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TrueSciPhi

Philosophy Podcast Episodes (Chronological)

A list of episodes from the trailing year of selected podcast series with associated Twitter feeds.

Updated: 2019-Jul-17 14:01 UTC. Listed episodes: 1186. Hide descriptions. Switch to ranked view. Search. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

Date Episode details
2019-Jul-17thumbnailThe true value of things
We have become alternately merchants and merchandise, and we ask, not what a thing truly is, but what it costs. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-17thumbnail0G65: The Evitable Conflict and The Zeroth Law
I built a superintelligent robot to write these show notes, and it just kept repeating the word "meta" over and over and over again. Not sure if it's a feature or a bug. While we sort it out, enjoy our episode on Asimov's The Evitable conflict, where he first describes The Zeroth Law of robotics. We explain the law, the problems it faces, and how they connect to issues like virtue theory and quest... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jul-16thumbnailStoicism: Escaping Mental Enslavement
So today’s episode we will dive back into some Stoicism and connecting it with the mental thinking blocks we face. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Podcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE9_6WnY7pzGmbIJ42SCJEQ Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Main Youtube: https:/... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jul-16thumbnailEpisode 168: The Big Lebowski vs Pulp Fiction (Pt. 2)
It's Part 2 of the Lebowski vs. Pulp Fiction showdown. This time we focus on the Dude, Walter, Donny, and most importantly Jesus Quintana. (Nobody fucks with the Jesus). What's the ethos of this stoner masterpiece? Is it a nihilstic movie? A deconstruction of masculinity? A cannabis infused Daoist parable? And is it fair to compare these two classics from the 90s? Fair? Who's the fucking nihilist ... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jul-16thumbnailAre you a slave, a fool, or what?
From the point of view of someone who has managed to overcome his attachment for externals, people going after riches and luxuries look like fools. Are you one of them? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-15thumbnailEp. 221: Functionalist Theories of Mind (Putnam, Armstrong) (Part One)
On Hilary Putnam's "The Nature of Mental States" (1973). What is the mind? Functionalist theories identify the mental with not with the brain exactly, but with something the brain does. So some other creature without a brain (maybe a computer) might be able to do that same thing if it could duplicate the structure of what our brains do. Is this a satisfying account of the mind? Don't wait for part... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jul-15thumbnail55 | A Conversation with Rob Reid on Quantum Mechanics and Many Worlds
As you may have heard, I have a new book coming out in September, Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime. To celebrate, we're going to have more than the usual number of podcasts about quantum mechanics over the next couple of months. Today is an experimental flipped podcast, in which I'm being interviewed by Rob Reid. Rob is the host of the After On podcast, of whi... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jul-15thumbnail484: Is Postmodernism Really to Blame for Post-Truth?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/postmodernism-really-blame. Postmodernism is often characterized by its rejection of concepts championed by the Enlightenment, like meaning, truth, reason, and knowledge. Some philosophers blame postmodernism for making cynicism about truth and facts now respectable in political debate. So is postmodernism responsible for “fake news” and “alt... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jul-14thumbnailSPACE & POLITICS With Ryan D Enos
Social geography. Space. Politics. Immigration. Race. Segregation. Racism. Trump. 2020. Ideology. Integration. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jul-14thumbnailThe world in a different light: Iris Murdoch’s philosophical vision
In a century that produced a dizzying array of philosophers and philosophical approaches, few philosophers were as distinctive, and stood out quite so conspicuously, as Iris Murdoch (1919-1999). (@RadioNational)
2019-Jul-14thumbnailEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part V. Further Analysis and Discussion)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jul-14thumbnailHoP 329 - Greeks Bearing Gifts - Byzantine Scholars in Italy
Bessarion and George Trapenzuntius, rival scholars from the Greek east who helped inspire the Italian Renaissance. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jul-11thumbnailEV - 98 The Shunyata of the Void with SomeStingray
We love talking emptiness of the self here in the void, and so I got the perfect not self to join me and discuss lots of fun topics in the world of Indian Philosophy. @SomeStingray is a must follow on philosophy twitter and we have a great time here, especially during the real/not real lightening round. Philosophy twitter will want to take careful notes in that section so you can troll the fish la... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jul-11thumbnailThe problem with fame, wealth and power
Seneca reminds us that in the time of Nero - just like today - famous, rich and powerful people are hiding much evil under a thin coating of titles. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-10thumbnailThe problem with excessive wealth
Seneca, who knew a thing or two about wealth, warns us about pursuing it. A mind that revels in luxury, he says, is a mind that has lost its balance. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-10thumbnailSusanna Schellenberg, "The Unity of Perception: Content, Consciousness, and Evidence" (Oxford UP, 2018)
How does perception result in thoughts about items in the world (such as dogs or flowers) and in conscious states of many kinds (such as experiences of seeing red)? How does perception provide evidence for our beliefs (such as the belief that there is a red rose in front of you)?In The Unity of Perception: Content, Consciousness, and Evidence (Oxford University Press, 2018), Susanna Schellenberg c... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jul-10thumbnail0G64: I Am Mother and Care Ethics
And now another installment in the deeply caring relationship that is our show. Can caring be shared through podwaves? I like to think so. Feel the care just flow out over you. Try not to think about how this relationship also feels like creepy paternalistic programming. This is all totally normal. This week we're covering I Am Mother, a new piece of sci fi horror by Netflix. There's a lot of good... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jul-10thumbnailPOSITIVE AND NEGATIVE FREEDOM
POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE FREEDOM by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jul-10thumbnailPublic Leaders: The Power Structure of Echo Chambers
Bringing in Michel Foucault's idea of power to examine how talking heads and rising talking heads fall into being on top of these echo chambers. Looking at how their knowledge leads to power and then blocks them off to alternative knowledge! Tune in! Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Podcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE9_6WnY7pzGmbIJ42SCJEQ Thanks for listening, please sub... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jul-09thumbnailWhy are you doing what you are doing?
Seneca reminds us that striving to be a better person is an end in itself, not to be pursued in order to boast to others of our accomplishments. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-08thumbnailKate Kirkpatrick on the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir
In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Kate Kirkpatrick, author of a new biography of Beauvoir, Becoming Beauvoir, discusses the relationship between the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir. Beauvoir is often portrayed as applying Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialism to the condition of women. Is this a fair assessment? We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation. (@philosophybites)
2019-Jul-08thumbnailEpisode 54: Indre Viskontas on Music and the Brain
It doesn’t mean much to say music affects your brain — everything that happens to you affects your brain. But music affects your brain in certain specific ways, from changing our mood to helping us learn. As both a neuroscientist and an opera singer, Indre Viskontas is the ideal person to talk about the relationship between music and the brain. Her new book, How Music Can Make You Better, digs... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jul-08thumbnail54 | Indre Viskontas on Music and the Brain
It doesn’t mean much to say music affects your brain — everything that happens to you affects your brain. But music affects your brain in certain specific ways, from changing our mood to helping us learn. As both a neuroscientist and an opera singer, Indre Viskontas is the ideal person to talk about the relationship between music and the brain. Her new book, How Music Can Make You Better, digs... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jul-08thumbnailWhat brought down Alexander the Great
Seneca reminds us that Alexander the Great conquered everything, except his own destructive emotions, which led to endless grief for him and his friends. Beware, therefore, of reacting in anger to your problems. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-08thumbnailThe Free Speech Episode
Dylan, Gabe, Lisa, and Kevin unite to discuss free speech, deplatforming, and rights. What should we make of conservative complaints that their free speech is being trampled on by protestors? Is deplatforming a harm? Do social media companies have an obligation to respect a freedom of speech? It is a tricky tangle of issues. This episode focuses on an article by Gabe called, “Sadly, There C... (@thevimblog)
2019-Jul-08thumbnail483: Summer Reading (and Misreading)
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/summer-reading-and-misreading. What should you be reading this summer—and how should you be reading it? We’re often told that fiction offers us entertainment, moral examples, and lessons about life. But are we getting too quick to dismiss complicated fiction—the kind that doesn’t have straightforward heroes and happy endings? Josh and Ken t... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jul-07thumbnailShorts - E21: Personal Accountability
“To remain the same in function, animals must change their form.” - Stephen Jay Gould, 1979 Gould wrote the quote above a couple times in different articles. Ryan likes it because he thinks it can apply to systems in general. Thus, to remain the same in function, systems should change their structure provided there are changes in their throughput. In organisms this happens with changes in ... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jul-07thumbnailThinking the country
What constitutes a "philosophical" conversation? You might reasonably expect such a conversation to be conceptual, exploring abstract notions of self, time, being, ethics and so on. For indigenous Australian philosophers, the conversation gets real very fast. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jul-07thumbnailEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part IV. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jul-07thumbnailHAP 32 - Talking Book - Early Africana Writing in English
18th century black authors touch on philosophical themes in autobiographical narratives, poetry, and other literary genres. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jul-07thumbnailResponsibility and Addiction
Are addicts responsible for harming their health? (@DavidEdmonds100)
2019-Jul-05thumbnailEp. 220: 10-Year Retrospective of The Partially Examined Life
Mark, Seth, Dylan, and Wes reflect on the changing state of podcasting and public philosophy over the last decade, how our goals and interests have changed since we started we started. Why don't colleges pay their faculty to educate the public through regular, broadcasted conversations like ours? If you think we're snarky, take a look at actual philosophy faculty! Should we continue to do more lit... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jul-05thumbnailMolyneux’s Problem
Marjolein Degenaar/ Barry Ginley/ Brian Glenney Listen to the recording here or on YouTube William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Jul-05thumbnailWho's got the time?
Doesn't it take time to practice Stoicism? We are all so busy! Here is Marcus Aurelius' response to that question. A response that applies also if you are a Christian, or a Buddhist, among other things. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-04thumbnailEV - 97 Dominating the Void with Toby Buckle
This week I'm joined by Toby Buckle of the Political philosophy podcast to discuss a particularly depressing theory of politics from his Machiavelli series centered around the desires to dominate/humiliate and the desires to avoid domination/humiliation. It feels very relevant to our current voidy moment.Invocation: Void Goddess Marianne Williamson's actual tweets.Political Philosophy Podcast: htt... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jul-04thumbnailWhat's the difference between useful and useless?
Epictetus argues that things are useless or useful not in themselves, but as a result of what we do with them. As usual in Stoicism, the answer comes from within, from our own attitudes toward things. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-03thumbnailEpisode 167: The Big Lebowski vs Pulp Fiction (Pt. 1)
There are only two kinds of people in the world, Pulp Fiction people and Big Lebowski people. Now Pulp Fiction people can like Big Lebowski and vice versa, but nobody likes them both equally. Somewhere you have to make a choice. And that choice tells you who you are. In the first episode of this two-parter, David and Tamler make that choice – and then go deep into the themes, performances, and... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jul-03thumbnailVideo Games: Becoming Human
How do video games help us become more human? Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-philosophy-guy-store Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendenw... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jul-03thumbnailThe definition of courage
Seneca explains that courage has little to do with rushing into battle to face an enemy. It's about how we handle the good and the bad that Fortuna throws our way. Also, wanna play ball with Socrates? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-03thumbnail#62 - Häggström on AI Motivations and Risk Denialism
In this episode I talk to Olle Häggström. Olle is a professor of mathematical statistics at Chalmers University of Technology and a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA) and of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA). Olle’s main research is in probability theory and statistical mechanics, but in recent years he has broadened his research interests to focus appl... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Jul-03thumbnail0G63: Fury Road and Ecofeminism
Witness our attempt to gain entry into a post gendered Valhalla! Led by the feminist valkyrie Jamie M. Lombardi (@euthyphro), Professor of philosophy at Bergen Community College, we EXPLODE the feminist symbolism and environmental messaging of Mad Max: Fury Road! ::fire guitar solo:: Seriously, this episode has everything. Top 10 action movie, progressive messaging, a guest who steals the show, an... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jul-02thumbnailWhat are we talking about, and why?
Human beings have an unparalleled ability to communicate with each other. And yet, Seneca suggests, much of the time we talk about things that are neither improving ourselves, nor making the world a better place. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEpisode #133 ... Carl Schmitt on Liberalism pt. 2
Today we continue our discussion of the work of Carl Schmitt. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEpisode #132 ... Carl Schmitt on Liberalism pt. 1
Today we begin our discussion on the work of Carl Schmitt. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEpisode 67 - Thomas Pradeu
On Episode 67, Nick chats with Dr. Thomas Pradeu, CNRS Senior investigator (DR2), and Head of the group “Conceptual and theoretical analysis of immune activation and biological boundaries at the University of Bordeaux, about Philosophy in biology—an innovative way to combine the contributions of philosophy of biology, experimental biology, and medical biology—and how this approach enriches t... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEpisode 53: Solo -- On Morality and Rationality
What does it mean to be a good person? To act ethically and morally in the world? In the old days we might appeal to the instructions we get from God, but a modern naturalist has to look elsewhere. Today I do a rare solo podcast, where I talk both about my personal views on morality, a variety of “constructivism” according to which human beings construct their ethical stances starting from bas... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jul-01thumbnail53 | Solo -- On Morality and Rationality
What does it mean to be a good person? To act ethically and morally in the world? In the old days we might appeal to the instructions we get from God, but a modern naturalist has to look elsewhere. Today I do a rare solo podcast, where I talk both about my personal views on morality, a variety of “constructivism” according to which human beings construct their ethical stances starting from bas... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEp. 219: The Harder Problem of Consciousness (Block & Papineau)
On Ned Block's "The Harder Problem of Consciousness" (2002) and David Papineau's "Could There Be a Science of Consciousness?" (2003). What would give us sufficient reason to believe that a non-human was conscious? Block thinks this is a harder problem that we might suspect. We can't know for sure exactly what consciousness in us is, so we can't know for sure what such a being might require (a brai... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailOn the vanity of mental gymnastics
Philosophers can be clever. Too clever for their own sake, suggests Seneca. Indeed, one measure of wisdom is precisely the ability to tell the difference between cleverness and usefulness. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailChristian List, "Why Free Will is Real" (Harvard UP, 2019)
Given our modern scientific view of the world, how is freedom of the will possible?  That is the classical problem of free will.  Strategies for addressing this problem include the flat denial of free will, as well as various attempts to render free will consistent with a physically deterministic world.  Among these latter, there’s a tendency to redefine free will in a way that di... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jul-01thumbnailEpisode 115: Katherine Ritchie discusses social groups
In this episode, Katherine Ritchie (CUNY Graduate Center, City College) lays out what it means to belong to a social group, and what kind of thing a social group is. (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-Jun-30thumbnailShorts - E20: The Monty Hall Problem
In this Short the Dawdlers play a game. Everyone loses. The end. (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jun-30thumbnailTHE SURVIVAL OF EUROPEAN LIBERALISM With Ian Dunt
Brexit. Liberalism. J S Mill. Free speech. Living truths. Liberal democracy. Europe. Tony Blair. Journalism. Consent of the governed. Far right parties. Anti-liberalism. The future of Europe. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jun-30thumbnailWitnessing and translating
What happens when we take philosophy into the field? This week we’re talking archaeology, with focus on feminism, tensions between indigenous and Western scientific knowledge, and the principles of reconciliation. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jun-30thumbnailEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part III. Modern Stoicism)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jun-30thumbnailHoP 328 - Old News - Introduction to the Italian Renaissance
A first look at the themes and figures of philosophy in the Italian Renaissance. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-28thumbnailHave you changed your mind yet?
Epictetus bluntly tells us that if we have not been affected by philosophy and have not changed our mind about something important as a result of it, we are simply playing a game. So, has philosophy changed your mind yet? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-27thumbnailPhilosophy and Death
In today’s episode, we will dive into the relationship between philosophy and death have. And maybe see how philosophy really comes about from our fear of death. Also, a tangent on religions relation to death. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Yo... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jun-27thumbnailHave you taken the easy step yet?
