to make a fine haze and have that effec... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 38 minutes
Protecting birds from brightly lit buildings, and controlling robots from orbit
On this week’s show: Saving birds from city lights, and helping astronauts inhabit robots First up, Science Contributing Correspondent Josh Sokol talks with host Sarah Crespi about the millions of migrating birds killed every year when they slam into buildings—attracted by brightly lit windows. New efforts are underway to predict bird migrations and dim lights along their path, using a bird-forecasting system called . Next, we hear from Aaron Pereira, a researcher at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and ... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 53 minutes
David Krakauer on Emergent Political Economies and A Science of Possibility (EPE 01)
The world is unfair — but how much of that unfairness is inevitable, and how much is just contingency? After centuries of efforts to arrive at formal theories of history, society, and economics, most of us still believe and act on what amounts to myth. Our predecessors can’t be faulted for their lack of data, but in 2022 we have superior resources we’re only starting to appreciate and use. In honor of the Santa Fe Institute’s new role as the hub of an international research network exploring Emergent Politi... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 32 minutes
Racial inequality in UK science
This month the Royal Society of Chemistry released a shocking report on racial inequality at all stages of academia, from research funding to career progression. Black scientists in particular are unfairly disadvantaged when it comes to funding allocation. This is bad for them, bad for science, and bad for society. So how do we change things? Dr Diego Baptista from the Wellcome Trust, Professor Melanie Welham from the UKRI, and Dr Addy Adelaine, from the non-profit organisation Ladders4Action, join us to di... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 29 minutes
#115: Quantum consciousness; next decade of space exploration; songs played on rat whiskers
What is consciousness? We’ve discussed many theories on the podcast, but in this episode the team explores a particularly bonkers one. Experiments with anaesthetics have hinted that something might be going on at the quantum level with microtubules in the brain. But is this finding enough?Ever wondered what a rainbow sounds like? Or perhaps what sounds a rat’s whiskers would make if played like a harp? Then wonder no longer! You can hear these sounds and more as the team speaks to musician and TV presenter ... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 95 minutes
Dorian Abbot: From Climate and Exoplanets to DEI and Free Speech.
Dorian Abbot is an associate professor of geophysics at the University of Chicago, who uses mathematical and computational models to understand and explain fundamental problems in Earth and Planetary Sciences. His work on climate, and paleoclimate in particular is particularly important as we try and determine the likelihood that some exoplanets may be habitable. This is an area where may claims are made, most often on the basis of far too little solid evidence, so Dorian’s computer models have been ... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Apr. 21, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, John and Lynn's guests include: (01:18) David Quammen, author of 2012’s book Spillover that predicted in detail the 2019 Covid pandemic. These past 2 years David has been hard at work interviewing 94 virologists and infectious-disease experts about the SARS-CoV-2 virus, its origins, evolution, and journey through the human population. Then, (29:18) Nicole Yunger Halpern who has written Quantum Steampunk: The Physics of Yesterday's Tomorrow. Halpern re-envisions the steam engin... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 62 minutes
Teuthology (SQUIDS) Encore with Dr. Sarah McAnulty
THE SQUIDMOBILE HAS ARRIVED. Get in losers; we’re talking cephalopods. Yes, she drives a vehicle with squid all over it and encourages people to text her, and we have this encore episode to prove it. The world's most impassioned squid nerd, Sarah McAnulty, gets locked in a basement with Alie to talk about cephalopods, alien DNA, camouflage, invisibility cloaks, why cute things make us bonkers, terrible mating strategies, cute and clever ones and why she is so charmed by squid. Also addressed: Philly accents... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 40 minutes
E4: Netherworld
After World War II, tensions build between the Soviet Union and the U.S. Scientists at Los Alamos continue developing nuclear weapons, helped by the recently-reconfigured ENIAC. Using a statistical method called Monte Carlo, they optimize nuclear weapons through computer simulations. In these simulations, physics is neither purely experimental nor theoretical–it’s both, creating what historian Peter Galison calls a “netherland…at once nowhere and everywhere.” And Klári finds herself immersed in this sort of... (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 7 minutes
NASA Rolls Back Its SLS Rocket for Repairs
After three attempts to run through a test of the Space Launch System, engineers spotted a leak and a faulty valve. The fixes may delay the first Artemis moon mission. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 13 minutes
Space junk – how should we clean up our act?
Ian Sample talks to Prof Don Pollacco and Prof. Chris Newman about the threat posed by space junk, and how we can tackle the problem (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 57 minutes
Katie Mack on the end of it all – and new beginnings
Katie Mack was recently appointed as Perimeter’s inaugural Hawking Chair in Cosmology and Science Communication. An adept science communicator, she is best known as @Astrokatie to her 400,000+ Twitter followers. She published her first book in 2020, The ... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-Apr-21 • 10 minutes
The Indicator: How Green Laws Stop Green Projects
The United States has a goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Without serious changes to lifestyles, that means dramatic investments in green energy. But environmental laws can actually get in the way. Today, our colleagues at NPR's daily economics podcast, The Indicator from Planet Money, compare the threats to two bats on opposite ends of the planet. The bats show the tension between local and global environmentalism and how building a green economy is forcing people to have tough conversations about... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 40 minutes
Why Is Inflammation a Dangerous Necessity?
We've heard a lot about the immune system during the COVID-19 pandemic, but of course our immune system fights off much more than the coronavirus. And while the immune system protects us brilliantly from countless pathogens every day, sometimes it can also attack our own bodies, causing harmful and even deadly inflammation. In this episode, host Steven Strogatz speaks with Shruti Naik, an immunologist and assistant professor of biological sciences at NYU's Langone Medical Center, to learn why the immune sys... (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 19 minutes
We could still limit global warming to just 2˚C — but there's an 'if'
A roundup of some recent stories from the Nature Briefing, including using leeches to survey wildlife, a potential interstellar meteorite, and more. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 6 minutes
Cosmic Simulation Shows How Dark-Matter-Deficient Galaxies Confront Goliath and Survive
Cosmic Simulation Shows How Dark-Matter-Deficient Galaxies Confront Goliath and Survive (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 31 minutes
Glow in the dark ocean
Most deep-water creatures are bioluminescent. Marine biologist Edie Widder has spent the last 40 years trying to figure out why. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 57 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 7: Covid 19 Political Lessons from Portugal
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to Portuguese Member of Parliament and internationally renowned biologist Alexandre Quintanilha about the many valuable lessons Portugal's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic could teach all of us, if only we'd take the time to pay attention. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmake... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 57 minutes
John Measey, "How to Write a PhD in Biological Sciences: A Guide for the Uninitiated" (CRC Press, 2021)
Listen to this interview of John Measey, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences at Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and author of How to Write a PhD in Biological Sciences: A Guide for the Uninitiated (CRC Press, 2021). We talk about how the communication of science is changing, and we talk about how you can keep up and produce the research you want to produce. John Measey : "We're in an extremely interesting time, because the potential that we have to not just publish what we've written — which i... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 9 minutes
For Kids Fleeing Ukraine, Wartime Trauma May Leave Lasting Wounds
Volunteers are rushing to provide online counseling, art therapy, and stress relief for the more than 2 million Ukrainian children who have become refugees. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-20 • 16 minutes
The Science Behind The Delta-8 Craze
In the cannabis industry, the chemistry lab meets agriculture. A cannabis product called Delta-8 has been popping up in smoke shops, CBD shops and even gas stations.Dr. Katelyn Kesheimer, a researcher at Auburn University and the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, joins the show to demystify Delta-8. In this encore episode, we'll learn what it's made of, where it comes from, why it's so popular, and why science and the federal government are falling so far behind the cannabis industry. Email the show at ... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-20
FQXi April 20, 2022 Podcast Episode
Constructor Theory and Irreversibility: A conversation with Chiara Marletto and Vlatko Vedral on a novel unification between information theory and thermodynamics and their recent experiment that tested, and corroborated, the constructor theoretic notion of irreversibility. With Logan Chipkin. (@FQXi)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 33 minutes
Into the eye of a storm: How hurricanes form
How do hurricanes form? This episode dives into the eye of the hurricane to track down that answer and so much more. We also talk to hurricane hunter Major Joyce Hirai, who flies airplanes into hurricanes as part of the Air Force’s Weather Reconnaissance team. Also, we learn how humans have figured out how to be resilient in the face of increasing hurricanes (and hear from our friend Manuel the Mangrove). And get your dancing shoes on, because we’ve got a catchy tune that explains how hurricanes are named. ... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 8 minutes
Ivermectin and COVID—Part 2 of 2
The drug ivermectin is really good for treating worms; unfortunately it was falsely promoted as a COVID cure due to data errors, drug trial anomalies, or insufficient publication review. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 38 minutes
Recycling
Get a jump start on Earth Day by joining us as we discuss garbage's sexy, complicated little brother: recycling! Grab the NordVPN deal ➼ https://nordvpn.com/TANGENTSTry it risk-free now with a 30-day money-back guarantee!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Ta... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 13 minutes
Manifestation: why the pandemic had many of us seeing ghosts - Science Weekly podcast
Madeleine Finlay asks why the past couple of years may have prompted a surge in reports of paranormal activity and what it tells us about our own psychology (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 10 minutes
Chernobyl Was a Wildlife Haven. Then Russian Troops Arrived
The area around the defunct power plant has been an unexpected rewilding success story. Now attempts to monitor progress are hampered by the war. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 58 minutes
Frankenfoods, Formula 1 & Fake news
Scientific insights from four incredible experts in our Easter panel show (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Apr-19 • 14 minutes
TASTE BUDDIES: Y U Salty?
Salt has such a rich history that it was once (and is perhaps still) a sign of wealth. In this latest installment of our series on flavor and taste, "Taste Buddies," Scientist-in-Residence Regina G. Barber goes on a salty flavor journey with scientist Julie Yu. Along the way, Julie explains salt's essential role in our daily lives and how it affects our perception of food. Follow Regina on Twitter @ScienceRegina. Email Short Wave at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 69 minutes
193 | Daniels on Everything, Everywhere, All at Once
I talk with filmmakers Daniels about chaos and the multiverse in their new movie Everything Everywhere All at Once. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 41 minutes
Jeff Sebo, "Saving Animals, Saving Ourselves: Why Animals Matter for Pandemics, Climate Change, and Other Catastrophes" (Oxford UP, 2022)
In 2020, COVID-19, the Australia bushfires, and other global threats served as vivid reminders that human and nonhuman fates are increasingly linked. Human use of nonhuman animals contributes to pandemics, climate change, and other global threats which, in turn, contribute to biodiversity loss, ecosystem collapse, and nonhuman suffering. Jeff Sebo argues that humans have a moral responsibility to include animals in global health and environmental policy. In particular, we should reduce our use of animals as... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 54 minutes
Eclectic Company (rebroadcast)
We present a grab bag of our favorite recent science stories – from how to stop aging to the mechanics of cooking pasta. Also, in accord with our eclectic theme – the growing problem of space junk. Guests: Anthony Wyss-Coray – Professor of neuroscience at Stanford University Oliver O’Reilly – Professor of mechanical engineering, University of California Berkeley. Moriba Jah – Professor of aerospace and engineering mechanics, University of Texas Originally aired March 1, 2021 Featuring music by Dew... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 45 minutes
652: Exciting Developments in Our Knowledge of Cortical Circuit Formation in the Mammalian Brain - Dr. Franck Polleux
Dr. Franck Polleux is a Professor of Neuroscience and member of the Zuckerman Mind, Brain, Behavior Institute at Columbia University. Franck’s research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie brain and neuronal... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 10 minutes
How Does a Newt Cross the Road? With Lots of Human Help
Brigades of volunteers are coming to the rescue of thousands of Pacific newts that perish each year as they migrate to their breeding grounds. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-18 • 14 minutes
The Pandemic Is Damaging Health Workers' Mental Health
A recent study found that working surge after surge in the pandemic, a majority of American health care workers experienced psychiatric symptoms — including depression and thoughts of suicide. And yet, mental health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee found that very few got help for these symptoms.If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Or text the word home to 741741. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-17 • 75 minutes
How ‘magic mushroom’ chemical treats depression
Brain scanning experiments reveal how psilocybin works to relieve severe depression. Psilocybin is the psychedelic substance in 'magic mushrooms'. The psychoactive chemical is currently in clinical trials in the UK and US as a potential treatment for depression and other mental illnesses. Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London tells Roland about the research Also in the show, worrying findings about the increase in premature deaths because of air pollution in growing cities in tropical Africa... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Apr-17 • 79 minutes
What Happened Before the Big Bang? | An Infinity of Worlds - Will Kinney
Will Kinney is a professor in the Department of Physics at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, where he has been on faculty since 2003. Dr. Kinney's research focuses on the physics of the very early universe, including inflationary cosmology, the Cosmic Microwave Background, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy. He has authored more than seventy published research articles and received the SUNY Chancellor's award for excellence in teaching in 2014. In his new book, An Infinity of Worlds, physicist Will Kinney explains... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Apr-17 • 11 minutes
The mindblowing physics you may not have heard of
Somewhere between the very, very big physics and the very, very little physics is ... condensed matter physics. You might not have heard of it before, but it’s just as mindblowing – as today’s guest Elise Kenny will demonstrate. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Apr-16 • 54 minutes
How our biggest threat is us
* New idea explains the enormous heat of the Sun’s corona * All environmental problems traced to immense human impact * This teenager loves science * Centre for the Digital Child studies impact of technology on children (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-16
The Skeptics Guide #875 - Apr 16 2022
Live from Boston with guest George Hrab; Over-Under; News Items: CRISPR-On, Achromatic X-Ray Lens, Pareidolia and Gender, Cleaning Solar Panels, Public Media and Democracy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 11 minutes
Coronapod: Infected immune cells hint at cause of severe COVID
Since the beginning of the pandemic there has been a debate amongst researchers about whether the body's immune cells can themselves be infected by SARS-CoV-2. Now two new studies show that they can - and what's more, the work has revealed a new mechanism for the massive inflammatory response seen in severe COVID. In this episode of Coronapod, we dig into the papers, asking why it has taken so long to get an answer to this question? How immune cell infection could lead to severe disease? And whether th... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 44 minutes
How should we measure cleverness?
The team at CrowdScience have spent years answering all sorts of listener questions, which must make them pretty smart, right? IN this week’s episode, that assumption is rigorously tested as Marnie Chesterton and the team pit their wits against a multitude of mindbending puzzles from an old TV gameshow - all in the name of answering a question from Antonia in Cyprus. She wants to know: how do we work out how clever someone is? Is IQ the best measure of cleverness? Why do we put such weight on academic per... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 7 minutes
Venturing Back to the Office and the Benefits of Hybrid Immunity: COVID Quickly, Episode 28
Venturing Back to the Office and the Benefits of Hybrid Immunity: COVID Quickly, Episode 28 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 47 minutes
Inaccurate COVID Case Numbers, Spending A Trillion Dollars To Solve Problems. April 15, 2022, Part 1
FDA Approves First Breathalyzer COVID Test The FDA approved a new COVID breathalyzer test, which gives results in just three minutes. It’s the first test that identifies chemical compounds of coronavirus in breath. The testing unit is about the size of a (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 47 minutes
NSF Director, Soylent Green In 2022, Colorado Snowpack, Springtime On Neptune. April 15, 2022, Part 2
Did ‘Soylent Green’s’ Predictions About 2022 Hold Up? In the spring of 1973, the movie Soylent Green premiered. The film drops us into a New York City that’s overcrowded, polluted, and dealing with the effects of a climate catastrophe. Only the city’s eli (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 29 minutes
Passing the Test: Stories about making the grade
In this week’s episode, both our storytellers are assessed and evaluated in ways they never expected. Part 1: During a visit to her doctor, comedian Angel Yau finds herself answering “always” to every question on the mental health evaluation. Part 2: Scientist Valerie Bentivegna doesn’t know what to do when her PhD supervisors tell her that her thesis isn’t good enough. Angel Yau is a comedian, storyteller, actor, and filmmaker from Queens, New York. She started her comedy career (unintentionally) in high s... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 20 minutes
NULL
A one-word magical spell. Several years back, that’s exactly what Joseph Tartaro thought he’d discovered. It was a spell that, if used properly, promised to make one’s problems disappear. And so he crossed his fingers, uttered the word and cast the encha (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 10 minutes
A Global Boom in Fences Is Harming Wildlife
Barriers are going up rapidly as border projects and livestock farming increase, but they impede wildlife migrations and genetically isolate threatened species. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-15 • 13 minutes
Can Skiing Survive Climate Change?
Climate change poses an existential threat to the ski industry. A warmer climate means less snow and less now menas a shorter season for snowboarders and skiiers. NPR correspondent Kirk Siegler first covered the issue 15 years ago as local station reporter in Aspen. Now he returns to that world-renowned destination and tells Short Wave co-host Aaron Scott about one resort's efforts to push the nation toward clean energy while it continues catering to the carbon-generating, jet-set crowd. Check out Kirk's fu... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 31 minutes
How ‘magic mushroom’ chemical treats depression
Brain scanning experiments reveal how psilocybin works to relieve severe depression. Psilocybin is the psychedelic substance in 'magic mushrooms'. The psychoactive chemical is currently in clinical trials in the UK and US as a potential treatment for depression and other mental illnesses. Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London tells Roland about the research Also in the show, worrying findings about the increase in premature deaths because of air pollution in growing cities in tropical Africa... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 114 minutes
Can the Internet Handle This Science?
