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Podcast Profile: Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society

podcast imageTwitter: @Aristotweets (followed by 466 philosophers)
Site: www.aristoteliansociety.org.uk/the-proceedings/proceedings-podcasts
174 episodes
2012 to present
Average episode: 53 minutes
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Categories: Talk/Seminar Series

Podcaster's summary: The Aristotelian Society, founded in 1880, meets fortnightly in London to hear and discuss talks given by leading philosophers from a broad range of philosophical traditions. The papers read at the Society’s meetings are published in the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society. The mission of the Society is to make philosophy widely available to the general public, and the Aristotelian Society Podcast Series represents our latest initiative in furthering this goal. The audio podcasts of our talks are produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, University of London. Please visit our website to learn more about us and our publications: http://www.aristoteliansociety.org.uk

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List Updated: 2022-Aug-10 11:32 UTC. Episodes: 174. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

Episodes
2022-Jun-27 • 52 minutes
20/06/22: Samuel Scheffler on Partiality, Deference, and Engagement
The partiality we display, insofar as we form and sustain personal attachments, is not normatively fundamental. It is a byproduct of the deference and responsiveness that are essential to our engagement with the world. We cannot form and sustain valuable personal relationships without seeing ourselves as answerable to the other participants in those relationships. And we cannot develop and sustain valuable projects without responding to the constraints imposed on our activities by the nature and requirement...
2022-Jun-14 • 56 minutes
6/05/22: Michael Della Rocca on Moral Criticism and the Metaphysics of Bluff
At a climactic—and, indeed, incendiary—moment in Bernard Williams’ classic essay, “Internal and External Reasons,” Williams says that those who advance moral criticisms by appealing to so-called external reasons are engaging in “bluff”. Williams thus alleges that condemning certain actions of others as somehow not only immoral, but also irrational or contrary to reason is nothing more than a kind of pretense. To say that a favorite pastime that so many of us happily engage in is empty, well—to use an Ame...
2022-Jun-07 • 54 minutes
30/05/22: Miriam Schoenfield on Deferring to Doubt
When we doubt a belief, we examine how things look from a perspective in which that belief is set aside. Sometimes we care about what that perspective recommends and, as a result, we abandon the belief we've been doubting. Other times we don't: we recognize that a perspective in which a certain belief is set aside recommends abandoning it, but we go on believing it anyway. Why is this? In this paper, I'll consider and then reject some proposals concerning when to defer to the perspective of doubt. I'll argu...
2022-May-30 • 73 minutes
23/05/22: Alexander Mourelatos on 'Parmenides of Elea and Xenophanes of Colophon: the Conceptually Deeper Connections'
In the interpretation of Parmenides of Elea, there is a certain vulgate, one widely represented in general histories of philosophy and indeed assumed by philosophers broadly. The metaphysical tenor and thrust of the philosophy of Parmenides, according to this vulgate, is holistic monism: "all things are one," in Greek, hen to pan. As it may be recalled, Parmenides reached his metaphysical conclusions by initially reflecting on the language of to mē on or to ouk on (either of which may be translated as "what...
2022-May-16 • 46 minutes
09/05/22: Mazviita Chirimuuta on Disjunctivism and Cartesian Idealisation
In this paper I give answers to two apparently unrelated questions and aim to convince you that these different concerns are, in fact, intertwined. The first question is, why is dualism so tenacious? The second is, what is really at issue in the debate between Burge and McDowell? Regarding the first question, various contemporary philosophers have cast Descartes as the originator of a pernicious idea about the radical difference between mind and body, an idea with weed-like tenacity, that many have attempte...
2022-May-02 • 55 minutes
25/04/22: Emma Borg on A Defence of Individual Rationality
Common-sense (or folk) psychology holds that (generally) we do what we do for the reasons we have. This common-sense approach is embodied in claims like “I went to the kitchen because I wanted a drink” or “She took a coat because she thought it might rain and she hoped to stay dry”. However, the veracity of these common-sense psychological explanations has been challenged by experimental evidence (primarily from behavioural economics and social psychology) which appears to show that individuals are systemat...
2022-Mar-23 • 55 minutes
21/03/22: Jack Spencer on Intrinsically Desiring the Vague
This paper is about whether it is rational to intrinsically desire the vague. A proposition is inconsequential if neither it, nor its negation is rational to intrinsically desire. The objects of intrinsic desire are propositions, and the contradictory of propositional vagueness is propositional precision. Every vague proposition is not precise, and every precise proposition is not vague. The question to be pursued thus can be posed as follows: is every consequential proposition precise? | | Jack Spencer is...
2022-Mar-14 • 53 minutes
07/03/22: Dawn Wilson on Reflecting, Registering, Recording and Representing: From Light Image to Photographic Picture
Photography is highly valued as a recording medium. Traditionally it has been claimed that photography is fundamentally a causal recording process, and that every photograph is the causal imprint of the world in front of the camera. In this paper I seek to challenge that traditional view. I claim that it is based on a ‘single-stage’ misconception of the process that defines photographs as mind-independent images and leaves no room for photographic depiction. I explain my objections to that view and propose ...
2022-Feb-28 • 53 minutes
21/02/22: Andrew Huddleston on Aesthetic Beautification
Aesthetic beautification is a familiar artistic phenomenon: Even as they face death, heroes and heroines in operas still sing glorious music. Characters in Shakespearean tragedies still deliver beautifully eloquent speeches in the throes of despair. Even depicting suffering and horror, paintings can still remain a transfixing delight for the eyes. In such cases, the work of art represents or expresses something we would, in ordinary life, attribute a negative valence (suffering, horror, death, and the like)...
2022-Feb-14 • 50 minutes
31/01/22: Rachel Cristy on Commanders and Scientific Labourers: Nietzsche on the Relationship Between Philosophy and Science
Nietzsche’s attitude toward science is ambivalent: he remarks approvingly on its rigorous methodology and adventurous spirit, but also points out its limitations and rebukes scientists for encroaching onto philosophers’ territory. What does Nietzsche think is science’s proper role and relationship with philosophy? I argue that, according to Nietzsche, philosophy should set goals for science. Philosophers’ distinctive task is to ‘create values’, which involves two steps: (1) envisioning ideals for human life...
2022-Jan-24 • 56 minutes
17/01/22: Rachael Wiseman on Metaphysics by Analogy
Metaphysicians are in the business of making and defending modal claims – claims about how things must be or cannot be. Wittgenstein’s opposition to necessity claims, along with his various negative remarks about ‘metaphysical’ uses of language, makes it seem almost a truism that Wittgenstein was opposed to metaphysics. In this paper I want to make a case for rejecting that apparent truism. My thesis is that it is illuminating to characterise what Wittgenstein and Anscombe are doing in their philosophical w...
2021-Nov-26 • 48 minutes
15/11/2021: Cécile Fabre on Doxastic Wrongs, Non-spurious Generalisations and Particularised Beliefs
According to the doxastic wrongs thesis, merely entertaining certain beliefs about others can wrong them, even if one does not act on those beliefs. Beliefs based on socially salient characteristics such as race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, etc., and which turn out to be false and are negatively valenced are prime candidates for the charge of doxastic wronging. My aim, in this paper, is to show that a plausible, Kantian argument for the thesis licences extending the latter to cases in which the ...
2021-Nov-04 • 41 minutes
18/10/2021: Heather Widdows on 'No Duty To Resist: Why individual resistance is an ineffective response to dominant beauty ideals'
Heather Widdows is the John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics and Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research and Knowledge Exchange) at the University of Birmingham. She is Deputy Chair of the Philosophy sub-panel for REF 2021 and was a member of the 2014 sub-panel. Her most recent book, Perfect Me: Beauty as an Ethical Ideal (2018), was described by Vogue as “ground-breaking” and listed by The Atlantic as one of the best books of 2018. She is author of The Connected Self: The Ethics and Governance of the Genetic Indi...
2021-Oct-07 • 54 minutes
4/10/2021 – 114th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Robert Stern asks ‘How is human freedom compatible with the authority of the Good?’ Murdoch on moral agency, freedom, and imagination
As the first talk for the 2021-22 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Robert Stern (University of Sheffield) as the 114th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. | | The 114th Presidential Address was chaired by Bill Brewer (KCL), the 113th President of the Aristotelian Society. | | | Robert Stern is Professor of Philosophy at the Uni...
2021-Jul-02 • 57 minutes
28/06/2021: Julia Borcherding on “I wish my Speech were like a Loadstone” – Cavendish on Love and Self-Love
Julia Borcherding is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge. Before moving to Cambridge, she was a Bersoff Faculty Fellow at New York University. Julia specializes in early modern philosophy, focusing on moral, epistemological and metaphysical themes and their intriguing interconnections. She has published on the philosophy of Leibniz, Conway, Cavendish, Arnauld and Spinoza. Her current book project The Metaphysics of Emotion investigates the underappreciated metaphysical dimensions of early ...
2021-Jun-25 • 47 minutes
21/06/2021: Michael Beaney on Swimming Happily in Chinese Logic
Michael Beaney (毕明安) is Regius Professor of Logic at the University of Aberdeen, Professor of the History of Analytic Philosophy at the Humboldt University in Berlin, and Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Recent books include The Oxford Handbook of the History of Analytic Philosophy (edited, OUP, 2013) and Analytic Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2017). While the main focus of his work has been on the history of analytic philosophy (especially the writings of Fr...
2021-Jun-11 • 60 minutes
07/06/2021: Corine Besson on Knowing How to Reason Logically
Corine Besson is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Sussex. She did her undergraduate degree in Philosophy and French Literature at the University of Geneva. She went to Oxford for her postgraduate studies, to first do a B.Phil, and then write a D.Phil. on the relation of second-order logic to the theory of meaning. | | Her research interests are in the philosophy of logic, epistemology, the philosophy of language, and the history of analytic philosophy. Her current work focuses mostly on...
2021-May-28 • 58 minutes
24/05/2021: Kenny Easwaran on a New Method for Value Aggregation
Kenny Easwaran is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Texas A&M University. He did his PhD in the Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science at UC Berkeley, and then worked at the Australian National University and the University of Southern California before moving to Texas A&M. He has done work on the foundations of probability and decision theory, as well as on the social epistemology of axioms and proofs in mathematical reasoning. His current work focuses on analogies between different possible futu...