Seneca says that being able to do without luxuries is but a small and easy step toward virtue. And yet so many of us have much trouble taking that  step. Have you? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-27thumbnailEV - 96 Giving the Void an Argument with Ben Burgis
This week I'm joined by the verbose socialist Ben Burgis to discuss his book Give them an Argument: Logic for the Left. We talk best practices, the limits of discourse, and why we wish it were true that leftist teachers were actually rising up and seizing the means of education.Give the Right an Argument: https://www.amazon.com/Give-Them-Argument-Logic-Left-ebook/dp/B07RD8MZ4L/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2K0B... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-26thumbnailThe difference between thinking and worrying
Seneca advises Lucilius to think, but not to worry, about the future. It is reasonable to plan for things to come and to act in the best way possible. So long as we don't delude ourselves into thinking that we actually control outcomes. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-26thumbnail0G62: One Punch Man and Process vs. Product
Ugh, woe is me. I used to find passion in the challenge of writing these show notes, but now that I've mastered the art of meta show notes-fu, there's no challenge left. I must seek out a show now with content so boring and straightforward that no amount of meta show notes will make it palatable. This is my hero's journey. Also, we're doing One Punch Man and discussing the tension between wanting ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-25thumbnailBlinded by Ideology
So today, we will get slightly political. Not biased political but more so an observation. Let me know what you think! Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.co... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jun-25thumbnailOut of the Vat #2 – Richard Ashcroft
Richard Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics and Deputy Head of the Department of Law at Queen Mary University of London. In this episode, Richard discusses his recent work on utopias, his love of... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natu... (@LSEPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-24thumbnail482: J.S. Mill and the Good Life
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/mill-and-good-life. John Stuart Mill was one of the most important British philosophers of the 19th century. As a liberal, he thought that individuals are generally the best judges of their own welfare. But Mill was also a utilitarian who thought that there were objectively lower and higher pleasures and that the good life was one which maximized h... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailEpisode 52: Frank Lantz on the Logic and Emotion of Games
Games play an important, and arguably increasing, role in human life. We play games on our computers and our phones, watch other people compete in games, and occasionally break out the cards or the Monopoly set. What is the origin of this human impulse, and what makes for a great game? Frank Lantz is both a working game designer and an academic who thinks about the nature of games and gaming. We d... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-24thumbnail52 | Frank Lantz on the Logic and Emotion of Games
Games play an important, and arguably increasing, role in human life. We play games on our computers and our phones, watch other people compete in games, and occasionally break out the cards or the Monopoly set. What is the origin of this human impulse, and what makes for a great game? Frank Lantz is both a working game designer and an academic who thinks about the nature of games and gaming. We d... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailEpisode 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part Two)
Continuing on "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003). We finish Chalmers's account of the types of physicialism, then move on to dualism (including epiphenomenalism), and finally dally with panpsychism, the specialty of our guest, Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast. Listen to part 1 first or listen to the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "G... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailEp. 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part Two)
Continuing on "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003). We finish Chalmers's account of the types of physicialism, then move on to dualism (including epiphenomenalism), and finally dally with panpsychism, the specialty of our guest, Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast. Listen to part 1 first or listen to the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "G... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailIn a little time you will be like Hadrian and Augustus
Marcus Aurelius takes the long view of things in order to remind himself that whatever troubles us so much right now will soon be over, one way or another. This isn't nihilism, but rather the conscious adoption of a healthier perspective on human affairs. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailARE IDEOLOGIES TRUE?
Is anyone really 'right' about political values, or does essentail​ contestability imply a strong relitavism​? (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jun-24thumbnailPaternalism and public health challenges to patient autonomy
Should patient autonomy always be respected? (@DavidEdmonds100)
2019-Jun-23thumbnailE33: Massimo Pigliucci's Hard Problems - Multi-Level Selection & Cultural Evolution
Times change and the recent past can sometimes become obsolete as the gaze of the mainstream world focuses on its new moment. But it wasn’t long ago when Richard Dawkins was calling for “militant atheism” and Dubya Bush stood on an aircraft carrier in front of a banner that read “Mission Accomplished”. Heck, there was a time when the 90’s did a collective eye roll at the 80’s. Tigers... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jun-23thumbnailHarry Frankfurt's Bullshit
Is Trump a liar? Or is it more accurate to call him a 'bullshitter'? On occasion, people will talk about bullshit as a political phenomenon. And when they do, they will reference a philosopher called Harry Frankfurt. Frankfurt wrote the essay "On Bullshit" in 1986, but it is back in vogue. In this episode, Kevin, Gabe, Dylan, and Zach talk about the essay—what it is about, what it gets wro... (@thevimblog)
2019-Jun-23thumbnailPublic health and the open society
Karl Popper's idea of "the open society" promoted values of inclusivity, transparency and democratic freedom. Today, some fear that the open society is under threat, with negative consequences for a lot of things we've come to take for granted - including public health. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jun-23thumbnailEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part II. The Discourses and The Enchiridion)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jun-23thumbnailHAP 31 - Justin Smith on Amo and Race in Early Modern Philosophy
Justin E.H. Smith joins us to discuss Anton Wilhelm Amo against the background of ideas about race in early modern philosophy, including Leibniz. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-22thumbnailYOLO Apologetics
Drake coined “YOLO,” short for “you only live once” in 2011, and then later apologized for all the douchiness it subsequently engendered.  But the spirit is ancient, and cross-cultural, speaking deeply to the kind of decision-making that is supposed to make for the good life. It seems to be saying that risk and spontaneity should be valued above prudence and planning. Is that true?Thi... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Jun-21thumbnailNEM#100: Dan Stuart Faces Truth and Writes Fiction in Mexico
Dan fronted Arizona cow-punk band Green on Red from 1979 to 1992, releasing seven albums and three EPs, and has since released four solo albums and some collaborations, growing increasingly literary, with two of his recent albums accompanied by novels. We discuss two tracks from The Unfortunate Demise of Marlowe Billings (2018): "A Killer Now" and "Sky Harbor," plus "La Passionaria" from Can o’ ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-21thumbnailThe Philosophers’ Book Club
Deborah Levy, The Cost of Living Listen here or on YouTube At the Philosophers’ Book Club, we select a work of fiction or non-fiction and our panel discusses its philosophical themes. For this... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Jun-21thumbnailPick your virtue buddy
Think of practicing philosophy as going to the gym: sure, you can do a lot on your own. But if you choose a good partner to keep you focused on the task, you'll see more steady improvement. So, who's your virtue buddy? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-20thumbnailEV - 095 The Void after Transition with Callie Wright
This week I'm joined by the wonderful Callie Wright (@calliegetsit), host of the Queersplaining podcast (@queersplaining), where she does in depth reporting on less visible stories within the LGBTQ community. We discuss going beyond the reoccurring narratives about LGBTQ lives, and how that plays out internally and in public forums like sports and politics.Invocation: The Power by Naomi AldermanEd... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-20thumbnail#61 - Yampolskiy on Machine Consciousness and AI Welfare
In this episode I talk Roman Yampolskiy. Roman is a Tenured Associate Professor in the department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science at the Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville. He is the founding and current director of the Cyber Security Lab and an author of many books and papers on AI security and ethics, including Artificial Superintelligence: a Futuristic Approach. ... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Jun-20thumbnailThus the study of wisdom has become the study of words
Seneca says that some people are interested in studying philosophy not to improve their souls, but to sharpen their wits. Time to reflect on what, exactly, we are doing and why. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-20thumbnailCamisha Russell, "The Assisted Reproduction of Race" (Indiana UP, 2018)
Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) such as in vitro fertilization and surrogacy have been critically examined within philosophy, particularly by feminists and bioethicists, but the role of race—both in how the technologies are used and in the effects that they are having—has received less attention.  In The Assisted Reproduction of Race (Indiana University Press, 2018), Camisha Rus... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jun-19thumbnailEV - 094 Echoes in the Void with C. Thi Nguyen
This week I'm joined by C. Thi Nguyen (@add_hawk) to discuss echo chambers, how they're more dangerous than mere epistemic bubbles, and how gaming might help!Thi's article on Echo Chambers: https://aeon.co/essays/why-its-as-hard-to-escape-an-echo-chamber-as-it-is-to-flee-a-cultThi's website: https://objectionable.net/Invocation: Peter Chiykowski Shortstory.comPhilosophers in Space: https://0gphil... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-19thumbnailConsider vegetarianism
Seneca says that we have enough sustenance without resorting to blood, and that a habit of cruelty is formed whenever butchery is practiced for pleasure. Something to meditate on a bit. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-19thumbnail0G61: The Waldo Moment and Politics as Entertainment
After such a meta conversation like this about the intricate relationship of media and information, it's really hard to do a meta writeup without going double meta, so here we are. Some episodes we're very much on the same page, and in many places (partly cause of internet issues) we were not in this episode. And I think that's great! There's a lot of moving parts here and it's hard to slow them a... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-19thumbnailPOSTMODERNISM, 2020, and Other Audience Questions
Machiavelli. Power. Stability. Postmodernism. Unions. Meritocracy. Prediction. Polling. Trump. 2020. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jun-18thumbnailEpisode 166: Total Recall
Memory is highly selective and often inaccurate. But what if we had an easily searchable video record of all our experiences and interactions? How would that affect our relationships? What would it reveal about our characters and our sense of who we are? Is there a kind of truth that can’t be determined by perfect objectivity? David and Tamler dive deep into Ted Chiang’s amazingly rich and poi... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jun-18thumbnailEpisode 66 - Caterina Marchionni
On Episode 66, Nick chats with Dr. Caterina Marchionni, University Lecturer in Practical Philosophy and member of TINT,  Centre for Philosophy of the Social Sciences, at the University of Helsinki, about her work in the philosophy and methodology of economics. (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Jun-18thumbnailOn the best way to resist temptation
Seneca and Epictetus agree: the best way to resist temptation is to avoid it altogether, because it's hard to practice temperance, at least initially. Modern cognitive science agrees. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-17thumbnailEpisode 51: Anthony Aguirre on Cosmology, Zen, Entropy, and Information
Cosmologists have a standard set of puzzles they think about: the nature of dark matter and dark energy, whether there was a period of inflation, the evolution of structure, and so on. But there are also even deeper questions, having to do with why there is a universe at all, and why the early universe had low entropy, that most working cosmologists don’t address. Today’s guest, Anthony Aguirr... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-17thumbnail51 | Anthony Aguirre on Cosmology, Zen, Entropy, and Information
Cosmologists have a standard set of puzzles they think about: the nature of dark matter and dark energy, whether there was a period of inflation, the evolution of structure, and so on. But there are also even deeper questions, having to do with why there is a universe at all, and why the early universe had low entropy, that most working cosmologists don’t address. Today’s guest, Anthony Aguirr... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-17thumbnailThe fortune of everyone is molded by their character
Cicero explains a classic Stoic paradox: only the wise person is free, while everyone else is a slave. To what? To externals that they think are indispensable for their happiness, and yet lay outside of their control. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-17thumbnailEpisode 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part One)
>On "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003), with special guest Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast. Can we explain human experience using the terms of brain physiology? Chalmers thinks not, and lays out the arguments against this and the range of positions philosophers have taken in response to these objections. Don't wait for part 2! Get the full, ad-f... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-17thumbnailEp. 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part One)
On "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003), with special guest Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast. Can we explain human experience using the terms of brain physiology? Chalmers thinks not, and lays out the arguments against this and the range of positions philosophers have taken in response to these objections. Continues on part two, or get the full, ad... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-16thumbnailHoP 327 - Michele Trizio on Byzantine and Latin Medieval Philosophy
The series on Byzantium concludes as Michele Trizio discusses the mutual influence of Byzantium and Latin Christendom. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-16thumbnailEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part I. The Context and Life of Epictetus)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jun-14thumbnailOn Strike
Jo Grady/ Martin O’Neill/ Waseem Yaqoob Listen here or on YouTube Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Jun-14thumbnailThe true hearer is ravished and stirred by the beauty of the subject matter, not by the jingle of empty words
Seneca briefly tells us both how to approach philosophy, and how not to. Are you a passive consumer of the stuff, or are you looking to become a better human being? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-13thumbnailPhilosophy rubs off of you
Seneca says that associating ourselves with a philosopher we cannot help but learning something that may change our lives. So today try to get a friend or relative into philosophy. You'll be doing some good for the whole human cosmopolis. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-12thumbnailThat which you cannot reform, it is best to endure
Is Stoicism about going through life with a stiff upper lip? No, but enduring what cannot be changed is part of the philosophy. Modern Stoic Larry Becker called it the "axiom of futility." --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-12thumbnail0G60: Voyager and Procreation
This week we're bring together a variety of fan favorites: 1. The best Star Trek captain 2. The right to procreate 3. Substrate Chauvanism Hopefully this will be enough fan service to pay off the rage we'll likely incur with next weeks episode. The topic for this week is Voyager season 2, episode 13: Prototype. It's one of many in the constellation of AI reproduction trek episodes and a fun intro ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-12thumbnailMACHIAVELLI 3 Chaos, Freedom, and Glory
MACHIAVELLI 3 Chaos, Freedom, and Glory by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jun-11thumbnailNo matter what trouble you mention, it has happened to many
Seneca reminds us that, regardless of how terrible a problem or event appears to be right now, plenty of others have gone through something similar before. They can be an inspiration to us to overcome whatever is happening in the same way. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-10thumbnailREISSUE-PEL Ep 21: Mind: Turing/Ryle/Nagel/Searle/Dennett (w 2019 Intro)
Discussing articles by Alan Turing, Gilbert Ryle, Thomas Nagel, John Searle, and Dan Dennett. What is this mind stuff, and how can it "be" the brain? Can computers think? What is it like to be a bat? With guest Marco Wise. Plus a new intro by Mark, Wes, and Seth reflecting back on this 2010 discussion, which we're re-releasing to help you prepare for our upcoming episodes in this area. End Song: "... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-10thumbnail481: The Limits of Tolerance
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/limits-tolerance. In order to reach compromise, people try to be tolerant of others with different beliefs. Despite its value, there are numerous factors that may hinder our exercise of tolerance. As the schisms between our beliefs grow larger, what happens when our moral and political ideals put us deeply at odds with your fellow citizens? Do we b... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jun-10thumbnailEpisode 50: Patricia Churchland on Conscience, Morality, and the Brain
It’s fun to spend time thinking about how other people should behave, but fortunately we also have an inner voice that keeps offering opinions about how we should behave ourselves: our conscience. Where did that come from? Today’s guest, Patricia Churchland, is a philosopher and neuroscientist, one of the founders of the subfield of “neurophilosophy.” We dig into the neuroscience of it all... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-10thumbnail50 | Patricia Churchland on Conscience, Morality, and the Brain
It’s fun to spend time thinking about how other people should behave, but fortunately we also have an inner voice that keeps offering opinions about how we should behave ourselves: our conscience. Where did that come from? Today’s guest, Patricia Churchland, is a philosopher and neuroscientist, one of the founders of the subfield of “neurophilosophy.” We dig into the neuroscience of it all... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-10thumbnailNicholas Shea, "Representation in Cognitive Science" (Oxford UP, 2018)
In order to explain thought in natural physical systems, mainstream cognitive science posits representations, or internal states that carry information about the world and that are used by the system to guide its behavior. Naturalistic theories of representation provide explanations of what information, or content, these internal states carry, and how they come to have the contents that they do. I... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jun-10thumbnailIs the President Above the Law?
Is the president above the law? We've all been wondering. Ishan, Dylan, and Zach discuss what a phrase like 'above the law' could mean. This is the final installment in a trilogy on the Mueller Report. Listen to the other episodes here: https://thevimblog.com/2019/04/28/philosophy-and-the-mueller-report/ Reach out to us with your thoughts, critiques, arguments at [email protected] ... (@thevimblog)
2019-Jun-10thumbnailEating Responsibly
Should obese people be held responsible for being overweight? (@DavidEdmonds100)
2019-Jun-09thumbnailDrone homicide, jiggling brains and neurobionic revenge porn
The march of technology never stops, and sometimes institutions have trouble keeping up with the changes. This week we’re looking at possible future crimes committed via technology that’s already with us: brain-computer interfaces, which enable things to happen in the physical world by means of neural impulses – thoughts and imaginings, rather than movements. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jun-09thumbnailEpisode 61, David Pearce on Transhumanism (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Co-founder of Humanity+, formerly known as the World Transhumanist Association, David Pearce is a leading figure of the transhumanist movement. David is perhaps best known for his 1995 manifesto, The Hedonistic Imperative, in which he argues that we can, and will, abolish suffering throughout the living world. Following The Hedonistic Imperative, David has published extensively on topics surroundi... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jun-09thumbnailHAP 30 - Dualist Personality - Anton Wilhelm Amo
Anton Wilhelm Amo, brought to Germany from his native Ghana, defends a rigorous dualism of mind and body. Was this philosophy connected to his African origins? (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jun-08thumbnail(sub)Text #1: Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”: Poesis as Revenge Forsaken
At last, the full, public release of this discussion between Wes Alwan and Bill Youmans covering Shakespeare's 1611 play about revenge, forgiveness, and authorship. Or maybe it's about exploitation, or how we react to changes in status, or perhaps how a liberal education can give you magical powers! Listen and decide for yourself! (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-08thumbnailThe Illusionist
Pyotr Tchaikovsky composed and conducted his final symphony in 1893. He died 9 days later, after having knowingly drunk an unboiled glass of water during a cholera epidemic. Deep into the symphony, Symphony no. 6, there is a paradoxical passage that, when played, no one will be able to hear.  This is because Tchaikovsky scored it to contain a musical illusion. We uncover the mystery of why he... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Jun-07thumbnailEV - 93 The Mind's Void with Dr. Keith Frankish pt. 2
Part two of my rousing conversation with Dr. Keith Frankish, where we try to answer the ageless question "Where is my mind? Where is my mind?". Keith is a brilliant proponent of the theory of Illusionism with regard to the existence of phenomenal state. I've read many of his papers and think they're excellent, and while Keith and I come from "different churches" when it comes to philosophy of mind... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-07thumbnailEV - 92 The Mind’s Void with Dr. Keith Frankish pt.1
As far as I can tell, I'm having the phenomenal sensation of joy at finally getting to have this conversation with Dr. Keith Frankish. Keith is a brilliant proponent of the theory of Illusionism with regard to the existence of phenomenal state. I've read many of his papers and think they're excellent, and while Keith and I come from "different churches" when it comes to philosophy of mind, we agre... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-07thumbnailWhat illusion about myself do I entertain?