This Week: Scientific Skepticism, Linking Brains, Biodiversity with Leeches, Less Lightning, Electricity From Archaea, Porpoise’s, Chimps, Rhesus Monkey Hearts, Missing Hub Humans, Space Balloons, Baby Brains, Plant Protection, And Much More… | The post 13 April, 2022 – Episode 871 – Can the Internet Handle This Science? appeared first on This Week in Science - The Kickass Science Podcast. | | (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 25 minutes
Desert ‘skins’ drying up, and one of the oldest Maya calendars
On this week’s show: Climate change is killing critical soil organisms in arid regions, and early evidence for the Maya calendar from a site in Guatemala Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how climate change is affecting “biocrust,” a thin layer of fungi, lichens, and other microbes that sits on top of desert soil, helping retain water and create nutrients for rest of the ecosystem. Recent measurements in Utah suggest the warming climate is causing a decline in the lichen com... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 207 minutes
AMA | April 2022
Ask Me Anything episode for April 2022. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 29 minutes
Global food security during Ukraine conflict
The Russian conflict in Ukraine is already causing hunger there, and as Ukraine and Russia are huge grain exporters, the crisis will be far reaching. Food prices everywhere are expected to rise, and there’s fear that the war could affect food supplies in some of the poorest parts of the world. Tim Lang, Emeritus Professor of Food Policy at City University of London, and Dr Hannah Ritchie, Head of Research at the website Our World in Data, join us to discuss food security. Lead is highly toxic to humans an... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 18 minutes
#114: A message to aliens, phage therapy for acne, calibrating the world’s oldest computer
Two teams are developing messages to send into space, in the hope that some advanced alien civilization will be able to pick them up. While METI is sending music, Beacon in the Galaxy is sending more complex information, like Earth’s location - which as the team explains is rather controversial…Acne is usually treated using antibiotics, but as the issue of antibiotic resistance grows, researchers have been looking at alternative methods. The team discusses the promising early successes of phage therapy.Most... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 18 minutes
Secrets of Early Animal Evolution Revealed by Chromosome 'Tectonics'
Just as plate tectonics makes sense of the geology and positions of continents, "genome tectonics" helps biologists reconstruct the genomic duplications, fusions and translocations that created the chromosomes we see today. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Apr. 14, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek and John Wells' guests include: (00:56) Ocean scientist and journalist Juli Berwald, who speaks about the far-reaching consequences of coral reef destruction and the persistence of efforts to keep them alive. Her new book is called Life on the Rocks: Building a Future for Coral Reefs.Then, (25:27) world-renowned primatologist Frans de Waal draws on decades of observation and studies of both human and animal behavior which comes together in his new book: DIFFEREN... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: aging increases cluttered memory and creativity
A new study documents that older adults have more space allocated to clutter, but that very clutter can also make older people more creative. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 38 minutes
E3: The Experimental Rabbit
When John von Neumann runs into fellow mathematician Herman Goldstine at a train station, Goldstine clues him into a new powerful computer called the ENIAC that is being constructed to help with the war effort, and Johnny immediately grasps the machine’s enormous potential. Though the computer is not completed in time to be useful in the second world war, it finds new purpose in the war’s aftermath. Soon, Klári von Neumann is enlisted to instruct the machine what to do, and in doing so, becomes one of the f... (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 7 minutes
The First Drug-Releasing Contact Lens Is Here
The FDA has approved daily disposables that release anti-allergy medication. Experts hope lenses could one day help treat cataracts and glaucoma. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 12 minutes
Does China need to rethink its zero-Covid policy?
After putting its 26 million residents into lockdown, Shanghai has struggled to contain the spread of Covid-19 and provide residents with basic necessities. As a result, it is now easing restrictions. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Vincent Ni about whether this could be a sign of the end for China’s zero-Covid policy (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 46 minutes
Timothy Hsieh on the magic of quantum
Timothy Hsieh is a Perimeter faculty member and a co-leader of the Institute’s Clay Riddell Centre for Quantum Matter. His research explores the intersection of quantum information and condensed matter physics. The Los Angeles native is also a classicall... (@Perimeter@laurenehayward@Call_me_Colin)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 54 minutes
Legless fossils, smells of the past, research with Russia, sleeping sharks and the new story of the first peoples in the Americas.
The first land animal to go legless three hundred million years ago; What did history smell like? New field of science aims to find out; This Canadian researcher was trapped on a Russian ship as war broke out; Sharks sleep, sometimes with their eyes wide open; A new book puts together the story of how people came to the Americas. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Apr-14 • 14 minutes
Addressing Water Contamination With Indigenous Science
Ranalda Tsosie grew up in the Navajo Nation, close to a number of abandoned uranium mines. The uranium from those mines leached into the groundwater, contaminating some of the unregulated wells that Ranalda and many others relied on for cooking, cleaning and drinking water. Today on the show, Ranalda talks to host Aaron Scott about her path to becoming an environmental chemist to study the extent of contamination in her home community using a blend of western and Diné science methods. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 64 minutes
Environmental Microbiology (TESTING WASTEWATER FOR DISEASES) with Amy Kirby
Oh boy. This episode may seeeeem crappy but it is certainly not a waste of your time. We’re not kidding, while the episode is of course wonderful, mostly thanks to our wonderful guests, it is also certainly about poopy wastewater and what we can all learn from it. About those terrific guests: we mostly speak with Dr. Amy E. Kirby, Ph.D., MPH of the frickin’ CDC (yes, that CDC) about the National Wastewater Surveillance System or NWSS. Did you know sewer water is not just a feature of teenage mutant ninja tu... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 28 minutes
Why do naked mole rats live as long as giraffes?
Identifying how animals’ mutation rates line up with their longevity, and what the war in Ukraine means for emissions. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 27 minutes
When reality broke
In the 1920s, the scientist Werner Heisenberg came up with a wild idea that broke reality as Western science knew it. And it's still unsettling to think about. Benjamin Labatut's recent book, When We Cease to Understand the World, makes readers feel the aftershocks of the revelation, asking, "What's real?" For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unex... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 61 minutes
Dashun Wang and Albert-László Barabási, "The Science of Science" (Cambridge UP, 2021)
Listen to this interview of Dashun Wang, Professor at the Kellogg School of Management and McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University, and also with Albert-László Barabási, Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern University. We talk about their new book The Science of Science" (Cambridge UP, 2021) and science, squared. Albert-László Barabási : "There is, of course, the need that you grow professionally. If you're a mathematician, ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 7 minutes
A Killer Parasite Is Wiping Out Hordes of Ants—in a Good Way
A microsporidian pathogen is annihilating tawny crazy ants, an invasive menace of the highest order. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-13 • 12 minutes
Voices From A Ukrainian Hospital Damaged By Russian Attacks
In the northern Ukrainian city of Chernihiv at least half a dozen hospitals have been damaged by Russian attacks. The Emergency Department of City Hospital No. 2, located on the ground floor, was instantly destroyed. In addition, the shock wave shattered windows across all nine floors of the building, showering everything with broken glass. Correspondent Ari Daniel talks to Emily about the attack and brings Short Wave the voices of three people who were there for the attack and the aftermath.Feel free to ... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 31 minutes
Is mind-reading real?
Can people actually read minds? Can we move objects with our brains like in the movies? We're exploring the history of shady psychics, sketchy seances, and secret superpower studies. Plus, hear from a scientist who is helping people regain the ability to pick up and move objects through the combined power of their brains and a special computer! | You can support our show by donating, buying our book or telling your friends about us! Head to brainson.org | If you’re in Los Angeles or the Twin Cities and ... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 7 minutes
Ivermectin and COVID
There are many cases of drugs being repurposed once a new aspect of them is discovered—their new use is often very beneficial. One such drug is ivermectin. It works well against various parasitic infections. It does not work against COVID. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 36 minutes
Soft Things
Spring is a soft and fluffy time of year, what with all the baby chicks and bunnies bopping around, so we here at Tangents are seizing the opportunity to talk about the softest, cutest, most huggable science there is!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangen... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 11 minutes
Companies May Soon Have to Reveal a Hidden Risk: Carbon Emissions
Big businesses set splashy climate targets but don’t always reveal their data. The Securities and Exchange Commission wants to change that—to protect investors. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 59 minutes
Contagious Cancers
Cancer is renown for spreading within a host, but some rare cases can jump from one individual to another (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 15 minutes
Why are climate and conservation scientists taking to the streets?
Madeleine Finlay speaks to conservation scientist Dr Charlie Gardner about civil disobedience – and why he thinks it’s the only option left (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-12 • 22 minutes
Planet Money: How Manatees Got Into Hot Water
Today we share the mic with our colleagues at Planet Money to talk about one of our favorite aquatic creatures: manatees. Decades ago, manatees nearly went extinct as their habitat dwindled and boats threatened their lives. But power companies noticed something: manatees were hanging out near their power plants, seeking out warm water. So, the power companies teamed up with environmentalists to turn the warm waters near power planets into manatee refuges — saving manatee lives and the power companies money ... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 77 minutes
192 | Nicole Yunger Halpern on Quantum Steampunk Thermodynamics
I talk with physicist Nicole Yunger Halpern about the emerging frontier of quantum thermodynamics. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 9 minutes
Rising temperatures and European bird traits
Martijn van de Pol reports that approximately half of the changes in the traits of 60 European bird species can be attributed to rising mean temperatures. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 58 minutes
Jim Al-Khalili Why I Love the Life Scientific!
Jim is a theoretical physicist at the University of Surrey where he holds a Distinguished Chair in physics as well as a university chair in the public engagement in science. He received his PhD in nuclear reaction theory in 1989 and has published widely in the field. His current interest is in open quantum systems and the application of quantum mechanics in biology. He is a prominent author and broadcaster. He has written 14 books on popular science and the history of science, between them translated into t... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 54 minutes
Finding Endurance
In 1915, Endurance, the ship that took Ernest Shackleton to the Antarctic, was slowly crushed and sank. Shackleton, and the 28 men he brought with him, were camped on the ice near the ship, and watched helplessly as their transport went to a watery grave, two miles down. But a recent expedition has found the Endurance, taking the world back to the last hurrah of the heroic age of polar expedition. How was it found, and what will be done with it? Also, while feats of exploration inspire TV shows and magazin... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 39 minutes
651: Studying Sea Worms and Discovering New Species - Dr. Pat Hutchings
Dr. Pat Hutchings is a Senior Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Museum Research Institute. She is a marine biologist who studies sea worms called polychaetes. Pat describes new species and works to understand where they live, what they... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 10 minutes
A Bold Idea to Stall the Climate Crisis—by Building Better Trees
Changing the genetic makeup of trees could supercharge their ability to suck up carbon dioxide. But are forests of frankentrees really a good idea? (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-11 • 12 minutes
Lemurs Will Rock You
There's a lot for scientists to learn about the origins of humans' musical abilities. In the last few years, though, they've discovered homo sapiens have some company in our ability to make musical rhythm. Producer Berly McCoy brings the story of singing lemurs to host Aaron Scott. She explains how their harmonies could help answer questions about the beginnings of our own musical abilities, and what all of this has to do with Queen. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-10 • 62 minutes
Tsunami detective in Tonga
Just over two months ago, the undersea volcano of Hunga Tonga erupted catastrophically, generating huge tsunamis and covering the islands of Tonga in ash. University of Auckland geologist Shane Cronin is now in Tonga, trying to piece together the sequence of violent events. Edinburgh University palaeontologist Ornella Bertrand tells us about her studies of the ancient mammals that inherited the Earth after the dinosaurs were wiped out. To her surprise, in the first 10 million years after the giant meteorit... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Apr-10 • 10 minutes
Climate adaptation: how this 'ugly cousin' went from zero to ... hero?
If you’re not something straightforward like a lawyer or a teacher or an electrician, there’s a question you hate getting at dinner parties – what do you do? And this week on Ockham’s Razor we're hearing from someone who particularly dreads this question. But Johanna Nalau's job – and what it means for our future – is an important one to get your head around. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Apr-09 • 54 minutes
Carbon movie explores the misunderstood element which has allowed life to happen
* Election hopes for science * Carbon – the element with a nice voice * Secondary science – more analysis, less rote learning, not so much time for history * Catastrophe – higher risk than most people might think (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-09
The Skeptics Guide #874 - Apr 9 2022
Interview with NASA Biologist John Kiss; News Items: Life on Europa, Ancient Skull Surgery, Artemis Stuck, Most Distant Star, Fake News; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Evolution and Racism; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 28 minutes
How many fossils are there?
The odds of becoming a fossil are vanishingly small. And yet there seem to be an awful lot of them out there. In some parts of the world you can barely look at a rock without finding a fossil, and museum archives worldwide are stuffed with everything from ammonites to Archaeopteryx. But how many does that leave to be discovered by future fossil hunters? What’s the total number of fossils left to find? That’s what listener Anders Hegvik from Norway wants to know and what CrowdScience is off to investigate.... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 49 minutes
Why Cold Plasma Could Help Sustainable Farming, How To Get Teens The Sleep They Need. April 8, 2022, Part 2
The Future of Sustainable Farming Could Be Cold Plasma Plasma is a fascinating medium. It’s considered the fourth state of matter—alongside solid, liquid and gas—and it’s everywhere. In fact, more than 99.9% of all matter in the universe is assumed to be (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 48 minutes
FDA To Analyze COVID Boosters Efficacy, Dig Into Spring With Gardening Science. April 8, 2022, Part 1
FDA Convenes Panel On COVID Boosters And New Vaccines This week, the FDA convened a panel of independent experts to discuss COVID-19 boosters and possible variant-specific vaccines. This comes after last week’s authorization of a second booster for people (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 6 minutes
Probiotics Could Help Save Overheated Corals
Probiotics Could Help Save Overheated Corals (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 42 minutes
Grief: Stories about dealing with loss
In this week's episode, our storytellers' lives and careers in science are shaped by a great loss in their lives. Part 1: When neuroscientist Macayla Donegan's partner is diagnosed with brain cancer, she's forced to make some tough decisions. Part 2: When Anant Paravatsu struggles in school, his mother comes to his rescue. Macayla Donegan is a recovering academic neuroscientist who just lost their spouse to brain cancer, and lost a career she had worked a long time for at the same time. She has a really cut... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 29 minutes
In the Dust of This Planet
Horror, fashion, and the end of the world … In this episode, first aired in 2014, but maybe even more relevant today, things get weird as we explore the undercurrents of thought that link nihilists, beard-stroking philosophers, Jay-Z, and True Detective. (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 45 minutes
Marcus Kaiser, "Changing Connectomes: Evolution, Development, and Dynamics in Network Neuroscience" (MIT Press, 2020)
The human brain undergoes massive changes during its development, from early childhood and the teenage years to adulthood and old age. Across a wide range of species, from C. elegans and fruit flies to mice, monkeys, and humans, information about brain connectivity (connectomes) at different stages is now becoming available. New approaches in network neuroscience can be used to analyze the topological, spatial, and dynamical organization of such connectomes. In Changing Connectomes: Evolution, Development, ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 9 minutes
Math’s ‘Oldest Problem Ever’ Gets a New Answer
A new proof significantly strengthens a decades-old result about the ubiquity of ways to represent whole numbers as sums of fractions. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 74 minutes
C. Brandon Ogbunu on Epistasis & The Primacy of Context in Complex Systems
Context is king: whether in language, ecology, culture, history, economics, or chemistry. One of the core teachings of complexity science is that nothing exists in isolation — especially when it comes to systems in which learning, memory, or emergent behaviors play a part. Even though this (paradoxically) limits the universality of scientific claims, it also lets us draw analogies between the context-dependency of one phenomenon and others: how protein folding shapes HIV evolution is meaningfully like the w... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 54 minutes
Arctic plastic pollution, the ‘drunken monkey’ hypothesis, the songs of the manatee, Indigenous led caribou conservation, the Norse in brown-land and tropical tree leaves.
Plastic pollution is all over the arctic | Monkeys consume fermenting fruit, likely for the extra calories from alcohol | Biologists record and translate the songs of the manatee | Indigenous-led conservation program saves caribou herd from extinction | The Vikings might have left Greenland when it turned into brown-land | Quirks Question - Do tropical trees lose their leaves? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Apr-08 • 10 minutes
War In Ukraine Sets Back Tuberculosis Treatment
According to the World Health Organization, Ukraine has the fourth highest incidence of tuberculosis in Europe — and one of the highest rates of multidrug resistant TB anywhere in the world. The country had been making progress but then came the pandemic, and now the war. Reporter Ari Daniel says doctors worry about increased spread of this contagious and deadly disease. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 28 minutes
#113: Climate change: suing governments to cut emissions; shock discovery in particle physics; a new function for dreams
The latest major report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out, and the message is clear. Time is running out to keep global warming to below 1.5 degrees. The report outlines the many ways we can make emissions cuts, one of which is through litigation. Hear from one of the report’s authors, Joana Setzer, who explores the growing use of legal action to challenge governments and corporations.Physicists are excited this week about a new finding that might challenge the standard model of part... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 146 minutes
Matt Ridley: The Origins of COVID-19
(The Origins Podcast will appear every other Thursday.) Matt Ridley is a veteran journalist and science writer, with a training in genetics. He is also a Conservative member of the House of Lords in the UK. Matt and I were able to discuss his training, and his move from scientist to journalist, as well as the spectrum of his experiences in his various roles. We then moved on to the centerpiece of our dialogue: His newest book, Viral, written with geneticist Alina Chan. Together they produced what I view... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 104 minutes
Are Brains or Brawn Better?
This Week: Honey Tech, Squid Games, Nighttime Solar Energy, Fungal Phenomena, Nighttime Solar, XE Identified, WHO Plan, Infection Inflammation, Bat Buddies, Darwin vs. bigotry, Fungal Phone, Asbestos, Brain Changes, And Much More... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 34 minutes
Tsunami detective in Tonga
Just over two months ago, the undersea volcano of Hunga Tonga erupted catastrophically, generating huge tsunamis and covering the islands of Tonga in ash. University of Auckland geologist Shane Cronin is now in Tonga, trying to piece together the sequence of violent events. Edinburgh University palaeontologist Ornella Bertrand tells us about her studies of the ancient mammals that inherited the Earth after the dinosaurs were wiped out. To her surprise, in the first 10 million years after the giant mete... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 24 minutes
A surprisingly weighty fundamental particle, and surveying the seas for RNA viruses
On this week’s show: A new measurement of the W boson could challenge physicists’ standard model, and an abundance of marine RNA viruses Staff Writer Adrian Cho joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new threat to the standard model of particle physics—a heavier than expected measurement of a fundamental particle called the W boson. They chat about how this measurement was taken, and what it means if it is right. Next, Sarah talks about the microscopic denizens of Earth’s oceans with Ahmed Zayed, a research... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 29 minutes
High Seas treaty talks and discoveries from the deep
The High Seas make up most of our oceans but belong to no-one and are largely unregulated, leaving them at risk of plunder. UN talks start afresh this week with the aim of protecting the marine biodiversity of these vast swathes of living ocean. Covid-19 can shrink our brains and lead to cognitive decline, even in mild cases, according to a new study out this week. Professor Gwenaëlle Douaud, who led the research, explains how they used hundreds of brain scans to discover the effects of Covid infection. ... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 53 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Apr. 7, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek and John Wells' guests include: (01:21) Salt Lake City's Dr. Joshua Schiffman, Peel Therapeutics’ co-founder, and CEO. We will speak with Joshua about how studying the evolution of elephants will help us fight cancer.Then, (26:44) America’s funniest science writer, Mary Roach who has written Packing for Mars for Kids.Finally, (39:36) NASA Hubble Senior Project Scientist Jennifer Wiseman. The Hubble Space Telescope has just discovered the farthest individual star... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: this impact framework could help us stop wrecking our recreation
Skiing, biking, hiking, ATV riding. Whatever form recreation takes, it has an impact on the environment. So how can studying the spectrum of impacts that recreation can have on an ecosystem lead to better management decisions? A new framework developed by researchers from USC, US Institute of outdoor recreation and tourism is working to answer this question and more. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 50 minutes
Seismology
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the study of earthquakes. A massive earthquake in 1755 devastated Lisbon, and this disaster helped inspire a new science of seismology which intensified after San Francisco in 1906 and advanced even further with the need to monitor nuclear tests around the world from 1945 onwards. While we now know so much more about what lies beneath the surface of the Earth, and how rocks move and crack, it remains impossible to predict when earthquakes will happen. Thanks to seismology, t... (@BBCInOurTime)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 40 minutes
E2: Women Needed
With John von Neumann absorbed in work, Klári struggles to find a niche in her new suburban home while dealing with devastating losses. A new chapter opens for Klári when the U.S. finally enters the war and women are called into the workforce. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 6 minutes
How Boa Constrictors Can Breathe Even as They Crush Their Prey
New research shows the snakes activate different sections of their rib cage, using their lungs as bellows to pull in air. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 13 minutes
Why has the UK (finally) expanded its Covid symptoms list?