2021-May-17 • 51 minutes
10/05/2021: Joseph Chan on Equality, Friendship, and Politics
Joseph Chan is Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at The University of Hong Kong. He is Global Scholar and Visiting Professor at the University Center for Human Values of Princeton University in 2019-2021 spring semesters. His recent research interests span Confucian political philosophy, comparative political theory, democratic theory, social and political equality, and popular sovereignty. He is the author of Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times (...
2021-Apr-30 • 54 minutes
24/04/2021: Ralf Bader on Coincidence and Supervenience
Ralf M. Bader is a professor of philosophy at the Université de Fribourg in Switzerland, where he holds the chair for ethics and political philosophy. His research focuses on ethics, meta-ethics, metaphysics, Kant, political philosophy and decision theory. He is also interested in neo-Kantian and early analytic philosophy, as well as the history of political thought. Previously, he was a Fellow of Merton College and an Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of Oxford, as well as ...
2021-Mar-29 • 55 minutes
22/03/2021: Helga Varden on Kant and Arendt on Barbaric and Totalitarian Evil
Helga Varden is Professor of Philosophy and Gender and Women Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has held visiting positions at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of St. Andrews, and she is an executive editor of the Journal of Canadian Philosophy. Her main research interests are Kant’s practical philosophy, legal-political philosophy and its history, feminist philosophy, and the philosophy of sex and love. In addition to her Sex, Love, and Gend...
2021-Mar-15 • 43 minutes
08/03/2021: Nicolas Cornell on Gambling on Others and Relying on Others
Nicolas Cornell is Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School. He works in normative ethics, contract law, and private law theory. His writing has appeared both in philosophy journals — including “The Possibility of Preemptive Forgiving” (Philosophical Review, 2017) and “Wrongs, Rights, and Third Parties” (Philosophy & Public Affairs, 2015) — and in law reviews — including “Competition Wrongs” (Yale Law Journal, 2020), and “A Complainant-Oriented Approach to Unconscionability and Contract Law...
2021-Mar-01 • 56 minutes
22/02/2021: Mary-Louise Gill on Aristotle’s Hylomorphism Reconceived
Mary-Louise Gill is David Benedict Professor of Classics and Philosophy at Brown University, and works on ancient Greek philosophy, especially Plato’s later metaphysics and method and Aristotle’s natural philosophy and metaphysics. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge, and previously taught at the University of Pittsburgh in Classics, Philosophy, and History & Philosophy of Science. She has held visiting positions at Dartmouth College, UCLA, UC Davis, Harvard, University of Paris...
2021-Feb-15 • 54 minutes
01/02/2021: Barbara Sattler on Paradoxes as Philosophical Method and their Zenonian Origins
Barbara Sattler is professor for ancient and medieval philosophy at Bochum University, and has taught at St. Andrews, Yale, and Urbana-Champaign before. The main areas of her research are issues in metaphysics and natural philosophy in the ancient Greek world, especially in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. She focuses on the philosophical processes through which central concepts of metaphysics and natural philosophy, such as space or speed, arise in Greek antiquity. By showing that such concepts were...
2021-Jan-25 • 52 minutes
18/01/2021: Lee Walters on the Linguistic Approach to Ontology
Lee Walters is an Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Southampton. Prior to joining Southampton, Lee studied philosophy at UCL and taught at Oxford. Lee’s main interests are in metaphysics, the philosophy of language, and philosophical Logic, with a particular emphasis on the philosophy of fiction. Lee has been an Associate Editor of Analysis; a trustee of the British Society of Aesthetics; has held a British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship; and has been a junior fellow at the Institute for...
2020-Nov-27 • 48 minutes
16/11/2020: Leigh Jenco on Moral Knowledge and Empirical Verification in Late Ming China
Leigh K. Jenco is Professor of Political Theory at the London School of Economics. She received her PhD in political science at the University of Chicago, before teaching at Brown University and the National University of Singapore. Her research works across the disciplinary platforms of political theory, global intellectual history, and Asian studies to demonstrate the value of Chinese thought for posing new questions of political life. She has served as associate editor of the flagship journal American ...
2020-Nov-09 • 51 minutes
2/11/2020: Adrian Haddock on the Wonder of Signs
Adrian Haddock is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Stirling, and between 2017 and 2019 he was a Senior Research Fellow in the Forschungskolleg Analytic German Idealism (FAGI) at the University of Leipzig. His work centres on the idea of subjectivity, and on its significance for understanding the fundamental concerns of philosophy. He has written on action, perception, knowledge, and language. He is currently in the process of completing a book manuscript, entitled Subject and Object, and...
2020-Oct-26 • 35 minutes
19/10/2020: Tommy Curry asks 'Must there be an Empirical Basis for the Theorization of Racialized Subjects in Race-Gender Theory?'
Tommy J. Curry is a Professor of Philosophy and holds the Personal Chair of Africana Philosophy and Black Male Studies at the University of Edinburgh. His research interests are 19th century ethnology, Critical Race Theory & Black Male Studies. He is the author of The Man-Not: Race, Class, Genre, and the Dilemmas of Black Manhood (Temple University Press 2017), which won the 2018 American Book Award, and Another white Man’s Burden: Josiah Royce’s Quest for a Philosophy of Racial Empire (SUNY Press 2018), wh...
2020-Oct-12 • 46 minutes
5/10/2020 – 113th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Bill Brewer on the Objectivity of Perception
As the first talk for the 2020-21 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Bill Brewer (King's College London) as the 113th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society's President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. | | Bill Brewer is Susan Stebbing Professor of Philosophy at King's College London, having previously been Research Fellow at King’s College Cambridge, Fellow and Tutor in Philoso...
2020-Oct-12 • 6 minutes
5/10/2020 – 113th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Helen Steward introduces Bill Brewer as the 113th President of the Aristotelian Society
As the first talk for the 2020-21 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Bill Brewer (King's College London) as the 113th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society's President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Please visit our Council page for further information regarding the Society's past presidents. | | The 113th Presidential Address will be chaired by Helen Steward (Leeds) - 112th ...
2020-Jun-29 • 71 minutes
15/6/2020: Walter Dean on Consistency and Existence in Mathematics
Walter Dean works in philosophy of mathematics and mathematical and philosophical logic. He also has interests in theoretical computer science and the history and philosophy of computation. He is currently working on applications of Reverse Mathematics and computational complexity theory within philosophy and on the historical and foundational significance of Gödel’s completeness theorem. He is currently Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick where he convenes the Mathematics and Phi...
2020-Jun-12 • 56 minutes
8/6/2020: Béatrice Han-Pile on Two Puzzles in the Early Christian Constitution of the Self: Reflections on Foucault’s Interpretation of John Cassian
Béatrice Han-Pile studied philosophy, history and literature at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (Paris) and was awarded a Fellowship from the Thiers Foundation while completing her doctoral thesis on Michel Foucault. Before coming to Essex, she taught in France at the Universities of Paris IV-Sorbonne, Reims and Amiens. She is the author of Foucault's Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical (Stanford University Press, 2002). She has published mostly on Foucault, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer,...
2020-Jun-05 • 46 minutes
1/6/2020: Anna Mahtani on Dutch Book and Accuracy Theorems
Anna Mahtani is Associate Professor in philosophy at the London School of Economics. She did her PhD on vagueness at Sheffield, and then worked at Oxford and the Open University, before arriving at the LSE. She studies decision theory, formal epistemology, and the philosophy of language, and works at the intersection of these different disciplines. She is currently working on several projects: tracing the implications of Frege’s puzzle for various principles of welfare economics; analysing the phenomenon of...
2020-May-26 • 55 minutes
18/5/2020: Maria Rosa Antognazza on the Distinction of Kind between Knowledge and Belief
Maria Rosa Antognazza is Professor of Philosophy at King’s College London. Educated at the Catholic University of Milan, she has held research and visiting fellowships in Italy, Germany, Israel, Great Britain and the USA, including a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a two-year research fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust, and the Leibniz-Professorship at the University of Leipzig (Leibniz’s Alma Mater) in 2016. She served as Head of the King’s Philosophy Department from 2011/12 to 2014/15 and is th...
2020-May-18 • 50 minutes
11/5/2020: Derrick Darby on Rights Externalism and Racial Injustice
Derrick Darby is Henry Rutgers Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. He discovered his passion for philosophy growing up in New York City’s Queensbridge public housing projects, as he reports in his TEDx talk Doing the Knowledge. After getting his undergraduate degree at Colgate University, he earned his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh. His work in social and political philosophy has focused on rights, inequality, and democracy, and generally examines how the live...
2020-May-03 • 45 minutes
27/4/2020: Nancy Cartwright asks Why Trust Science?
Nancy Cartwright is a methodologist and philosopher of the natural and human sciences, with special focus on causation, evidence and modelling. Her recent work has been on scientific evidence, objectivity and how to put theory to work. She is a Professor of Philosophy at Durham University and the University of California San Diego, having worked previously at Stanford University and the London School of Economics. Professor Cartwright is a former MacArthur fellow, a fellow of the British Academy and the Aca...
2020-Apr-17 • 71 minutes
30/3/2020: Dana Nelkin on Equal Opportunity
Dana Kay Nelkin is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, San Diego, and an Affiliate Professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. Her areas of research include moral psychology, ethics, bioethics, and philosophy of law. She is the author of Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility (Oxford University Press, 2011), and a number of articles on a variety of topics, including self-deception, friendship, the lottery paradox, psychopathy, forgiveness, moral luck, and praise and bl...
2020-Mar-23 • 58 minutes
16/3/2020: Andrew Bacon on Vagueness at Every Order
Andrew Bacon is an associate professor at the University of Southern California. His main interests are in metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of language and philosophical logic. He has recently completed a book on vagueness entitled Vagueness and Thought, and is presently writing a textbook on higher-order logic aimed at metaphysicians. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Bacon's talk - 'Vagueness at Every Order' - at the Aristotelian Society on 16 March 2020. The recording was produced b...
2020-Mar-01 • 46 minutes
17/2/2020: Alexander Douglas on Spinoza’s Unquiet Acquiescentia
Alexander Douglas is a lecturer in the School of Philosophical, Anthropological, and Film Studies at the University of St Andrews. Previously he taught at Heythrop College, University of London. He studies early modern rationalism, particularly various forms of Cartesianism and especially that of Spinoza. He is interested in the idea that human reason can access a reality not visible to the senses and aims to trace some of its history, involving the history of formal logic and theology as well as of philoso...