Without knowing about modern psychological research, Epictetus figured out that we all too easily fool ourselves. Here are three Stoic techniques to at least partially remedy the problem. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-06thumbnailEV91 - The Void after God
Like the uncomfortable sensation in a limb you sat on too long, we’re back! So sorry for the hiatus, I promise it won't happen again. This week we're joined by Ryan Bell from the Life after God podcast. Ryan is a former pastor who was effectively excommunicated for his progressive views and now helps individuals as they try to make sense of a life after religion. We discuss the loss of belief in... (@ETVPod)
2019-Jun-06thumbnailWhat things you can be robbed of, and what things you can't
Cicero explains that we may lose any external good, because it isn't truly ours, but rather on loan from the universe. However, our judgments, considered opinions, and consciously embraced values are truly ours and cannot be taken away. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-05thumbnailHow to do a premeditation of adversity
Seneca talks about the premeditatio malorum, an exercise that allows us to be mentally prepared for possible negative outcomes of our action. The key to it is to engage your reasoning faculty, not your emotional reactions. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-04thumbnailEpisode 165: Life With No Head (With Sam Harris)
Sam Harris returns to the podcast to talk about meditation and his new Waking Up meditation app. What are the goals of mindfulness practice - stress reduction and greater focus, or something much deeper? Can it cure David's existential dread? Tamler's fear of his daughter going away to college? Can sustained practice erode the illusion of self? Is that even something we'd want to do? What if it di... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jun-04thumbnailLife is like a journey: some things that you don't like will be thrown at you
Seneca uses a metaphor of life as a journey, or as a trip to the thermal baths, to make the point that obstacles will be thrown our way, either on purpose or by accident. The question is: how do we deal with them? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-03thumbnailEpisode 217: Discussing Calderón's "Life Is a Dream"
On the 1636 comedy by Pedro Calderón de la Barca, considering destiny (Christian vs. Ancient Greek), skepticism, meta-theater, and the ethic of honor. Listen to our performance first. With guests Bill Youmans and Erica Spyres. End song: "Pulling Apart" by Jonathan Segel. Hear him on Nakedly Examined Music #38. Please fill out our bonus material survey at partiallyexaminedlife.com/bonus. Please su... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-03thumbnailBad Philosophy: Stefan Molyneux
Thought about doing a Stefan Molyneux book review but then I thought better of it. Check out why.....he's bad at philosophy(logic and reasoning). Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw M... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jun-03thumbnailEpisode 49: Nicholas Christakis on Humanity, Biology, and What Makes Us Good
It’s easy to be cynical about humanity’s present state and future prospects. But we have made it this far, and in some ways we’re doing better than we used to be. Today’s guest, Nicholas Christakis, is an interdisciplinary researcher who studies human nature from a variety of perspectives, including biological, historical, and philosophical. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolution... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-03thumbnail49 | Nicholas Christakis on Humanity, Biology, and What Makes Us Good
It’s easy to be cynical about humanity’s present state and future prospects. But we have made it this far, and in some ways we’re doing better than we used to be. Today’s guest, Nicholas Christakis, is an interdisciplinary researcher who studies human nature from a variety of perspectives, including biological, historical, and philosophical. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolution... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jun-03thumbnail"Busyness" is no proof of happiness
Seneca anticipates modern social psychological research in arguing that keeping oneself busy for the sake of being busy does not lead to happiness. On the contrary. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jun-03thumbnail418: Matter and Energy: The Dark Side
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/matter-and-energy-dark-side. All the matter we have ever observed accounts for less than 5% of the universe. The rest? Dark energy and dark matter: mysterious entities that we only know about from their interactions with other matter. We infer their existence to satisfy our laws—but are we justified in making conclusions about what we cannot dire... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jun-03thumbnailMACHIAVELLI 2 Resistance Freedom
Freedom. Donald Trump. Radicalism. Quentin Skinner. Republicanism. Riots. Class conflict. Ideology. Social Justice. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jun-02thumbnailGlimpse: Machiavellian Politics (for Partially Examined Life #14)
Does politics have to be Machiavellian? Do you have to be ruthless to succeed? Given our treatment of Game of Thrones and Life Is a Dream, and the way in which end-justifying-the-means logic plays endlessly in our real-life political situation, it's time we looked back on our episode 14 on Machiavelli. Mark Linsenmayer reviewed that episode and recorded a little essay about practicing Machiavellia... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jun-02thumbnailEpicureanism and the Problem of Premature Death (Audio Essay)
This audio essay looks at the Epicurean philosophy of death, focusing specifically on how they addressed the problem of premature death. The Epicureans believe that premature death is not a tragedy, provided it occurs after a person has attained the right state of pleasure. If you enjoy listening to these audio essays, and the other podcast episodes, you might consider rating and/or reviewing them... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Jun-02thumbnailAnalytic philosophy: the leading brand
A quick scan of leading philosophy journals reveals that what passes for "philosophy" is selectively screened, with analytic philosophy clearly the dominant style. We look at the history of this phenomenon, some of the likely consequences, and how might it be addressed. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jun-02thumbnailEpisode 61, David Pearce on Transhumanism (Part I - Transhumanism)
Co-founder of Humanity+, formerly known as the World Transhumanist Association, David Pearce is a leading figure of the transhumanist movement. David is perhaps best known for his 1995 manifesto, The Hedonistic Imperative, in which he argues that we can, and will, abolish suffering throughout the living world. Following The Hedonistic Imperative, David has published extensively on topics surroundi... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jun-02thumbnailHoP 326 - Istanbul (Not Constantinople) - the Later Orthodox Tradition
When the Byzantine empire ended in 1453, philosophy in Greek did not end with it. In this episode we bring the story up to the 20th century. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-May-31thumbnailPeople will do the same things even though you would burst with rage
Marcus Aurelius joins Seneca in his rejection of anger as a valid or effective motivator of human action. We should, instead, be moved to act by positive triggers, such as a sense of justice, or duty, or love. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-31thumbnailMary Kate McGowan, "Just Words: On Speech and Hidden Harm" (Oxford UP, 2019)
We’re all familiar with the ways in which speech can cause harm. For example, speech can incite wrongful acts. And I suppose we’re also familiar with contexts in which a person who occupies a position of authority can harm others simply by speaking – as when a boss announced and thereby institutes a discriminatory office policy. In such cases, the announcement is itself a harm in addition to... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-May-30thumbnailThe most important contribution to peace of mind is never to do wrong
Seneca explains why not doing wrong is your best bet toward achieving serenity of mind. Of course, it's also the virtuous thing to do. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-29thumbnailWhat goads people into destroying other people?
Seneca gives a disturbing list of reasons why we kill each other. Most of them are precisely the kind of negative emotions that Stoic training is attempting to move away from. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-29thumbnail0G59: Endgame and Moral Saints
As luck would have it, Mr. Smith, we're in the one and only timeline where you can make a difference. Snap your fingers and you can make the superhero movies go away forever, but only at the cost of never seeing the space babies ever again. Should you be expected to make that snap? This week we're talking Endgame and another famous concept by Susan Wolf, the issue of "moral saints". This topic rel... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-May-29thumbnailMACHIAVELLI History and Ideology
Freedom. Radicalism. The Renaissance. Machiavellianism. Republicanism. Ideology. Interpretation. Class Conflict. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-May-28thumbnailReplication Crisis?
Alexander Bird/ Laura Fortunato/ Marcus Munafò Listen here or on YouTube The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-May-28thumbnailEpisode 65 - Remco Heesen
On Episode 65, Nick chats with Dr. Remco Heesen, faculty member in philosophy at the University of Western Australia, about his research concerning what happens after scientific evidence is collected, such as the scientist’s choice of when to share her findings, and how peer review may affect what gets reported. (@SciPhiPod)
2019-May-28thumbnailNo need to be Cato in order to practice virtue
Seneca discusses the grand example of Cato the Younger, his favorite role model. But even in ordinary life we can be courageous and just, if we pay attention to what we are doing and why. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-28thumbnail#054 Humility Q&A: Self-Care, Self-Promotion, And The Myth of Being Self-Made
Welcome to the third and final episode on the topic of humility! In this episode you’ll hear the audience Q&A portion of the event with guests A.J. Jacobs and Dr. Serene J Khader. Topics discussed: The relationship between humility and artists, one way to change our approach to self-promotion for our projects, how can we make less harmful choices with our wallets, how we can re-frame the pop... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-May-27thumbnailPEL Audioplayers: "Life Is a Dream" by Pedro Calderón de la Barca
Your hosts are joined by real actors to do an unrehearsed read of Calderón's 1636 comedy La Vida Es Sueño, using Stanley Appelbaum's 2002 translation. Ep. 217 will cover the philosophical issues the play raises. Recorded in NYC on 4/7: Talene Monahon (Rosaura), David Epstein (Segismundo), Bill Youmans (Clotaldo), Erica Spyres (Estrella), Chris Martin (Basilio), Mark Linsenmayer (Clarín), Seth P... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-27thumbnailEpisode 48: Marq de Villiers on Hell and Damnation
If you’re bad, we are taught, you go to Hell. Who in the world came up with that idea? Some will answer God, but for the purpose of today’s podcast discussion we’ll put that possibility aside and look into the human origins and history of the idea of Hell. Marq de Villiers is a writer and journalist who has authored a series of non-fiction books, many on science and the environment. In Hell ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-27thumbnail48 | Marq de Villiers on Hell and Damnation
If you’re bad, we are taught, you go to Hell. Who in the world came up with that idea? Some will answer God, but for the purpose of today’s podcast discussion we’ll put that possibility aside and look into the human origins and history of the idea of Hell. Marq de Villiers is a writer and journalist who has authored a series of non-fiction books, many on science and the environment. In Hell ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-26thumbnailShorts - E19: Repeatability in Science
Everything is unique, yet almost everything is ignored. Herein may lie the crux of history as we fashion it for our purposes. Repeatability is a most productive bias. (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-May-26thumbnailAre We in a Constitutional Crisis?
An unofficial sequel to the discussion on the Mueller Report, Dylan, Gabe, Ishan, and Zach reconvene to figure out what a “constitutional crisis” is. Like good philosophers, they distinguish a variety of types. Then they try to determine whether America is actually in one. Don’t miss the concluding segment. The participants play America’s fastest growing game show, “Constitutional... (@thevimblog)
2019-May-26thumbnailMind, matter and motherhood
When Nicola Redhouse had each of her two children, she experienced shattering post-natal anxiety that sent her deep into the mystery of the self, and the relationship between mind and body. A long standing participant in psychoanalysis, she found herself up against the practical limits of Freudian theory - but would science provide more useful insight? (@RadioNational)
2019-May-26thumbnailHAP 29 - Out of Africa - Slavery and the Diaspora
An introduction to Africana philosophical thought as it emerged from the modern experience of slavery and colonization by Europeans. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-May-26thumbnailEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indul... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-May-25thumbnailUncivil Disobedience
In Australia, vegan and animal liberation activism has recently become intense and disruptive, invading farms, restaurants, and city centers. They’re doing everything from rescuing animals to blocking traffic, and occupying steakhouses. Some argue that these new activists are needlessly victimizing innocent farmers, business owners, and consumers. Others argue that the activists are only doing w... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-May-24thumbnailThe answer is always going to be "it depends"
Cicero reminds us that in virtue ethics the answer to moral questions is always going to depend on circumstances, a striking contrast with modern - and arguably less useful - universalist frameworks like deontology and consequentialism. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-23thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 216 Game of Thrones' Fantasy Politics (Part Two)
Get teased re. Mark and Wes's post-finale, spoiler-filled continuation of the discussion of the show. How does its conclusion affect its overall political message? Does it make sense to be performing feminist critiques on a show based on the premise of people murdering each other for power? To hear the full discussion, become a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter. For more about these options see ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-23thumbnailSpend some time with Zeno and Socrates instead
Want to become a better person? Forget about traveling, since you will bring with you the same problems you are trying to flee. Read a good book instead, enter in conversation with the best minds humanity has produced across time. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-22thumbnailEpisode #131 ... Gramsci - Cultural Hegemony
Today we discuss the work of Antonio Gramsci. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest)
2019-May-22thumbnailThe problem is that you are travelling with your emotions and are followed by your afflictions
Seneca continues his analysis of the relationship between traveling and self-improvement. While there are good reasons to travel (leisure and learning), self-improvement isn't one of them, because that requires critical reflection, wherever one happens to be. Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/message Become a supporter of this podcast: https://... (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-22thumbnail0G58: Runaround and Three Laws of Robotics
Here's my story, it's sad but true, about a bot that I once knew. It took my laws, and then ran around, all the science juice pools in town. This week we're beginning a journey through the robot short stories of Isaac Asimov, beginning with Runaround, the first story where Asimov specifically lays out the three laws of robotics. We discuss the many problems with these laws as well as why they're s... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-May-21thumbnailGame of Thrones: Political Violence
Hello friends, probably my last Game of Thrones episode for a long time! Anyway, in this one, I do a short review of season 8, mainly because I think you need to know where I stand on it. But, the focus on the episode is how this final season concluded a major political theme of the show: political violence. Game of Thrones forces us to ask the political question, what are you willing to support i... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-May-21thumbnailKathleen Stock on What is a Woman?
'What is a woman?' has become a contentious question with practical implications. The philosopher Kathleen Stock gives an account of the category 'woman' and how we should think about it. She gives a different answer to this question which Amia Srinivassan addressed in a previous Philosophy Bites interview on this topic. (@philosophybites)
2019-May-21thumbnailIf you travel in order to escape yourself, don't
As Socrates said to someone who was complaining that traveling brought him no benefits: "It serves you right! You travelled in your own company!" Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/message Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-21thumbnail#053 Losing My Religion With Auguste Comte and AJ Jacobs
In this episode you’ll learn what the French philosopher and eccentric, Auguste Comte can teach us about the relationship between faith, humanity, and humility. You’ll also hear what the bestselling author A.J. Jacobs has learned about gratitude and luck via his many personal quests for knowledge and self-improvement. This episode is part two in a three part series on HUMILITY. #thehappierhour... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-May-20thumbnail#60 - Véliz on How to Improve Online Speech with Pseudonymity
In this episode I talk to Carissa Véliz. Carissa is a Research Fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at the University of Oxford. She works on digital ethics, practical ethics more generally, political philosophy, and public policy. She is also the Director of the research programme 'Data, Privacy, and the Individual' at the IE's Center... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-May-20thumbnailEpisode 216: Game of Thrones' Fantasy Politics
Discussing the TV show (2011-2019) based on the books by George R.R. Martin. What's the role of a mass-consumed fantasy series in today's society? Is it our "fantasy" to have all these horrible things happen to us? Is this an edifying prompt to engage in public moral thinking, or a spectacular distraction of the kind that those Marxist theorists keep warning us about? We get into the function of f... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-20thumbnailEpisode 47: Adam Rutherford on Humans, Animals, and Life in General
Most people in the modern world — and the vast majority of Mindscape listeners, I would imagine — agree that humans are part of the animal kingdom, and that all living animals evolved from a common ancestor. Nevertheless, there are ways in which we are unique; humans are the only animals that stress out over Game of Thrones (as far as I know). I talk with geneticist and science writer Adam Rut... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-20thumbnail47 | Adam Rutherford on Humans, Animals, and Life in General
Most people in the modern world — and the vast majority of Mindscape listeners, I would imagine — agree that humans are part of the animal kingdom, and that all living animals evolved from a common ancestor. Nevertheless, there are ways in which we are unique; humans are the only animals that stress out over Game of Thrones (as far as I know). I talk with geneticist and science writer Adam Rut... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-20thumbnailWe must suffer for the sake of those we love
Seneca dispels the stereotype of Stoics going through life with a stiff upper lip by explicitly advocating suffering for those we love. What marks the Stoic is not that she doesn't suffer, but how she handles suffering. Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/message Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-19thumbnailShorts - E18: Depression
Life may be meaningless, but is it hopeless? This week the Dawdlers do a little Short on depression. Don't?...enjoy this? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-May-19thumbnailHOW TO BE HAPPY With Peter Singer
Why are so many of us unhappy? Peter Singer, ‘The world’s most influential philosopher’ joins the podcast to discuss the link between doing good and being happy, money and happiness, working for a charity, right-wing self-help guru’s, and his advice for living a happy life. For more on effective giving: https://www.thelifeyoucansave.org (@PolPhilPod)
2019-May-19thumbnail009 – Lab Coats
When did scientists start wearing white coats? Why do doctors wear them too? And are they strictly necessary in toothpaste commercials? Elena and Ian don their most fashionable lab jackets to look at the life and times of science's iconic wardrobe. If you liked this episode, subscribing/following means you'll get the next one automatically. We'd love it if you could leave us a review on iTunes too... (@wondercupboard)
2019-May-19thumbnailThe blind spot
Can science potentially reveal everything, giving us a "God's eye view" of the world? Some hope that the answer is (or will one day be) Yes - other more cautious observers wonder if science can ever overcome its blind spot. (@RadioNational)
2019-May-19thumbnailHoP 325 - Platonic Love - Gemistos Plethon
Was Gemistos Plethon, the last great thinker of the Byzantine tradition, a secret pagan or just a Christian with an unusual enthusiasm for Platonism? (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-May-19thumbnailEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part III - The Meaning)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indul... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-May-17thumbnailNEM#98: Phil Judd Entertains Himself
Phil founded New Zealand's Split Enz with Tim Finn in 1972, recorded a seminal punk single with Suburban Reptiles, had an Australian #1 hit with The Swingers, then moved to solo and soundtrack work until 2006, since which he's recorded five thickly textured solo albums including extensive one-man-band work. We discuss the title track from Flightless Bird (2019), "Kite Flying Day" from Play It Stra... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-17thumbnailTheory is fine, but useless if you don't practice
Epictetus complains about something that hasn't changed much in two millennia: people who are happy to discuss the fine logical points of ethical dilemmas, but are apparently not that interested in becoming better human beings. Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/message Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/suppo... (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-16thumbnailRemember what you should offer and what you should withhold
Seneca reminds us how to behave with fellow human beings, but also that, from a Stoic perspective, what is and is not to be valued (one's good and bad judgments) is not quite what most people value, focused as they often are on externals. Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/message Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmedita... (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-15thumbnailShould People Be Punished for Crimes They Can’t Remember Committing?