After scrapping free rapid tests, and with the highest levels yet of Covid-19, this week the UK expanded its official Covid symptom list. Madeleine Finlay asks, why now? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-07 • 15 minutes
TASTE BUDDIES: The Origins Of Umami
Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks with producer Chloee Weiner about why it took so long for umami to be recognized as the fifth taste. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 26 minutes
Five years in the coldest fridge in the known Universe
Searching for an elusive process that could explain a cosmic imbalance, and solving the mystery of the missing microbial plasmids. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 11 minutes
5 promising factors propelling climate action | Gabriel Kra
Given the scale of the challenge, the conversation around climate change is often tinged with doom and gloom. But climate tech investor Gabriel Kra thinks we need to reframe the crisis as a source of tremendous opportunity. He offers five big reasons to be optimistic about climate -- starting with the fact that many of the world's best minds are focused and working on building a clean future for all. (@TEDTalks)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 44 minutes
Untangling Why Knots Are Important
Everyone knows what a knot is. But they have special significance in math and science because their properties can help unlock hidden secrets like the biochemistry of DNA or the geometry of three-dimensional spaces. In this episode, Steven Strogatz explores the mysteries of knots with the mathematicians Colin Adams and Lisa Piccirillo. (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 28 minutes
Making Sense: The sixth sense
Why stop at five senses? Just how much of the world can we perceive? And how much is out there that’s still out of reach, hiding in the dark? This is the sixth and final episode of our six-part series, Making Sense. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about yo... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 7 minutes
The Farthest Star Sheds New Light on the Early Universe
A cosmic fluke helped Hubble spy Earendel, a giant star at the edge of the known universe that could tell us more about what happened after the Big Bang. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-06 • 10 minutes
The Indicator: Destroying Personal Digital Data
We're turning over the mic to NPR's daily economics podcast, The Indicator from Planet Money. It's filled with one of our favorite topics: Data. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 93 minutes
Echinology (SEA URCHINS & SAND DOLLARS) with Rich Mooi
The hedgehogs of the sea: echinoids are spiky, spiny, pokey, be-toothed, venomous, mysterious, gorgeous evolutionary marvels. And Dr. Rich Mooi of the California Academy of Arts & Sciences is one of their biggest champions. Come stroll through the offices for a face-to-face encounter with this infectious expert. We talk sand dollars, uni, doves of peace, fire urchins, kelp forests, tiny hats, butt placement, foot eyes and how to find your niche, even if it’s miles below the surface on a rotting log. And bon... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 27 minutes
Owl about Owls
We’re headed off to an owl sanctuary to meet up with Nolan the know-it-owl for a special night owl Tour. We hear the sound of owl wings and check out some super-tubular owl eye facts. Find out how owls can swivel their heads 270 degrees and why their ears are at uneven spots on their heads. We’ll meet a poetry-loving barn owl named Olive, who fills us in on why owls are considered wise. Fun fact: owls are sometimes classified by their sounds -- bigger owls are hooters and smaller owls are tooters! | | Spec... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 7 minutes
The swing of bowling
Ball games were happening 3,500 years ago, and ever since then we’ve bounced and batted in all sorts of fun ways. We're especially interested in the mechanics of a ball curving as it travels through the air—which happens in swing bowling. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 39 minutes
Nerves
Someone can get on your nerves. You can have nerves of steel. Heck, they can even be frayed! But have you ever wondered what nerves actually are? If so, you've come to the right place! This week, our dear friend and contributor Deboki Chakravarti (@okidoki_boki) stops by to join the fun, and Ceri hosts for the first time ever! Don't miss it!Grab the NordVPN deal ➼ https://nordvpn.com/TANGENTS Try it risk-free now with a 30-day money-back guarantee!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out ... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 60 minutes
Science of the Silver Screen
A novel take of the Oscars; a scientific critique with The Naked Scientists... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 19 minutes
Audio long-read: A more-inclusive genome project aims to capture all of human diversity
Researchers are looking to build a human ‘pangenome’ that includes wider human genetic variation than previous attempts. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 65 minutes
Daniel Bolnick, Editor in Chief of "The American Naturalist"
Listen to this interview of Daniel Bolnick, Editor in Chief of The American Naturalist and Professor of evolution and ecology at the University of Connecticut. We talk about the role of research journals today and we talk about the location of research journals in the big endeavor that is called science. Daniel Bolnick : "Ultimately, research articles are technical. Articles have to deal with the mathematics or with the details of the physiology or the neurobiology that they're dealing with. But the authors... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 52 minutes
The Future of Delusions: A Discussion with Lisa Bortolotti
The accusation “you’re deluded” is often used as something of a cheap shot intended to silence an opponent in debate. But what is the nature of a delusion and how can we assess rationality and irrationality? In this podcast, Owen Bennett-Jones talks to Professor Lisa Bortolotti who studies the philosophy of psychology and psychiatry at Birmingham University and is the author of among many other things, Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs (Oxford UP, 2010) and most recently edited Delusions in Context (Pa... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 63 minutes
Zeynep Pamuk, "Politics and Expertise: How to Use Science in a Democratic Society" (Princeton UP, 2021)
Our ability to act on some of the most pressing issues of our time, from pandemics and climate change to artificial intelligence and nuclear weapons, depends on knowledge provided by scientists and other experts. Meanwhile, contemporary political life is increasingly characterized by problematic responses to expertise, with denials of science on the one hand and complaints about the ignorance of the citizenry on the other. Politics and Expertise: How to Use Science in a Democratic Society (Princeton Univers... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 8 minutes
How to Navigate Online Mental Health Resources
Finding therapy and support can be confusing. Here are some tips on how to get help, from understanding insurance websites to keeping track of the bills. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 15 minutes
Why is England keeping the abortion ‘pills by post’ scheme?
Last week MPs voted to keep the ‘pills by post’ abortion service introduced at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. Madeleine Finlay finds out about the benefits of self-managed medical abortions and whether ‘Plan C’ could ever become available from pharmacies (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-05 • 11 minutes
When To Consider Another COVID-19 Booster
This week, U.S. Food and Drug Administration vaccine advisors will meet to discuss long-term COVID vaccine strategy. This follows the recent FDA authorization and CDC recommendation of a second booster available for people 50 and older and some immunocompromised people. Going forward, will the strategy change from counting boosters to making a COVID vaccine a seasonal shot? Allison Aubrey talks to Emily Kwong about the latest on boosters, what's known about the vaccination timeline for younger children, and... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 82 minutes
191 | Jane McGonigal on How to Imagine the Future
I talk with futurist and game designer Jane McGonigal about using social simulations to understand the future. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 96 minutes
If Darwin Had A Spaceship | Arik Kershenbaum: The Zoologist’s Guide to the Galaxy
What would a modern-day 'Voyage of the Beagle ' be like? Cambridge zoologist Arik Kershenbaum evokes Charles Darwin's travels in a trip not confined to the earth's confines. Come along with us on a journey of discovery through the entire galaxy where we encounter aliens and their planets with supersonic creatures, a moon where aliens have a language composed of smells, and aliens who scream with fear, act honestly and have technology. The Zoologist's Guide to the Galaxy answers these questions using the lat... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 54 minutes
Go With the Flow (rebroadcast)
Solid materials get all the production credit. Don’t get us wrong, we depend on their strength and firmness for bridges, bones, and bento boxes. But liquids do us a solid, too. Their free-flowing properties drive the Earth’s magnetic field, inspire a new generation of smart electronics, and make biology possible. But the weird thing is, they elude clear definition. Is tar a liquid or a solid? What about peanut butter? In this episode: A romp through a cascade of liquids with a materials scientist who is bot... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 44 minutes
650: Finding Compounds in Fungi to Develop New Drugs to Fight Cancer - Dr. Nicholas Oberlies
Dr. Nicholas Oberlies is the Patricia A. Sullivan Distinguished Professor of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). Nick’s lab is working to discover compounds in fungi... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 7 minutes
Scientists Map Yellowstone’s Plumbing With … a Helicopter
For the first time, scientists get a look at what's going on under the park's geysers. It may even help them better understand the origin of life on Earth. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-04 • 12 minutes
What We Gain From Dark Night Skies
For many of us, seeing stars in the night sky is challenging because of light pollution. But there are some communities that are trying to change that. Today on the show, we visit cultural astronomer Danielle Adams in the world's first international dark sky city. Theoretical physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein also joins us to explain why access to dark night skies is so important. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Apr-03 • 58 minutes
Radioactive Red Forest
Russian forces in the forested exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear site may be receiving potentially dangerous levels of radiation. After the nuclear accident trees were felled and radioactive material was buried across the site. As the forest regrew its took up much of that radiation - making it the most radioactive forest in the world according to Tom Scott from Bristol University who studies radiation levels in the region. The troop's activities, from digging trenches to lighting fires as missile... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Apr-03 • 11 minutes
Why Australia is the lucky country when it comes to snakes
It’s no secret that Australia is home to many a venomous snake but this week’s guest wants to convince you that we should look at this as a blessing, not a curse. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Apr-02 • 54 minutes
The end of astronauts?
* The end of astronauts? * The First Astronomers * Kiama students' hopes for International Youth Science Forum * Derek Denton – working and publishing science at age 97 (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Apr-02
The Skeptics Guide #873 - Apr 2 2022
Guest Rogue Andrea Jones Roy; Special Report: Political Science of War; News Items: Transgenic Plants in Space, Homeopathy Trials and Publication Bias, Psychedelic Treatments, Anti-Universe, Plastic in our Blood; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 44 minutes
Why do animals migrate? Part 2
Many animals undertake remarkable migratory journeys; travelling thousands of miles only to return to same burrow or beach they departed from. Yet, unlike humans, they don’t have digital or paper maps to guide their way, so how are they able to orientate themselves with such accuracy? In the second part of this migration story, CrowdScience’s Anand Jagatia explores how animals are able to navigate using the sun, stars, smells, landmarks and magnetism to help guide them. Anand journeys to the coast of Flori... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 9 minutes
Second Boosters, Masks in the Next Wave and Smart Risk Decisions: COVID Quickly, Episode 27
Second Boosters, Masks in the Next Wave and Smart Risk Decisions: COVID Quickly, Episode 27 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 47 minutes
Why People Can’t Read Bar Graphs, First Complete Human Genome Released, Mars Book Club Finale. April 1, 2022, Part 2
Can You Read A Bar Graph? Bar graphs seem like one of the simplest ways to represent data. Many people assume that the longer the bar, the bigger the number it represents. Sometimes bar graphs represent an average not a total count, which is trickier to u (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 47 minutes
Experimental HIV Vaccines, Lithium Mining In Oregon, Controlling The Tawny Crazy Ant. April 1, 2022, Part 1
Why Another Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapsed On March 15, the Conger ice shelf, a piece of ice half the size of Rome, collapsed in eastern Antarctica. It’s the first time that side of the continent experienced a major loss of ice in the 40-year history of sa (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 28 minutes
On the Spectrum: Stories about being neurodivergent
In this week’s episode, both our storytellers share their experience with the autism spectrum. This episode is in honor of World Autism Awareness Day, April 2, which hopes to further people’s understanding and acceptance of autistic people. Part 1: Neuroscientist B. Blair Braden is confused as to why her neighbour doesn’t pick up on any of her social cues. Part 2: For her entire life Behavioral Neuroscientist Susan Rapley doesn’t understand why she can’t fit in. B. Blair Braden received her doctorate in Beh... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 65 minutes
Inheritance
Once a kid is born, their genetic fate is pretty much sealed. Or is it? In this episode, originally aired in 2012, we put nature and nurture on a collision course and discover how outside forces can find a way inside us, and change not just our hearts an (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 25 minutes
All About Birds: A Series of Regional Field Guides from Princeton University Press
The All About Birds Regional Field-Guide Series brings birding enthusiasts the best information from the renowned Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s website, AllAboutBirds.org, used by more than 21 million people each year. These definitive books provide the most up-to-date resources and expert coverage on bird species throughout North America. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.f... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 7 minutes
This Cheetah Robot Taught Itself How to Sprint in a Weird Way
Researchers got the machine to run nearly 13 feet per second. It ain't graceful, but this powerful technique is preparing robots for the chaos of the world. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 54 minutes
New human genome, lion cuddle chemical, Pluto’s ice volcanoes, deconstructing de-extinction, giant crocodiles in BC
Scientists sequence complete, gap-free human genome for the first time; Oxytocin helps aggressive rescue lions chill out in sanctuaries; Pluto’s strange landscape includes 7 km tall ice volcanoes; Deconstructing de-extinction; Giant crocodiles left trackways in northeastern BC 95 million years ago. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Apr-01 • 14 minutes
What Octopus Minds May Tell Us About Aliens
Octopuses! They are escape artists, they camouflage in all kinds of surroundings, and they are incredibly intelligent creatures--and that intelligence evolved completely separately from humans'. That separate evolution makes them the perfect animal to study for Dominic Sivitilli, a PhD candidate in astrobiology and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Washington.Short Wave co-host Aaron Scott and Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) camera person Stephani Gordon visited Dominic's lab to learn about oc... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 30 minutes
Radioactive Red Forest
Russian forces in the forested exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear site may be receiving potentially dangerous levels of radiation. After the nuclear accident trees were felled and radioactive material was buried across the site. As the forest regrew its took up much of that radiation - making it the most radioactive forest in the world according to Tom Scott from Bristol University who studies radiation levels in the region. The troop's activities, from digging trenches to lighting fires as missile... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 95 minutes
Science Appreciates Manatees
This Week: How AI will kill everyone, Tissues, Caribou, Nasal sprays for covid, Vaccine vs Vaccine, Fruit Fly Sperm, Boa Constrictor Breathing, Rude AI, Two Legged Snakes, And Much More… (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 25 minutes
Probing Earth’s mysterious inner core, and the most complete human genome to date
On this week’s show: A journey to the center of the center of the Earth, and what was missing from the first human genome project Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about the many mysteries surrounding the innermost part of our planet—from its surprisingly recent birth to whether it spins faster or slower than the rest of the planet. Next,Sarah chats with Adam Phillippy about the results from the Telomere-to-Telomere (T2T) Consortium, an effort to create a complete and detailed read of ... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 28 minutes
Cyber frontlines in Ukraine
As conflict continues in Ukraine, there are invisible ‘cyber frontlines’ running in parallel to the physical fighting. We hear how the country’s tech scene is responding to the Russian invasion, as Mike Sapiton, Tech Editor at Forbes Ukraine gives us a view from the ground, and Professor Madeline Carr explains why cyber warfare can be particularly dangerous. A major report published this week speaks to a different kind of crisis: climate change. There are stark warnings for humanity and the planet, with t... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 25 minutes
A Solution to the Faint-Sun Paradox Reveals a Narrow Window for Life
We might have a past faint sun to owe for life’s existence. This has consequences for the possibility of life outside Earth. The post A Solution to the Faint-Sun Paradox Reveals a Narrow Window for Life first appeared on Quanta Magazine (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 26 minutes
#112: Gene therapy success; biodiversity talks; the genetics of blood sucking; the farthest star ever seen
A world-first gene therapy has been used to successfully treat a rare genetic skin disease. Referred to as “the worst disease you’ve never heard of”, the condition makes everyday living an ordeal. The team finds out how this new treatment works.Astronomers have detected a star more than 27 billion light years away - the most distant individual star we’ve ever seen. The team explains how this finding could shed light on what was going on in the early universe, ‘shortly’ after the Big Bang.In a bid to tackle ... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: what will happen to Utah's 'greatest snow' when there's no more snow?
Utah's title of "greatest snow" is at risk due to climate change. We're focusing on impacts, perceptions and adaptation strategies ski resorts are taking as they cope with climate change. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Mar. 31, 2022
On today's Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek and John Wells' guests include: (01:03) Tanya Lewis, senior editor at Scientific American who will talk about how scientists are just starting to unravel Covid's long-term cardiac effects... it turns out even mild COVID can increase the risk of heart problems.Then, (23:09) scientists are beginning to learn more about how to stave off Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive challenges. One of the most promising new areas of research is the effect of certain games... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 67 minutes
Hilary Glasman-Deal, "Science Research Writing For Native and Non-Native Speakers of English" (World Scientific Publishing Europe, 2020)
Listen to this interview of Hilary Glasman-Deal, teacher of STEMM communication at the Centre for Academic English, Imperial College London, and author ofScience Research Writing For Native and Non-Native Speakers of English (World Scientific Publishing Europe, 2020). We talk about researching, reading, and writing. Hilary Glasman-Deal : "One of the things I'm very often saying, particularly with early-career researchers, is this: 'Look, your reading is clearly effective, because you understand your field, ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 38 minutes
E1: The Grasshopper
To understand how Klára Dán von Neumann arrived at computer programming, we need to first understand where she came from. Born in Budapest to a wealthy Jewish family, Klári grew up surrounded by artists, playwrights, and intellectuals. Her first marriage, to an inveterate gambler, took her on a tour of Europe’s casinos, and in one of them, she had a chance encounter with the famous mathematician, John von Neumann. (@LostWomenofSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 8 minutes
Astronomers Tally the Growing Carbon Footprint of Space Science
Observatories require electricity and computing power to process data from deep space. Is there a way to make them run greener? (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 12 minutes
Can the science of PTSD help soldiers in Ukraine?