2020-Feb-10 • 48 minutes
3/2/2020: Philip Goff on Panpsychism and Free Will
Philip Goff is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Durham University. His work is focused on how to integrate consciousness into our scientific worldview, and he defends panpsychism on the grounds that it avoids the difficulties faced by the more traditional options of physicalism and dualism. He has published an academic book on this topic – Consciousness and Fundamental Reality (Oxford University Press) – as well as a book aimed at a general audience – Galileo’s Error: Foundations for a New Science of Co...
2020-Jan-26 • 56 minutes
20/1/2020: Emily Thomas on Time and Subtle Pictures in the History of Philosophy
Emily Thomas is Associate Professor in Philosophy at Durham University. Prior to this she obtained a PhD from the University of Cambridge, and held a NWO grant at the University of Groningen. She has published widely on the history of metaphysics, especially space and time. In 2018 she published two books: a monograph Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics (Oxford University Press) and a collection Early Modern Women on Metaphysics (Cambridge University Press). Her next book, on the philos...
2019-Dec-30 • 56 minutes
9/12/2019: Meena Dhanda on the Philosophical Foundations of Anti-Casteism
Meena Dhanda is Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Politics at the University of Wolverhampton. She is an advocate of socially engaged philosophy. Her research focus is on understanding injustices, prejudices and misrepresentations suffered by powerless groups, which she pursues through transdisciplinary studies, specifically connecting caste, class, gender and race. Her work includes: The Negotiation of Personal Identity and Reservations for Women, besides papers in international journals, book chapters ...
2019-Nov-29 • 52 minutes
4/11/2019: Colleen Murphy on Principled Compromises
Colleen Murphy is a Professor in the College of Law with courtesy appointments in the Departments of Philosophy and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she is also Director of the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program. Previously she was an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Texas A&M University, a Laurence S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellow at the Princeton University Center for Human Values, and a Visiting Professor at the 4.TU Centre for Ethics in th...
2019-Nov-03 • 58 minutes
21/10/2019 – Glen Pettigrove on Ambition, Love, and Happiness
Glen Pettigrove is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Glasgow, occupying the Chair in Moral Philosophy previously held by Glasgow’s favourite son, Adam Smith. Before joining the Glasgow department Glen was Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Auckland. He specializes in moral psychology, normative ethics, and early modern philosophy. He has a particular interest in the role of the emotions in our personal and collective lives and has written on anger, cheerfulness, forgiveness, g...
2019-Oct-15 • 59 minutes
7/10/2019 – 112th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Helen Steward on Free Will and External Reality: Two Scepticisms Compared
As the first talk for the 2019-20 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Helen Steward (University of Leeds) as the 112th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. | | Helen Steward is Professor of Philosophy of Mind and Action at the University of Leeds. She received her D.Phil from the University of Oxford in 1992. Before moving to Leeds i...
2019-Jun-07 • 49 minutes
3/6/2019: Kathleen Stock asks What is Sexual Orientation?
Kathleen Stock is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sussex. She works in philosophy of imagination and fiction, and has a growing interest in issues of gender, sex, and sexual orientation. She has also published on the nature of sexual and other kinds of objectification. Her most recent major publication is Only Imagine: Fiction, Interpretation and Imagination (Oxford 2017). | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Stock's talk - 'What is Sexual Orientation?' - at the Aristotelian S...
2019-May-28 • 43 minutes
28/5/2019: Thomas Sattig on the Flow of Time in Experience
Thomas Sattig is Professor of Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Tübingen. He completed his D.Phil. at Oxford University, where he was also a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow and a Junior Research Fellow. Subsequently, he held positions as Assistant Professor at Tulane University and at Washington University in St. Louis. Sattig works primarily in metaphysics. He focuses on issues concerning material objects, persons, time, modality, mereology, and indeterminacy, often following metaphysics to r...
2019-May-19 • 66 minutes
13/5/2019: Christian List on What’s Wrong with the Consequence Argument: A Compatibilist Libertarian Response
Christian List is Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at the London School of Economics and a Fellow of the British Academy. He works at the intersection of philosophy, economics, and political science, with a particular focus on individual and collective decision-making and the nature of intentional agency. Recently, a growing part of his work has addressed metaphysical questions, e.g., about free will, causation, probability, and the relationship between “micro” and “macro” levels of analysis in...
2019-May-07 • 54 minutes
29/4/2019: Cheshire Calhoun on Responsibilities and Taking On Responsibility
Cheshire Calhoun is CLAS Trustee Professor of Philosophy at Arizona State University and chair of the American Philosophical Association’s board of officers. Her work spans the philosophical subdisciplines of normative ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of emotion, feminist philosophy, and gay and lesbian philosophy. She has recently published a collection of previously published essays under the title Moral Aims: Essays on the Importance of Getting it Right and Practicing Morality with Others (OUP 2016),...
2019-Mar-31 • 61 minutes
18/3/2019: Stephen Mulhall on Heidegger’s Fountain: Ecstasis, Mimesis and Engrossment in the Origin of the Work of Art
Stephen Mulhall is Professor of Philosophy and a Fellow of New College, Oxford. His research interests include Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Nietzsche and Sartre; moral philosophy; the relationship between philosophy, theology and religion; and the relationship between philosophy and the arts (especially film and literature). His most recent publications include: ‘The Great Riddle: Wittgenstein and Nonsense, Theology and Philosophy’ (OUP, 2015), and ‘On Film: 3rd Edition’ (Routledge, 2016). | | This podcast is ...
2019-Mar-08 • 49 minutes
4/3/2019: Sophia Connell on Care and Parenting in Aristotelian Ethics
Sophia Connell is lecturer in ancient philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London. She did her MPhil and PhD at the University of Cambridge. She is a former Fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge and taught philosophy in Cambridge for many years, receiving the Pilkington Prize for teaching excellence in 2016. Her main research interests are ancient Greek philosophy and the history of analytic philosophy. She has published Aristotle on Female Animals: Study of the Generation of Animals (Cambridge Unive...
2019-Feb-24 • 62 minutes
18/2/2019: Nicholas K. Jones on Propositions and Cognitive Relations
Nicholas K. Jones’ research interests lie at the intersection of metaphysics with the philosophy of logic and language, especially anything connected with objecthood. He is currently working on the metaphysics of higher-order quantification and applications of higher-order resources within metaphysics. | | He arrived at the University of Birmingham as a Birmingham Research Fellow in 2013, and has been Senior Lecturer there since 2017. Before joining Birmingham, he was a Fitzjames Research Fellow at Merton ...
2019-Feb-11 • 59 minutes
4/2/2019 – Amia Srinivasan on Genealogy
Amia Srinivasan is an Associate Professor of philosophy at Oxford and a tutorial fellow at St John’s College. Previously she was a permanent lecturer at University College London and a Prize Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. She works on topics in epistemology, metaphilosophy, political philosophy and feminism, and is currently writing a book on the genealogy of belief. Her essays and criticism have appeared in The New York Review of Books, the London Review of Books, Harper’s, The Nation, and elsewhere....
2019-Jan-27 • 43 minutes
21/1/2019 – Keith Allen asks Whether We Should Believe Philosophical Claims on Testimony
Keith Allen is Senior Lecturer at the University of York. He has been at York since 2007, and before that was Jacobsen Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy (2005-7). His areas of research include colour, perception, and the history of philosophy, particularly early modern philosophy and phenomenology. He is the author of A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Deputy Director of the University of York’s Humanities Research Centre. | | This podcast is an audio recordin...
2018-Dec-08 • 59 minutes
26/11/2018 – Stephen Neale on Means Means Means
Stephen Neale is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics, and Kornblith Chair in the Philosophy of Science and Value at the City University of New York. He is a British philosopher and specialist in the philosophy of language who has written extensively about meaning, information, interpretation, and communication, and more generally about issues at the intersection of philosophy and linguistics. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Neale's talk - 'Means Means Means' - at the A...
2018-Nov-18 • 50 minutes
12/11/2018 – Rae Langton on Empathy and First Personal Imagining
Rae Langton is Knightbridge Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Newnham College. Born and raised in India, she studied Philosophy at Sydney and Princeton, and has taught philosophy in Australia, Scotland, the USA, and England. She held professorships at Edinburgh 1999-2004 and at MIT 2004-2013. She works in moral and political philosophy, speech act theory, philosophy of law, the history of philosophy, metaphysics, and feminist philosophy. She is the author of Kantian Hum...
2018-Nov-04 • 53 minutes
29/10/2018 – Fabienne Peter on Normative Facts and Reasons
Fabienne Peter is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick and currently the Head of Department. She specializes in moral and political philosophy and in epistemology. The justification of political decisions has been a longstanding focus of her research and she has published extensively on political and democratic legitimacy. She is currently primarily working on topics in social, moral and political epistemology and in meta-ethics, especially on questions relating to the justification of act...
2018-Oct-22 • 52 minutes
15/10/2018 – Sarah Fine on Refugees, Safety and a Decent Human Life
Sarah Fine is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at King’s College London. She is also a Fellow at the Forum for European Philosophy. She co-edited (with Lea Ypi) Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership (Oxford University Press, 2016). Her research to date has focused on the ethics of migration, and particularly the question of whether states have a moral right to exclude non-citizens. In recent years, she also has been thinking a lot about methodology in political philosophy, and ...
2018-Oct-12 • 45 minutes
1/10/2018 – 111th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Jonathan Wolff on Equality and Hierarchy
As the first talk for the 2018-19 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Jonathan Wolff (University of Oxford) as the 111th President of the Aristotelian Society. | | Jonathan Wolff is the Blavatnik Chair in Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford. He was formerly Professor of Philosophy and Dean of Arts and Humanities at UCL. | | His recent work has largely concerned equality, disadvantage, ...