Analyzing an article by Professor of Philosophy Helen BeeBee, "Should people be punished for crimes they can't remember committing?" We bring in the help of a murderer with dementia on death row, The Hulk, and an uncontrollable drunk. Tune in! An ask from you the audience...please share with your friends! I don't do an interview podcast so relying on organic growth means partially rely on yo... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-May-15thumbnailThe Hulk: Should People Be Punished for Crimes They Can’t Remember Committing?
Analyzing an article by Professor of Philosophy Helen BeeBee, "Should people be punished for crimes they can't remember committing?" We bring in the help of a murderer with dementia on death row, The Hulk, and an uncontrollable drunk. Tune in! An ask from you the audience...please share with your friends! I don't do an interview podcast so relying on organic growth means partially rely on yo... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-May-15thumbnailHumanity is what it is, not what we would like it to be
Seneca reminds us that our fellow human beings aren't always trustworthy or well intentioned. Nevertheless, we have a duty to treat others, and ourselves, with forgiveness, to be helpful when we can, and to endure when we cannot. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-15thumbnail0G57: Orphan Black and Human Cloning
Well friends, I'm gonna level with you. We've been doing a little bit of mad sciencing on the side, and it appears some of the clones got loose and recorded an episode on Orphan Black and the Ethics of Cloning. It's a bit all over the place from what I'm told, but we thought it best to honor their plucky ingenuity and share the results with you, so that you can decide if the world is a better plac... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-May-14thumbnailEpisode 164: Choosing to Believe
David and Tamler argue about William James' classic essay "The Will to Believe." What's more important - avoiding falsehood or discovering truth? When (if ever) is it rational to believe anything without enough evidence? What about beliefs that we can't be agnostic about? Are there hypotheses that we have to believe in order for them to come true? Does James successfully demonstrate that faith can... (@verybadwizards)
2019-May-14thumbnailYour role model may be closer than you think
In which I compare my adoptive grandfather to Cato the Younger. Not because he fought battles against tyrants, but because he was a decent and kind human being. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-14thumbnailEpisode 114: Sally Haslanger discusses ideology
What is the nature of a person's political outlook? (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-May-14thumbnail#052 Speaking Up With Audre Lourde and Serene J Khader
In this episode you’ll learn what the poet and feminist icon Audre Lorde can teach us about identity and the importance of speaking up for the oppressed. You’ll also hear why philosophy professor Dr. Serene J Khader believes we should rethink the way we empower women, and why humility is not one size fits all. This kicks off a three part series on HUMILITY. #thehappierhour Show notes: TheHappi... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-May-13thumbnailEpisode 215: Brave New World: PEL Live 10th Anniversary Show
On Aldous Huxley’s 1932 dystopian novel, recorded at Manhattan's Caveat on 4/6/19, with audience participation. If we harness the power of society to employ available technologies to really focus on making people happy, what would the result be? This is Huxley's thought experiment, but is it in all respects a dystopia, and is it a fair test of the ideal of social improvement or merely of a flawe... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-13thumbnailEpisode 46: Kate Darling on Our Connections with Robots
Most of us have no trouble telling the difference between a robot and a living, feeling organism. Nevertheless, our brains often treat robots as if they were alive. We give them names, imagine that they have emotions and inner mental states, get mad at them when they do the wrong thing or feel bad for them when they seem to be in distress. Kate Darling is a research at the MIT Media Lab who specia... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-13thumbnail46 | Kate Darling on Our Connections with Robots
Most of us have no trouble telling the difference between a robot and a living, feeling organism. Nevertheless, our brains often treat robots as if they were alive. We give them names, imagine that they have emotions and inner mental states, get mad at them when they do the wrong thing or feel bad for them when they seem to be in distress. Kate Darling is a research at the MIT Media Lab who specia... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-13thumbnail413: The Big Bang – Before and After
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/big-bang-before-and-after. The Big Bang theory is the prevailing theory about the “birth” of the universe. It posits a singularity, or super high density state from which the entire universe expanded and continues to expand. But what exactly is the Big Bang, and what’s the evidence that it took place? How do we account for the “Big Bang sta... (@philtalkradio)
2019-May-13thumbnailVirtue is all-or-nothing, and yet, we can make progress
Cicero talks about one of the classic Stoic paradoxes: virtue is all-or-nothing, and yet one can make progress toward it. How is this possible? In this episode we explain, by way of a geometrical analogy. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-13thumbnailE32: Anatol Rapoport's Man-Made Conflicts - General Systems Theory
This week the Dawdler's take a step back from the previous weeks and dig down behind to examine an example of a general conceptual framework for thinking about systems, identity, and conflict - evolution, memes, and perspectivism; while they examine Anatol Rapoport's 1974 book Conflict in Man-Made Environment. (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-May-12thumbnailPOLITICS WITOUT GUARANTEES with Jacob T. Levy
In the second part of my conversation with professor Jacob T. Levy we look at the need people have for guarantees in their political and moral systems; guarantees that their will of the world will both be actualized and be morally correct. We ask what the world looks like in the absence of such certainty. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-May-12thumbnailWhy Isn't Something "Real" Until it is Online?
An epilogue to the episode titled, “Why Isn’t the Internet the ‘Real’ World?” Dylan and Zach consider a phenomena that might be in tension with Zach’s idea that we, in some vague and unarticulated way, take the internet to occupy a lower level of reality. It isn’t the “real world.” The episode is about the sentiment behind the phrase, “pics or it didn’t happen.” What should... (@thevimblog)
2019-May-12thumbnailIrrationality
In 1944, Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer published their famous claim that "Enlightenment reverts to mythology" - meaning that any rational order sooner or later collapses into irrationality. Seven decades later, it seems they were were right on the money. Is human society fated to be irrational? And why is the alt-right having all the crazy fun these days? (@RadioNational)
2019-May-12thumbnailHAP 28 - Chike Jeffers on Precolonial African Philosophy
Co-host Chike Jeffers and Peter chat about the themes and questions raised by the podcast so far. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-May-12thumbnailEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part II - The Plot Continued)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indul... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-May-11thumbnailFor Women Only (pt. 2)
In the 40 years since the events at Olivia Records, gender categorization seems to pop up sporadically in the mainstream press, leading to what sociologist Laurel Westbrook calls "gender panics," and then they disappear only to emerge again at some other time. An analysis of gender panics show that people fear some gender nonconformists but seem perfectly fine with others.  It turns out that ... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-May-10thumbnailAvengers Endgame: Film Analysis, questions, and outcome implications
A little bit less organized in this one friends. Just thought I would get out some thoughts! Anyway, in this episode, I do a quick analysis on Avengers: Endgame and raise some questions I hope the Marvel Universe chooses to get into in their coming films! We will see. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain F... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-May-10thumbnailDo the right thing because it is the right thing to do
Marcus Aurelius argues that when we do something right we shouldn't expect either recognition or a return. Otherwise, we are doing the right thing for the wrong reason. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-10thumbnailJames Doyle, "No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism" (Harvard UP, 2018)
This is the centennial year of the birth of G.E.M. Anscombe, one of the major philosophical figures of the 20th century within the analytic tradition. A close associate of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Anscombe contributed fundamental insights in philosophy of mind, action theory, and ethics. In his new book No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism (Harvard University Press, 2018), James Doyle c... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-May-09thumbnailLet us postpone nothing. Let us balance life’s account every day.
Seneca reminds us that we do not actually know when "the remorseless law of Fate" has fixed the time of our death. Therefore, we should prioritize what's important, postpone nothing, and balance our life’s account every day. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-09thumbnail#59 - Torres on Existential Risk, Omnicidal Agents and Superintelligence
In this episode I talk to Phil Torres. Phil is an author and researcher who primarily focuses on existential risk. He is currently a visiting researcher at the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at Cambridge University. He has published widely on emerging technologies, terrorism, and existential risks, with articles appearing in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Futures, Erkenntnis, Met... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-May-09thumbnailBergson and Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the French philosopher Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and his ideas about human experience of time passing and how that differs from a scientific measurement of time, set out in his thesis on 'Time and Free Will' in 1889. He became famous in France and abroad for decades, rivalled only by Einstein and, in the years after the Dreyfus Affair, was the first ever Jewish mem... (@BBCInOurTime)
2019-May-08thumbnailNo sensation of evil can reach one who is dead
Seneca agrees with Epicurus: there is no sense in fearing what happens after death, since we won't be there to experience it. Therefore, we should not allow religious and political authorities to manipulate us through that fear. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-08thumbnail0G56: Humans and Everyday AI
Hello [primary user] and welcome to the show notes for your brand new copy of our episode about Humans, a British show about how awkward it will be when we're all surrounded by vastly superior, extremely polite robits. We hope you will find this show to be...suitable. If you find it sup bar, and can overcome the British urge to never voice that feeling, do let us know. And of course, if you want t... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-May-08thumbnailJUSTICE IN A FALLEN WORLD With Jacob T. Levy
Can we know the nature of justice before confronting the conditions of injustice? I’m joined by Jacob T Levy to discuss his upcoming work Justice in Babylon, we cover Ideal theory, Rawls, the nature of politics and the nature of the human condition. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-May-07thumbnailEpisode 64 - Matt Brown
On Episode 64, Nick chats with Dr. Matt Brown, Associate Professor of Philosophy and History of Ideas, and Director of the Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology at University of Texas at Dallas, about the ways in which science is a value-laden enterprise, the impact of the value-ladenness of science on our conception of the role of science in policy, and the parallels between scie... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-May-07thumbnail#051 Design Q&A: Designing Our Dreams With Derrida and Kant
In this episode you’ll hear the audience Q&A from the live Happier Hour event with Debbie Millman (design expert and host of Design Matters), Dr. Kathleen Wallace (professor of Philosophy at Hofstra University), and host Monica McCarthy. You’ll learn how Immanuel Kant and Jacques Derrida can help us design our personal brand online and in interviews, and how we can better achieve our dream... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-May-07thumbnailNot feeling pain would make us inhuman, not sages
Seneca talks to his friend Lucilius about how to console the bereaved, dispelling the stereotype of Stoics as individuals who go through life with a stiff upper lip. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-06thumbnailUnderstanding Free Speech and the Privilege of having an Audience
The recent news story about Facebook banning people such as Alex Jones and Laura Loomer had my mind working about a topic I don't like talking about—free speech. As in it's talked about so often that it becomes tiring. So I decided to contradict myself in this one and do it anyway. In this one, I discuss free speech, John Stuart Mill "On Liberty" and understanding the distinction between free sp... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-May-06thumbnail480: What Is Religious Belief?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-religious-belief. Many people profess to believe in an all-powerful, all-knowing, benevolent God. Yet psychological data shows that people often think and reason about God in ways contrary to their professed religious beliefs. So, are these so-called religious beliefs genuinely held? Or are “believers” just playing an elaborate game of pre... (@philtalkradio)
2019-May-06thumbnailEpisode 45: Leonard Susskind on Quantum Information, Quantum Gravity, and Holography
For decades now physicists have been struggling to reconcile two great ideas from a century ago: general relativity and quantum mechanics. We don’t yet know the final answer, but the journey has taken us to some amazing places. A leader in this quest has been Leonard Susskind, who has helped illuminate some of the most mind-blowing ideas in quantum gravity: the holographic principle, the string ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-06thumbnail45 | Leonard Susskind on Quantum Information, Quantum Gravity, and Holography
For decades now physicists have been struggling to reconcile two great ideas from a century ago: general relativity and quantum mechanics. We don’t yet know the final answer, but the journey has taken us to some amazing places. A leader in this quest has been Leonard Susskind, who has helped illuminate some of the most mind-blowing ideas in quantum gravity: the holographic principle, the string ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-May-06thumbnailEpisode 214: More Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part Two)
Concluding Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1885). What's the wise way to live? We start in earnest into part three, treating the "spirit of gravity" where socially-imposed values cover over your uniqueness, omni-satisfaction vs. being choosy, "Old and New Tablets" where Nietzsche explores various ethical and meta-ethical issues (e.g. is self-overcoming a matter of one-time self-act... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-06thumbnailE31: The Helm of the Mutineers - On Sociopolitical Revolutions
E31: The Helm of the Mutineers – On Sociopolitical Revolutions There’s a poem by Portia Nelson called “There’s a hole in my sidewalk”. In it, she keeps going down the street, falls in the hole in the sidewalk, and struggles to get out. The poem is about repeating patterns that ultimately hurt you. The punchline? Walk down another street. In this episode, we Dawds discuss sociopolitic... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-May-06thumbnailEV - 090 The Void Report
Aaron gives us an update on his court case, we discuss the Muller Report, and then give our take on the people running for the Democratic Presidential bid.Open Invocation:Walt WhitmanMaking The Void Livable:Mortal Kombat 11  (@ETVPod)
2019-May-05thumbnailETV - 089 Better Know Frances Kamm
For this installment of Better Know a Philosopher, we're talking about Frances Kamm. Aaron has had to pleasure to work with her recently, so he has first hand knowledge on how awesome she is. Making the Void Livable:https://direkris.itch.io/you-are-jeff-bezos (@ETVPod)
2019-May-05thumbnailMugged by reality
Reality TV draws increasing concern from observers who fear that cast, producers and audiences alike could be participating in something morally reprehensible - and that serious consequences for society lie ahead. (@RadioNational)
2019-May-05thumbnailHoP 324 - United We Fall - Latin Philosophy in Byzantium
Thomas Aquinas finds avid readers among Byzantines at the twilight of empire, and is used by both sides of the Hesychast controversy. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-May-05thumbnailEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part II - The Plot)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indul... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-May-03thumbnailChallenge your impressions, don't "just do it"
Epictetus tells us about a fundamental Stoic technique: never act on first impressions and implied judgments. Always pause, challenge your impressions, make the judgments explicit, and see whether they were on target or not. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-03thumbnailNEM#97: Taking Danny Seraphine Back to Chicago
Danny drummed with Chicago from its founding in 1967 through 1990 and wrote several songs for the band during the mid-late 70s, often with David "Hawk" Wolinski. We discuss "Little One" (and our intro music, "Take Me Back to Chicago") from Chicago XI (1977), "Street Player" from Chicago 13 (1979), and "Devil's Sweet" from Chicago VII (1974). End song: "The Real World" by California Transit Authori... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-May-02thumbnailThe view from above, Seneca style
Here is Seneca's version of an exercise most often associated with Marcus Aurelius: when you feel overwhelmed by your problems, take a minute to consider a broader perspective. When your mind is calmer, come back to earth and tackle the problems. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-01thumbnailEpisode 163: Should I Stay or Should I Go? (Ursula K. Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas")
David and Tamler are pulled into Ursula K. Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas." Omelas is a truly happy city, except for one child who lives in abominable misery. Is that too high a moral cost? Why do some people walk away from the city? Why does no one help the child? Why does Le Guin make us create the city with her? Plus, we talk about our listener meetup in Vancouver, and a new edit... (@verybadwizards)
2019-May-01thumbnailWhat ought to be done must be learned from one who does it
Seneca suggests we pick a role model to help us become better persons. This ancient practice actually gets some empirical confirmation from modern psychology. So, who's your model, and why? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-May-01thumbnailMollie Gerver, "The Ethics and Practice of Refugee Repatriation" (U Edinburgh Press, 2018)
Moral and political theorists have paid a healthy amount of attention to states’ rights to determine who may reside within their territory.  Accordingly, there’s a large literature on immigration, borders, asylum, and refugees.  However, relatively little work has been done on questions concerning how refugees are treated once they have gained access to a new country; and from these ... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-May-01thumbnail0G55: Cube and Kafkaesque
"Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a pool cleaning robot, or whether I am now a pool cleaning robot, dreaming I am a man." -RoboZhuangzi This week we're discussing the Canadian Classic, Cube! This movie really exemplifies the concept of "kafkaesque", and we're joined by the amazing Cecil of Cognitive dissonance to unpack this tricky concept. We also dive into the idea of so... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-May-01thumbnailBen Shapiro is on the Wrong Side of History - Prager U Response
So Ben Shapiro did one of his Prager U video based on his book. The video happens to cover more of the history side of things(which I missed in my review episode), so I thought it would be some fun new content to include. Plus, you receive his actual wording and voice to connect with my responses! As always, thanks for listening. Ben's Prager Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVD0xik-_FM&a... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Apr-30thumbnailPlants
Karine Bonneval/ Paco Calvo/ Tom Greaves Listen here or on YouTube Philosophers have long assumed that plants are inferior to humans and animals: static, inert, and unreflective. But recent... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Apr-30thumbnailIf someone can withstand fire or exile, surely you can overcome something...