Experiencing distressing events, such as wars, can cause people to develop post-traumatic stress disorder. Ian Sample looks at why some end up with this debilitating condition, and how understanding more about the psychology of PTSD could help build emotional resilience (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-31 • 12 minutes
The Peculiar Physics Of The Wiffle Ball
Shall we play a game - of Wiffle ball? Invented in 1953, this lightweight alternative to a baseball is perfectly suited for back yard romping. Today we explain why the design of the Wiffle ball guarantees that you don't need a strong arm to throw a variety of pitches. More about Jenn Stroud Rossmann's work on Wiffle Balls here:https://www.theatlantic.com/technol... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-31
FQXi March 31, 2022 Podcast Episode
Eerie quantum Aharanov-Bohm effect demonstrated for gravity; mysteries about the nature of time; how choices can curve spacetime; and the Science of Can and Can't. (@FQXi)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 54 minutes
Brian Keating On The Leon Logothetis Podcast
The following is my appearance on the Leon Logothetis Podcast. Leon is the creator of THE KINDNESS DIARIES on Netflix and Amazon. He’s known for creating content around the world to highlight the best in humanity, and it was a privilege to be on his show. The show’s premise is that Leon does NOT know who is going to be his guest. That is why we start off with introductions. I was a bit nervous about going in blind, but Leon made it a great experience. Subscribe to his podcast here. From Leon’s show notes: “... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 28 minutes
Winding roads could make you a better navigator
How where you grew up affects your navigational abilities, and understanding how coastal storm surges are changing. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 5 minutes
New Research Decodes the Sea Cow's Hidden Language
New Research Decodes the Sea Cow's Hidden Language (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 26 minutes
Making Sense: Sight unseen
Close your eyes and try to imagine an apple. Can you see anything? Aphantasia is the inability to see with your mind’s eye. Since it was discovered, scientists have been asking the question: What is the mind’s eye even for? This is the fifth episode of our six-part series, Making Sense. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making ... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 47 minutes
Rachel E. Gross, "Vagina Obscura: An Anatomical Voyage" (W. W. Norton, 2022)
A camera obscura reflects the world back but dimmer and inverted. Similarly, science has long viewed woman through a warped lens, one focused narrowly on her capacity for reproduction. As a result, there exists a vast knowledge gap when it comes to what we know about half of the bodies on the planet. That is finally changing. Today, a new generation of researchers is turning its gaze to the organs traditionally bound up in baby-making—the uterus, ovaries, and vagina—and illuminating them as part of a dynami... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 65 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 4: Science, Societal Values and COVID
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to Lorraine Daston, director emerita of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin about a number of hugely relevant issues at the intriguing overlap between science and societal values. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmaker's journey in 10 essays) and a ser... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 46 minutes
Hannah Star Rogers, "Routledge Handbook of Art, Science, and Technology Studies" (Routledge, 2021))
I spoke with Hannah Star Rogers, one of the editors of the Routledge Handbook of Art, Science, and Technology Studies (Routledge, 2021). Art and science work is experiencing a dramatic rise coincident with burgeoning Science and Technology Studies (STS) interest in this area. Science has played the role of muse for the arts, inspiring imaginative reconfigurations of scientific themes and exploring their cultural resonance. Conversely, the arts are often deployed in the service of science communication, illu... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 10 minutes
How to Tell If Your Spaghetti Is Done Using Just a Ruler
Keep throwing noodles against the wall if you want, but this tactic ensures the pasta's texture is just right every single time. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 67 minutes
Carnivorous Phytobiology (MEAT-EATING PLANTS) with Hali’a Eastburn
Flesh hungry plants. The world’s fastest hunters. Botany with brains? Seymour, it’s time to feed because we’re doing meat-eating plants with conservation ecologist and carnivorous phytobiologist, Hali’a Eastburn. Can a Venus Fly Trap digest human flesh? Do frogs think of pitcher plants as home or hell? How fast is a bladderwort? Are scientists anesthetizing plants? Why exactly DID they name a fly trap after the goddess of love? Also: homicidal plant tattoos, nature’s grossest vending machines, and what pla... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Mar-30 • 15 minutes
The Community Scientists Who Helped Discover A New Planet
Short Wave host Emily Kwong talks with astronomer Paul Dalba and community scientist Tom Jacobs about how their collaboration led to the discovery of a new exoplanet. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 27 minutes
How are we related to stars?
Forget those fancy awards shows. This episode of Brains On is exploding with the stars. Find out how each of us is related to these beautifully bright beacons. Plus, we’ll consider what happens when gravity weighs down on a star over millions, and even billions, of years. We’ll also meet a star detective, who was able to witness an exploding star (aka supernova). All that and a stellar, new Mystery Sound to tickle your ears. Now, let’s blast off!!! | | This episode was sponsored by: | Indeed (Indeed.com/BR... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 5 minutes
Antarctic fiery flush
At Australia's Antarctic base they do lots of cool science stuff, and aim to create as little waste as possible—including the toilets. There's actually a toilet known as the 'Fire Breathing Dragon'—so more exciting than its official name of Electric Incinerating Toilet. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 33 minutes
SciShow Tangents Classics - Flowers
It's Spring Breeeaaaak baby, and we're taking the day off! Enjoy this classic episode on Flowers so you'll know all you need to know when they start blooming! See you next week!Note: The podcast ad for the IMPACT app is unscripted and being recorded live. It may contain some slight differences. Please visit https://impact.interactivebrokers.com/ for full details of products and services. Interactive Brokers, LLC member FINRA/SIPC.The projections or other information generated by IMPACT app regarding the lik... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 8 minutes
Scientists Watch a Memory Form in a Living Brain
While observing fearful memories take shape in the brains of fish, neuroscientists saw an unexpected level of synaptic rewiring. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 58 minutes
Human Milk
From the transfer of stem cells to insights into cancer research, the science (and sales) of human milk (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 14 minutes
COP15: is 2022 the year we save biodiversity?
Government negotiators from around the world are gathered in Geneva to hammer out the details of a Paris-style agreement for nature. But with time running out to stem the destruction of life-sustaining ecosystems, will it be enough? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-29 • 13 minutes
To Be DST, Or Not To Be. That Is The Question.
This month, the U.S. Senate unanimously approved a bill to make daylight saving time permanent. Now sleep scientists are weighing in and are suggesting the opposite — that standard time might be a better choice. Correspondent Allison Aubrey talks to host Emily Kwong about the pros and cons of adopting permanent daylight saving time or year-round standard time.You can follow Emily on Twitter @EmilyKwong1234 and Allison @AubreyNPR. Email Short Wave at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 8 minutes
Origin of the Great Unconformity
Brenhin Keller and Kalin McDannell explore the origins of a worldwide gap in the geologic record spanning hundreds of millions to billions of years. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 64 minutes
190 | Lea Goentoro on Regrowing Limbs
Regrowing limbs is an obvious medical goal, toward which there hasn't been much tangible progress. Is biology finally providing some clues? (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 37 minutes
649: Fascinated by the Forces and Features that Contribute to Flow in Rocks and Ice - Dr. Christine McCarthy
Dr. Christine McCarthy is the Lamont Assistant Research Professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She studies the mechanical and geological features of ice and rocks. Even though on the surface rocks appear static, deep... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 54 minutes
The Latest Buzz
Is your windshield accumulating less bug splatter? Insects, the most numerous animals on Earth, are becoming scarcer, and that’s not good news. They’re essential, and not just for their service as pollinators. We ask what’s causing the decrease in insect populations, and how can it be reversed. Also, the story of how California’s early citrus crops came under attack – a problem that was solved by turning Nature on itself. And how chimpanzee “doctors” use insects to treat wounds. We investigate the small an... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 12 minutes
Climate Change Is Disrupting the Global Supply Chain Too
Extreme weather, from floods to wildfires, is increasingly hammering ports, highways, and factories. It’s expected to get worse. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 31 minutes
Bonus Podcast: Naked Reflections Showcase
We share an episode of Naked Reflections, this one considering the sensitive subject of genocide... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Mar-28 • 13 minutes
Indoor Air Quality is Cool for Schools
The benefits of indoor air quality in schools are substantial, but American school buildings are old and many face major challenges when it comes to upgrades. Science and health correspondent Maria Godoy talks to host Aaron Scott about how there are a few hopeful signs that indoor air quality in schools will be improved- including some federal money and a new awareness of air quality because of the pandemic. Read Maria's story on indoor air quality in schools here: n.pr/3uy3A93Email the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-27 • 11 minutes
Unseen minerals all around us
Look, don’t put your mobile phone in a blender. Just… trust me on this one. But if you did, you’d find more of the periodic table of elements in that pulverised phone dust than you might expect. What’s that, you want more context? Allison Britt from Geoscience Australia can explain. First broadcast 11 July 2021. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Mar-26 • 54 minutes
Electric outboards making a splash and David Stewart celebrates 40 years recording bird calls
* Soviet scientists locked up or killed for accepting Mendelian genetics * E-boats bigger and stronger * Birds – today’s link to dinosaurs * David Stewart – 40 years recording bird calls (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-26
The Skeptics Guide #872 - Mar 26 2022
Daylight Saving Time; News Items: SLS is here, COVID Brain, Origins of Life, Orbiting Solar Power, Antarctic Heat Wave; Who's That Noisy; Name That Logical Fallacy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Mar-26 • 54 minutes
Mingzhen Lu on The Evolution of Root Systems & Biogeochemical Cycling
As fictional Santa Fe Institute chaos mathematician Ian Malcolm famously put it, “Life finds a way” — and this is perhaps nowhere better demonstrated than by roots: seeking out every opportunity, improving in their ability to access and harness nutrients as they’ve evolved over the last 400 million years. Roots also exemplify another maxim for living systems: “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” As the Earth’s climate has transformed, the plants and fungi have transformed along with it, reaching into... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 37 minutes
Why do animals migrate? Part 1
Wherever you are in the world you are probably near an animal that has undertaken a remarkable migratory journey, be that a butterfly, bird or sea turtle. But what CrowdScience listener Moses in Kenya wants to know is why they bother making such long and precarious voyages - and how they're able to reliably navigate over hundreds and sometimes even thousands of miles. In this first of two episodes, presenter Anand Jagatia travels to the Americas to meet the scientists finding and tracking these animals in o... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 47 minutes
Ukraine And The Energy Market, More West Nile Virus, Bird Flu In Chickens, 5,000 Exoplanets Found. March 25, 2022, Part 1
How Has The War In Ukraine Shaped The Global Energy Market? Russia’s war on Ukraine sent shock waves through the global energy market. The United States and the United Kingdom stopped importing Russian oil and gas, and the European Union set a target of r (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 47 minutes
How Vampire Bats Evolved To Drink Blood, Ethics Checks On Brain Research, Cicada Exhibit. March 25, 2022, Part 2
How Vampire Bats Evolved To Drink Blood Vampire bats subsist solely on blood: In technical terms, they’re what’s called “obligate sanguivores.” And the three species of vampire bats are the only mammals to have ever evolved this particular diet. Living on (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 33 minutes
Science of Gender: Stories outside the binary
In honor of International Transgender Visibility Day on March 31 this week’s episode celebrates storytellers who are transgender and gender nonconforming. Part 1: Comedian Riley Silverman attempts to use science to change the course of puberty. Part 2: Comedian Ang Buxton explores the differences in gender expectations from the football field to the middle school cafeteria. Riley Silverman is a writer, comedian, and professional geek. An author of Star Wars books, Riley is also a contributing writer for Ner... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 42 minutes
The Right Stuff
Since the beginning of the space program, we’ve always expected astronauts to be fully abled athletic overachievers who are one-part science-geek, two-parts triathlete – a mix the writer Tom Wolfe famously called “the right stuff.” But what if, this whol (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 10 minutes
The War Puts Ukraine's Clinical Trials—and Patients—in Jeopardy
Hundreds of trials have been disrupted in the medical research hub. Some patients are at risk of losing their last chance at survival. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 54 minutes
Boa breathing, green fire retardant vampire bat evolution, building urban biodiversity and fungal leather
How do snakes breathe when eating huge meals?; A new chemistry for green fire retardants; How vampire bats had to evolve to live on blood alone; How do we build urban biodiversity as cities continue to grow?; Waste food fed to fungi is turned into faux leather. (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Mar-25 • 13 minutes
Hal Walker: The Man Who Shot The Moon
In addition to flying, landing, and returning from the moon in 1969 — NASA's Apollo 11 crew helped with a series of scientific experiments. One of them was to leave a special instrument with lots of little reflectors on the surface of the moon. The goal of that experiment was to beam a laser at the moon. Today on the show, Scientist-In-Residence Regina G. Barber talks to host Aaron Scott about the lunar laser ranging experiment — and how shooting that laser helped us better understand one of Einstein's theo... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 116 minutes
What Should Astronauts Eat?
This Week: RNA Replication, Space Health, Entangled Protons, Robot Control, Ruffs, Totipotent Cells, Climate Optimism, Replication, Mind Control, And Much More… (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 170 minutes
The Origins Podcast: Roger Penrose
Summary: Roger Penrose and I discussed his life and work in science, mathematics, art and beyond, including the work for which he won the Nobel Prize, and his recent highly controversial proposal regarding the beginning and end of the Universe.To get this episode into your RSS feed, please click the button below from your phone:Roger Penrose, who shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics, for his 1965 theoretical demonstration that black holes are an inevitable consequence of Einstein’s General Relativi... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 32 minutes
Warming world
Unseasonably high temperatures have been recorded in both polar regions. Glaciologist Ruth Mottram discusses why they might be occurring now and the potential impact on her own work measuring climate change in Greenland. Erica Ollmann Saphire from the La Jolla Institute for Immunology tells us about her work developing new treatments for Ebola, she is looking to develop drugs which work not just on Ebola but also a range of related Viruses. And Eugene Koonin from the United States National Institutes of... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 27 minutes
Scientists become targets on social media, and battling space weather
On this week’s show: Why it’s tougher than ever to be a researcher on Twitter, and a highlight from this year’s AAAS Annual Meeting First up, Contributing Correspondent Cathleen O’Grady talks with host Sarah Crespi about the harassment that COVID-19 researchers are facing and a survey conducted by Science that shows more media exposure is linked to higher levels of abuse. Next, producer Meagan Cantwell shares another interview from this year’s AAAS Annual Meeting. She talks with Delores Knipp, a research ... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 36 minutes
The Colour Conundrum
The world is full of colour! But, wonders listener Maya Crocombe, ‘how do we see colour and why are some people colour blind?’ Dr Rutherford and Professor Fry set out to understand how special light-sensitive cells in our eyes start the process of colour perception, why people sometimes have very different experiences of colour and whether, in the end, colour is really just ‘in our heads’. Dr Gabriele Jordan from Newcastle University explains why lots of men struggle to discriminate between certain colour... (@AdamRutherford@FryRsquared)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 28 minutes
#111: Antarctic and Arctic record-breaking heat; octopus brains insight; black hole paradox explained
Extreme weather events have been recorded at both of Earth’s polar regions, as the Arctic and Antarctic are hit by major heat waves. To put this into context, Rowan speaks with climate scientist and Hot Air author Peter Stott.How did octopuses get to be so clever? Their intelligence is unusual for an invertebrate, so researchers have been trying to track down what’s going on in their brains. The team examines new findings which suggest it has something to do with microRNAs.Black holes have always been myste... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 49 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Mar. 24, 2022
On Cool Science Radio for March 24, 2022, Lynn and John's guests are: (01:42) Nims Purja- the first man ever to summit all 14 of the world’s 8000-meter “Death Zone” peaks, and he did it in less than 6 months. He also authored a book about his experience; Beyond Possible: One Soldier, Fourteen Peaks- My Life in the Death Zone. If you are familiar with Netflix’s “14 Peaks” you will not want to miss this conversation. (24:46) Harry Glorikian then joins the show. He has just written The Future You: How Artifici... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: could anemone venom be our saving grace when it comes to chronic pain?
We love to identify good guys and bad guys–in cartoons, movies, and nature. Nature’s good guys, for example, pollinate our crops. The bad guys are venomous animals that bite, sting, or even kill us with their poisons. But recent scientific discoveries by an Australian scientist revealed that the venom of a species of sea anemones contains 84 types of toxins, some of which might serve as the foundation for medicines that alleviate human pain. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 49 minutes
Lucy Cooke, "Bitch: On the Female of the Species" (Basic Books, 2022)
Bitch: On the Female of the Species (Basic Books, 2022) is a fierce, funny, and revolutionary look at the queens of the animal kingdom. Studying zoology made Lucy Cooke feel like a sad freak. Not because she loved spiders or would root around in animal feces: all her friends shared the same curious kinks. The problem was her sex. Being female meant she was, by nature, a loser. Since Charles Darwin, evolutionary biologists have been convinced that the males of the animal kingdom are the interesting ones—domi... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 8 minutes
4 Years On, a New Experiment Sees No Sign of ‘Cosmic Dawn’
Astronomers tried to confirm a signal from the birth of the first stars after the Big Bang. They saw nothing. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 13 minutes
Two years on, what have we learned about lockdowns?
Ian Sample speaks to Prof Adam Kucharski about how well lockdowns have worked around the world since 2020 (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-24 • 13 minutes
Can Nuclear Power Save A Struggling Coal Town?
A struggling Wyoming coal town may soon go nuclear with help from an unlikely partner, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates. NPR Correspondent Kirk Siegler takes us to Kemmerer, Wyo., where Gates' power company, supported by public funds, plans to open a new type of nuclear energy plant in hopes of replacing a closing coal plant. The model facility would create jobs and provide the flexible baseline energy needed to back up solar, wind and other renewables. But is it a good fit for rural Kemmerer? (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 44 minutes
Why Do We Die Without Sleep?