2018-Sep-09 • 71 minutes
8/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium VI on Fundamental Powers, featuring Alexander Bird and Barbara Vetter
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Sep-09 • 56 minutes
8/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium V on Benevolence, featuring Nomy Arpaly and Erasmus Mayr
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Sep-09 • 61 minutes
8/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium IV on What Brains-in-Vats Can Know, featuring Ofra Magidor and Aidan McGlynn
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Sep-09 • 71 minutes
7/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium II on Racial Justice, featuring Charles Mills and Katrin Flikschuh
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Sep-09 • 64 minutes
7/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium I on Plato on the Uses and Value of Knowledge, featuring Verity Hale and Melissa Lane
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Sep-09 • 48 minutes
6/7/2018: Joint Session Podcast - Inaugural Address - John Divers asks W(h)ither Metaphysical Necessity?
The 92nd Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Oxford from 6 to 8 July 2018. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigious UK ...
2018-Jun-25 • 59 minutes
18/6/2018: Victoria McGeer on Intelligent Capacities
Victoria McGeer is a Senior Research Scholar in the Center for Human Values and Lecturer in Philosophy at Princeton University. She is also a Senior Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy at the Australian National University. Her published work reflects her wide range of interests encompassing topics in moral psychology, the development of agential capacities and its impairments, responsibility, the nature of folk-psychological explanation, problems of self-knowledge, and the metaphysics of mind. Her ...
2018-Jun-14 • 45 minutes
4/6/2018: Holly Lawford-Smith on Collective Culpability and Collective Punishment
Holly Lawford-Smith is a senior lecturer in political philosophy at the University of Melbourne. She held previous positions at the University of Sheffield and the Australian National University. She is currently interested in collective action, collective agency, and collective responsibility, and also their applications in climate ethics, the ethics of consumption, and the ethics of privilege. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Lawford-Smith's talk - 'Collective Culpability and Collective Puni...
2018-Jun-01 • 46 minutes
21/5/2018: Lisa Shapiro on Assuming Epistemic Authority
Lisa Shapiro is Professor of Philosophy at Simon Fraser University. Her research concerns accounts of human nature in the 17th and 18th centuries. In particular, she is interested the place of the passions (or emotions) in these accounts, as vehicles of human cognitive connection to the world. Her work has focused on Descartes, Spinoza and Hume, but also touched on Malebranche and Condillac. Her current project concerns accounts of the development of human rational capacities – or an embodied human mind – i...
2018-May-13 • 60 minutes
23/4/2018: Alison Hills on Moral and Aesthetic Virtue
Alison Hills is Tutorial Fellow in Philosophy at St John’s College, University of Oxford. Her research is in Moral Philosophy. Her PhD was on Kant’s moral theory, in particular, on whether Kant shows that we have reason to be moral. She also has interests in metaethics (especially moral knowledge) and normative ethics (especially Kant’s moral theory). She has also written on applied ethics, about whether our intentions have any moral significance, and about the moral status of animals. Her most recent book,...
2018-Apr-15 • 44 minutes
19/3/2018: Martin Saar asks What is Social Philosophy?
Martin Saar is professor of social philosophy at the Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main (since fall 2017). He has taught in Bremen, Hamburg, Berlin and Leipzig. His areas of specialization and teaching are contemporary political and social philosophy and the history of early modern and modern political thought (with focus on Spinoza, Nietzsche, Marx, Foucault, Critical Theory, Post-structuralism, and interdisciplinary research on collective memory, affect, ideology, and power). | | This podcast is an aud...
2018-Mar-12 • 59 minutes
5/3/2018: Sarah Moss on Moral Encroachment
Sarah Moss is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan. She works primarily in epistemology and the philosophy of language, and often on questions at the intersection of these subfields. She is the author of Probabilistic Knowledge (forthcoming with Oxford University Press), in which she defends a unified probabilistic theory of the contents of belief, assertion, and knowledge. For instance, she argues in her book that credences can constitute knowledge, in just the same way that f...
2018-Mar-01 • 58 minutes
19/2/2018: Alex Voorhoeve on Epicurus, Pleasure, the Complete Life, and Death: A Partial Defence
Alex Voorhoeve is Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). He works primarily in the theory and practice of distributive justice (especially with respect to health care), in decision theory, and moral psychology, but also has interests in the work of Epicurus, Mandeville, Hume and Smith. His articles have appeared in Ethics, Philosophy & Public Affairs, and Economics & Philosophy, among other places. He is the autho...
2018-Feb-13 • 55 minutes
5/2/2018: Craig French on Naïve Realism and Diaphaneity
Craig French is a philosopher of mind and psychology at the University of Nottingham. This podcast is an audio recording his talk - 'Naïve Realism and Diaphaneity' - at the Aristotelian Society on 5 February 2018. The recording was produced by the Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2018-Jan-28 • 57 minutes
22/1/2018: Sarah Sawyer on the Importance of Concepts
Sarah Sawyer is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Sussex. She has published on externalism and singular thought in the philosophy of mind, on proper names and fictional terms in the philosophy of language, on self-knowledge, epistemic warrant and scepticism in epistemology, and on judgement, motivation and reasons in metaethics. She is on the executive committee and council for the Royal Institute of Philosophy, is Publications Officer of the Mind Association Occasional Series and is an Ass...
2017-Dec-20 • 53 minutes
27/11/2017: Laurent Jaffro on Forgiveness and Weak Agency
Laurent Jaffro is professor of moral philosophy at Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne since 2009 and a senior fellow of the Institut Universitaire de France since 2017. He is presently visiting professor at the University of Neuchâtel. He formerly taught philosophy at Blaise Pascal University and at the University of Nanterre. He is editor of Analyse et Philosophie, a series at Vrin. He has published on eigteenth-century British moral philosophy, especially on the third earl of Shaftesbury, and more recen...
2017-Dec-20 • 51 minutes
13/11/2017: Elizabeth Ashford on the Infliction of Severe Povertyas the Perfect Crime
Elizabeth Ashford is senior lecturer in moral philosophy at the University of St Andrews. She did her MA at UNC Chapel Hill and her BA and DPhil at Oxford University, and was awarded her DPhil in 2002. Her main research interests are in moral and political philosophy. She has recently finished a contribution to UNESCO Volume I, Freedom from Poverty as a Human Right (OUP forthcoming), and her current research project is to develop a book on utilitarian and Kantian conceptions of impartiality and of rights. D...
2017-Nov-10 • 53 minutes
30/10/2017: John Gardner on Discrimination: The Good, the Bad, and the Wrongful
John Gardner FBA is a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, with the title of Professor of Law and Philosophy in the University of Oxford. From 2000 to 2016 he held Oxford’s Chair of Jurisprudence. Before that he was Reader in Legal Philosophy at King’s College London (1996-2000), Fellow and Tutor in Law at Brasenose College, Oxford (1991-6) and Examination (‘Prize’) Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford (1986-91). He has also held visiting positions at Columbia University, Yale University, the...
2017-Oct-23 • 48 minutes
16/10/2017: François Recanati on Fictional, Metafictional, Parafictional
A research fellow at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Paris since 1979, François Recanati has taught in several major universities around the world, including Berkeley, Harvard, Geneva, and St Andrews. In addition to his CNRS job, he is a ‘directeur d’études’ at EHESS and the Director of Institut Jean-Nicod, a research lab in philosophy, linguistics and cognitive science hosted by the Ecole Normale Supérieure. His publications in the philosophy of language and mind include more tha...
2017-Oct-08 • 55 minutes
2/10/2017 – 110th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Helen Beebee on Philosophical Scepticism
As the first talk for the 2017-18 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Helen Beebee (University of Manchester) as the 110th President of the Aristotelian Society. | | Helen Beebee is Samuel Hall Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester. She completed her PhD at King’s College London in 1996, and has previously held positions at Edinburgh, St. Andrews, UCL, The Australian National University, and Birmingham. Her...
2017-Jul-08 • 51 minutes
19/6/2017: Shamik Dasgupta on Normative Non-Naturalism and the Problem of Authority
Shamik Dasgupta is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He works primarily in metaphysics and the philosophy of science, with additional research interests in epistemology and ethics. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Dasgupta's talk - 'Normative Non-Naturalism and the Problem of Authority' - at the Aristotelian Society on 19 June 2017. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2017-Jun-09 • 57 minutes
5/6/2017: Daniel Viehoff on Serving the Governed
Daniel Viehoff is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at New York University. His research focuses on political, legal, and moral philosophy. He is especially interested in questions of political authority and legitimacy, and in democratic theory. Daniel is currently completing a book manuscript on the special duties we have to obey democratically made decisions. In addition he is doing work on the nature of voting rights and the justification of democratic enfranchisement. | | | This podcast is an audio re...
2017-May-31 • 49 minutes
22/5/2017: Ursula Renz on Self-Knowledge as a Personal Achievement
Ursula Renz is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria, where she teaches classes in both Theoretical Philosophy (epistemology, metaphysics and philosophy) and Early Modern Philosophy. She has published widely on Early Modern Philosophy (Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Shaftesbury), Kant, the Marburg School of Neo-Kantianism (Cohen, Natorp, Cassirer), as well as on the emotions, self-knowledge, and the problem of epistemic trust. In her talk, she will address a few philosophical problem...
2017-May-13 • 63 minutes
8/5/2017: Gerald Lang on What Follows from Defensive Non-Liability?
Gerald Lang teaches Philosophy at the University of Leeds, and received his training in Bristol and Oxford. He was the co-editor of Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes from the Ethics of Bernard Williams (OUP 2012), along with Ulrike Heuer, and How We Fight: Ethics in War (OUP 2014), along with Helen Frowe. He has published on a large number of topics in moral and political philosophy: distributive justice, political liberty, consequentialism, fairness, life and death issues in reproductive ethics, well-bei...
2017-Mar-23 • 52 minutes
6/3/2017: Beate Roessler on Privacy as a Human Right
Beate Roessler is Professor of Ethics and its History at the University of Amsterdam; from 2003 to 2010 she also taught as Socrates-Professor for the Foundations of Humanism at Leiden University. She formerly taught philosophy at the Free University, Berlin, Germany, and at the University of Bremen, Germany. In 2003/4 she was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin; she is a co-editor of the European Journal of Philosophy. Her publications include The Value of Privacy, P...
2017-Mar-02 • 55 minutes
20/2/2017: Lea Ypi on Pragmatist Coherence as the Source of Truth and Reality
Lea Ypi is Professor of Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at the Australian National University. She is the author of Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency (Oxford University Press 2012) and, with Jonathan White, The Meaning of Partisanship (Oxford University Press, 2016). She has edited Migration in Political Theory (OUP 2016, with Sarah Fine) and Kant and Colonialism (OUP 2015, with Katrin Flikschuh). She is currently wri...