Seneca lists an impressive gallery of ancient Roman role models, who have done brave things to safeguard their ideals. Surely, then, we can find the courage to overcome our comparatively small problems in everyday life, no? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-30thumbnail#050 Moral By Design With Immanuel Kant and Kathleen Wallace
Is it possible to design a universal moral code? Is it ever acceptable to lie? Hear what the philosopher Immanuel Kant had to say about ethics and his influence in philosophy today. You’ll hear from Hofstra philosophy professor Kathleen A Wallace about Kant’s Categorical Imperative, and whether or not it can help life suck less. #thehappierhour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHa... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Apr-30thumbnailEpisode #130 ... Dewey and Lippman on Democracy
Today we talk about a famous debate from the early 20th century. (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Apr-29thumbnail479: Is Philanthropy Bad for Democracy?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philanthropy-bad-democracy. In a liberal democracy, individuals should have the freedom to give money to charities of their choice. But there’s a difference between charitable giving from ordinary individuals and philanthropic giving from extremely wealthy individuals. Whose interests are served when the wealthy give? Should the state continue to... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Apr-29thumbnailEpisode 214: More Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part One)
On the remainder of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1885). How can we keep our spirits up and avoid nihilism? We consider Nietzsche's "solution" of eternal recurrence, why he uses a poetic, allegoric style, and more. Don't wait for part 2. Get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsor: Get $10 off a Skylight Frame in time for Mother's Day at skylightframe.c... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-29thumbnailEpisode 63 - Hannah Rubin
On Episode 63, Nick chats with Dr. Hannah Rubin, Assistant Professor at Notre Dame University about her growing research on the evolution of cooperative and altruistic behavior, genetics in evolutionary game theory, experimental economics in philosophy, and her experience serving as Managing Editor for the journal, Philosophy of Science. (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Apr-29thumbnailEpisode 44: Antonio Damasio on Feelings, Thoughts, and the Evolution of Humanity
When we talk about the mind, we are constantly talking about consciousness and cognition. Antonio Damasio wants us to talk about our feelings. But it’s not in an effort to be more touchy-feely; Damasio, one of the world’s leading neuroscientists, believes that feelings generated by the body are a crucial part of how we achieve and maintain homeostasis, which in turn is a key driver in unders... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-29thumbnail44 | Antonio Damasio on Feelings, Thoughts, and the Evolution of Humanity
When we talk about the mind, we are constantly talking about consciousness and cognition. Antonio Damasio wants us to talk about our feelings. But it’s not in an effort to be more touchy-feely; Damasio, one of the world’s leading neuroscientists, believes that feelings generated by the body are a crucial part of how we achieve and maintain homeostasis, which in turn is a key driver in understa... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-29thumbnailDon't suffer before it is necessary
Seneca reminds us that the future is not under our control, and that the best way to prepare for it is to act here and now, where we actually have causal efficacy. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-29thumbnailPhilosophy and the Mueller Report
The Mueller report—along with Attorney General William’s Barr’s accompanying antics—have come. They have also largely gone from the news cycle. But that is a shame. There is a lot to digest and think about. Like good philosophers, Dylan, Zach, Ishan, and Gabe gather to discuss many of the issues that the massive Mueller Report poses. - What should we take from it? - What is up wit... (@thevimblog)
2019-Apr-28thumbnailWHAT IS IDEOLOGY? With Matto Mildenberger And Jonathan Leader Maynard
What is an ideology? What do intellectuals studying it in opinion polls, contemporary debates, and historical texts understand it to mean? I’m joined by the authors of a recent survey of the study of ideology in different disciplines, Matto Mildenberger and Jonathan Leader Maynard, to help make sense of it all. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Apr-28thumbnailE30: The Imbalance of the Century - Zizek v. Peterson
Who's interested in current events!? This week, the Dawdlers talk about the Slavoj Zizek/Jordan B. Peterson "debate": Happiness: Capitalism vs. Marxism. ...and there's not much else to say! So, declaw your lobsters and have a listen! (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Apr-28thumbnailGuilty
Resentment, blame and guilt are generally placed on the negative side of the ledger of human emotions. Nobody particularly enjoys the way they feel. But they are morally important all the same, both in the public sphere and in the realm of interpersonal relationships. (@RadioNational)
2019-Apr-28thumbnailHAP 27 - Beyond the Reaction - The Continuing Relevance of Precolonial Traditions
As the twentieth century draws to a close, the critique of ethnophilosophy gives way to approaches that continue to privilege the study of precolonial traditions. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-28thumbnailEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part I - Introduction)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indul... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Apr-27thumbnailFor Women Only
It is currently very difficult to get your gender legally changed in the U.K, That might change. In recent months, philosophers have been drafted into making complicated and contentious arguments about what it is to be a man, woman, or any other gender in the service of advancing or blocking the movement for trans-rights and recognition. In particular, it has exposed a conflict between trans-right... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Apr-27thumbnailFor Women Only (pt. 1)
It is currently very difficult to get your gender legally changed in the U.K, That might change. In recent months, philosophers have been drafted into making complicated and contentious arguments about what it is to be a man, woman, or any other gender in the service of advancing or blocking the movement for trans-rights and recognition. In particular, it has exposed a conflict between trans-right... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Apr-26thumbnailThe skill of the pilot is independent of the value of the cargo
Cicero uses a metaphor involving ship pilots and their cargo to remind us that a more or less valuable "cargo" doesn't make us better or worse "pilots." It is our skills, that is our virtue, that make the difference. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-26thumbnail#58 - Neely on Augmented Reality, Ethics and Property Rights
In this episode I talk to Erica Neely. Erica is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Ohio Northern University specializing in philosophy of technology and computer ethics. Her work focuses is on the ethical ramifications of emerging technologies. She has written a number of papers on 3D printing, the ethics of video games, robotics and augmented reality. We chat about the ethics of augmented re... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Apr-25thumbnailThe universe is morally neutral
Seneca, differing from Epictetus in a metaphysical sense, says that the universe is - as we would put it - morally neutral to us. What matters, then, is how we handle so-called "good" and "bad" things. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-24thumbnailEp85 - God Is a Question
In episode 84 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. William Irwin today about his most recent book, God Is a Question, Not an Answer published in December 2018 with Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. Dr. Irwin is Herve A. LeBlanc Distinguished Service Professor and Chair of Philosophy at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. He is also the author o... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Apr-24thumbnailA long life is like a long journey: there is bound to be rain and mud on the way
Seneca uses a colorful analogy between life and a journey. Sure, we'd like to live longer, but when the journey is longer a number of unpleasant things are bound to happen, like rain and mud. Just bring good gear with you for the trip. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-24thumbnail0G54: The Fifth Element and Manacheanism
Well, it looks like we're taking another beloved classic and ruining it with our patented ruining sauce. I'm not sure if that makes us team good or team evil, or maybe it proves that those things make no sense, like this movie. Of course we save most of the darkness for after dark and focus on a debate over the nature of evil between Manachean dualism and St. Augustine's "absence of good" model of... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-24thumbnailDennis Prager(Prager U) Thinks You Can't Justify Not Murdering Without God
I tackle a new podcast episode format in this one, taking on some Prager U content! I guess Dennis Prager thinks you can't justify not murdering without God. In that case, I hope he continues believing in God for our safety. Anyway, I deconstruct his arguments for objective morality based on God. I also address his misunderstanding of the English language. Prager U video: https://www.youtube.co... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Apr-23thumbnailWant to be alive? Pay the taxes of life
Seneca uses an interesting economic analogy to remind us that the privilege of being alive comes with the tax of suffering setbacks and losses. Understanding this helps us to cope with problems and even to look forward to them as further exercises in virtue. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-23thumbnail#049 Designing Your Life With Debbie Millan and Jacques Derrida
In this episode you’ll hear how designing our lives can help us be happier. You’ll learn what the award winning design expert and podcast host Debbie Millman has to say about pursuing success and fame, and what the philosopher Jacques Derrida can teach us about meaning and giving voice to the voiceless. #thehappierhour Shownotes: thehappierhour.org Facebook: facebook.com/thehappierhour Instagr... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Apr-23thumbnail#049 Designing Your Life With Debbie Millman and Jacques Derrida
In this episode you’ll hear how designing our lives can help us be happier. You’ll learn what the award winning design expert and podcast host Debbie Millman has to say about pursuing success and fame, and what the philosopher Jacques Derrida can teach us about meaning and giving voice to the voiceless. #thehappierhour Shownotes: thehappierhour.org Facebook: facebook.com/thehappierhour Instagr... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Apr-22thumbnailGlimpse: Nietzsche's Last Man (for Partially Examined Life #213)
Is technology making us complacent? Are we in danger of becoming Nietzsche's famed "last men" who are no longer capable of creativity and independent thought? Mark Linsenmayer from the Partially Examined Life philosophy podcast lays out Nietzsche's idea and argues that on the contrary, having our basic needs met by technology can free us up to pursue the creative endeavors that Nietzsche saw as th... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-22thumbnailEpisode 43: Matthew Luczy on the Pleasures of Wine
Some people never drink wine; for others, it’s an indispensable part of an enjoyable meal. Whatever your personal feelings might be, wine seems to exhibit a degree of complexity and nuance that can be intimidating to the non-expert. Where does that complexity come from, and how can we best approach wine? To answer these questions, we talk to Matthew Luczy, sommelier and wine director at Mélisse... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-22thumbnail43 | Matthew Luczy on the Pleasures of Wine
Some people never drink wine; for others, it’s an indispensable part of an enjoyable meal. Whatever your personal feelings might be, wine seems to exhibit a degree of complexity and nuance that can be intimidating to the non-expert. Where does that complexity come from, and how can we best approach wine? To answer these questions, we talk to Matthew Luczy, sommelier and wine director at Mélisse... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-22thumbnail478: Authority and Resistance
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/authority-and-resistance. Authority can refer to people or institutions that have the political power to make decisions, give orders, and enforce rules. It can also refer to a certain kind of expertise or knowledge that we might defer to. Sometimes we respect authority, and sometimes we resist it or even revolt against it. But where exactly does au... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Apr-22thumbnailEpisode 213: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part Two)
Continuing on Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, books 1 and 2 (1883). We talk through Nietzsche's symbolism (tightrope walkers and gravediggers and snakes, oh my!), the path toward the overman, his screed against the state, the Will to Power as the will to overcome oneself by reconciling oneself with the past, and more. Listen to part one first or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edit... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-22thumbnailExpand your circles of concern
Seneca says that it is natural for us to be virtuous. Modern scientists say that it is natural for us to be prosocial. Either way, it is reason that allows us to expand our instinctive circles of ethical concern. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-22thumbnailWhy Isn't the Internet the "Real" World?
We often talk about a distinction between the online world and the “real” world? We say text or email conversations aren’t real conversations. We say we want to meet people IRL—in real life. What does this distinction mean? And is there such a distinction? In this episode, Dylan and Zach attempt to answer these questions. Zach puts forward two claims: 1) we don’t really know what w... (@thevimblog)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailIDEOLOGY & BREXIT A conversation with Helen Thompson
IDEOLOGY & BREXIT A conversation with Helen Thompson by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailPREVIEW-(sub)Text#6: Melanie Klein's "Notes on Some Schizoid Mechanisms"
Wes Alwan is joined by Dr. Glenn Mobray to discuss this classic 1946 psychoanalytic text. This is a preview of a 63-minute discussion. You can listen to the whole thing by becoming a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. Listen to more (sub)Text. (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailEV - 088 Puppetry in the Void
Today we're welcoming Cam Garrity, a puppeteer, podcaster, graphic artist, and so much more. We discuss the beauty of puppetry, while Cam gives us some insights into why it's such a wonderful medium.Opening Invocation:Kafka's "A Little Fable"  (@ETVPod)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailPolitics and the sacred
According to Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, modern secular politics is theological from the ground up – which may come as a nasty surprise to the many people who believe, often for very good reasons, that religion and politics should be kept as far from each other as possible. (@RadioNational)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailHoP 323 - Through His Works You Shall Know Him - Palamas and Hesychasm
Gregory Palamas and the controversy over his teaching that we can go beyond human reason by grasping God through his activities or “energies”. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-21thumbnailEpisode 59, God and Suffering: Live in Liverpool
Believe it or not, humans have been debating questions concerning God for as long as couples have been discussing what they fancy for dinner. Does God exist? Is God all-power, all-knowing and all-loving? Shall we try that new Mexican restaurant on Bold Street? In this episode, we’re going to be discussing the existence of God in relation to the problem of evil, more specifically, on what has com... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Apr-20thumbnailUnderstanding Hume on Miracles (Audio Essay)
This audio essay is an Easter special. It focuses on David Hume's famous argument about miracles. First written over 250 years, Hume's essay 'Of Miracles' purports to provide an "everlasting check" against all kinds of "superstitious delusion". But is this true? Does Hume give us good reason to reject the testimonial proof provided on behalf of historical miracles? Maybe not, but he certainly prov... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Apr-19thumbnailNEM#96: Andrew McMahon Throws in All His Favorite Things
Andrew has put out nine albums and a few EPs under of piano-and-vocal-based pop using various band names since he was in high school in the late 90s. We discuss two of his Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness tracks: "Blue Vacation" from Upside Down Flowers (2018) and "Synesthesia" from The Pop Underground EP, then "Me and the Moon" by Something Corporate from North (2003), and conclude by listening t... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-19thumbnailIt's far easier to change yourself than others
Marcus Aurelius reminds us that we spend far too much time trying to change other people, which is outside of our control, and too little time attempting to improve ourselves, which we certainly have the power to do. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-19thumbnailJill Stauffer, "Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard (Columbia UP, 2015)
In Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard (Columbia University Press 2015, paperback 2018), Jill Stauffer argues that survivors of unjust treatment and dehumanization can experience further harm when individuals and institutions will not or cannot hear the survivors’ claims about what they suffered and what they are owed for having suffered. She calls this further harm “ethical l... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Apr-19thumbnailJill Stauffer, "Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard" (Columbia UP, 2015)
In Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard (Columbia University Press 2015, paperback 2018), Jill Stauffer argues that survivors of unjust treatment and dehumanization can experience further harm when individuals and institutions will not or cannot hear the survivors’ claims about what they suffered and what they are owed for having suffered. She calls this further harm “ethical l... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Apr-18thumbnailThe problem with expensive meals
Seneca echoes the advice of Musonius Rufus when he says that we don't need to pay for extravagant meals with ingredients brought from all over the world. Every time we sit at the table to eat we have a chance to exercise temperance. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-18thumbnail#048 Doubt Q&A: On Skepticism, Cynicism, and Optimism
In this episode you’ll hear how a 14th century Franciscan friar can teach us to make better choices, and what cynicism, skepticism, and optimism have in common with science, Socrates, and musical theater. This is the audience Q&A portion of the event on DOUBT featuring philosophy professor Nick Pappas and molecular biologist turned science advocate, Maryam Zaringhalam. #TheHappierHour Showno... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Apr-17thumbnailWe should prosecute our politicians and generals
Continuing his criticism of the state's war machine, Seneca exhorts us to prosecute our politicians and generals for the crimes they commit in our own name. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-17thumbnail0G53: Zima Blue and Projects of Worth
Welcome to the beginning of our show's blue period. Until I decide otherwise we'll only be doing sci-fi that's blue themed. Waterworld. The Shape of Water. Mr. MeSeeks. Yellow Submarine. Don't worry, there will be some deeper meaning to it all that you'll probably fail to grasp but will pretend you understand at parties. Okay, enough meta, we're doing the Zima Blue episode from the Netflix series ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-17thumbnailPHILOSOPHY & HARRY POTTER A Conversation With Brenden Weber
I’m joined by Brenden Weber, host of the Philosophy Guy podcast. We chat about the current state of public philosophy from the podcasting community to the intellectual dark web. We then go into depth on his analysis of the moral philosophy of Harry Potter: Is death part of life - and accepting it a part of a moral life – or is it a problem to be solved? You can check out his podcast at... (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Apr-16thumbnailGame of Thrones: Death and Morality
ohhh trying to feed off some of that Game of Thrones final season hype. I discuss the meaning of death and the use of death in Game of Thrones. Tune in! Embrace the Void: https://voidpod.com/podcasts Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKl... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Apr-16thumbnailEpisode 162: Parents Just Don't Understand (with Paul Bloom)
As parents we like to think we have an impact on our children - their future, their happiness, the kinds of people they turn out to be. But are we deluded? Dave and Tamler are joined by empathy's kryponite, the great Paul Bloom, to talk about Judith Rich Harris's view that parents matter a lot less than you might think (while genes and peer groups matter a lot more than you might think) . Plus... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Apr-16thumbnailSeneca on war as human folly
Seneca writes words about the foolishness of war that were surprisingly modern for his time, and unfortunately very much still pertinent to us today. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-15thumbnailA surprisingly difficult simple precept