Why do we need sleep? In the search for answers, scientists have uncovered more thought-provoking mysteries central to what sleep is, how it evolved and the benefits that it provides. In this episode, the mathematician and science communicator Steven Strogatz speaks with Dragana Rogulja, an assistant professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School who recently discovered how sleep deprivation causes death in fruit flies, and Alex Keene, a neurogeneticist at Texas A and M University studying cave fish to... (@QuantaMagazine@stevenstrogatz)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 29 minutes
Milky Way's origin story revealed by 250,000 stars
Precisely ageing subgiant stars gives new insight into the Milky Way’s formation, and uncovering Yellowstone’s hydrothermal plumbing system. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 38 minutes
Making Sense: The Umami Mama
For thousands of years, there have been four basic tastes recognized across cultures. But thanks to Kumiko Ninomiya (a.k.a. the Umami Mama), scientists finally accepted a fifth. So could there be even more? This is the fourth episode of our six-part series, Making Sense. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial cont... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 69 minutes
N. J. Enfield, "Language Vs. Reality: Why Language Is Good for Lawyers and Bad for Scientists" (MIT Press, 2022)
Nick Enfield’s book, Language vs. Reality: Why Language is Good for Lawyers and Bad for Scientists (MIT Press, 2022), argues that language is primarily for social coordination, not precisely transferring thoughts from one person to another. Drawing on empirical research, Enfield shows that human lexicons the world over are far more coarse-grained than our perceptual faculties. Yet, at the same time, languages vary in the structure and sophistication of their representations. This means that, for instance, h... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 6 minutes
The EPA May Extend the Use of Pesticides that Paralyze Bees
Later this year, the agency will decide whether to allow four chemicals, which have been banned in Europe, to continue being used on US farms. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-23 • 12 minutes
Should Bulldogs Exist?
Cute, wrinkly faces aside, bulldogs have myriad health problems. Science points to purebred breeding practices as the reason. NPR Science correspondent Lauren Sommer talks to host Aaron Scott about how a bulldog breeding ban in Norway has fueled an ongoing debate on the practice of breeding dogs with low genetic diversity and, as a result, high instances of health problems. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 32 minutes
Why are butts and poop so funny?
This episode is a real stinker, but it had to happen. We go behind the scenes on what makes butts and poop so funny. Why does the mere mention of them make us laugh? | | We all have butts and we all poop. Those are the facts. But human butts are different than almost any other animal. We look into the evolution of butts, and find out how our senses of humor develop when we're kids. And we hear from comic Tim Platt on why he thinks butts and poop will always be funny. Plus, we’ll check in with Channel 2... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 56 minutes
Eve Vavagiakis: Inspiring The Next Generation
Dr. Vavagiakis is a postdoctoral associate in the Physics Department at Cornell University. She work on four collaborations: ACT, CCAT-prime, CMB-S4, and the Simons Observatory. www.simonsobservatory.org ... Eve got her PhD at Cornell University in 2021, where she was an NSF Graduate Research Fellow and Provost Diversity Fellow on instrumentation and analysis for cosmology and astrophysics. She designed Mod-Cam, a first light instrument for the CCAT Observatory‘s Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST).... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 8 minutes
Wood for the future
Wood has a loads of potential—from it we can make semi-conductors, batteries, steel, concrete, even plastics. It does need a lot of processing but we already do that with materials like steel, glass and concrete. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 36 minutes
Homes
From shells to hives to holes in the ground, most animals have a place to call home. And today, we're paying them all a visit! So open up, cause Science is knocking and it needs to use your bathroom!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangents sticker!A big t... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 68 minutes
Howard Burton, "Pandemic Perspectives: A Filmmaker's Journey in 10 Essays" (Open Agenda, 2022)
Howard Burton has been talking to very wise people for decades--scientists, historians, political thinkers, philosophers, etc. When Covid "hit" he was, like many of us, puzzled. Where did it come from? How should we respond to it? What does it say about us? So he did what he does: Had conversations with 32 very wise people about Covid. He filmed the discussions, and you can watch them here. Some of them will be released as podcasts on the Ideas Roadshow Podcast, which you can find here. He also wrote a book... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 49 minutes
LIFE ADVICE: For anyone who is tired & needs some hacks
Pomodoro timers! Bullet journals! Apps, tips, tricks and philosophies. Also: the most mellow episode ever, recorded late at night in a guest room. Like a cozy duvet of wisdom, this one is full of life hacks for remaining productive & healthy during distracting times. I asked Ologites their best strategies for keeping their brains less burdened and organizing everything from schedules to leftovers to sock drawers. In quick 5 chapters: Your Hot Bod Needs ThisHome is Where the Hard IsWrestling with Father Time... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 6 minutes
The War in Ukraine Is Threatening the Breadbasket of Europe
Millions of tons of grain may not make it out of the country this year. The shortfall could spread hunger and civil unrest worldwide. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 14 minutes
As the energy crisis bites, could fracking ever actually work?
Amid soaring energy prices the UK government has said it is considering all options for securing supplies and dampening costs – including fracking. Anand Jagatia explores why fracking is back on the table and whether it could ever really be a viable solution (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 60 minutes
Energy in crisis: nuclear goes up the agenda
Confronting crippling power bills, there's renewed interest in nuclear energy... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Mar-22 • 8 minutes
COVID-19 Cases Rise In The U.K., U.S. Watches For New Wave
The omicron outbreak has slowed dramatically in the U.S. But cases are rising in Britain due to an omicron subvariant. There are signs the U.S. could also see a bump in cases in the coming weeks. Stay safe out there, fabulous listeners! Feel free to drop us a line at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 82 minutes
189 | Brian Klaas on Power and the Temptation of Corruption
I talk with political scientist Brian Klaas about corruption in politics: where it comes from and how to prevent it. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 10 minutes
To Test Cancer Drugs, These Scientists Grew ‘Avatars’ of Tumors
Growing organoids in dishes and xenografts in mice lets scientists re-create a living person’s tumor—and test dozens of drugs against them at the same time. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 57 minutes
Kate Crawford, "The Atlas of AI: Power, Politics, and the Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligence" (Yale UP, 2021)
What happens when artificial intelligence saturates political life and depletes the planet? How is AI shaping our understanding of ourselves and our societies? In The Atlas of AI: Power, Politics, and the Planetary Costs of Artificial Intelligence (Yale University Press, 2021), Kate Crawford reveals how this planetary network is fuelling a shift toward undemocratic governance and increased racial, gender, and economic inequality. Drawing on more than a decade of research, award‑winning science, and technolo... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 77 minutes
Stephen B. Heard, "The Scientist’s Guide to Writing: How to Write More Easily and Effectively Throughout Your Scientific Career, 2nd ed." (Princeton UP, 2022)
Listen to this interview of Stephen Heard, Professor of Biology at the University of New Brunswick. We talk about his book The Scientist’s Guide to Writing: How to Write More Easily and Effectively Throughout Your Scientific Career, 2nd ed. (Princeton UP, 2022), we talk about writing when it's a verb, we talk about writing when it's a choice, and we talk about writing when it's the science. Stephen Heard : "Especially for early-career scientists there's a risk of their writing entering into a positive feedb... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 55 minutes
Nuclear Worries
The nuclear threat is back, and the Doomsday Clock is almost at midnight. How did we end up here again? In the 1930s, German physicists learned that splitting the nuclei of heavy atoms could release tremendous amounts of energy. Such theoretical ideas became relevant when WW II began. Today, we try to eliminate nuclear weaponry while exploiting the atom for peaceful uses, such as energy generation. But as the invasion of Ukraine shows, power plants can also be military targets. We lay out some of the quest... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 46 minutes
648: Investigating Interactions Between Neurons and Glial Cells in Health and Disease - Dr. Nathan Smith
Dr. Nathan Smith will soon be starting his new roles as Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion in Research and Research Education as well as Associate Professor of Neuroscience in the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester.... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Mar-21 • 16 minutes
Parents Of Transgender Youth Fear Texas' Anti-Trans Orders
Texas Governor Greg Abbott has directed the state's Department of Family and Protective Services to investigate certain gender-affirming care as possible child abuse, leaving parents of transgender youth feeling caught between two choices: support their children or face a possible investigation. Annaliese and Rachel are mothers living in Texas and both have transgender children. They speak to NPR about the emotional and mental toll this order has had on their families. And while the order is currently block... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-20 • 59 minutes
Covid in the sewers
Analysis of wastewater from sewage systems has provided an early warning system for the presence of Covid19 in communities – showing up in the water samples before people test positive. It’s also possible to identify the variants and even specific genetic mutations. Davida Smyth of Texas A&M University has been using this technique in New York and found intriguing results -forms of the virus not present in humans. The suggestion is that mutated forms may be infecting other animals, possibly those present in... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Mar-20 • 12 minutes
Hiding drugs in nanomaterials to repair brains
If you could take your brain and zoom in a couple of times – and then a bit more – you’d see structures that look like towers and tentacles, and behave like pieces of automatic Lego. It’s a crazy miniature world, and one we’re going to get a tour of today. Our tour guide is Dr Kiara Bruggeman, who’s hijacking and hacking these nano-sized structures, in the hopes of helping stroke-affected brains heal. [First aired July 25, 2021] (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Mar-19 • 54 minutes
The future of scientific collaborations in doubt following Russia's attack on Ukraine, and warnings of dire climate impacts made years ago.
* Scientific collaborations in doubt following Russia's attack on Ukraine * Warnings on climate and flooding seen in today’s massive property losses * Parkinson's Disease – it’s like walking through honey * New approach for those with OCD to cope with unwanted mental images * Creswell Eastman discovers iodine deficiency disorder, then helps millions of children * Sea stars and urchins move south with warmer waters changing ecosystems * George Ivanoff helps us survive the supernatural (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-19
The Skeptics Guide #871 - Mar 19 2022
Interview with Michelle Ciulla Lipkin from the National Association for Media Literacy Education; News Items: Why Is Life Symmetrical, Evolution of Language, Moon Rocks, Plasma Laser Lens, International Paranormal Conference; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 32 minutes
Is maths real?
Faced with one cake and eight hungry people, it’s pretty obvious how maths underpins reality. But as mathematics gets further from common sense and into seemingly abstract territory, nature still seems to obey its rules - whether in the orbit of a planet, the number of petals on a flower, or the structure of an atom. But what exactly is the relationship between mathematics and reality? That’s the impossibly difficult question CrowdScience has been set this week by our listener Sergio in Peru. It’s one that... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 14 minutes
Coronapod: How vaccine complacency is plaguing 'COVID zero' strategies
A handful of states around the world have pursued 'COVID zero' strategies. Through a combination of intensive lockdowns, travel restrictions and comprehensive test and trace systems, regions like Tonga, New Zealand, Taiwan, mainland China and Western Australia managed to keep the virus at bay. But now many of these countries are facing new outbreaks on a scale they have not yet seen, and it is being driven in part by vaccine hesitancy. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss how a successful publi... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 9 minutes
Florida Gets Kids and Vaccines Wrong and Ukraine's Health Crisis: COVID Quickly, Episode 26
Florida Gets Kids and Vaccines Wrong and Ukraine's Health Crisis: COVID Quickly, Episode 26 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 47 minutes
James Webb Focused Image, Decarbonize Your Home, Wildlife Crime. March 18, 2022, Part 1
The James Webb Telescope Releases Its First Focused Image This week eager astronomers got an update on the progress of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which launched last December. After a long period of tweaking and alignment, all 18 mirrors of th (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 47 minutes
Dandelion Sensors, GoFundMe Healthcare Shortcomings, Where Did Mars’ Water Go. March 18, 2022, Part 2
Flower Power: Floating Sensors Inspired By Dandelions Dandelions’ white puff balls are irresistible—kids delight in blowing on them until the seeds break free, floating away. But, dandelion seeds’ ability to travel through the air is not just aesthetic. L (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 34 minutes
Diabetes Awareness: Stories about dealing with diabetes
In this week’s episode both our storytellers are sharing their experience with diabetes. More than 34.2 million Americans have diabetes, however, many people don’t know about the disease or that they even have it. This episode is to raise awareness for American Diabetes Association Alert Day, which is on March 22 this year. Part 1: Diabetes runs in Michele Carlo’s family and she’s determined not wind up like them. Part 2: Comedian Gastor Almonte comes to terms with his new diabetes diagnosis. Michele Carlo... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 57 minutes
Stress
Stress can give your body a boost - raising adrenaline levels, pumping blood to the muscles, heightening our senses. And those sudden superpowers can be a boon when you’re running from a lion. But repeatedly dipping into that well can make you sick, even (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 8 minutes
Are These Chimpanzees Using Insects as Medicine?
Researchers observed chimps in Gabon applying insects to wounds—and it’s raising big questions about animal altruism and self-medication. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 25 minutes
Evolution 'Landscapes' Predict What's Next for COVID Virus
Studies that map the adaptive value of viral mutations hint at how the COVID-19 pandemic might progress next. The post Evolution ‘Landscapes’ Predict What’s Next for COVID Virus first appeared on Quanta Magazine (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 54 minutes
A sabretooth hypercarnivore, pack hunting spiders, urban trees and invasive insects, testing a baleen whale’s hearing, tire rubber pollution, clothes that listen to you and lithium mining in Ontario.
Paleontologists identify the first sabre-toothed mammalian hypercarnivore; A rare social spider hunts in packs in order to kill large prey; The urban tree canopy is facing a worst-case scenario in the near future; How do you test how well a whale hears?; Rubber dust from car tires can poison freshwater fish; Your favourite shirt might soon be listening to your hearbeat; Canada has lithium in Northwestern, Ontario. What is being done to mine it? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 14 minutes
How Art Can Heal The Brain
Arts therapies appear to ease a host of brain disorders from Parkinson's to PTSD. But these treatments that rely on music, poetry or visual arts haven't been backed by rigorous scientific testing. Now, artists and brain scientists have launched a program to change that. NPR's brain correspondent Jon Hamilton tells us about an initiative called the NeuroArts Blueprint. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-18 • 29 minutes
#110: Solution for Ukraine food crisis; why young blood rejuvenates; climate horror in Australia; Hannah Peel’s new music
As 10 percent of the world’s wheat comes from Ukraine, Russia’s attack on the country could spark global food shortages. But the team discuss a simple solution to the problem that could have knock-on benefits for climate and biodiversity.In vampire news, the team explains how we may have found the secret ingredient in young blood that causes it to have rejuvenating powers. This comes off the back of a 2012 study which saw old mice rejuvenated fur after being transfused with the blood of the young.Cases of c... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 113 minutes
When Irish Pi Are Smiling
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Egg To Offspring, Female jockeys, Webb Alignment, Homeopathy, Cell Lineage, Good news; but just Blairly, COVID Rising, School Masking, Birds Smell, Fire Bad, Fire Good, The Winning Mindset, (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 30 minutes
Covid in the sewers
Analysis of wastewater from sewage systems has provided an early warning system for the presence of Covid-19 in communities – showing up in the water samples before people test positive. It’s also possible to identify the variants and even specific genetic mutations. Davida Smyth of Texas A&M University has been using this technique in New York and found intriguing results - forms of the virus not present in humans. The suggestion is that mutated forms may be infecting other animals, possibly those present ... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 28 minutes
The challenges of testing medicines during pregnancy, and when not paying attention makes sense
On this week’s show: Getting pregnant people into clinical trials, and tracking when mice aren’t paying attention First up, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how scientists can overcome the lack of research on drug safety in pregnancy. Next,Nikola Grujic, a Ph.D. student at the Institute for Neuroscience at ETH Zürich, talks aboutrational inattention in mice and how it helps explain why our brains notice certain things—and miss others. This week’s episode was produce... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 15 minutes
The coin toss of Alzheimer's inheritance
Marty Reiswig talks about his experience in a clinical trial that hopes to at least delay the onset of Alzheimer's symptoms. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 34 minutes
The Turn of the Tide
Mathematician Hannah Fry and geneticist Adam Rutherford investigate your everyday science queries. Today, they get stuck into two questions about tides. Lynn Godson wants to know why isn’t high tide at the same time at all points around the coast? Whilst Tim Mosedale asks, could we ever harness tidal power commercially? Did you think tides are caused by the pull of the Moon? And that they come in and out twice a day? Well, yes, that’s true but it turns out there’s so much more to it than that, especially he... (@AdamRutherford@FryRsquared)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 199 minutes
AMA | March 2022
Ask Me Anything episode for March 2022. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 52 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Mar. 17, 2022
On this episode of Cool Science Radio, Lynn Ware Peek and John Wells' guests include:(01:08) Science writer David Robson who has written, The Expectation Effect: How Your Mindset Can Change Your World. Robson shows how our brains are “prediction machines.” They construct an elaborate simulation of the world each moment, based on previous experience and the expectations of the data hitting the senses.(28:56) Writer, speaker, and podcast host Christina Crook who has been studying the relationship between joy ... (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: how does science move from the lab to your living room?
New scientific discoveries are the purview of researchers, but that vital information is important to everyone. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 9 minutes
The Amazon Rainforest May Be Nearing a Point of No Return
Satellites spot troubling signals that may portend a transformation from rainforest to savanna, with profound implications for the planet. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 12 minutes
Covid cases are rising again – how worried should we be?