2017-Feb-16 • 53 minutes
6/2/2017: Genia Schönbaumsfeld on Beliefs-in-a-Vat
Genia Schӧnbaumsfeld is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton who specializes in Epistemology, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard and the Philosophy of Religion. She is the author of The Illusion of Doubt, forthcoming with Oxford University Press later this year, and of A Confusion of the Spheres – Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein on Philosophy and Religion, also with Oxford UP (2007). In her new book she argues that radical scepticism is an illusion generated by a Cartesian picture of one’s evident...
2017-Jan-30 • 44 minutes
23/1/2017: Eleanor Knox on Novel Explanation and the Special Sciences - Lessons From Physics
Eleanor Knox is a Lecturer in Philosophy at King's College London. Her work has two strands, one in the foundations of spacetime physics, and another in inter-theoretic relations in physics and science more generally. The two come together when thinking about emergent spacetimes in theories of quantum gravity; much of her work focusses on Spacetime Functionalism, an approach to the interpretation of spacetime theories that promises to help us understand emergent spacetimes. After a BA, BPhil and DPhil at Ox...
2017-Jan-17 • 49 minutes
9/1/2017: Hasok Chang on Pragmatist Coherence as the Source of Truth and Reality
Hasok Chang is the Hans Rausing Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. Previously he taught for 15 years at University College London, after receiving his PhD in Philosophy at Stanford University following an undergraduate degree at the California Institute of Technology. He is the author of Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism and Pluralism (Springer, 2012), winner of the 2013 Fernando Gil International Prize, and Inventing Temperature: Measurement and Scientific Progress...
2016-Dec-06 • 63 minutes
28/11/2016: James Studd on Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox
James Studd is the University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor at Lady Margaret Hall. In addition to the philosophy of mathematics, he works on the philosophy of logic, with occasional forays into the philosophy of language and metaphysics. He is currently writing a book about absolute generality (forthcoming with OUP). | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Studd's talk - 'Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox' - at the Aristotelian Socie...
2016-Nov-20 • 43 minutes
14/11/2016: Beth Lord on Disagreement in the Political Philosophy of Spinoza and Rancière
Beth Lord is Reader in Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen. She works on history of philosophy in the continental tradition, with a particular focus on Spinoza. Currently she is researching the concept of equality in Spinoza’s texts from its geometrical origins to its metaphysical and political uses. She recently led a three-year AHRC-funded research project that investigated the relevance of Spinoza’s concepts of ratio and equality to housing design. She is co-author (with Peg Rawes, Bartlett School o...
2016-Nov-06 • 52 minutes
6/10/2016: Elizabeth Cripps on Justice, Integrity and Moral Community
Elizabeth Cripps is a senior lecturer in political theory at the University of Edinburgh. She is the author of Climate Change and the Moral Agent: Individual Duties in an Interdependent World (Oxford, 2013), which defends a 'weakly collective' moral duty to act on climate change and explores the implications for individual duties. She currently works on population, climate change and justice, and on the intersect between climate duties and parents' duties to their children. | | This podcast is an audio rec...
2016-Oct-24 • 51 minutes
17/10/2016 - Christopher Daly on Persistent Philosophical Disagreement
Christopher Daly is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester. He has published in metaphysics, methodology and philosophy of language. He is a co-editor of the journal Analysis. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Daly's talk - 'Persistent Philosophical Disagreement' - at the Aristotelian Society on 17 October 2016. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2016-Oct-11 • 56 minutes
3/10/2016 - 109th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Tim Crane on the Unity of Unconsciousness
As the first talk for the 2016/17 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Tim Crane (University of Cambridge) as the 109th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society's President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Please visit our Council page for further information regarding the Society's past presidents. | | The 109th Presidential Address will be chaired by Susan James (Birkbeck) - 108th...
2016-Jun-26 • 56 minutes
Dorothea Debus on Shaping Our Mental Lives
Dorothea Debus teaches Philosophy at the University of York. Her main areas of research lie in the Philosophy of Mind and Psychology. She has written on philosophical questions relating to the phenomena of memory, the imagination, attention, and the emotions, and more recently she has started work on a new research project which investigates our active involvement with our own mental lives. The paper presented here will offer some of this new material for discussion. | | This podcast is an audio recording ...
2016-Jun-11 • 57 minutes
Hilary Greaves on Cluelessness
Hilary Greaves is Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include foundational issues in consequentialism ('global' and 'two-level' forms of consequentialism), aggregation, moral psychology and selective debunking arguments, population ethics, the interface between ethics and economics, the analogies between ethics and epistemology, and formal epistemology. She currently directs a three-year project on population ethics, funded by The Leverhulme Trust. | | This...
2016-Jun-03 • 53 minutes
Dominic Scott on From Painters to Poets: Method in Plato, Republic X
Dominic Scott is a Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University and a Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall. He has worked in many areas of ancient Greek philosophy, especially in epistemology and ethics. He is the author of Recollection and Experience (CUP 1995) and Plato's Meno (CUP 2006). His most recent book is Levels of Argument: a Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (OUP 2015). He has also recently edited The Pseudo-Platonic Seventh Letter (OUP 2015) and co-authored The Hum...
2016-May-21 • 62 minutes
09/05/2016: Peter Poellner on Phenomenology and the Perceptual Model of Emotion
Peter Poellner is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. He has published on topics in the philosophy of value, the philosophy of mind, and the history of philosophy – in the latter area, especially on Nietzsche, Husserl and Sartre. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Poellner's talk - 'Phenomenology and the Perceptual Model of Emotion' - at the Aristotelian Society on 9 May 2016. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2016-May-01 • 59 minutes
25/04/2016: Mary Leng on Naturalism and Placement
Mary Leng is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of York. Prior to coming to York she held a Research Fellowship at St John’s College, Cambridge, and a Lectureship at the University of Liverpool, as well as visiting positions at the University of British Columbia and the University of California at Irvine. She received her PhD in from the University of Toronto, and studied Mathematics and Philosophy as an undergraduate at Balliol College, Oxford. Although a naturalist in the Quinean tradition, s...
2016-Mar-20 • 53 minutes
07/03/2016: Jessica Leech on the Mereology of Representation
Jessica Leech is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. Her research interests, contemporary and historical, centre around the topic of modality. She has written on topics in the metaphysics of modality such as relative necessity, and on the nature of logical laws. In her writing she has also explored what Kant had to say about modality, and issues arising from that. She is in the final stages of writing a book that attempts to draw out Kant's views on modality, and apply them to contempor...
2016-Feb-28 • 51 minutes
22/02/2016: Tobias Rosefeldt on Closing the Gap
Tobias Rosefeldt is professor of philosophy at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He works on Kant’s theoretical philosophy and has written a book on Kant’s theory of the self. He is currently interested in giving an interpretation of Kant’s distinction between appearances and things in themselves that is able to solve some of the notorious problems with it. He is also interested in contemporary metaphysics and the philosophy of language and tries to show that you can believe that there are things that do not...
2016-Feb-18
08/02/2016: Jules Holroyd asks What Do We Want From a Model of Implicit Cognition?
Jules Holroyd was a lecturer in the philosophy department at the University of Nottingham. Her research interests are in moral psychology, political philosophy and feminist philosophy. Her recent research has focused on how our models of responsibility and agency might be responsive to the ndings of empirical psychology. She is working on a Leverhulme funded project with psychologists at the University of Sheffield, investigating how moral responses - such as blame - might in uence the expression of implici...
2016-Feb-04 • 59 minutes
25/01/2016: James Wilson on Internal and External Validity in Thought Experiments
James Wilson integrates philosophy with other relevant disciplines, such as epidemiology, economics and political theory to explore conceptual and practical challenges in the sustainable and equitable improvement of human wellbeing. He focuses particularly on public health ethics, and the ownership and governance of ideas and information. He received his PhD from UCL in 2002, then held temporary lectureships in Philosophy at University of Roehampton (2002-3) and Birkbeck (2003-4), before becoming Lecturer i...
2016-Jan-19 • 44 minutes
11/01/2016: Tim Bayne on 'Gist!'
Tim Bayne holds the Rotman Chair in the Philosophy of Neuroscience at the University of Western Ontario and is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Otago and his doctorate from the University of Arizona. He is the author of The Unity of Consciousness (OUP, 2010) and Thought: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2013). His current research focuses on the measurement of consciousness and the use of neuroimaging to ascribe consciousness...
2015-Dec-06 • 51 minutes
30/11/2015: Fiona Woollard on Dimensions of Demandingness
Fiona Woollard is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Southampton. She works in normative and applied ethics, the philosophy of sex and the philosophy of pregnancy and motherhood. In her first book, Doing and Allowing Harm (Oxford, 2015), she argues that constraints against doing harm and permissions to allow harm are necessary for anything to belong to a person, even that person’s body. She also defends a ‘moderate’ account of requirements to prevent harm to others. | | This podcast ...
2015-Nov-22 • 60 minutes
16/11/2015: Jérôme Dokic on Aesthetic Experience as Metacognitive Feeling
Jérôme Dokic is Professor of Cognitive Philosophy at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (now part of PSL Research University) and a member of Institut Jean-Nicod in Paris. He has written many essays on indexicality, perception, memory and imagination. His work has lately focused on philosophical and empirical issues concerning noetic or metacognitive feelings such as presence, familiarity and confidence. His books include La philosophie du son with Roberto Casati (Philosophy of sound, Chambon,...
2015-Nov-14 • 43 minutes
2/11/2015: Benjamin Sachs on Contractarianism as a Political Morality
Benjamin Sachs is a lecturer in philosophy at the University of St. Andrews. He has worked on issues in distributive justice, health care justice, coercion, normative ethics, environmental ethics, and the ethics of research on human subjects. He is currently interested in animal ethics and in addition is planning to write several papers that would together constitute an argument for contractarianism. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Sach's talk - 'Contractarianism as a Political Morality' - at...