Seneca tells us something that may appear to be a no-brainer, and yet is difficult to apply: never believe that you can be happy through the unhappiness of another. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-15thumbnailEpisode 213: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part One)
On Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, books 1 and 2 (1883). What is wisdom? In this text whose style parodies the Bible, we get pithy advice and allegorical imagery to guide us away from self-defeating, life-denying attitudes and orient us towards creative self-overcoming (i.e. exertion of the Will to Power). The Last Man who no longer knows how to give birth to a dancing star is a ro... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-15thumbnail477: Hacking the Brain – Beyond the Five Senses
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/hacking-brain. Humans evolved to have a variety of senses—smell, sight, touch, etc.—that provide information about the world around us. Our brains use this sensory information to construct a particular picture of reality. But what if it were technologically possible to hack our brains and create new senses for humans, such as echolocation or ma... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Apr-15thumbnailEpisode 42: Natalya Bailey on Navigating Earth Orbit and Beyond
The space age officially began in 1957 with the launch of the Sputnik 1 satellite. But recent years have seen the beginning of a boom in the number of objects orbiting Earth, as satellite tracking and communications have assumed enormous importance in the modern world. This raises obvious concerns for the control and eventual fate of these orbiting artifacts. Natalya Bailey is pioneering a novel a... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-15thumbnail42 | Natalya Bailey on Navigating Earth Orbit and Beyond
The space age officially began in 1957 with the launch of the Sputnik 1 satellite. But recent years have seen the beginning of a boom in the number of objects orbiting Earth, as satellite tracking and communications have assumed enormous importance in the modern world. This raises obvious concerns for the control and eventual fate of these orbiting artifacts. Natalya Bailey is pioneering a novel a... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-15thumbnailShorts - E17: Life is Meaningless
Do you laugh in the face of the abyss? Or do you sob uncontrollably? Either way, it doesn't matter you tiny speck of nothing! In this Short, the Dawdlers use Thomas Nagel's 1971 paper "The Absurd" as a guide for a discussion of the meaning of life (or something like that). Enjoy the discussion or cry yourself to sleep while listening. It doesn't matter. Nothing does!! -Ye olde Dawdlers (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Apr-14thumbnailNutting it out
How are your critical thinking skills? Fine, you say. Everybody sees themselves as a competent critical thinker. But when you break critical thinking down to its component skills, it turns out to be more complicated and difficult than you might expect. (@RadioNational)
2019-Apr-14thumbnailHAP 26 - Kai Kresse on the Anthropology of Philosophy
An interview with Kai Kresse who discusses his efforts to do "anthropology of philosophy" on the Swahili Coast. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-14thumbnailEpisode 58, ‘The Idealism and Pantheism of May Sinclair’ with Emily Thomas (Part II)
Emily Thomas is an Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Durham University; whose work focuses primarily on the history of metaphysics and the metaphysics of space and time. Thomas’ work in these areas has had a great impact, most notably, through her 2018 books Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics and Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. In this episode, we’ll be discussing E... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Apr-13thumbnailDemons of Democracy
Preschool kids get their first taste of democratic participation when they vote on their class name, and democratic private schools try to display the value of democracy by making kids vote on everything, even the school budget. Does it work or do kids make terrible decisions? One diagnosis of our modern-day political problems is that too many stupid people are voting for stupid things. There are ... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Apr-12thumbnailHappiness is an inside job
Cicero reminds us that happiness - meaning our satisfaction with our own life - is guaranteed if we don't hitch it to external events, but only to our own reasoned judgments. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-11thumbnailThe proximity of good people is good for you
Seneca reminds us that it is important to associate with good people. Their goodness is both an inspiration and a guide to make ourselves better human beings. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-11thumbnailEV - 087 35mm of Void
Our guest this week is Brenden Webber of the Philosophy Guy Podcast. We each list our top 3 voidy films and discuss their merits that make them void worthy.Opening Invocation:Kafka's "A Little Fable"Making The Void Livable:The high school that put on a theatrical production of Alien. (@ETVPod)
2019-Apr-10thumbnail#57 - Sorgner on Nietzschean Transhumanism
In this episode I talk Stefan Lorenz Sorgner. Stefan teaches philosophy at John Cabot University in Rome. He is director and co-founder of the Beyond Humanism Network, Fellow at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies (IEET), Research Fellow at the Ewha Institute for the Humanities at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, and Visting Fellow at the Ethics Centre of the Friedrich-Schiller-Univ... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Apr-10thumbnailRepetition is useful
Seneca says that we should remind ourselves of things we know, because all too often we don't pay attention to them. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-10thumbnailT. J. Kasperbauer, "Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes Towards Animals" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Non-human animals are companions, research subjects, creatures we fear, creatures we eat. Why do we put other animals in the various categories we do, and treat them in the various good and bad ways that we do? These are questions about human attitudes towards other animals, and the moral implications of those attitudes. In Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes Towards Animals (Oxford ... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Apr-10thumbnail0G52: Infinity Wars and Overpopulation
Lemme just get my witty banter beard on: Hey kids, do you like violence? Want to see Murtle the turtle stick needles in Dr. Strange's eyelids? Sorry, not current enough pop culture reference? How bout this? What's big, purple, has a jewelry fetish, and makes some really sound points about overpopulation? That's right! A Kardashian Oompa loompa. Too many references mashed together? Okay, how bou... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-09thumbnailApproach your life all things considered
Modern Stoic Larry Becker, building on Seneca, advises us to approach the problems we encounter not one at a time, but within the context of our life treated as a whole dynamic project. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-08thumbnailEpisode 212: Sartre on Literature (Part Two)
Continuing on What is Literature? (1948). Sartre gives a phenomenology of reading and writing that makes reading into a creative act of completing the writer's work, and calls this cooperation ethical: the work is an appeal to the reader's freedom, and also the reader's responsibility to then know what the work reveals. Are you shirking, all you skimmers? Start with part one, or get the unbroken, ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-08thumbnailEpisode 41: Steven Strogatz on Synchronization, Networks, and the Emergence of Complex Behavior
One of the most important insights in the history of science is the fact that complex behavior can arise from the undirected movements of small, simple systems. Despite the fact that we know this, we’re still working to truly understand it — to uncover the mechanisms by which, and conditions under which, complexity can emerge from simplicity. (Coincidentally, a new feature in Quanta on this p... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-08thumbnail41 | Steven Strogatz on Synchronization, Networks, and the Emergence of Complex Behavior
One of the most important insights in the history of science is the fact that complex behavior can arise from the undirected movements of small, simple systems. Despite the fact that we know this, we’re still working to truly understand it — to uncover the mechanisms by which, and conditions under which, complexity can emerge from simplicity. (Coincidentally, a new feature in Quanta on this p... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-08thumbnailEpisode 62 - Denny Borsboom
On Episode 62, Nick chats with Dr. Denny Borsboom, Professor of Psychology and program leader of the Psychological Methods Group at the University of Amsterdam, about how he applies philosophy of science to to his research in psychological methods, conceptual issues in contemporary psychometrics, and his influential work on network approaches to psychopathology. (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Apr-08thumbnailEpisode 113: Tom Pashby discusses quantum mechanics
In this episode, Tom Pashby explains how quantum physics is different from theories that came before, and runs through some of the ways that philosophers and physicists have tried to make intuitive sense of this challenging framework. (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-Apr-08thumbnailSeneca agrees with Ricky Gervais on the afterlife and the meaning of existence
Seneca points out that it doesn't matter if there is no continuation of life after death. Just like British comedian Ricky Gervais did recently in his series, aptly entitled "After Life." Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailFuturism, Fascism, & Other Audience Questions.
I take questions from Facebook and twitter on Ancient Stoic Philosophers, J S Mill, randomization in democracy, ethical consumerism, futuristic concerns about body modification and if fascism is left wing or right wing. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailShorts - E16: The Good Life
One way or many ways or any ways... Is there a recipe to live The Good Life? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailArtificial intelligence, real emotions
Artificial intelligence is pretty impressive these days. An AI robot can interact with humans in ways that give a strong impression of empathy, intellectual engagement and independent thought. A robot can smile, frown and respond to emotional cues offered by human faces and voices. But can it experience real emotions of its own? (@RadioNational)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailHoP 322 - Do the Math - Science in the Palaiologan Renaissance
Mathematics and the sciences in Byzantium, focusing on scholars of the Palaiologan period like Blemmydes and Metochites. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailEpisode 58, ‘The Idealism and Pantheism of May Sinclair’ with Emily Thomas (Part I)
Emily Thomas is an Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Durham University; whose work focuses primarily on the history of metaphysics and the metaphysics of space and time. Thomas’ work in these areas has had a great impact, most notably, through her 2018 books Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics and Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. In this episode, we’ll be discussing E... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Apr-07thumbnailBen Shapiro's "The Right Side of History": Analyzed
Sooo I read Ben Shapiro's new book, The Right Side of History, friends! Well, now let me provide my analysis of his philosophical arguments. Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/store... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Apr-05thumbnailEV - 086 Buckle Up, We're Talking Politics
This week we're joined by Toby Buckle of the Political Philosophy Podcast. We discuss the role of language in political debate. Special thanks to Toby for supplying us with his backup audio and special thanks to Brian Ziegenhagen for editing the show.Opening Invocation:Jake the Fake JakePolitical Philosophy Podcast: https://www.politicalphilosophypodcast.com/ (@ETVPod)
2019-Apr-05thumbnailCut off anger at its inception
Epictetus treats anger as an addiction: we should suppress the urge as soon as we begin to feel it, and celebrate the days we have managed to stay away from this temporary madness. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-05thumbnailNEM#95: R. Stevie Moore Just Happens... Frequently!
Stevie has been recording pop tunes and/or wild experiments nearly continually since the late 60s, with hundreds of albums, many of them compilations of home recordings. We discuss "Pop Music" and "Take Back" from Afterlife (2019) and "The House Is Not in Order" by R. Stevie Moore and Alan Jenkins and the Kettering Vampires from The Embodiment of Progressive Ideals (2018) and conclude by listening... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-04thumbnailHow long you live is not up to you, how you live is
Seneca uses the dichotomy of control to get us to move away from our obsession with living longer, and toward paying attention to living better. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-03thumbnailMarcus Regulus and the hard core of Stoicism
A good Stoic can be "happy" even on the rack. This phrase happened to be true in the case of the Roman general Marcus Regulus. And his story is worth pondering to see that we can be helpful and find meaning in so many small ways. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-03thumbnail0G51: The Ricklantis Mixup and Artistic Improvement
After a trilogy like this, what is left to be said? All the references have been made. All the Chidi'ing about better and worse art. And lets all be honest, after pouring our hearts into these episodes, we all know the buzz will be 95% about what we're doing next week, so go ahead and scroll on down. You've earned it. Tradition and the Individual talent: https://www.bartleby.com/200/sw4.html Supp... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Apr-02thumbnailEpisode 161: Reach-Around Knowledge and Bottom Performers (The Dunning-Kruger Effect)
The less we know, the more we know it. David and Tamler talk about the notorious Dunning-Kruger effect, which makes us overconfident in beliefs on topics we're ignorant about and under-confident when we're experts. Plus, we break down an evolutionary psychology article on why poor men and hungry men prefer women with big breasts. Trust us, it's a really bad study. We're sure about it. (@verybadwizards)
2019-Apr-02thumbnailJordan Peele's 'Us': Philosophy, Symbolism, and Self-Examination
Jordan Peele has done it again in this one. The creator of Get Out has made a great film full of deeper meanings and thoughtful symbolism. I take a look at his recent film 'Us' that has been all the rage. How does the film force us to examine not only ourselves but society itself? Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: http... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Apr-02thumbnailVirtue is like the sun behind a cloud
Seneca says that when negative developments affect our lives, virtue is like the sun behind a cloud: it keeps shining, and eventually dissipates the clouds. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-02thumbnailLIBERTARIANISM 4 The Nature Of Change
In the finale I continue the story of liberalism vs libertarianism into the middle of the twentieth century. We explore the Keynes vs Hayek debate, the formulation of the modern welfare state and the 1945 general election. The finale also covers the different battlegrounds of ideological competition and ends by arguing for a particular understanding of what political change is and how it is poss... (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Apr-01thumbnailEpisode 212: Sartre on Literature (Part One)
On Jean-Paul Sartre's What is Literature (1948), ch. 1 and 2. What's the purpose of literature? Why write prose as opposed to poetry? Sartre argues that while poetry is about the words themselves, prose is about the ideas, so it's necessarily political. A written work is essentially an ethical appeal for a reader to apply his or her own faculties and experiences to complete the work through the ac... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Apr-01thumbnail409: Radical Democracy
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/radical-democracy. Liberal democracy has its problems, including the fact that in trying to build consensus, it often ends up oppressing minorities or those who dissent. Radical democracy, on the other hand, tries to build consensus around difference, and challenge oppressive power relationships. But what are the risks of radical democracy? Is it r... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Apr-01thumbnailEpisode 40: Adrienne Mayor on Gods and Robots in Ancient Mythology
The modern world is full of technology, and also with anxiety about technology. We worry about robot uprisings and artificial intelligence taking over, and we contemplate what it would mean for a computer to be conscious or truly human. It should probably come as no surprise that these ideas aren’t new to modern society — they go way back, at least to the stories and mythologies of ancient Gre... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-01thumbnail40 | Adrienne Mayor on Gods and Robots in Ancient Mythology
The modern world is full of technology, and also with anxiety about technology. We worry about robot uprisings and artificial intelligence taking over, and we contemplate what it would mean for a computer to be conscious or truly human. It should probably come as no surprise that these ideas aren’t new to modern society — they go way back, at least to the stories and mythologies of ancient Gre... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Apr-01thumbnailThe fanciness of your scabbard says nothing about the effectiveness of your sword
Seneca uses the analogy of a scabbard and a sword to remind us that external goods, like wealth or health, are indeed preferable, but only in a limited fashion. What's truly important is the shape of our character. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Apr-01thumbnailMichael Hannon, "What is the Point of Knowledge? A Function-First Epistemology" (Oxford UP, 2019)
Epistemologists working traditional modes have sought to discover the necessary and sufficient conditions under which one has knowledge.  This has led to several tricky philosophical problems.  Perhaps most notorious of these are the problems concerning skepticism.  It seems that any analysis of knowledge admits of cases where the analysis is satisfied and yet knowledge has not been... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Apr-01thumbnailPREVIEW-(sub)Text#5: Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya"
Wes Alwan is joined by Monica McCarthy of the Happier Hour podcast to discuss Anton Chekhov's 1898 play about family dysfunction and potentially wasting your life. This is a preview of a 54-minute discussion. You can listen to the whole thing by becoming a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-31thumbnailShorts - E15: Health
What's a healthy podcast release schedule? We sure don't know but are trying to figure it out! (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Mar-31thumbnailThe ecology of torture
Who is responsible for acts of torture? Individual perpetrators, certainly. But focusing on the guilt of individuals can lead us to miss the significance of context - social, political, cultural, the "ecology" of complex circumstances within which practices of torture occur. (@RadioNational)
2019-Mar-31thumbnailHAP 25 - Wise Guys - Sage Philosophy
Henry Odera Oruka’s new method for exploring philosophy in Africa, based on interviews with wise individuals. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-31thumbnailEpisode 57, ‘Pantheism: Personhood, Consciousness and God’ with Sam Coleman (Part II)
Specialising in philosophy of mind, Sam Coleman is a reader in philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire. Coleman’s main work centres around questions concerning consciousness, predominantly, on what has come to be known as ‘the hard problem of consciousness’. To paraphrase Colin McGinn, the problem can be summarised as follows: how does soggy grey matter give rise to vivid technicolour ... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Mar-30thumbnail#56 - Turner on Rules for Robots
In this episode I talk to Jacob Turner. Jacob is a barrister and author. We chat about his new book, Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), which discusses how to address legal responsibility, rights and ethics for AI.You can download here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the show on iTunes, Stitcher and a variety of other services (the RSS feed is he... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Mar-30thumbnailName of God (2019)
A few days after the New Zealand Mosque massacre, Dr. Thaya Ashman heard about a woman who was too afraid to come out in public in her hijab for fear of being targeted. So Dr. Ashman had an idea to invite every person in New Zealand to wear a headscarf in public. The result was quite different from what happened in America three years ago, when a woman who tried to make a similar gesture of good w... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Mar-29thumbnailEp84 - Feminism and Peace: Jane Addams's Legacy
In episode 84 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Patricia Shields on “Feminism and Peace: Jane Addams's Legacy.” Dr. Shields is editor of editor of Jane Addams: Progressive Pioneer of Peace, Philosophy, Sociology, Social Work, and Public Administration, published in 2017. She is also Professor of Political Science at Texas State University in San Marc... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Mar-29thumbnailWhat does it mean to live every day as if it were your last?