Science correspondent Nicola Davis speaks to Anand Jagatia about the increase in coronavirus infections and what it could mean. (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-17 • 15 minutes
Fighting Misinformation With Science Journalism
On December 31, 2021, The Joe Rogan Experience podcast on Spotify posted an episode with an interview with physician Dr. Robert Malone full of misinformation about the Covid-19 vaccine. This sparked outrage, a letter from a group of medical professionals, scientists and educators to Spotify and a series of creators pulling their content from the platform. Science Vs., a podcast produced by Gimlet Media which is owned by Spotify, decided to take a stand too.Listen to the episodes of Science Vs discussed here... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 27 minutes
The vest that can hear your heartbeat
A fabric microphone that can pick up human speech, and how AI helped the government of Togo distribute financial aid. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 103 minutes
Sara Walker: The Origin of Life
Sara Walker is an astrobiologist and theoretical physicist interested in the origin of life and how to find life on other worlds. She is most interested in whether or not there are “laws of life’ related to how information structures the physical world that could universally describe life here on Earth and on other planets. Walker is deputy director of the pioneering Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science, which is devoted to confronting the big questions of science and philosophy. She is Associ... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 30 minutes
Making Sense: No one nose
Dogs can smell cancer, Covid-19, and many other health problems in humans. Now, scientists are trying to duplicate these powers in robotic sniffers. But there’s a big challenge here: Scientists don’t really understand how smell works. This is the third episode of our six-part series, Making Sense, and it originally ran on March 10, 2021. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] W... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 51 minutes
Florian Jaton, "The Constitution of Algorithms: Ground-Truthing, Programming, Formulating" (MIT Press, 2021)
The Constitution of Algorithms: Ground-Truthing, Programming, Formulating (MIT Press, 2021) is a laboratory study that investigates how algorithms come into existence. Algorithms--often associated with the terms big data, machine learning, or artificial intelligence--underlie the technologies we use every day, and disputes over the consequences, actual or potential, of new algorithms arise regularly. In this book, Florian Jaton offers a new way to study computerized methods, providing an account of where al... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 45 minutes
Pandemic Perspectives 2: A Conversation with Stephen Scherer
In this Pandemic Perspectives Podcast, Ideas Roadshow founder and host Howard Burton talks to Stephen Scherer, Chief of Research at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, about how lessons learned from the pandemic might be best harnessed to increase the likelihood of future breakthroughs in biomedical research. Ideas Roadshow's Pandemic Perspectives Project consists of three distinct, reinforcing elements: a documentary film (Pandemic Perspectives), book (Pandemic Perspectives: A filmmaker's journey in 10 e... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 29 minutes
Smologies #11: SNAILS & SLUGS with Jann Vendetti
The SMOL version of an ep about smol precious creatures, we're talkin' slimy little angels with bellies for feet... literally! That's what gastropod means! We've got Dr. Jann Vendetti of the Natural History Museum of LA County to talk with Alie about snail-based beauty products, escargot, urban snails, thousands and thousands of teeth, and whether or not you should adopt a rabbit-sized pet snail. Click here for the full-sized, somewhat filthy versionSLIME project at NHM.orgMore episode sources & linksBecome... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 9 minutes
Iceland Bets on Herd Immunity
The island nation's government joins several other European countries in dropping Covid restrictions—but not everyone is sure the timing’s right. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 33 minutes
Jackie Higgins, "Sentient: How Animals Illuminate the Wonder of Our Human Senses" (Atria Books, 2022)
Packed with beautiful imagery, but also hard scientific facts, Jackie Higgins's book Sentient: How Animals Illuminate the Wonder of Our Human Senses (Atria Books, 2022) explores how we process the world around us by analyzing the incredible sensory capabilities of thirteen animals and reveals that we are not limited to merely five senses. There is a scientific revolution stirring in the field of human perception. Research has shown that the extraordinary sensory powers of our animal friends can help us bett... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-16 • 13 minutes
What Mount Kilimanjaro Has To Do With The Search For Alien Life
Understanding how life survives in extreme Earth environments could point to ways life can survive on other worlds. Astrobiologist Morgan Cable talks to host Emily Kwong about how her missions here on Earth have guided two upcoming NASA missions in search for alien life, not in a far off galaxy, but here in our solar system. The Titan Dragonfly and the Europa Clipper missions will each explore an ocean world in our solar system, where scientists believe we could find life--life that may be unlike anything w... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 34 minutes
Inside the immune system: Bad robots and friendly monsters
The immune system is so cool and so important but it largely goes about its business without us knowing it. In this episode you'll get a front row seat as our immune cells (aka friendly monsters) fight off bacteria and viruses (aka bad robots). We'll also find out how vaccines provide important training for our immune cells. Plus, co-host Colin quizzes Molly on immune system facts and there's a brand new mystery sound! | | This episode was brought to you by | Indeed (indeed.com/BRAINSON) | Int... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 12 minutes
Are You Better Than a Machine at Spotting a Deepfake?
Are You Better Than a Machine at Spotting a Deepfake? (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 8 minutes
Sydney smallpox epidemic
We're now quite familiar with terms like 'herd immunity' and 'epidemic', and that when separate groups of people—with separate germs—meet for the very first time, things can turn out badly. If you have never been exposed to a specific germ you won't be primed for protection against it. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 36 minutes
Green
Grass... money... Ninja Turtles... some of the best things in the world are all the same color: green! This week, we're taking a deeper look at this most verdant of colors. Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangents sticker!A big thank you to Patreon subscr... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 7 minutes
Offshore Wind Turbines Could Mess With Ships’ Radar Signals
A new study finds that turbines can muddle ships' navigational systems, obscuring the location of smaller boats or creating misleading images on radar screens. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 11 minutes
10% of the world’s wheat comes from Ukraine - will war change that?
Together, agricultural exports from Russia and Ukraine account for about 12% of global food calories. Madeleine Finlay finds out how the war between the two countries could impact the supply and cost of food around the world (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 60 minutes
Behaviour
Exploring the science of changing behaviours and the brain-based systems which direct how we act... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Mar-15 • 12 minutes
Humble Pi: Enjoying When Math Goes Awry
We celebrate math with stand-up mathematician Matt Parker, who talks about his book, Humble Pi. (encore) (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 81 minutes
188 | Arik Kershenbaum on What Aliens Will Be Like
I talk with zoologist Arik Kershenbaum about the likely forms of alien biology. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 11 minutes
Ethnoracial identity of MENA Americans
Neda Maghbouleh, Ariela Schachter, and René Flores explore the US Census classification of people with Middle Eastern and North African ancestry. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 48 minutes
647: Advancing Microbial Applications in Agricultural Management - Dr. Louis Schipper
Dr. Louis Schipper is a Professor in the School of Science at the University of Waikato. Research in Louis’s group focuses on how we can work with the land to achieve the food and other things we need while minimizing negative environmental impacts.... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 48 minutes
Annabel Streets, "52 Ways to Walk: The Surprising Science of Walking for Wellness and Joy, One Week at a Time" (G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2022)
Annabel Streets' book 52 Ways to Walk: The Surprising Science of Walking for Wellness and Joy, One Week at a Time (G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 2022) is a first-of-its-kind guide that blends cutting-edge research with an avid walker’s pragmatic how-to advice. This is the book for everyone—new walkers, seasoned walkers, and anyone who wants to boost the benefits of a daily constitutional. Inspirational and grounded in science, 52 Ways to Walk delivers the best kept secrets of healthy and happy walkers—people who hav... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 54 minutes
Identity Crisis (rebroadcast)
DNA is the gold standard of identification. Except when it’s not. In rare cases when a person has two complete sets of DNA, that person’s identity may be up in the air. Meanwhile, DNA ancestry tests are proving frustratingly vague: dishing up generalities about where you came from rather than anything specific. And decoding a genome is still relatively expensive and time-consuming. So, while we refine our ability to work with DNA, the search is on for a quick and easy biomarker test to tell us who we are. ... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 10 minutes
The Pandemic Tanked Rates of Childhood Vaccination—for Everything
Routine shots are down for everything from measles to tetanus to polio, leaving kids unprotected and raising the risk of outbreaks. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 120 minutes
What is the Secret to Longevity?
This Week: Science Headlines, Hybrid Genes & Mammoth Things, Napping Sharks, Mice Aging Cured, Jay Learning, 10-Legged Octopus?, Animal Sounds, Storm-water Emissions, Shackleton's Ship!, Worm Decisions, Aging Brains, And Much More... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Mar-14 • 15 minutes
Genetic Fact Vs. Fiction And Everything In Between With Janina Jeff
Geneticist Janina Jeff is back on the show to talk with host Emily Kwong about season 2 of her podcast In Those Genes. They talk about rhythm, aging and navigating what can be ascribed to our genes and what is determined by society.Check out more of Janina's work on In Those Genes: inthosegenes.comEpisodes referenced in today's Short Wave include:- R&B: Rhythm & Blackness- Black Don't CrackAnd listen to our last episode with Janina: n.pr/35TPyWJEmail the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-13 • 64 minutes
Why are Covid19 cases rising in Hong Kong?
Hong Kong had been very successful at preventing the spread of Coivd19. Testing and isolation measures were very effective. However, vaccine uptake was low amongst elderly people and that says virologist Malik Peiris has now left them vulnerable to the highly infectious Omicron variant. The bombing of a scientific institute in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv has echoes of the Stalinist purges says physicist and historical Mikhail Shifman. He tells us how the institute developed as a leading centre for physi... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Mar-13 • 11 minutes
Artificial intelligence, sound design and creativity
They will have played a critical role in many of your favourite albums, but what exactly does an audio mastering engineer do? And how is artificial intelligence shaking up what's traditionally been an exacting audio science? (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Mar-12 • 93 minutes
James Altucher chats with Brian Keating about news in science, and his upcoming audio book with Carlo Rovelli - Galilleo's Dialogue!
James Altucher chats Dr. Brian Keating on his new ventures, sciences, and he teased his upcoming book as well! Please Visit our Sponsors: LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/impossible to post a job for FREE Athletic Greens, makers of AG1 which I take every day. Get an exclusive offer when you visit https://athleticgreens.com/impossible AG1 is made from the highest quality ingredients, in accordance with the strictest standards and obsessively improved based on the latest science. All 33 Chairs. My All33 Chair i... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-12 • 54 minutes
Compelling novels highlight ecosystems under pressure and vale Richard Leakey
Horridus to help answer questions about Triceratops and other dinos Charlotte McConaghy’s compelling novels built on complex characters in a fast-changing natural world Vale Richard Leakey (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-12
The Skeptics Guide #870 - Mar 12 2022
Guest Rogue, Brian Wecht; News Items: Solid State Batteries, Are Coronal Loops Real, COVID Anosmia, Alcohol and the Brain; Special Report: Update on String Theory; Quickie with Bob: Bacteria Convert Sunlight to Energy; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 35 minutes
Does massage work?
Massage has been used for thousands of years to soothe our aches and pains and help us relax. Today there are a wide array of styles to choose from – Swedish massage, deep tissue, hot stone, sport, Thai, the list goes on. But which techniques are backed up by evidence? CrowdScience listeners Catherine and Stacy are keen for us to untangle this knotty issue, so presenter Caroline Steel selflessly ventures from her desk to the massage table all in the name of science. Is there such thing as a muscle 'knot' ... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 57 minutes
The Ethics of Autonomous Vehicles with Bryant Walker Smith
Autonomous vehicles hardly live up to their name. The goal of true “driverlessness” was originally hyped in the 1930s but keeps getting kicked further and further into the future as the true complexity of driving comes into ever-sharper and more daunting focus. In 2022, even the most capable robotic cars aren’t self-determining agents but linked into swarms and acting as the tips of a vast and hidden web of design, programming, legislation, and commercial interest. Infrastructure is more than the streets an... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 47 minutes
Will Russia’s War Spur Clean Energy Efforts, What Is “Life,” Scientific Sewer Tour. March 11, 2022, Part 2
Will Russia’s War In Ukraine Finally Spur A Clean Energy Revolution? This week President Biden tightened sanctions on Russia, cutting off imports of Russian oil to the United States in response to Russia’s war on Ukraine. The conflict has put a sudden, sh (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 47 minutes
Mask Mandates Drop, International Salmon Survey, Long COVID Answers And Questions. March 11, 2022, Part 1
As Mask Mandates Drop, COVID Cases Increase In Some Parts Of World Later this month, Hawai’i will become the 50th and final state in the U.S. to drop its indoor mask mandate, as those and other COVID-19 protections tumble down nationwide and in places lik (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 26 minutes
Pi Day: Stories about a very specific number
In honor of Pi Day on March 14, this week’s episode features two stories about how a particular number has impacted the live’s of the storytellers. Part 1: Math teacher Theodore Chao goes all out for Pi Day at his school. Part 2: Debbie Char learns what a flash point is while cooking a meal for her date. Theodore Chao is an associate professor of mathematics education at The Ohio State University. He who loves using video and storytelling to get kids to share about how they really do math, not what someone ... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 6 minutes
A Treasure Trove of Dinosaur Bones in Italy Rewrites the Local Prehistoric Record
New fossils are changing a decades-old story about the species that roamed the Mediterranean 80 million years ago. (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 64 minutes
The Helen Keller Exorcism
Fantasy writer Elsa Sjunneson has been haunted by Helen Keller for nearly her entire life. Like Helen, Elsa is Deafblind, and growing up she was constantly compared to her. But for a million different reasons she hated that, because she felt different fr (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 10 minutes
Genetic Databases Are Too White. Here’s What It’ll Take to Fix It
Most genetic research is done on people of European descent. That’s led to misdiagnoses, inaccurate tests, and missed opportunities for new treatments. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 54 minutes
Russia and space cooperation, the UN plastic treaty, ancient 10-legged octopus, medical alarm sounds and the price of fear for prey animals.
Will cooperation in space with Russia survive war in Ukraine? | For more than half a century, through international conflict and political turmoil, the west has cooperated on a wide range of activities in space with the Soviets and then the Russians, culminating in the International Space Station. We speak with Mac Evans, former head of the Canadian Space Agency about why the war in the Ukraine runs the risk of ending that long collaboration. | | What will the new UN treaty to control plastic pollution ne... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 14 minutes
A Physics Legend Part Two: Chien-Shiung Wu's Granddaughter Reflects
Growing up, Jada Yuan didn't realize how famous her grandmother was in the world of physics. In this episode, we delve into the life of physicist Chien-Shiung Wu from her granddaughter's perspective. Jada talks to host Emily Kwong about writing the article Discovering Dr. Wu for the Washington Post, where she is a reporter covering culture and politics. Check out part one in which Emily talks to Short Wave's scientist-in-residence about how Chien-Shiung Wu altered physics. She made a landmark discovery in 1... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-11 • 32 minutes
#109: Ukraine war stokes energy crisis; emergency sounded over Amazon rainforest; secular intelligent design; mammalian virgin birth
The war in Ukraine has sparked an energy crisis, as European countries attempt to cut ties with Russia. The team discusses what this means for the future of energy production and how it may speed up our pivot to renewable energy. They also explore the growing concerns at various nuclear sites in Ukraine, as some have been seized by the Russians, while others have been damaged during the conflict.For the first time a virgin birth has taken place in a mammal - a female mouse has given birth without any input ... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 30 minutes
Why are Covid-19 cases rising in Hong Kong?
Hong Kong had been very successful at preventing the spread of Covid-19. Testing and isolation measures were very effective. However, vaccine uptake was low amongst elderly people and that says virologist Malik Peiris has now left them vulnerable to the highly infectious Omicron variant. The bombing of a scientific institute in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv has echoes of the Stalinist purges says physicist and historical Mikhail Shifman. He tells us how the institute developed as a leading centre for phys... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 31 minutes
Monitoring wastewater for SARS-CoV-2, and looking back at the biggest questions about the pandemic
On this week’s show: We have highlights from a special COVID-19 retrospective issue on lessons learned after 2 years of the pandemic First up, Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss what scientists have learned from scanning sewage for COVID-19 RNA. And now that so many wastewater monitoring stations are in place—what else can we do with them? Next, we have researcher Katia Koelle, an associate professor of biology at Emory University. She wrote a review on the evolv... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 34 minutes
The Shocking White Hair
Why does human hair go grey and is it ever possible for it to go white overnight from shock? Hannah and Adam explore why hair goes grey, how much stressful life events and a lack of sleep can speed up the process. They hear from the pilot whose hair turned white after a flight where all 4 of his engines failed after flying through a volcanic ash cloud - was the shock responsible? They also uncover new research which has shown it's possible for greying hair to return to its natural colour and ask if this fin... (@AdamRutherford@FryRsquared)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 85 minutes
Harvard Physicist Describes the Inside of a Black Hole | Shep Doeleman
Sheperd S. Doeleman is an Astrophysicist at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian and Founding Director of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a synchronized global array of radio observatories designed to examine the nature of black holes. He is also a Harvard Senior Research Fellow and a Project Co-Leader of Harvard’s recently established Black Hole Initiative (BHI). The BHI is a first-of-its-kind interdisciplinary program at the University that brings together the disciplines of Astronomy, P... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: researchers are coming together to address society's grand challenges
When we think of research universities, we imagine lab scientists hunkered in their labs, or marine biologists in their research ships, pursuing ever-narrower questions about their specialized study topics. But the complex questions and problems that concern society today must almost always draw upon the knowledge of more than a single discipline – yet scientists receive little or no training to cross intellectual and disciplinary borders. So they need help – and a new Center at the University of Utah is pr... (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 52 minutes
Intellectual Humility in Science: A Discussion with Glenn Sauer
Today’s episode of How To Be Wrong welcomes Glenn Sauer, who is Donald J. Ross Sr. Chair in Biology and Biochemistry and Professor of Biology at Fairfield University, where he also serves as Associate Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences. Our conversation covers a range of topics related to the issue of intellectual humility, including the conflict between scientific and religious perspectives in the US and the politics of certainty that dominates much contemporary discourse about policy as well as ideas ... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 46 minutes
Joseph L. Graves and Alan H. Goodman, "Racism, Not Race: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions" (Columbia UP, 2021)
The science on race is clear. Common categories like “Black,” “white,” and “Asian” do not represent genetic differences among groups. But if race is a pernicious fiction according to natural science, it is all too significant in the day-to-day lives of racialized people across the globe. Inequities in health, wealth, and an array of other life outcomes cannot be explained without referring to “race”—but their true source is racism. What do we need to know about the pseudoscience of race in order to fight ra... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 10 minutes
Cities Are Unlikely Yet Powerful Weapons to Fight Climate Change
The UN's latest IPCC report paints a dire picture for the species of Earth. But it also suggests how urban areas can help humanity face down the threat. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 14 minutes
How come some people haven’t had Covid yet?