2015-Oct-27 • 49 minutes
19/10/2015: David Enoch on What’s Wrong with Paternalism:Autonomy, Belief and Action
David Enoch is The Rodney Blackman Chair in the Philosophy of Law, at The Faculty of Law and the Philosophy Department, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He studied law and philosophy in Tel Aviv University, where he earned his B.A. and LL.B. in 1993. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy from NYU in 2003. David works primarily in moral, political, and legal philosophy. His publications include: Taking Morality Seriously (OUP, 2011); “Against Public Reason”, in Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy 1 (201...
2015-Oct-11 • 53 minutes
5/10/2015 - 108th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Susan James on Freedom and Nature: A Spinozist Invitation
As the first talk for the 2015/16 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year's Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Susan James (Birkbeck, University of London) as the 108th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society's President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Please visit our Council page for further information regarding the Society's past presidents. | | The 108th Presidential Address will be chaired by Adrian Moore (Oxford)...
2015-Jun-22 • 65 minutes
15/6/2015: Susanna Siegel on Epistemic Charge
Susanna Siegel is Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She is author of The Contents of Visual Experience (Oxford University Press, 2010), and numerous articles in the philosophy of perception. Recent papers discuss the varieties of influences on perceptual experiences from cognition, affect, and learning, their impact on the epistemic role of perception, and the nature of belief. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Siegel's talk - 'Epistemic Charge' - at the Aristote...
2015-Jun-08 • 45 minutes
1/6/2015: Giles Pearson asks What are Sources of Motivation?
Giles Pearson is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Bristol. He has been at Bristol since 2007. Prior to that he was a lecturer at Birkbeck College, London (2006-2007), and a research fellow at Christ’s College, Cambridge (2003-6). His research is in ancient philosophy and metaethics, with particular interests in Aristotle’s moral and philosophical psychology, and philosophical accounts of motivation. He is the author of Aristotle on Desire (2012, Cambridge University Press) and he co-ed...
2015-May-26 • 65 minutes
18/5/2015: Sacha Golob on Self-Knowledge, Agency and Self-Authorship
Sacha Golob is a Lecturer in Philosophy at King’s College London; prior to that he was a Research Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge. His research focuses on the intersection between the history of philosophy and contemporary philosophy of mind, action and ethics. He is the author of Heidegger on Concepts, Freedom and Normativity (CUP 2014), and the editor of the forthcoming Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy (CUP 2016). | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Golob's talk - 'Self-Knowledge, Agency a...
2015-May-12 • 67 minutes
11/05/2015: Simon Prosser on Why are Indexicals Essential?
Simon Prosser is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. His main research interests are in the philosophy of mind and in metaphysics. He has published articles on temporal experience, intentionalism about conscious experience, indexical thoughts, the metaphysics of time, and emergent properties. He is currently adding the finishing touches to a monograph on the experience of time and change, and also writing a couple of papers on the individuation of concepts. In the future he plans ...
2015-May-05 • 50 minutes
27/4/2015: Christoph Hoerl on Writing on the Page of Consciousness
Christoph Hoerl is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. His research is mainly in the philosophy of mind, with a particular interest in philosophical questions about the nature of temporal experience, memory, and our ability to think about time. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Hoerl's talk - 'Writing on the Page of Consciousness' - at the Aristotelian Society on 27 April 2015. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2015-Mar-16 • 46 minutes
9/3/2015: Matthew Chrisman on Knowing What One Ought To Do
Matthew Chrisman is a Reader in Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh. His research has focused on ethical theory, the philosophy of language, and epistemology. He has published widely in these areas, including articles in the Journal of Philosophy, the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Philosophers’ Imprint and Philosophical Studies. Recent papers have been on the meaning of moral terms, the semantics of deontic modals, and the n...
2015-Feb-26 • 48 minutes
23/2/2015: Louise Richardson on Perceptual Activity and Bodily Awareness
Louise Richardson is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of York. This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Richardson's talk - 'Perceptual Activity and Bodily Awareness' - at the Aristotelian Society on 23 February 2015. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company.
2015-Feb-17 • 51 minutes
9/2/2015: Sophie Gibb on Defending Dualism
Sophie Gibb is Senior Lecturer at the Department of Philosophy, Durham University. Her research is in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, with particular interests in the mental causation debate, the categories of being, and causation, laws and powers. Recent papers are on the ontology of the mental causation debate, the subset account of property realization, and tropes and laws. She is leader of the philosophy of mind work group within the Durham Emergence Project, which is an interdisciplinary resear...
2015-Feb-02 • 46 minutes
26/1/2015: Dominic Gregory on Visual Content, Expectations, and the Outside World
Dominic Gregory teaches Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. He has written on the logic, epistemology, and metaphysics of modality, but his work has lately focused upon various questions concerning distinctively sensory representations such as pictures and sensory mental images. His recent book "Showing, Sensing, and Seeming" (OUP 2013) develops a general account of the nature of the contents belonging to those representations: the book contains detailed philosophical examinations of sensory mental i...
2015-Jan-19 • 51 minutes
12/1/2015: Michael Garnett on Freedom and Indoctrination
Michael Garnett is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Birkbeck College. He works in political philosophy and the philosophy of agency, where his research concerns a number of issues related to the idea of freedom. Recent papers are on the nature of autonomy, the idea of human unpredictability, coercion, and the relationship between freedom and agency. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Garnett's talk - 'Freedom and Indoctrination' - at the Aristotelian Society on 12 January 2015. The recording w...
2014-Dec-08 • 46 minutes
1/12/2014: Jens Timmermann on What’s Wrong with ‘Deontology’?
Jens Timmermann is Reader in Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. He was trained as an ancient philosopher but now largely works on Kant’s ethics, political philosophy and philosophy of law. Recent publications include a volume on Kant’s “Critique of Practical Reason” (edited jointly with Andrews Reath), a German-English edition of Kant’s “Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals” and an article on the possibility of moral conflict in Kantian ethics. He is currently interested in Kant’s account ...
2014-Nov-25 • 44 minutes
17/11/2014: Paulina Sliwa on Understanding and Knowing
Paulina Sliwa is a University Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge. She received her PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her undergraduate degree from Balliol College, Oxford. Her research interests are in Epistemology, Ethics, and Moral Psychology. Recently, she has written about higher-order evidence, moral testimony, moral motivation, and the nature of moral praise and blame. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Sliwa's talk - 'Under...
2014-Nov-11 • 45 minutes
3/11/2014: John Heil on Aristotelian Supervenience
John Heil is professor of philosophy at Washington University in St Louis and Honorary Research Associate at Monash University. His work centers on topics in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. He is interested in the extent to which medieval and early modern approaches to metaphysical issues might shed light on contemporary debates over the nature of substances, properties, and relations (especially causal relations), and truthmakers for modal truths. Many of these themes are addressed in his most rece...
2014-Oct-27 • 54 minutes
20/10/2014: Catharine Abell on Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation
Catharine Abell is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at The University of Manchester. Her research is predominantly in aesthetics and focuses on issues concerning the representational arts. She has published papers on topics such as the nature of depiction, how representational works of art express emotions and other mental states, and what it is for something to be an artwork. Her current research addresses issues such as the nature of fiction, the interpretation of works of fiction, and what styles and genres...
2014-Oct-13 • 53 minutes
6/10/2014 - 107th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Adrian Moore on Being, Univocity and Logical Syntax
As the first talk for the 2014/15 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Adrian Moore, University of Oxford, as the 107th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. | | The 107th Presidential Address was chaired by David Papineau (KCL) – 106th President of the Aristotelian Society. | | Adrian Moore is Professor of Philosophy at the Universi...
2014-Oct-13 • 64 minutes
13/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium V on Self-Regulation, featuring Tamar Szabó Gendler and Jennifer Nagel
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Oct-13 • 61 minutes
13/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium IV on the Ethical Significance of Persistence, featuring Amber Carpenter and Stephen Makin
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Oct-13 • 63 minutes
12/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium III on Culpability, Duress and Excuses, featuring Gideon Rosen and Marcia Baron
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Oct-13 • 42 minutes
12/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium II on Moral Testimony, featuring Hallvard Lillehammer and Roger Crisp
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Oct-13 • 63 minutes
12/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Symposium I on Truth and Meaning, featuring Ian Rumfitt and Gary Kemp
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Oct-13 • 50 minutes
11/7/2014: Joint Session Podcast - Alan Millar on Reasons for Belief, Perception and Reflective Knowledge
The 88th Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association was held at the University of Cambridge from 11 to 13 July 2014. The Joint Session is a three-day conference in philosophy that is held annually during the summer by the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association. It has taken place at nearly every major university across the United Kingdom and in Ireland. Since 1910, the Joint Session has grown to become the largest gathering of philosophers in the country, attracting prestigiou...
2014-Jun-23 • 53 minutes
16/6/2014: Elizabeth Barnes on Going Beyond the Fundamental: Feminism in Contemporary Metaphysics
Elizabeth Barnes has been a senior lecturer at Leeds since 2006. Before going to Leeds she was a PhD student in the Vagueness Project of the Arche AHRC Research Centre for the philosophy of logic, language, mathematics, and mind at the University of St. Andrews. Her main research interests are in metaphysics and ethics. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr Barnes' talk - 'Going Beyond the Fundamental: Feminism in Contemporary Metaphysics' - at the Aristotelian Society on 16 June 2014. The recording...
2014-Jun-09 • 52 minutes
2/6/2014: Alix Cohen on Kant on the Ethics of Belief
Before joining the University of Edinburgh as Chancellor’s Fellow in January 2014, Alix Cohen taught at the universities of York and Leeds, having previously held a Junior Research Fellowship at Newnham College, Cambridge. She is the author of Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History (Palgrave, 2009) and has published papers on Kant as well as Hume and Rousseau. She is currently editing Kant’s Lectures on Anthropology: A Critical Guide (CUP, 2014) and Kant on Emotion and Value (Palgrav...
2014-May-27 • 57 minutes
19/5/2014: Ulrike Heuer on Intentions and the Reasons for Which We Act
Ulrike Heuer is an Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Leeds having previously worked in the philosophy departments at the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University and Barnard College. She has also been a faculty fellow of the Center for Ethics at Harvard University, and of the Center for Ethics and Public Affairs at Tulane University. Her research focuses on theories of practical reasons, the relation of reasons and values, various problems in normative ethics, and philosophy of a...