Marcus Aurelius advises us to live by avoiding both violent emotions and torpor, and by not being a hypocrite. But also, to treat every day as if it were our last. What does that mean? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-28thumbnailThe importance of sound judgment
Seneca provides a very clear explanation of the Stoic distinction between virtue and external things, leading to the surprising conclusion that even health is not an unquestionable good. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-27thumbnailHow to achieve serenity
Seneca talks about a major "side effect," so to speak, of the Stoic stance: achieving tranquillity of mind through the development of an attitude of equanimity. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-27thumbnailListener Qs 8
We survived another nominal gauntlet! Thanks again to everyone who contributes to the collective in any form. We'll merge into Roko's Basilisk in no time. Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): https://www.facebook.com/groups/985828008244018/ Email us... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-27thumbnail0G50: The Ricklantis Mixup and Aesthetic Objectivity
Now that the exposition zone is done, this seems like a time for a drink and a wild, twisty podcast with elitist overtones. A podcast about art, about objectivity, references, poetry! Podcasts are for philosophizing, and now is the time for Aesthetics! ::cue the creepy Morty music:: Tradition and the Individual talent: https://www.bartleby.com/200/sw4.html Support us at Patreon: https://www.patre... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-26thumbnailOut of the Vat #1 – Steven French
Steven French is a Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Leeds. In this episode, Steven discusses his current interest in phenomenological approaches to quantum mechanics, and... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natur... (@LSEPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-26thumbnailVirtue is the only good, naturally
Cicero asserts the standard, and apparently paradoxical, Stoic position that virtue is the onyl true good. Let's see why. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-26thumbnailBad Philosophy: God's Not Dead
Ohhh I cover some horrendous argumentation in this one. Does God's Not Dead prove the existence of God? No. The God's Not Dead film pretends to argue for the existence of God honestly...I explain why that is definitely not the case. Let's talk some philosophy, tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/t... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Mar-26thumbnail#047 Weird Science With Karl Popper and Maryam Zaringhalam
In this episode you’ll learn the difference between science and pseudoscience and how the philosopher Karl Popper radically changed how we view both. You’ll also hear from molecular biologist turned science advocate, Maryam Zaringhalam, about why diversity is imperative for progress, and how all of us can (and should) ward off science skeptics in order for all of us to be happier. #thehappierh... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Mar-25thumbnailDisgust
Jo Applin/ Tina Chanter/ Sophie Russell Listen here or on YouTube Disgust is deceptively simple: physical repulsion to something revolting or potentially contagious. Behind this straightforward... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Mar-25thumbnailEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part Three)
Moving finally on to Jean-Paul Sartre's "Black Orpheus" (1948), where he introduces a book of black poetry by praising its revolutionary spirit as embodied in "negritude." Is this a legitimate consciousness-raising exercise or a weird fetishization of blackness? Listen to parts one and two first, or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition, which will also get you access to (sub)Text#5 on Checkho... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-25thumbnailEpisode 61 - David Papineau
On Episode 61, Nick chats with Dr. David Papineau, Professor of Philosophy of Science at King's College London and the City University of New York Graduate Center, about stories from his early days studying the logic of statistical inference under Ian Hacking, his work on philosophical naturalism, teleosemantics, and consciousness, and how he came to write his most recent book, “Knowing the Scor... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Mar-25thumbnailEpisode 39: Malcolm MacIver on Sensing, Consciousness, and Imagination
Consciousness has many aspects, from experience to wakefulness to self-awareness. One aspect is imagination: our minds can conjure up multiple hypothetical futures to help us decide which choices we should make. Where did that ability come from? Today’s guest, Malcolm MacIver, pinpoints an important transition in the evolution of consciousness to when fish first climbed on to land, and could sud... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-25thumbnail39 | Malcolm MacIver on Sensing, Consciousness, and Imagination
Consciousness has many aspects, from experience to wakefulness to self-awareness. One aspect is imagination: our minds can conjure up multiple hypothetical futures to help us decide which choices we should make. Where did that ability come from? Today’s guest, Malcolm MacIver, pinpoints an important transition in the evolution of consciousness to when fish first climbed on to land, and could sud... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-25thumbnailBe aware of what you can and cannot change
Seneca says that Nature does not discriminate, it hands out suffering and death to everyone, eventually. But we can still make our life better by developing equanimity toward what we cannot change while trying to change what we can. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-24thumbnailBREXIT, IRELAND, AND THE CONSTITUTION - A Conversation With Cathy Barry
What does Brexit mean for peace in Ireland, Parliamentary democracy, and the British constitution? How should we think about the motivations and actions of all involved? Is there any way forward from here? Cathy Barry joins the podcast to help me make sense of it all. Cathy is editor of the Irish philosophy blog www.irishphilosophy.com You can follow her on twitter @cathyby and @irishphiloso... (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Mar-24thumbnailShorts - E14: Fairness
This week the Dawdlers talk about Fairness. Medieval fairs, County fairs...everything... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Mar-24thumbnailTechne-logy
The ancient Greek root of our word "technology" is techne, which means "craftsmanship" or "art". In a world where technology today is thought of in mechanistic terms - consumer items that simply appear in our lives and perform certain functions - is it time we rediscovered the techne behind its development? (@RadioNational)
2019-Mar-24thumbnailHoP 321 - Judith Herrin on Byzantium and Islam
Historian Judith Herrin joins us to talk about competition and mutual influence between Islam and Byzantium. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-24thumbnailEpisode 57, ‘Pantheism: Personhood, Consciousness and God’ with Sam Coleman (Part I)
Specialising in philosophy of mind, Sam Coleman is a reader in philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire. Coleman’s main work centres around questions concerning consciousness, predominantly, on what has come to be known as ‘the hard problem of consciousness’. To paraphrase Colin McGinn, the problem can be summarised as follows: how does soggy grey matter give rise to vivid technicolour ... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Mar-22thumbnailNEM#94: Ian Moore Grown Far Beyond Blues-Rock
Ian has released 10 studio albums and 3 EPs since 1993, starting as an Austin guitar hero and evolving into an eclectic, subtle Seattle songwriter who teaches songwriting courses. We discuss "1000 Blackbirds" from Toronto (2018), the title track from Strange Days (2017), and "Abilene" from Luminaria (2004). End song: "Sad Affair" from El Sonido Nuevo (2011). Intro: "Satisfied" from Ian Moore (1993... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-22thumbnailHow to shape your character
Epictetus reminds us that character is a matter of habit. Willfully change your habits, and you will be on your way toward becoming a better human being. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-21thumbnailWe Are Not Good
Hmmm, I give off a little bit of my opinion in this one. Just went down the rabbit hole. I'm posting because I want all your thoughts. How good are we? When I hear this question, I want my gut reaction to be yes, of course, we are good! But the thinking side of me starts to take over, ‘but is this the case?’ Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast a... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Mar-21thumbnailWelcoming Cicero to our line up
This episode features our first discussion of Cicero. While not a Stoic (he considered himself an Academic Skeptic), he was sympathetic to Stoic philosophy, and frequently borrowed from it to create his own eclectic blend of moral philosophy. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-20thumbnailThe Optimist's Guide to Schopenhauer's Pessimism (Audio Essay)
Schopenhauer was a profoundly pessimistic man. He argued that all life was suffering. Was he right or is there room for optimism? This audio essay tries to answer that question. It is based on an earlier written essay. You can listen below or download here.These audio essays are released as part of the Philosophical Disquisitions podcast. You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Pl... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Mar-20thumbnailThese are your choices
Seneca, building on the Stoic concept of universal causation, reminds us that we don't get to say how the universe works. Our only choices are to accept it (and work within it), or take "the open door," as Epictetus puts it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-20thumbnailListener Qs 7
No snark or satire or pop culture references here, just a big earnest thank you for supporting us and making all this possible. We've had so much fun and we've just barely scratched the surface. So yeah, thanks! Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): ht... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-20thumbnail0G49: The Ricklantis Mixup and Aesthetics, Part 1
Aw Jeez, we're grabbing all sorts of third rails on this one. We're doing a multi-parter on an episode of Rick and morty, some might say THE episode of Rick and Morty, and we're talking aesthetics, AND we're going to try to figure out why T.S. Eliot thinks art can't improve and what he means by that and is he right or is he proven wrong by Ricklantis being possibly the best episode of television e... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-19thumbnailEpisode 160: Everything is Meaningless: The Book of Ecclesiastes
David and Tamler dive into the book of Ecclesiastes, an absurdist classic that is somehow also a book of the Bible. Is everything meaningless, vain, and a chasing after the wind? Are humans just the same as animals? Are wise people no better off than fools? Will God judge us after we die, rewarding the good people and punishing the shit-heels? What if there is no afterlife and this is all we get? ... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Mar-19thumbnailCan we really improve ourselves?
Seneca reminds us that although some people are naturally more virtuous than others, and that much depends on our family upbringing, we are capable of making rational decisions as adults. So make the decision to practice every day to become a better human being. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-19thumbnailDiscussion of Massive Online Peer Review and Open Access Publishing
In the information age, knowledge is power. Hence, facilitating the access to knowledge to wider publics empowers citizens and makes societies more democratic. How can publishers and authors contribute to this process? This podcast addresses this issue. We interview Professor Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, whose book, The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance (forthcoming with MIT Pr... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Mar-19thumbnail#046 Doubt With Socrates and Nick Pappas
In this episode you’ll hear the philosophical history of “doubt” and learn why a healthy dose of skepticism can help us face our fears in work and life today. Philosophy professor Nick Pappas and host Monica McCarthy chat about Socrates’ contributions to the topic of doubt and how we can apply his lessons in order to live more well-examined lives. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Faceboo... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailEpisode 60 - James "Jack" Justus
On Episode 60, Nick chats with Dr. James “Jack” Justus, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Floria State University, about how his early interest in the outdoors led to his work in the philosophy of conservation ecology, his heroic attempt to integrate decision theory and environmental ethics, and his upcoming book on the philosophy of ecology. (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part Two)
Continuing on Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate (1946). Is there an "authentic" way to respond to persecution? As part of his critique of anti-semitism, Sartre criticized the responses of some Jews to this situation, e.g. denying that the persecution exists, pretending to not be Jewish, or in any way accepting the terms of anti-semitism and setting up o... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailAnnouncement! Bonus: Examining Yourself: Is the Self an Illusion?
Hello everyone! A big announcement in this one friends. Plus, some audio to let you know what the heck I'm talking about. Yeet, Youtube channel!!!! Please subscribe, give a thumbs up, and watch the video to help support! Link: https://youtu.be/2PLAu5lj2iw (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailWisdom as a better filter to examine your life
Seneca provides us with one of the best definitions of wisdom. Let's see what it means, and how to apply it to our daily life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailE29: Hustling Past the Graveyard - Ideation in the New Gilded Age
“If you want new ideas, read old books.” -Ivan Pavlov This was the sentiment Ryan witnessed at an evolution conference a few years back. On the one hand, it is a condemnation of the state of originality in science. And, on the other, it is a commendation of its resourcefulness. But why the need for such resourcefulness? What’s the problem? In this episode the Dawdlers talk about the stat... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Mar-18thumbnailEpisode 38: Alan Lightman on Transcendence, Science, and a Naturalist’s Sense of Meaning
Let’s say, for sake of argument, that you don’t believe in God or the supernatural. Is there still a place for talking about transcendence, the sacred, and meaning in life? Some of the above, but not all? Today’s guest, Alan Lightman, brings a unique perspective to these questions, as someone who has worked within both the sciences and the humanities at the highest level. In his most recent ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-18thumbnail38 | Alan Lightman on Transcendence, Science, and a Naturalist’s Sense of Meaning
Let’s say, for sake of argument, that you don’t believe in God or the supernatural. Is there still a place for talking about transcendence, the sacred, and meaning in life? Some of the above, but not all? Today’s guest, Alan Lightman, brings a unique perspective to these questions, as someone who has worked within both the sciences and the humanities at the highest level. In his most recent ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-17thumbnailEV - 085 This Rand Is My Rand
Aaron just couldn't get enough Ayn Rand from episode 83 that we decided to revisit one of her main philosophical principles: Egoism. We attempt to steel bot the idea and then tear it down to pieces.Opening Invocation:Ricklantis MixupMaking The Void Livable:Rock Climbing (@ETVPod)
2019-Mar-17thumbnailInto The Void - A Conversation With ETV's Aaron R (2)
Without free will or agency is morality possible? What could we ever really say we know about morality, is such knowledge possible and how would we go about knowing it? I go deep in my second part with Aaron from the Embrace The Void podcast. https://voidpod.com https://www.patreon.com/PoliticalPhilosophyPodcast (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Mar-17thumbnailAre we enlightened?
Most of us think of the European Enlightenment as a historical period during which society cast off the shackles of mythic thinking. Today, mythic thinking is alive and well in the era of neo-liberal capitalism - at least that's according to the analysis of critical theory, a mode of philosophy deeply rooted in the dynamics of history. Critical theory comes to us via Max Horkheimer and Theodor Ado... (@RadioNational)
2019-Mar-17thumbnailEpisode 56, ‘Utopia for Realists’ with Rutger Bregman (Part II)
Rutger Bregman is a historian and author, best known for his bestselling book, Utopia for Realists: and how we can get there. Arguing for new utopian ideas such as a fifteen-hour work week and universal basic income, Utopia for Realists has been translated into over 30 different languages, making headlines and sparking movements across the world. Despite the fact we’ve never had it better, says ... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Mar-17thumbnailHAP 24 - Professionally Speaking - The Reaction Against Ethnophilosophy
Paulin Hountondji and other African philosophers criticize ethnophilosophy and advocate a universalist approach. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-16thumbnailThe Forever War
This year will mark the 18th anniversary of the war in Afghanistan, the forever war characterized by regime change, a surge, drawdowns, and then re-engagement across three Presidential administrations. We take a retrospective of the entire war, from the forgotten events of the lead-up to its total financial and moral costs to date. Journalist Douglas Wissing and Professor Neta Crawford of the Cost... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Mar-16thumbnailEpisode #129 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 5 - Difference
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Mar-16thumbnailEpisode #128 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 4 - Flows
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Mar-15thumbnailMarcus Aurelius and the chocolate cake
Marcus Aurelius exhorts us to not just do it, but slow down, think about it, and then see if we really want to do it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-14thumbnailStoicism and war
Seneca says it in uncertain terms: it is not wisdom that contrives arms, or walls, or instruments useful in war; nay, her voice is for peace, and she summons all mankind to concord. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-14thumbnail#55 - Baum on the Long-Term Future of Human Civilisation
In this episode I talk to Seth Baum. Seth is an interdisciplinary researcher working across a wide range of fields in natural and social science, engineering, philosophy, and policy. His primary research focus is global catastrophic risk. He also works in astrobiology. He is the Co-Founder (with Tony Barrett) and Executive Director of the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute. He is also a Research A... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Mar-14thumbnailAuthenticity
Melvyn Bragg and guests dicuss what it means to be oneself, a question explored by philosophers from Aristotle to the present day, including St Augustine, Kierkegaard, Heidegger and Sartre. In Hamlet, Polonius said 'To thine own self be true', but what is the self, and what does it mean to be true to it, and why should you be true? To Polonius, if you are true to yourself, ‘thou canst not be f... (@BBCInOurTime)
2019-Mar-13thumbnailMood
Ben Highmore/ Carolyn Pedwell/ Anil Sebastian Listen to the recording here or on YouTube Mood is an ephemeral thing, changing with the seasons and eluding our control. Why are our moods so... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Mar-13thumbnailSpider-Man: The Growing Pains of Life
I talk some Spider-Man in this one friends! More so focussing on the new one, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Anyway, how does this film connect with the audience? It connects with everyone, that's the point. But what does this connection do for our lives? What does it force us to examine? Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full A... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Mar-13thumbnailThe three parts of philosophy
Seneca summarizes the reasons why to live a good life (the domain of Ethics) one has to learn how to reason well (Logic) and how to better understand the world (Physics). Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-13thumbnail0G48: Groundhog Day and Buddhist Virtue Theory
Rise and shine, philosonaughts, and don't forget your space suit, cause it's voidy outside! We're stretching the concept of sci-fi to the brink by doing Groundhog Day and discussing how it's the perfect parable for the Buddhist version of virtue theory that Aaron finds so very tempting. Rise and shine, spacebrains, and don't forget your space vats, cause it's voidy outside! We're pushing the conce... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-12thumbnailEp83 - Philosophy and Environmental Policy
In episode 83 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Andrew Light on “Philosophy and Environmental Policy.” Dr. Light is University Professor of Philosophy, Public Policy, and Atmospheric Sciences and Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy at George Mason University. He is also Distinguished Senior Fellow at the World Resources Institu... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Mar-12thumbnailConcern yourself with careful living
Seneca criticizes the tendency of some philosophers to spend a lot of time trying to develop more carerful ways of speaking, at the expense of figuring out more careful ways of living. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-11thumbnail476: Immigration and Multiculturalism
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/immigration-and-multiculturalism. Whether for economic reasons or to flee violence and persecution, immigration rates continue to climb globally. At the same time, opposition to immigration and intolerance of multiculturalism is also growing. Should cultural or ethnic identity ever be a factor in immigration policy? Do immigrants have an obligation... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Mar-11thumbnailEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part One)
On Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate (1946) and "Black Orpheus" (1948). How can we best understand the psychology of racism? Sartre condemns anti-Semitism as denying the facts of the human condition: the responsibility for fixing problems and not blaming them on a demonized other. But he also criticizes "the democrat" for a humanism that pretends we're ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-11thumbnailHere's your top priority in life
Seneca says that it causes far too much discomfort to the ears of others to be recognized as a learned person. Better for us and everyone else to be recognized as a good person. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-11thumbnailEpisode 37: Edward Watts on the End of the Roman Republic and Lessons for Democracy
When many of us think “Ancient Rome,” we think of the Empire and the Caesars. But the Empire was preceded by the Roman Republic, which flourished for a full five centuries. Why, after such a long and prosperous run, would an essentially democratic form of government change — with a good deal of approval from its citizens — into an autocracy? That’s the question I discuss with today’s g... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-11thumbnail37 | Edward Watts on the End of the Roman Republic and Lessons for Democracy
When many of us think “Ancient Rome,” we think of the Empire and the Caesars. But the Empire was preceded by the Roman Republic, which flourished for a full five centuries. Why, after such a long and prosperous run, would an essentially democratic form of government change — with a good deal of approval from its citizens — into an autocracy? That’s the question I discuss with today’s g... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-11thumbnailElizabeth Schechter, "Self-Consciousness and Split Brains: The Mind's I" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Human brains have two hemispheres whose major connection is the corpus callosum, which enables information to be shared between the hemispheres. Split-brain subjects are people whose corpus callosum has been surgically cut to alleviate epilepsy. This and other similar operations or conditions yield an odd phenomenon in which the patient appears to be two agents: for example, in controlled experime... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Mar-11thumbnailConstellary Tales #6: Philip K. Dick's "Minority Report" (PEL Crossover Special)
PEL's Mark Linsenmayer joins hosts Ken Gerber and Brian Hirt to weigh in on the philosophical implications of precognitive crime fighting in Philip K. Dick's "The Minority Report." Brian quizzes Mark and Ken on PKD movie trivia. Get more Constellary Tales podcasts, and read original sf in the magazine at constellary.com. Listen to PEL #175 on Blade Runner. (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-10thumbnailMORAL LUCK A Conversation With ETV's Aaron Rabinowitz
MORAL LUCK A Conversation With ETV's Aaron Rabinowitz by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Mar-10thumbnailE28: The Pleistocene - Part II
Back with Part II of The Pleistocene, Ryan blathers on as H-dog harnesses a mega-punnage. This is the exciting part so are you not excited!? Anyway, enjoy the data dump. Yer welcome. “The” Dawdler’s 00:04:27 – Housekeeping (Sammy Harris-style) 00:17:06 – The Epistemological State of Human Prehistory 00:30:14 – Hominine Lineages 00:36:21 – Stone Toolmaking ... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Mar-10thumbnailEpisode 56, ‘Utopia for Realists’ with Rutger Bregman (Part I)
Rutger Bregman is a historian and author, best known for his bestselling book, Utopia for Realists: and how we can get there. Arguing for new utopian ideas such as a fifteen-hour work week and universal basic income, Utopia for Realists has been translated into over 30 different languages, making headlines and sparking movements across the world. Despite the fact we’ve never had it better, says ... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Mar-10thumbnailFree speech crisis on campus?