There are countless individuals who have knowingly been exposed to Covid-19, often multiple times, but have never had a positive test. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Linda Geddes about how scientists are trying to solve the mystery of why some people don’t catch Covid (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-10 • 12 minutes
A Physics Legend Part One: How Chien-Shiung Wu Changed Physics Forever
In the 1950's, a particle physicist made a landmark discovery that changed what we thought we knew about how our universe operates. And Chien-Shiung Wu did it while raising a family and an ocean away from her relatives in China. Short Wave's Scientist-In-Residence Regina Barber joins host Emily Kwong to talk about that landmark discovery--what it meant for the physics world, and what it means to Regina personally as a woman and a Chinese and Mexican American in physics. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-09 • 28 minutes
The AI that deciphers ancient Greek graffiti
An artificial intelligence that restores illegible inscriptions, and the project that's reintroducing lost species in Argentina. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-09 • 29 minutes
Making Sense: The healing power of touch
Doctors can save the lives of premature infants, but the process is often painful. Luckily, a solution might be as simple as a parent’s loving touch. This is the second episode of our new six-part series, Making Sense. For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a great place to view show transcripts and read more about the topics on our show. Also, email us! [email protected] We read every email. Support Unexplainable by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Mar-09 • 11 minutes
Neural Noise Shows the Uncertainty of Our Memories
The electrical chatter of our working memories reflects our lack of confidence about their contents. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-09 • 64 minutes
Ferroequinology (TRAINS) Encore with Matt Anderson
Trains. Locomotives. Choochoos. Bullet trains. Hyperloops. Subways. How fast can they go? How did they change American history? Why do people love them? What should we do with all that abandoned track? Can you marry a train? What's it like to shovel coal into a steam engine?Alie went off the rails at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan talking to an official ferroequinologist and curator Matt Anderson -- who confessed to some youthful railroad mischief, delivered a succinct slice of U.S. History, ha... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Mar-09 • 15 minutes
TASTE BUDDIES: Science of Sour
Pucker up, duderinos! Short Wave's kicking off a series on taste we're calling, "Taste Buddies." In today's episode, we meet Atlantic science writer Katherine Wu and together, we take a tour through the mysteries of sourness — complete with a fun taste test. Along the way, Katie serves up some hypotheses for the evolution of sour taste because, as Katie explains in her article, "The Paradox of Sour," researchers still have a lot to learn about this weird taste.Baffled by another mundane aspect of our existe... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 25 minutes
What's up with worms?
What’s up with worms? How do they sleep? Why are they slimy? How do they move? Here at Brains On, the only way to find out is to embark on an EPIC QUEST! | Join co-host Ezra and the worm adventurer extraordinaire Sir Wormus on a journey to find the Golden Worm, a magical artifact! On the way, they’ll learn all about the noble earthworm from the Tome of Worms, a magic book containing all the knowledge of worm expert Emma Sherlock from the Natural History Museum in London! | Will our heroes find the Golden ... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 5 minutes
Worm blobs
When digging the compost pile into the garden, Dr Karl noticed a ball of entangled shape-shifting worms. You might think 'yuck'—but there's a 'wow' factor because some animal groupings can generate intelligence, giving the group an advantage over solitary individuals. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 43 minutes
Computers
Back in my day, a computer was a computer: It was big, tan, and was plugged into your living room wall. But now we've got computer cars, computer phones, even computer lightbulbs! And that's great! But I think we better keep an eye on them all, just in case...Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... t... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 50 minutes
The Future of Consciousness: A Discussion with Eva Jablonka
What makes a living body conscious? What is consciousness and are there different types of it? These questions have been studied by Professor Eva Jablonka from the Cohn Institute for the History of Philosophy of Science and Ideas at Tel Aviv University. Much of her early work was on epigenetic inheritance which poses questions such as whether learned behaviour can be passed on from one generation to the next and that has led her to think about whether it’s possible to take an evolutionary approach to consci... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 5 minutes
In Alaska, Beavers Are Engineering a New Tundra
Once nonexistent in the northwest part of the state, beavers are both benefiting from and changing a warming landscape. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 59 minutes
Cyberwarfare
As global conflict increasingly turns digital, we look at the tools, targets & implications of cyberwarfare... (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 13 minutes
Is Russia losing the information war?
Since the start of the Russia-Ukraine war, disinformation and propaganda has been rife across both state-controlled media and digital platforms. Ian Sample finds out about the myths propagated online, and who is winning the disinformation war (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-08 • 11 minutes
Checking In On Our Pandemic Habits: What To Lose And What To Keep?
Over the last few years, we've all found different ways to cope with the pandemic. Some people started drinking more, moving less, maybe eating more. Now that the pandemic is at a lull, health experts say it's time to take stock of these habits. Short Wave host Aaron Scott chats with health correspondent Allison Aubrey about how our daily habits have been affected and changed — for better or worse — and how one might start to change ones they want to change.You can follow Aaron on Twitter @AaronScottNPR and... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 81 minutes
187 | Andrew Leigh on the Politics of Looming Disasters
I talk with Andrew Leigh of the Australian Parliament about how we can politically act to protect against existential risks. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 56 minutes
Jo Handelsman, "A World Without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet" (Yale UP, 2021)
A World without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet (Yale University Press, 2021) by celebrated biologist Jo Handelsman lays bare the complex connections among climate change, soil erosion, food and water security, and drug discovery. Humans depend on soil for 95 percent of global food production, yet let it erode at unsustainable rates. In the United States, China, and India, vast tracts of farmland will be barren of topsoil within this century. The combination of i... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 54 minutes
You Are Exposed (rebroadcast)
There’s no place like “ome.” Your microbiome is highly influential in determining your health. But it’s not the only “ome” doing so. Your exposome – environmental exposure over a lifetime – also plays a role. Hear how scientists hope to calculate your entire exposome, from food to air pollution to water contamination. Plus, new research on the role that microbes play in the development of neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s, and the hot debate about when microbes first colonize the body. Could a fetu... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 41 minutes
646: Examining the Genetic Basis of the Evolution of Plant Innovations - Dr. Verónica Di Stilio
Dr. Verónica Di Stilio is a full Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington. As a plant evolutionary biologist, Verónica is interested in understanding how the diversity of plant life came to be. In particular, she... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 10 minutes
What Neurodivergence Teaches Us About How to Live
Scientist and writer Camilla Pang explains what the rationality of science showed her about making better decisions, processing feedback, and feeling like an outlier. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-07 • 13 minutes
Dr. Thomas Insel On Why The U.S Mental Health System Has Failed And What Can Be Done
Health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee talks with Dr. Thomas Insel about his new book, Healing: Our Path from Mental Illness to Mental Health. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-06 • 12 minutes
The mental health seesaw
What makes someone who cruises through life relatively happily different to someone who struggles with mental health issues? At least part of it lies in our genes – and there’s not much we can do about that. But there are other factors that we can control. Mary McMillan is trying to figuring out the divide between the two through a highly scientific process involving ... spit in a cup. First broadcast 28 March 2021. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Mar-06 • 58 minutes
Covid -19 origins
Wuhan's Huanan Seafood Market is associated with many of the first cases or Covid- 19, but data on precisely how and from where the virus might have first spread has been difficult to find. However a re-examination of the earliest samples collected from the market seem to pinpoint where the virus first showed itself. Sydney University virologist Eddie Holmes says this evidence will be crucial in determining which animals may have initially passed the virus to humans. Humans are known to have passed the Sar... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Mar-05 • 54 minutes
We were warned of pandemic in 1994, and hydrogen for far north Queensland
Artificial intelligence – promises and threats Drone helps control invasive species on Norfolk Island Triceratops comes to Melbourne Hydrogen coming for Cape York communities Pandemic – how we were warned (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-05
The Skeptics Guide #869 - Mar 5 2022
Special Report: Ukraine; News Items: Quantum Gravity Gradiometer, Sea Level Rise, NASA Innovative Projects, Biological Sex; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 27 minutes
How high can insects fly?
If you took a fly into a really tall elevator and let it out at the top, would it still be able to fly? And what’s the absolute highest an insect could possibly go? It’s a question that’s been bugging CrowdScience listener Chee for a while, but presenter Alex Lathbridge is on the case. He discovers that when they’re not buzzing around your lunch, insects can be routinely found flying high up in the atmosphere travelling from A to B. There are also ground-dwelling bumblebees living in the mountains of Sichua... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 17 minutes
Coronapod: why stopping COVID testing would be a mistake
Scientists say that now is the time to improve COVID data, not cut it back (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 7 minutes
The Push to Move Past the Pandemic: COVID Quickly, Episode 25
The Push to Move Past the Pandemic: COVID Quickly, Episode 25 (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 47 minutes
T. Rex Dispute, Texas Trans Healthcare, Russian Cyber Warfare, Bird Calls. March 4, 2022, Part 1
The Tyrannosaurus Rex Is Having An Identity Crisis There are few creatures, present or extinct, that hold the iconic status of the Tyrannosaurus rex. In museums and dinosaur media, this powerful, lumbering reptile often plays a starring role. But new rese (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 47 minutes
Lack Of Black Physicists, Solar Outages, Martian Meteorites, What Is A Butt. March 4, 2022, Part 2
Where Are The Black Physicists? Black scientists make up less than one percent of physics PhDs in the U.S. And since 1999, most physics departments in the country have failed to graduate more than one or two Black undergraduates. Furthermore, the share of (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 32 minutes
The Miracle of Life: Stories about birth
In this week’s episode both our storytellers share their experience of that beautiful and magical moment when new life is brought into this world. Part 1: Ed Pritchard inadvertently becomes a leatherback turtle midwife during his first field job. Part 2: Science reporter Ari Daniel's life is influenced by his remarkable grandmother. A native of South Florida, Ed Pritchard has fostered a love for the marine environment since an early age. Ed holds a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from the Univers... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 53 minutes
Life in a Barrel
This week, we flip the Disney story of life on its head thanks to a barrel of seawater, a 1970s era computer, and underwater geysers. It’s the chaos of life. Latif, Lulu, and our Senior Producer Matt Kielty were all sitting on their own little stories un (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 8 minutes
Air Pollution May Keep Insects From Stopping to Smell the Flowers
Researchers ran an outdoor experiment to see if diesel exhaust and ozone would interfere with pollinators’ search for floral scents. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 89 minutes
How to Pronounce Science
This Week: Science & Policy, Mask Pollution, Personality Takes Guts?, Let's Eat Bugs, Cancer Cures, Tires Are Bad, Chimp Learning, Animal All-Nighters, Face Mask Followings, Epigenetic Brain MRI, Energetic Vision, Space Quickies, And Much More... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 54 minutes
Climate change and health, the biggest bacteria, rare earth metal recycling, tracking a giant Antarctic iceberg and are we living in a simulation?
IPCC report gives bleak warning about the future, but ideas on how we should prepare; Scientists discover the world’s biggest bacteria; Rare earth elements can be extracted from mining and electronic waste; Researchers watch a wandering Antarctic iceberg the size of PEI melt down; Could we be living in a computer simulation? And if we were, would there be any way to tell? (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 23 minutes
Emily Runs A Marathon
In collaboration with our colleagues at Life Kit, host Emily Kwong talks about her experience and discusses keys to training with running coach Laura Norris. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-04 • 33 minutes
#108: Ukraine: health crisis and threat of nuclear war; IPCC report on limits to climate adaptation; Wuhan origin of covid
As the war in Ukraine intensifies, Vladimir Putin raised Russia’s nuclear readiness level. The team discusses what this means about the likelihood of nuclear war. They also explore the unfolding humanitarian crisis in the country.The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report is out, and it focuses on impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. We hear from Swenja Surminski, head of adaptation research at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.New studies into the star... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 19 minutes
A global treaty on plastic pollution, and a dearth of Black physicists
On this week’s show: The ins and outs of the first global treaty on plastic pollution, and why the United States has so few Black physicists First up, Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the world’s first global treaty on plastics pollution–and the many questions that need answers to make it work. Read a related Policy Forum here. Up next, we hear from some of more than 50 Black physicists interviewed for a special news package in Scienceabout the barriers Black physicists face, ... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 30 minutes
Covid -19 origins
Wuhan's Huanan Seafood Market is associated with many of the first cases or Covid- 19, but data on precisely how and from where the virus might have first spread has been difficult to find. However a re-examination of the earliest samples collected from the market seem to pinpoint where the virus first showed itself. Sydney University virologist Eddie Holmes says this evidence will be crucial in determining which animals may have initially passed the virus to humans. Humans are known to have passed the S... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 33 minutes
Surprising Symmetries
Two eyes, two arms, two legs - we’re roughly symmetrical on the outside, but inside we’re all over the place! We just have one heart, which is usually on the left, one liver on the right, one spleen and one appendix….‘Why is that?’ wonders listener Joanne. Our science sleuths discover that being symmetrical down the middle - at least on the outside - is by far the most common body plan across the animal kingdom. Professor Sebastian Shimeld from the University of Oxford takes us on a journey into the deep e... (@AdamRutherford@FryRsquared)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 9 minutes
What seaweed and cow burps have to do with climate change | Ermias Kebreab
Scientists have long known that cows are a huge source of the greenhouse gas methane, contributing up to four percent of emissions globally. But could there be a way to make cattle less -- ahem -- gassy? Animal scientist Ermias Kebreab talks through an ingenious solution to reduce methane-rich cow burps by feeding cattle something growing below the surface of the ocean: seaweed. (@TEDTalks)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 17 minutes
Flying Fish and Aquarium Pets Yield Secrets of Evolution
New studies reveal the ancient, shared genetic "grammar" underpinning the diverse evolution of fish fins and tetrapod limbs. Read more at QuantaMagazine.org. Music is "Hidden Agenda" by Kevin MacLeod. (@QuantaMagazine)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 45 minutes
Cool Science Radio | Mar. 3, 2022
In this episode of Cool Science Radio : (1:08) Florence Williams who has written HEARTBREAK: A Personal and Scientific Journey and (23:49) Dr. Michael Ryan Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at Carleton University. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 10 minutes
Researchers Analyzed Folk Music like It Was DNA: They Found Parallels between Life and Art
Researchers Analyzed Folk Music like It Was DNA: They Found Parallels between Life and Art (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 10 minutes
What It Would Take to Bring the ISS Back to Earth in One Piece
NASA plans to deorbit the International Space Station in 2031 by crashing it into the ocean. But is there another way? (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 14 minutes
What have fossil fuels got to do with the invasion of Ukraine?
Madeleine Finlay speaks to Fiona Harvey about how Vladimir Putin has weaponised Russia’s fossil fuels, and how Europe could reshape its energy supplies for the future (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 91 minutes
Part 2: Attention-Deficit Neuropsychology (ADHD) with How to ADHD, Black Girl Lost Keys, Jahla Osborne + more
Did Part 1 leave you informed and now you need a pep talk? Get ready for an absolute banger of an episode with 5 experts: René Brooks of BlackGirlLostKeys.com, TEDTalk speaker and How to ADHD YouTuber Jessica McCabe and neuroscientist Jahla Osborne of University of Michigan. What is it like to get diagnosed? How do you know which medication – if any – is right for you? Why is there such a spike in ADHD diagnoses during the pandemic? Autism and ADHD: what’s the deal? What accommodations should a person ask f... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Mar-03 • 10 minutes
Silver Linings From The UN's Dire Climate Change Report
The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) just released the second of three reports on climate change. Nearly 300 scientists from all over the world worked together to create this account of how global warming is affecting our society. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher fills us in on this major climate science report and actually brings three empowering takeaways hidden within it. Read the report here: https://bit.ly/3hzWNFvAnd listen to Rebecca Hersher's hopeful takeaways from ... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-02 • 30 minutes
COVID stimulus spending failed to deliver on climate promises
G20 COVID stimulus packages fail to deliver on emissions, how knowing something about a stranger could alter your behaviour, and scientists condemn the invasion of Ukraine. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Mar-02 • 41 minutes
Making Sense: How sound becomes hearing
In the same way optical illusions trick our eyes, audio illusions can trick our ears. This raises a fundamental question: What is hearing, and how much of it is made up by our brains? This is the first episode of our new six-part series, Making Sense. You can find more of Diana Deutsch’s auditory illusions at https://bit.ly/3Mdh6H4, Matthew Winn's research at http://www.mattwinn.com/Research.html, and Mike Chorost's writing at https://michaelchorost.com For more, go to http://vox.com/unexplainable It’s a gr... (@voxdotcom@nhassenfeld)
podcast image2022-Mar-02 • 9 minutes
This Plastic Dot Sniffs Out Infections Doctors Can’t See
Keeping wounds covered can help them stay clean. But if bacteria grow beneath the bandages, things can get dangerous. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-02 • 141 minutes
Ayaan Hirsi Ali
This episode features a very special guest, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, who has an incredible life story and track record of speaking out against oppression, fighting for freedom of expression, and fostering a deeper discussion around some of today's most... (@LKrauss1@OriginsProject)
podcast image2022-Mar-02 • 14 minutes
How A Collection Of Threatened Bird Calls Swept The Australian Album Charts
Host Emily Kwong quizzes musician and nature enthusiast Anthony Albrecht on the threatened Australian birds calls on his new album, Songs of Disappearance. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 34 minutes
Mountain life: How's the air up there?
The ExPLORERR was built to go everywhere. That’s why this vehicle’s full name is: the Extremely Practical Land and Ocean Rover Exploring Remote Realms. And guess what? It has a recording studio built on-board! Good thing, because this episode was recorded while traveling up, up, up a mountain! | | We discover some wildlife that lives at great heights as well as a rhyming ice cream salesman. Our pal and atmospheric scientist, Dr. Deanna Hence checks in to answer a popular question: if hot air rises, why is ... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 75 minutes
Hakeem Oluseyi: Quantum Leaps!
Hakeem Oluseyi is an American astrophysicist, cosmologist, inventor, educator, science communicator, author, actor, veteran, and humanitarian. Oluseyi was named a Visiting Robinson Professor at George Mason University in 2021, a distinction by which the university recognizes outstanding faculty. In 2021, he published an autobiography titled: A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars co-authored with Joshua Horwitz. His best known scientific contributions are research on the transfer o... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 6 minutes
Black holes bared
The final piece about why the 100 million or so black holes in our Milky Way galaxy are missing. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 43 minutes
Venus
We kick off Season 4 by getting up close and personal with Earth's other, less popular, more mysterious neighbor: Venus!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangents sticker!A big thank you to Patreon subscribers Garth Riley and Tom Mosner for helping to make ... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 46 minutes
The Future of Sleep: A Discussion with Derk-Jan Dijk
Many people, at some stage of their life, worry about sleep: are they getting enough of it? Or even, too much? Derk-Jan Dijk is Professor of Sleep and Physiology at University of Surrey. His current research interests include the contribution of sleep to brain function in healthy ageing and dementia; the role of circadian rhythms in sleep regulation; negative effects of sleep loss; understanding age and sex related differences in sleep physiology and developing tests to monitor sleep. In this podcast he dis... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 14 minutes
Orcas: Apex Predators Or Marine Park Stars?