2014-May-27 • 55 minutes
12/5/2014: Tim Button on the Weight of Truth
Tim Button is a University Lecturer, and a Fellow of St John’s College, at the University of Cambridge. He has published articles in metaphysics, logic and philosophy of mathematics. His first book, "The Limits of Realism" (OUP, 2013), deals with the relationship between semantics and scepticism. It critically explores explores and develops several themes from Hilary Putnam’s work on realism and antirealism, notably: the model-theoretic arguments; the connection between truth and justification; the brain-in...
2014-May-06 • 61 minutes
28/4/2014: Eileen John on Literature and Disagreement
Eileen John is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. Her research is in aesthetics and philosophy of literature, with particular interests in literature and knowledge, and some broader interests in personal autonomy, moral psychology, and conditions for ethical life. Recent papers are on second-personal constraints on love, the nature of our concern for fictional characters, and expressive thought in poetry. She directs Warwick’s Centre for Research in Philosophy, Literature and th...
2014-Mar-17 • 53 minutes
10/3/2014: Jessica Moss on Plato's Appearance/Assent Account of Belief
Jessica Moss is Professor of Philosophy. She received her B.A. from Yale University and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Princeton University (2004). Her primary area of research is ancient philosophy, especially ethics and psychology. Her article “Akrasia and Perceptual Illusion” was chosen for The Philosopher’s Annual as one of the ten best articles published in philosophy in 2009. Her book "Aristotle on the Apparent Good: Perception, Phantasia, Thought, and Desire" was published by Oxford University Press in...
2014-Mar-03 • 55 minutes
24/2/2014: Paul Faulkner on a Virtue Theory of Testimony
Paul Faulkner is a senior lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. His research interest is principally in testimony and trust. He is the author of 'Knowledge on Trust' (OUP 2011). | | This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Faulkner's talk - 'A Virtue Theory of Testimony' - at the Aristotelian Society on 24 February 2014. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, University of London.
2014-Feb-17 • 54 minutes
10/2/2014: Conor McHugh on Fitting Belief
Conor McHugh is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Southampton. He has published articles on a range of topics in epistemology and philosophy of mind, including self-knowledge, epistemic warrant, mental agency, doxastic control and freedom, epistemic responsibility, the aim of belief, and assertion. He is currently working on epistemic normativity and the nature of belief, on the normativity of attitudes more generally, and on related issues in value theory. He is an investigator on the AHRC-fund...
2014-Feb-03 • 53 minutes
27/1/2014: Robert Pippin on the Significance of Self-Consciousness in Idealist Theories of Logic
Robert B. Pippin is the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought, the Department of Philosophy, and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books on German idealism, including "Kant’s Theory of Form" (1982), "Hegel’s Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self-Consciousness" (1989), "Modernism as a Philosophical Problem" (1991), and "Hegel’s Practical Philosophy" (2008). He has also written on literature ("Henry James and Mode...
2014-Jan-20 • 58 minutes
13/1/2014: Nicholas Shea on Exploited Isomorphism and Structural Representation
Nicholas Shea is an interdisciplinary philosopher of mind, and of psychology, cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience. He came into philosophy via an MA at Birkbeck and PhD at King’s College London. He then worked as a research fellow in Oxford, based in the Faculty of Philosophy and Somerville College and affiliated to the Department of Experimental Psychology, before joining King’s College London in 2012. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Shea's talk - 'Exploited Isomorphism and St...
2014-Jan-07 • 48 minutes
2/12/2013: Francesco Berto on Conceiving the Inconsistent
Francesco Berto is Senior Lecturer at the Department of Philosophy and Research Leader at the Northern Institute of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen. He has also worked at the University of Notre Dame (IN, USA), the Sorbonne-Ecole Normale Supérieure of Paris, and the Universities of Padua and Venice (Italy). He has published monographs on metaphysics and the philosophy of logic, and papers in Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophical Studies, the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, the European Journal of Ph...
2013-Nov-26 • 59 minutes
18/11/2013: Jonathan Lear on Integrating the Non-Rational Soul
Jonathan Lear is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago and a member of the Committee on Social Thought. He is author most recently of 'Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation', 'A Case for Irony', and 'Freud'. | | This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Lear's talk - 'Integrating the Non-Rational Soul' - at the Aristotelian Society on 18 November 2013. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, Univer...
2013-Nov-09 • 54 minutes
4/11/2013: Tim Mulgan on Ethics for Possible Futures
Tim Mulgan is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Auckland, and Professor of Moral and Political Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. He is the author of The Demands of Consequentialism (Oxford University Press 2001), Future People (Oxford University Press 2006), Understanding Utilitarianism (Acumen 2007), and Ethics for a Broken World (Acumen/McGill-Queens University Press 2011). He is currently completing a manuscript for Oxford University Press entitled Purpose in the Universe: the moral ...
2013-Oct-29 • 54 minutes
21/10/2013: Robert Kane on Acting “of One’s Own Free Will”: New Perspectives on an Ancient Philosophical Problem
Robert Kane (Ph. D. Yale University) is University Distinguished Teaching Professor of Philosophy Emeritus and Professor of Law at The University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of seven books and more that seventy articles on the philosophy of mind, free will and action, ethics and value theory and philosophy of religion, inclu­ding Free Will and Values (1985), Through the Moral Maze (1994), The Significance of Free Will (Oxford, 1996), A Contem­pora­ry Introduction to Free Will (Oxford, 2005), Four V...
2013-Oct-11 • 56 minutes
7/10/2013 - 106th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: David Papineau on Sensory Experience and Representational Properties
David Papineau was born in Italy and educated in Trinidad, England, and South Africa. He has a BSc in mathematics from the University of Natal and a BA and PhD in philosophy from Cambridge. He has lectured at Reading University, Macquarie University, Birkbeck College London, and Cambridge University. Since 1990 has been Professor of Philosophy at King’s College London. He was President of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science for 1993-5 and President of the Mind Association for 2009-10. In 20...
2013-Jun-10 • 53 minutes
3/6/2013: Oliver Pooley on Relativity, the Open Future, and the Passage of Time
Oliver Pooley a University Lecturer in the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Oriel College, Oxford. He works in the philosophy of physics and in metaphysics. Much of his research focuses on the nature of space, time and spacetime. Oliver read Physics and Philosophy at Balliol College, and took an MASt in Maths at St John’s College, Cambridge, before returning to Oxford to do graduate work in Philosophy. Before taking up his current position at Oriel, h...
2013-May-29 • 53 minutes
20/5/2013: Clayton Littlejohn on the Russellian Retreat
Clayton Littlejohn is Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at King’s College London. His publications include Justification and the Truth-Connection (Cambridge University Press, 2012), This is Epistemology (Wiley, Forthcoming), and Epistemic Norms, edited with John Turri (Oxford University Press, Forthcoming). His current research concerns the relation between theoretical and practical reason. This podcast is an audio recording of Clayton's talk - "The Russellian Retreat" - at the Aristotelian Society o...
2013-May-15 • 53 minutes
13/05/2013: Gary Watson on Psychopathy and Prudential Deficits
Gary Watson is Provost Professor of Philosophy and Law at the University of Southern California. Gary's area of specialization is moral, political philosophy and legal philosophy, with a special concentration on the theory of agency and responsibility. More recently, his research investigates the question of whether criminal law has a coherent normative underpinning. This podcast is an audio recording of Gary's talk - "Psychopathy and Prudential Deficits" - at the Aristotelian Society on 13 May 2013. The r...
2013-May-08 • 41 minutes
29/4/2013: Fabian Freyenhagen on Ethical (Self-)Critique
Fabian Freyenhagen is Reader in Philosophy at the University of Essex, having previously taught at Sheffield and Cambridge. Apart from articles and a forthcoming book on Adorno’s (practical) philosophy, he has also published on Kant and Hegel as well as on contemporary political philosophy. He has co-edited two books (Disputing the Political: Habermas and Rawls, with Gordon Finlayson; and The Legacy of John Rawls, with Thom Brooks). He is Co-Investigator of a major AHRC-funded research initiative, the Essex...
2013-Apr-24 • 48 minutes
22/4/2013: Ian Phillips on Perceiving the Passing of Time
Ian Phillips is a Lecturer in the Philosophy Department at University College London. Before that he was a Fellow by Examination at All Souls College, Oxford University. Ian is the author of numerous articles in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science, one of which was recently awarded the William James Prize for Contributions to the Scientific Study of Consciousness. He is currently writing a book on our experience of time. This podcast is an audio recording of Ian's talk - "Perceiving the Passing of ...
2013-Apr-15 • 62 minutes
4/3/2013: Rowan Cruft on Why is it Disrespectful to Violate Rights?
Rowan Cruft has taught philosophy at the University of Stirling since 2002. He has published articles on the nature and justification of rights and duties, focusing on comparisons between different forms of right: human rights, contractual rights, property rights, legal rights. He is co-editor of Crime, Punishment and Responsibility: the jurisprudence of Antony Duff (OUP 2011), and is currently co-editing OUP’s Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights (forthcoming 2014). This podcast is an audio recordin...
2013-Feb-25 • 58 minutes
18/2/2013: John Carriero on Epistemology Past and Present
John Carriero is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is author of Between two Worlds: a Reading of Descartes’s “Meditations” (2009) and co-editor with Janet Broughton of A Companion to Descartes (2008). He is especially interested in understanding early modern rationalist thought as the outgrowth of the seventeenth-century collision between the new science and Aristotelianism. His essays “Spinoza on Final Causality” (2005) and “Substance and Ends” (2008) are two signifi...
2013-Feb-14 • 54 minutes
4/2/2013: Josh Parsons on Presupposition, Disagreement and Predicates of Taste
Josh Parsons was born in Wellington, New Zealand, and studied at Victoria University, Wellington before moving to Australia to do his PhD at the Australian National University. He worked at the Arché research centre, University of St Andrews (2001- 2004; after leaving he retained an honorary position at St Andrews until 2010); University of California, Davis (2004-2005); and Otago University (2006-2011). Josh returned to the UK to take up a lecturership at Oxford University in December 2011. This podcast is...
2013-Jan-28 • 54 minutes
21/1/2013: Tom Stern on Nietzsche, Amor Fati and The Gay Science
Tom Stern is a Lecturer in Philosophy at University College London, where he is also the Academic Director of the European Social and Political Studies programme. Before starting at UCL, he studied at Cambridge and at the University of Chicago. His research interests include Nietzsche and aesthetics. As regards Nietzsche, he has written a number of articles exploring various candidates for a positive ethics in Nietzsche’s philosophy. These include discussions of the concept of the Übermensch, of Eternal Rec...
2013-Jan-14 • 44 minutes
7/1/2013: Clare Chambers on the Marriage-Free State
Clare Chambers is University Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. Her field is political philosophy, particularly feminist and liberal theories of justice, equality, autonomy, culture, family and the body. Clare is the author of two books: Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice (Penn State University Press, 2008) and, with Phil Parvin, Political Philosophy: A Complete Introduction (Hodder, forthcoming 2012). She has also written numerous articles and c...
2013-Jan-03 • 46 minutes
10/12/2012: Maria Alvarez on Agency and Two-Way Powers
Before coming to King’s College London, Maria Alvarez was a lecturer at the University of Southampton, having previously taught at the universities of Oxford and Reading. Maria is also a member of the Executive Committee of the British Philosophical Association. Her research interests include the philosophy of action, including the metaphysics and explanation of actions, reasons for action, agent causation, and the problem of free will and moral responsibility. This podcast is an audio recording of Maria's ...
2012-Dec-06 • 44 minutes
3/12/2012: Angela Breitenbach on Aesthetics in Science: A Kantian Proposal
Angela Breitenbach is a Lecturer in the Philosophy Faculty at the University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on the history of modern philosophy, in particular the philosophy of Kant, as well as questions in philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, and aesthetics. She has published on various aspects of Kant’s philosophy, and is the author of Die Analogie von Vernunft und Natur (The Analogy of Reason and Nature, de Gruyter 2009). Angela was educated in Cambridge and Berlin, and held a Junior Researc...
2012-Dec-06 • 56 minutes
19/11/2012: Guy Longworth on Sharing Thoughts About Oneself
Guy Longworth is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. His research focuses on the nature of linguistic understanding and its role in the communication of knowledge. He has also written on testimony, generative linguistics, and the work of J. L. Austin. This podcast is an audio recording of Guy Longworth's talk - "Sharing Thoughts About Oneself" - at the Aristotelian Society on 19 November 2012. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Ins...
2012-Nov-12 • 42 minutes
5/11/2012: Johannes Roessler on the Epistemic Role of Intentions
Johannes Roessler is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Warwick University. He has published articles on issues in the philosophy of mind, epistemology and cognitive development, and has co-edited three interdisciplinary volumes: Agency and Self-Awareness (2003), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds (2004) and Perception, Causation and Objectivity (2011). This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Roessler's talk - "The Epistemic Role of Intentions" - at the Aristotelian Society...
2012-Oct-30 • 24 minutes
22/10/2012: Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra on Resemblance Nominalism, Conjunctions and Truthmakers
Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra is the author of Resemblance Nominalism (Oxford University Press, 2002) and co-editor of Real Metaphysics (Routledge, 2003). He has written many articles on metaphysics and early modern philosophy. He is a Fellow and Tutor at Oriel College, University of Oxford. This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Rodriguez-Pereyra's talk - "Resemblance Nominalism, Conjunctions and Truthmakers" - at the Aristotelian Society on 22 October 2012. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broa...
2012-Oct-16 • 54 minutes
105th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Sarah Broadie on 'Actual Instead'
Sarah Broadie is in the Moral Philosophy Department at the University of St Andrews. She has previously worked in philosophy departments at Princeton, Rutgers, Yale, the University of Texas at Austin, and Edinburgh University. Her publications include Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotle’s Physics (1982); Passage and Possibility: a study of Aristotle’s modal concepts (1982); Ethics with Aristotle (1991); Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics: Commentary, with translation by Christopher Rowe (2002); Aristotle an...
2012-Jun-27 • 55 minutes
18/6/2012: Michael Smith on Agents and Patients
Michael Smith is the author of The Moral Problem (1994); Ethics and the A Priori: Selected Essays on Moral Psychology and Meta-Ethics (2004); and the co-author of Mind, Morality and Explanation: Selected Collaborations (2004), a collection of papers written in various combinations by Smith, Frank Jackson and Philip Pettit when they were colleagues at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University. In 2004 Smith moved to Princeton University where is currently McCosh Professor of Phil...
2012-Jun-27 • 50 minutes
14/6/2012: Kieran Setiya on Knowing How
Kieran Setiya was an undergraduate at Cambridge and a graduate student at Princeton. He is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, and is the author of Reasons without Rationalism (Princeton, 2007) and Knowing Right From Wrong (Oxford, forthcoming). This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Setiya's talk - "Knowing How" - at the Aristotelian Society on 14 June 2012. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, Univers...
2012-May-30 • 79 minutes
21/5/2012: Michael Thompson on You and I
Michael Thompson received his PhD in Philosophy at UCLA, where he was a student of Philippa Foot. He is a Professor at the University of Pittsburgh, and was formerly an Assistant Professor at UCLA. He is the author of Life and Action (Harvard University Press 2008, 2012; Suhrkamp 2011) and "What is it to Wrong Someone?" in Reason and Value, ed. Wallace et al. (O.U.P. 2006). This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Thompson's talk - "You and I" - at the Aristotelian Society on 21 May 2012. The recordi...
2012-May-25 • 56 minutes
14/5/2012: Frank Jackson on Leibniz's Law and the Philosophy of Mind
Frank Jackson is a regular visiting professor at Princeton University and holds fractional research positions at The Australian National University and La Trobe University. He is a Corresponding Fellow of The British Academy. His publications include: Perception (Cambridge UP 1977), Conditionals (Blackwell1987), The Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, co-authored with David Braddon-Mitchell (Blackwell, 1996), From Metaphysics to Ethics (Oxford UP 1998), Language, Names, and Information (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)...
2012-Mar-08 • 52 minutes
5/3/2012: Fiona Leigh on Restless Forms and Changeless Causes
Fiona Leigh is a Lecturer in Philosophy at University College London, where she joined the Department in 2009, after earning her PhD (Monash). Fiona’s area of research specialty is Plato’s later metaphysics, especially Plato’s Sophist, and she has published papers in journals including Phronesis, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Aperion, and Journal of Philosophy of Education. Currently she is working on a monograph length reading of the Sophist, and is interested in the potentially positive role of ar...
2012-Feb-24 • 55 minutes
20/2/2012: Heather Logue on Naïve Realism
Heather Logue is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on issues in metaphysics and epistemology, and particularly on issues concerning perceptual experience. This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Logue's talk - "Why Naïve Realism?" - at the Aristotelian Society on 20 February 2012. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, University of London.
2012-Feb-21 • 53 minutes
6/2/2012: Stacie Friend on Fiction as a Genre
Stacie Friend is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, where she has been teaching since 2007. Her research is at the intersection of aesthetics and philosophy of language and mind, focusing primarily on issues relating to fiction. She has published papers on the nature of fiction, discourse and thought about the non-existent, the metaphysics of fictional characters, emotional responses to fiction and tragedy and the cognitive values of literature. This podcast is an aud...
2012-Feb-21 • 52 minutes
23/01/2012: Dudley Knowles on Good Samaritans & Good Government
Dudley Knowles retired in July 2011 as Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. He studied for his first degree at Bedford College, University of London, graduating in 1970. After a spell managing a hotel in Glencoe, he studied for a two-year thesis (MLitt) at the University of Glasgow, where he was appointed lecturer in 1973. He remained in Glasgow throughout his academic career. Although he has published on a variety of topics, his main interests have been in political philosophy an...
2012-Feb-21 • 61 minutes
9/01/2012: Seth Yalcin on Bayesian Expressivism
Seth Yalcin is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also a member of the Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science. Prior to that he was an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at New York University. He holds a PhD in philosophy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He works mostly in the philosophy of language, on descriptive and foundational issues in natural language semantics. Lately his work has borrowed ideas from formal epistemology a...
2012-Feb-21 • 55 minutes
5/12/2011: Daniel Rothschild on Expressing Credences
Daniel Rothschild is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. Prior to that he was an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University. He holds a PhD in Philosophy from Princeton University. His research focuses on natural language semantics and pragmatics. He has written on specific constructions such as conditionals, descriptions, questions, and modals, as well as foundational topics such as presupposition, expressivism, game-theoretic pragmatics, and dynamic semantics. This ...
2012-Feb-21 • 49 minutes
21/11/2011: David Barnett on Counterfactual Entailment
David Barnett is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Prior to arriving at CU in 2005, he held positions at the University Vermont and Davidson College. In 2008, he was a visiting professor at NYU, where he obtained his PhD in in 2003. Barnett works mainly in philosophy of language and metaphysics, but also has interests in philosophy of mind. This podcast is an audio recording of Dr. Barnett's talk - "Counterfactual Entailment" - at the Aristotelian Society on 21 Nove...
2012-Feb-21 • 61 minutes
7/11/2011: Øystein Linnebo on Reference by Abstraction
Øystein Linnebo is Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London, where he arrived in January 2010, having held positions at the Universities of Bristol, Oxford, and Oslo. He obtained his PhD in Philosophy from Harvard University in 2002 and an MA in Mathematics from the University of Oslo in 1995. Linnebo’s research interests lie in philosophical logic, philosophy of mathematics, metaphysics, early analytic philosophy, as well as parts of philosophy of language and philosophy of science. This p...
2012-Feb-21 • 42 minutes
20/10/2011: Gianfranco Soldati on Direct Realism & Immediate Justification
Gianfranco Soldati works on phenomenology, mind and knowledge. Among other things he is interested in problems related to self-knowledge and in the philosophical analysis of experience. This podcast is an audio recording of Professor Soldati's talk - "Direct Realism and Immediate Justification" - at the Aristotelian Society on 20 October 2011. The recording was produced by Backdoor Broadcasting Company in conjunction with the Institute of Philosophy, University of London.
2012-Feb-19 • 54 minutes
104th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Marie McGinn on Non-Inferential Knowledge
Marie McGinn is Professor Emerita in Philosophy at the University of York, and part-time Professor of Philosophy at the University of East Anglia. Her main areas of research include the philosophy of Wittgenstein, epistemology and the philosophy of mind. She is the 104th President of the Aristotelian Society for the 2011/12 academic year. This podcast is an audio recording of Professor McGinn's inaugural address titled, "Non-Inferential Knowledge." The Address took place on 10 October 2011 at the Chancellor...