NPR science correspondent Lauren Sommer joins Short Wave host Emily Kwong to talk about a team of researchers who were the first to document a pack of orcas attacking a blue whale. Their work shows that killer whales, while stars in marine parks and movies, are also the ocean's top-- and often vicious-- predators. Humans' complex relationship with them may say more about humans than about the orcas. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 7 minutes
Gene-Edited Brain Organoids Are Unlocking the Secrets of Autism
Harvard researchers used lab-grown clumps of neurons called organoids to reveal how three genes linked to autism affect the timing of brain development. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 15 minutes
Act now: understanding the latest warnings in the IPCC report
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued its bleakest warning yet, showing a rapidly narrowing window for action to avoid the worst impacts of climate breakdown. Ian Sample speaks to environment editor Damian Carrington about the report’s findings, and what it means for the future of humanity (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Mar-01 • 60 minutes
Q&A: Defining AI, Dark Energy & Dr NO
We're answering your questions on motion, cleanliness and the Disney robot WALL-E? (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 72 minutes
186 | Sherry Turkle on How Technology Affects Our Humanity
I talk with Sherry Turkle about how our ubiquitous connection to devices affects how we see and relate to ourselves and other people. (@seanmcarroll)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 23 minutes
Audio long-read: The race to save the Internet from quantum hackers
Almost everything we do on the Internet is made possible by cryptographic algorithms, which scramble our data to protect our privacy. However, this privacy could be under threat. If quantum computers reach their potential these machines could crack current encryption systems — leaving our online data vulnerable.To limit the damage of this so called 'Q-day', researchers are racing to develop new cryptographic systems, capable of withstanding a quantum attack.This is an audio version of our feature: The race ... (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 56 minutes
Skeptic Check: 5G
5G, the latest mobile network standard, is coming. As new cell towers sprout around the world, do we know enough to confidently claim that this new technology is safe? After all, older networking standards relied on microwaves, radiation which has wavelengths of inches to a foot or so. 5G operates at much higher frequencies, with millimeter wavelengths. Some are worried that being subjected to millimeter radiation could cause cancers. But what does science say? 5G: the promise and the perils. Guests: Jon ... (@BiPiSci@SethShostak@mollycbentley)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 39 minutes
645: Laboring to Understand the Interactions Between Pregnancy and the Immune System - Dr. Elizabeth Bonney
Dr. Bonney is a Professor and Director of the Research Division in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of Vermont. She studies the immune systems of pregnant women. Dr. Bonney is trying to understand... (@PBtScience@PhDMarie)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 8 minutes
Any Single Galaxy Reveals the Composition of an Entire Universe
In computer simulations, researchers have discovered that a neural network can infer the amount of matter in a whole universe by studying just one galaxy. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 9 minutes
Disparities in scholarly output
Thema Monroe-White and Cassidy Sugimoto discuss how disparities at the intersection of race and gender affect the expansion of scientific knowledge. (@PNASNews)
podcast image2022-Feb-28 • 15 minutes
What Led To The Massive Volcanic Eruption In Tonga
Scientists are piecing together what led up to a massive volcanic eruption in Tonga last month. NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel joins the show to talk about the likely sequence of events— and what it can teach us about future eruptions like this one.Email the show at [email protected] (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Feb-27 • 58 minutes
Reforming the 'China Initiative'
A scheme in the US designed to prevent industrial espionage and the theft of intellectual property, is to be refocused after it was accused of unfairly targeting Chinese American scientists. We speak to Gang Chen, a professor from MIT who was falsely accused of financial crimes, and Holden Thorp Editor in Chief of the Journal Science who tells us why the ‘China Initiative’ is at odds with the reality of international scientific collaboration. And a huge study of farmed animals in China, from raccoon dogs t... (@bbcworldservice)
podcast image2022-Feb-27 • 11 minutes
Artificial muscles and medical devices
What does it take to peel a banana? It’s something most of us can do without thinking, but imagine making a machine that could operate with that much dexterity. This week, we’re hearing from Geoff Spinks, a materials engineer whose focus is on creating teeny, tiny machines that could fit inside your body. (@ABCscience@teegstar)
podcast image2022-Feb-26 • 54 minutes
How trees are gold – when alive
Human population the driver of greenhouse emissions and all environmental wows Meg Lowman - a voice for trees Flying foxes crashing (@ABCscience)
podcast image2022-Feb-26
The Skeptics Guide #868 - Feb 26 2022
News Items: Hot Jupiters, Jumping To Conclusions, Nanoparticles to Stop Internal Bleeding, Internet 2035; Quickie with Bob: Plasma Physics; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Bird Deaths; Science or Fiction (@SkepticsGuide@stevennovella)
podcast image2022-Feb-26 • 99 minutes
It's not Twosday. It's Science Day!
This Week: It's A Gas, Tapir Frog, Synthetic Neurons, Why Tie Tubes?, The Birds, COVID Vs. HIV, Vaccine Networks, Lizard Tails, Self-aware Fish, Rat Time, Singing In The Brain, Brain Death, And Much More... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 31 minutes
How did we discover fire?
Controlling fire was a turning point in the development of human civilisation. But how did fire become part of the human toolkit? It's a question that has got Crowdscience listener Joseph wondering. He wants to know how humans first made fire and how that knowledge spread around the world, eventually developing into our industrial civilisations today. Archaeologists have many different ideas and theories about this. Did humans learn the skill millions of years ago, and carry it with them as they migrated ... (@BBCScienceNews)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 47 minutes
Bridge Infrastructure, Cat Ancestor Gap, Lab Mice, Power Of The Dog, Mars Book Club. Feb 25, 2022, Part 2
Pittsburgh’s Bridge Collapse Spotlights America’s Infrastructure Woes Our modern world is made up of infrastructure: Roads, buildings, and bridges all play a big role for many people’s daily lives. If these structures do their jobs well, we don’t think mu (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 47 minutes
Eye Implant Ethics, Sled Dogs, Tranquility Sound Scapes. Feb 25, 2022, Part 1
Paul Farmer, Global Health Leader, Dies At 62 Paul Farmer, physician and co-founder of the humanitarian medical organization Partners in Health died unexpectedly this week in Rwanda at the age of 62. Farmer was widely known for his compassion, and his con (@scifri)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 34 minutes
Work: Stories about science as a job
In this week’s episode both our storytellers give us a glimpse into how they make a living in science. Part 1: After a gruelling residency shift, Natalia Khosla starts questioning how medical students are trained. Part 2: Mateus F. Carneiro doesn’t know what to do when his paycheck still hasn’t show up three months into his new research job. Natalia Khosla, who also goes by Neha, is an artist, dancer, medical student, and radical intersectional feminist whose activism, research, and art is focused on the le... (@storycollider)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 56 minutes
Speed
We live our lives at human speed, we experience and interact with the world on a human time scale. In this episode, which first aired in its entirety in the winter of 2013, we put ourselves through the paces. We examine a material that exists between two (@Radiolab@lmillernpr@latifnasser)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 35 minutes
David Rettew, "Parenting Made Complicated: What Science Really Knows about the Greatest Debates of Early Childhood" (Oxford UP, 2021)
Screen time. Daycare. Praise. Sleep training. Spanking and time-outs. Helicopter versus "old school" parenting. There are a lot of questions facing parents of young children but consistent and reliable science-based answers can be hard to find. Parenting Made Complicated: What Science Really Knows about the Greatest Debates of Early Childhood (Oxford UP, 2021), written by child psychiatrist Dr. David Rettew, tackles many of the biggest controversies facing new parents today and examines the science behind t... (@NewBooksSci)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 7 minutes
DeepMind Has Trained an AI to Control Nuclear Fusion
The Google-backed firm taught a reinforcement learning algorithm to control the fiery plasma inside a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 74 minutes
Elizabeth Hobson on Animal Dominance Hierarchies
Irrespective of your values, if you’re listening to this, you live in a pecking order. Dominance hierarchies, as they’re called by animal behaviorists, define the lives of social creatures. The society itself is a kind of individual that gathers information and adapts to its surroundings by encoding stable environmental features in the power relationships between its members. But what works for the society at large often results in violence and inequity for its members; as the founder of this field of resea... (@sfiscience@michaelgarfield)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 11 minutes
Twinkle, Twinkle, Shooting Star . . .
One of the video games that Short Wave's Scientist in Residence has been playing a lot in the pandemic is Animal Crossing, in which bits of stars fall along the beach. It got Regina thinking — what ARE shooting stars? For answers on all things asteroid, meteoroid and comet, she turns to planetary scientist Melissa Rice. Haven't had any luck Googling to learning more about a cool phenomenon? Shoot us an email [email protected], and we'll dig up some answers. (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 54 minutes
A Quirks & Quarks special: Feeding The Future - How we can feed 10 billion people without killing the planet
By many estimates we’re going to have 10 billion people on the planet by the year 2050. That’s a lot of mouths to feed. As it is, we have a hard time feeding the world’s current population. Many experts say that our food systems are at a breaking point, and that the way we eat - and what we eat - has to change. But there are solutions. | | This week, on a special edition of Quirks & Quarks, we’ll unpack the latest science showing what the future of food should look like. | | First we look at how farmers... (@CBCQuirks)
podcast image2022-Feb-25 • 33 minutes
#107: Ukraine invasion: cyberwar threat and effect on climate targets; Covid pandemic isn’t over; how we sense pain
Russia has begun its invasion of Ukraine, a move which will have far reaching consequences. The team discusses two of those - the first being western Europe’s reliance on oil and gas from Russia, and the knock-on effect on climate targets. The second is the threat of Russian cyberattacks on Ukraine, which could cause huge disruption to internet and IT services globally.The last remaining covid restrictions have been scrapped in England, as the Prime Minister announces the country’s ‘living with covid’ plan.... (@newscientist)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 26 minutes
Reforming the ‘China Initiative’
A scheme in the US designed to prevent industrial espionage and the theft of intellectual property, is to be refocused after it was accused of unfairly targeting Chinese American scientists. We speak to Gang Chen, a professor from MIT who was falsely accused of financial crimes, and Holden Thorp Editor in Chief of the Journal Science who tells us why the ‘China Initiative’ is at odds with the reality of international scientific collaboration. And a huge study of farmed animals in China, from raccoon dogs ... (@bbcworldservice@thescienceear)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 31 minutes
Securing nuclear waste for 100,000 years, and the link between math literacy and life satisfaction
On this week’s show: Finland puts the finishing touches on the world’s first high-level permanent nuclear repository, and why being good at math might make you both happy and sad First up, freelance science journalist Sedeer El-Showk joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his visit to a permanent nuclear waste repository being built deep underground in Finland, and the technology—and political maneuvering—needed to secure the site for 100,000 years. Also this week, Pär Bjälkebring, a senior lecturer in the de... (@ScienceMagazine)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 29 minutes
World’s largest Jurassic pterosaur found on Skye
In a week of exciting fossils finds we get up close to a 170 million year old pterosaur, found on the Isle of Skye. And over in the States, some fossilised fish hold the clue to what time of year the dinosaurs, along with three quarters of life on Earth, met their end. We hear from researcher Melanie During who tells us how growth patterns in sturgeons' bones reveal the season of this mass extinction. Predictions for how our climate will change over the coming years are essential in setting and meeting em... (@BBCRadio4)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 65 minutes
Marilyn Simons: Legion of Honor!
Dr. Marilyn Hawrys Simons received a B.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from SUNY, Stony Brook and has volunteered in the non‑profit sector for the last thirty years. In 1994, she co‑founded the Simons Foundation together with her husband, Jim Simons, and served as its President until June 2021. Asteroid 10701 Marilynsimons is named after her! The Simons Foundation is a charitable organization that was founded to fund basic research and educational programs in mathematics, physical and life sciences. The Foundatio... (@Into_Impossible@DrBrianKeating)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 95 minutes
How to Make A Time Crystal
This Week: Time Crystals, HIV Cured?, Sex Ed, AI Fashion Maps, Extreme Life, Heart Fish, Venom Resistant Birds, Animal Optimism, Bacteria & Fatigue, Caloric Restriction, Clutter Or Enrichment?, MS Twins Study, And Much More... (@TWIScience@drkiki@Jacksonfly@blairsmenagerie)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 35 minutes
The Weird Waves of Wi-Fi
We use Wi-Fi every day, but do you know how it works? “Is it waves and science or just some mystical magical force?” wonders listener Abby. Well, our science sleuths are on the case. To help them navigate the strange realm of electromagnetic waves they are joined by Andrew Nix, Professor of Wireless Communication Systems from the University of Bristol. He explains why your wi-fi router won’t heat up your baked beans, but your microwave will. Andrea Goldsmith, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engine... (@AdamRutherford@FryRsquared)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 51 minutes
Cool Science Radio | February 24, 2022
Today's guests on Cool Science Radio are (1:20) Annabel Streets author of 52 Ways to Walk and (24:35m) Dr. Anton Bizzell : physician and entrepreneur. (@KPCWRadio)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 26 minutes
UnDisciplined: could the genes associated with autism be a driving factor in human ingenuity?
Autism is a word that many people fear, but much of that fear is driven by the fact that the United States has classified autism as a disorder. What if we started to think of the autistic brain as just different, not disordered? What if we thought of the autistic brain as an asset, not a liability? We want to try and change the way you think about autism. (@SoUndisciplined@mdlaplante@nalininadkarni)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 9 minutes
Serious, Salty Trouble Is Brewing Under Antarctic Glaciers
Alarming new research suggests warm seawater is rushing under the ice, perhaps doubling the rate of melting. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 13 minutes
Covid-19: what’s the evidence for vaccinating kids?
When the announcement came that all children aged five to 11 in England will be offered a Covid vaccine, emphasis was placed on parental decision-making. But for many it won’t be an easy choice. Ian Sample hears how the evidence stacks up. (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Feb-24 • 13 minutes
Schedule Those Doctor's Appointments!
The pandemic is at a turning point. Hospitalizations in this country are down. Deaths are starting to decline. Some of the states that have had the strictest COVID restrictions are starting to dial back. With fewer cases, and more tools to manage COVID, we can start putting more focus on other diseases again. Doctors are encouraging patients to get the checkups they've been holding off on. NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey talks about the future of masking, virus detection and routine preventive care... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Feb-23 • 25 minutes
Dinosaur-destroying asteroid struck in spring
Researchers pinpoint the season that a cataclysmic asteroid struck Earth, and how climate change is affecting the intensity of fires at night. (@NaturePodcast)
podcast image2022-Feb-23 • 7 minutes
Huge Sponges Are Eating an Extinct Arctic Ecosystem
Thousands of years ago, hydrothermal vents fed worms deep below the ice. Scientists have found 300-year-old sponges feeding on the worms’ fossilized remains. (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Feb-23 • 13 minutes
Do You See What I See?
Everyone sees the world differently. Exactly which colors you see and which of your eyes is doing more work than the other as you read this text is different for everyone. Also different? Our blind spots – both physical and social. As we continue celebrating Black History Month, today we're featuring Exploratorium Staff Physicist Educator Desiré Whitmore. She shines a light on human eyesight – how it affects perception and how understanding another person's view of the world can offer us a fuller, better pi... (@NPR)
podcast image2022-Feb-23 • 101 minutes
Part 1: Attention-Deficit Neuropsychology (ADHD) with Russell Barkley
Focus. Productivity. Relationships. Distraction. Neurodiversity. How do you know if you have ADHD? How can you get others to understand your ADHD brain? What are your treatment options and how can they help? In Part 1, we talk racing thoughts, brilliant brains and the causes and effects of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with the world’s leading expert, Dr. Russell Barkley who is A BIG DEAL. Psychologist, retired professor of clinical psychiatry, author and speaker, Dr. Barkley has a personal conne... (@Ologies@alieward)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 30 minutes
Chilling out with snow
There are many different types of snow. From the fluffy to the slushy, this slippery frozen stuff comes in all different shapes and sizes. | | From a distance, snowflakes may all look the same, but they are not. In fact, there are lots of different shapes of snowflakes — not just those classic shapes you might try to replicate with paper cut-outs. | | In this episode, Dr. Ken Libbrecht answers all of our snowflake questions: How are snowflakes made? Why are they different shapes? How is it that they’re a... (@Brains_On)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 7 minutes
Black hole buddies
More on the almost-emptiness that is black holes. Because they're invisible, they're difficult to find—but sometimes get discovered because they give off X-rays. (@ABCscience@DoctorKarl)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 30 minutes
SciShow Tangents Classics - The Internet
Season 3 has come to a close, and the Tangents crew is taking a week off. While we scour the World Wide Web for all new, mind-blowing science facts, enjoy this classic episode about the Internet!Head to https://www.patreon.com/SciShowTangents to find out how you can help support SciShow Tangents, and see all the cool perks you’ll get in return, like bonus episodes and a monthly newsletter!And go to https://store.dftba.com/collections/scis... to buy your very own, genuine SciShow Tangents sticker!A big thank... (@SciShowTangents@hankgreen@ceriley@itsmestefanchin@im_sam_schultz)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 7 minutes
This Maine Farm Is Harvesting the Sun's Power while it Picks the Blueberries
This Maine Farm Is Harvesting the Sun's Power while it Picks the Blueberries (@sciam)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 9 minutes
They Lived in a Pandemic Bubble. Now Covid Has Arrived
Some remote Pacific island nations haven't had a single case of Covid-19 for the past two years. Now they're reopening to the world, but can they handle an outbreak? (@WIREDScience)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 14 minutes
Will storms like Eunice become the norm?
The UK has been hit with a series of storms whose high winds and heavy rain have brought widespread flooding, travel chaos, and damaged infrastructure. But does climate breakdown mean that this rare event will happen more often? Could these kinds of storms get worse, too? (@guardianscience)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 59 minutes
Under the Microscope
Zooming in on how microscopes have opened our eyes to life beyond the naked eye. (@NakedScientists)
podcast image2022-Feb-22 • 13 minutes
Vacuuming DNA Out Of The Air
A few years ago, ecologist Elizabeth Clare had an idea--what if she could study rare or endangered animals in the wild without ever having to see or capture them? What if she could learn about them by only pulling data out of thin air? It turns out, the air's not so thin. There are bits of DNA floating around us, and Elizabeth figured out how to collect it. She talks to guest host Lauren Sommer about testing her collection method in a zoo, how another science team simultaneous came up with and tested the sa... (@NPR)