With freedom of speech at Australian universities currently under governmental review, we explore the notion of free speech on campus. Should what gets said at universities - and who gets to say it - be regulated? And is the supposed "free speech crisis" just a front for the culture wars? (@RadioNational)
2019-Mar-10thumbnailHoP 320 - People of the South - Byzantium and Islam
Intellectual exchange between Christians and Muslims, and the later flowering of Syriac literature including the philosopher Bar Hebraeus. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-09thumbnailNEM#93: Peter Aaron Lives in the Blues-Punk Moment
Peter started in hardcore punk and used the blues to add depth for his band the Chrome Cranks, which released four studio albums and a live album in the mid-1990s then another in 2012. Since then he's been a music journalist and author, writing about the Ramones, the Band, and others, with occasional musical projects. We discuss his new single "Bomb Train Blues" (2018) with the band Young Skulls, ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-09thumbnailEV - 084 Free Will Wheaton
Here to have out age old battle of free will with Aaron is none other than Darron (@NecessaryBeing). They get into the weeds discussing free will, determinism, and if it's possible for there to be a spectrum.Opening Invocation:Deacon of Doubt @DeaconDoubt (@ETVPod)
2019-Mar-08thumbnailIn order to learn something new you need to forget what you think you already know
Epictetus advises his students, and all of us, to drop our preconceptions and actually open our minds to new notions. Try to practice that the next time you engage in a "conversation" on social media. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-07thumbnailThe Moral Problem of Accelerating Change (Audio Essay)
(Subscribe here)This is an experiment. For a number of years, people have been asking me to provide audio versions of the essays that I post on the blog. I've been reluctant to do this up until now, but I have recently become a fan of the audio format and I appreciate its conveniences. Also, I watched an interview with Michael Lewis (the best-selling non-fiction author in the world) just this week... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Mar-07thumbnailSeneca criticizes the institution of war
In a rather forceful passage Seneca makes a strong political statement, referring to Roman imperialism as "sacrilege on a grand scale." Unfortunately, two millennia later, we still honor that sort of sacrilege, which flies in the face of the virtue of justice and the concept of cosmopolitanism. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-07thumbnailEpisode 112: Myisha Cherry discusses the skill of conversation
In this episode, Myisha Cherry argues that having a productive conversation with someone often involves explicitly laying out each person's background experiences and expectations. (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-Mar-07thumbnail#045 Failure With Jean-Paul Sartre and Olivia Goldhill
Kicking off Season 3 of The Happier Hour, is guest Olivia Goldhill, a journalist who specializes in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience as we explore the topic of FAILURE. You’ll learn what Jean-Paul Sartre and the Existentialists can teach us about failure, and why so much of the current self-help advice gets failure wrong. #TheHappierHour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Facebook: @TheHappi... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2019-Mar-06thumbnailWealth doesn't make you a better person
Seneca constructs another logical argument to make the point that wealth is not an intrinsic good. Rather, it is how it is used that can be good or bad. Know any virtuous billionaires, by chance? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-06thumbnail0G47: Annihilation and Deep Ecology, Part 2
::Maynard James Keenan does weird synthesizer stuff in a way that totally works:: Strap in friends, it's time to get weird! We're taking that tasty body horror from part one and we're cranking up the David Lynch. Lean into the confusion and embrace the ambiguity, as a PZ Meyers alien clone walks us through the theory of Deep Ecology, a view that seeks to replace our individual centric models with ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-05thumbnailEpisode 159: You Have the Right to Go to Prison
Poor and black defendants have more legal rights than ever, but that didn't stop mass incarceration. Why is that? We talk about a paper by Paul Butler called "Poor People Lose: Gideon and the Critique of Rights." Plus, we answer the question that’s on everyone’s mind: how to live as an anti-natalist. And Tamler is appalled to discover David's anti-natalist leanings. (@verybadwizards)
2019-Mar-05thumbnailStoic Lessons for a Toxic Political Climate
Woooo, I try to get all Stoic in this one friend. I found some interesting quotes that made me think of our terrible current state of political discourse. Listen in for some Stoic lessons to consider before your next political debate with your neighbor. Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy ... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Mar-05thumbnailChance events are not good for you
Seneca builds a simple argument to show that random events, like winning a lottery, are actually not good for you, despite appearances to the contrary. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailThe Irish Enlightenment
Ian McBride/ Katherine O’Donnell/ Tom Stoneham Listen to the recording here or on YouTube Though often overlooked in discussions of the Enlightenment, Ireland was a vibrant centre for... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailEpisode 210: Franz Fanon's Black Existentialism (Part Two)
Continuing on Black Skin White Masks (1952), starting with the influential ch. 4 "The Fact of Blackness." Are the successive coping strategies to racism (including "anti-racist racism" and embrace of negritude) that Fanon describes necessary steps in a dialectic which should be encouraged, or would it be best to learn from his "mistakes" and jump right to the humanistic end-point? With guest Lawre... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailEpisode 210: Frantz Fanon's Black Existentialism (Part Two)
Continuing on Black Skin White Masks (1952), starting with the influential ch. 4 "The Fact of Blackness." Are the successive coping strategies to racism (including "anti-racist racism" and embrace of negritude) that Fanon describes necessary steps in a dialectic which should be encouraged, or would it be best to learn from his "mistakes" and jump right to the humanistic end-point? With guest Lawre... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailEpisode 36: David Albert on Quantum Measurement and the Problems with Many-Worlds
Quantum mechanics is our best theory of how reality works at a fundamental level, yet physicists still can’t agree on what the theory actually says. At the heart of the puzzle is the “measurement problem”: what actually happens when we observe a quantum system, and why do we apparently need separate rules when it happens? David Albert is one of the leading figures in the foundations of quant... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-04thumbnail36 | David Albert on Quantum Measurement and the Problems with Many-Worlds
Quantum mechanics is our best theory of how reality works at a fundamental level, yet physicists still can’t agree on what the theory actually says. At the heart of the puzzle is the “measurement problem”: what actually happens when we observe a quantum system, and why do we apparently need separate rules when it happens? David Albert is one of the leading figures in the foundations of quant... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailEp87 - Going to College in the Sixties
In this 87th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. John Thelin, University Research Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation at the University of Kentucky and author of Going to College in the Sixties. John is an historian and author of many books, including his widely read and studied A History of American Higher Education. He was honor... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Mar-04thumbnailMuch of what we have is superfluous
Seneca says that his life's journey taught him that much of what we possess is superfluous, and indeed positively gets in the way of living a good life. He ought to know, as we discuss in this episode. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-03thumbnailE27: The Pleistocene - Part I
Finally!! Ryan gets to talk about the Pleistocene—the epoch in which a new ice age began and we sapiens evolved…into incredible narcissists the likes of which the world has never seen. Two things: In this episode 1) Ryan nerds out while Harland lends intermittent support and 2) this is the first part of a two part series some (specifically Ryan, for fear of being alone in his appreciation of... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Mar-03thumbnailEV - 083 Void Shrugged
For our next installment of Better Know a Philosopher, we tackle Ayn Rand. We look at her life and work including Atlas Shrugged.Opening Invocation:Charles Bukowski (The Last Night of the Earth Poems)Making the Void Livable:Young people, like the ones who talking with Dianne Feinstein  (@ETVPod)
2019-Mar-03thumbnailEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pr... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Mar-03thumbnailExistentialism and crisis
Existentialism entered the popular consciousness after World War 2, and for many it still has a mid-century ring to it. But how does it look look today, especially in an age where the unfolding environmental crisis calls for something more than radical humanism? (@RadioNational)
2019-Mar-03thumbnailHAP 23 - Nkiru Nzegwu on Gender in African Tradition
An interview with Nkiru Nzegwu on matriarchy and gender fluidity in Africa. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Mar-02thumbnailJESUS, SEX, AND THE FAMILY A conversation with Dale Martin (2)
What was the sexuality of the historical Jesus? Did he have romantic partners? What did Jesus and Paul teach about teach about the desirability or permissibility of sex, what where their views on the family, and how should all of that impact how we live today? (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Mar-02thumbnailBrave New World
Richard Ashcroft/ David Healy/ Emily Jackson Listen to the recording here or on YouTube In this age of utopian technologies, we can design mechanical limbs for amputees and chemically engineer... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Mar-02thumbnailNo Offense
What if you could sue someone for calling you a racial slur? In the 90s, one country that always looked very similar to America decided to allow it, rolling back the rights to free speech in the interest of protecting victims of hate speech. Is the result a slippery slope to government tyranny, or a more harmonious society? The moral right to hate speech does not run as deep in the U.S. as most pe... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Mar-01thumbnailWhen to care, or not, about other people's opinions
Marcus Aurelius reminds us that all too often we care far too much about the opinions of people we do not actually hold in high esteem. If they judge us badly according to mistaken values, the problem is theirs, not ours. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Mar-01thumbnailGuy Axtell, "Problems of Religious Luck: Assessing the Limits of Reasonable Religious Disagreement" (Lexington, 2019)
Our lives are shot through with contingency – where, when, and into what circumstances we are born is largely a matter of chance. And yet those features play determining roles in our lives. The languages we speak, the customs we practice, as well as our tastes and ambitions, all seem to depend largely on luck. In many cases, this is also true of our religious convictions. Hence a puzzle: it is c... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Feb-28thumbnailEV - 082 Heretic Life in Utah with Uncle Mark
Joining us for this episode is Mark from the How To Heretic Podcast. We talk about Mark's experience as a gay man growing up in Utah, the Mormon church, Pride, and many other topics. (@ETVPod)
2019-Feb-28thumbnailThe Haunting of Neo-liberalism
Robert Eaglestone/ Simon Glendinning/ Maja Zehfuss Listen to the recording here or on YouTube Marx famously wrote in the nineteenth century of the spectre of communism haunting Europe, and the end of... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Feb-28thumbnailEpisode 59 - Branden Fitelson
On Episode 59, Nick chats with Dr. Branden Fitelson, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Northeastern University, about his early days working in mathematics and physics as a research scientist at Argonne National Laboratory and a NASA contractor, his highly-social approach to doing and learning philosophy, his work on probability in scientific inference, the story of the Formal Epistemology ... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Feb-28thumbnailEpisode #54 - Sebo on the Moral Problem of Other Minds
In this episode I talk to Jeff Sebo. Jeff is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Affiliated Professor of Bioethics, Medical Ethics, and Philosophy, and Director of the Animal Studies M.A. Program at New York University.  Jeff’s research focuses on bioethics, animal ethics, and environmental ethics. He has two co-authored books Chimpanzee Rights and Food, Animals, and th... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Feb-28thumbnailMake your life the best it can be given the materials you are given
Seneca brings up a parallel between the life of virtue and the art of a sculptor like Phidias. Just like a good sculptor will make the best art that the materials at his disposal permit, so we can be good human beings regardless of the specific circumstances of our lives. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-27thumbnailEveryone is a good pilot on a calm sea
Seneca uses a sailing metaphor to remind us that hardship in life, just like a storm at sea, is what truly tests our virtue, as the storm tests the pilot's skills. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-27thumbnail0G46: Annihilation and Catastrophic Destruction, Part 1
::Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young casually play in the background:: Oh, hey, didn't see you there. Welcome to part one of Annihilation. There's a supernatural doins a transpiring, but cause this is the south we're going to meander our way into it like an albino croc at feeding time. We're joined by special guest PZ Meyers for this journey into the heart or weirdness. He'll be playing the role of ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-26thumbnailThe Meaning of Life
I'm biting off more than I can chew in this one friends. Life motto. Luckily, I seek answers from those much wiser than me. So today, I examine the question we all attempt to contemplate, what is the meaning of life? Utilizing perspectives from Viktor Frankl, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and dogs. Tune in and let me know what you think of my attempt! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, r... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Feb-26thumbnailTreat yourself as you would a sick friend
Seneca dispels the stereotype of Stoics as going through life with a stiff upper lip. Stoic training doesn't insulate us from sufferings. It gives us tools to deal with suffering. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-25thumbnail408: The Philanthropy Trap
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philanthropy-trap. Many of us generally admire people who donate large sums of money to charity. Yet people donate for all sorts of reasons – some selfless, some not so much. Should we consider philanthropy as mere ego expression for the wealthy, or is it genuinely altruistic behavior? If philanthropists are so concerned with having an impact on ... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailEpisode 35: Jessica Yellin on The Changing Ways We Get Our News
Everything we think about the world outside our immediate senses is shaped by information brought to us by other sources. In the case of what’s currently happening to the human race, we call that information “the news.” There is no such thing as “unfiltered” news — no matter how we get it, someone is deciding what information to convey and how to convey it. And the way that is happenin... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-25thumbnail35 | Jessica Yellin on The Changing Ways We Get Our News
Everything we think about the world outside our immediate senses is shaped by information brought to us by other sources. In the case of what’s currently happening to the human race, we call that information “the news.” There is no such thing as “unfiltered” news — no matter how we get it, someone is deciding what information to convey and how to convey it. And the way that is happenin... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailEpisode 210: Frantz Fanon's Black Existentialism (Part One)
On Black Skin White Masks (1952). How does growing up in a racist society mess people up? Fanon's "clinical study" includes phenomenology, poetry, and a lot of existentialism, which means that the "let's embrace negritude in the face of bigotry" solution isn't ultimately available to him: We're all radically free, with no race-specific essence, whether positive or negative. With guest Lawrence War... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailModerate insanity is not a good thing
Seneca directly takes on the Peripatetics, followers of Aristotle, and criticizes their notion that virtue always lies in the middle. Some things, like insanity, or anger, are not good even in small quantities. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailChristian Miller on the Character Gap
Christian Miller believes that there is a character gap, a gap between what we think we are like morally and how we actually behave. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he explores the psychology of moral behaviour, and how we can become better people. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation. (@philosophybites)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailPhilip Pettit on the Birth of Ethics
Where did ethics come from? Philip Pettit tells an 'as if' story about the birth of ethics that is designed to illuminate what ethics is and why it evolved on this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from Patreon donors for this episode. (@philosophybites)
2019-Feb-25thumbnailShorts - E13: The Future
If you've got a 401k you might think you have comfort that awaits you in 20-30 years. You might consider yourself able to live without working, seeing yourself eating simple meals and meeting friends on easy adventures without a thought toward responsibility. Or maybe you have a dentist appointment tomorrow and you hate the dentist because they always make you feel bad about yourself. Or may... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-24thumbnailGENDER IN THE NEW TESAMENT A Conversation With Dale Martin
Dale Martin returns to the podcast! We cover Paul’s ideas about resurrection, the gender of the resurrected dead, the gender spectrum in the ancient world, the modern invention of the male/ female dichotomy, and postmodernism. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Feb-24thumbnailEpisode 55, Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis (Part III - The Meaning)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pr... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Feb-24thumbnailOn the way
John Kaag is a philosopher who travelled to the Swiss Alps with the aim of putting into practice some of Nietzsche's recommendations for "becoming who you are". In his memoir Hiking With Nietzsche, what he finds is that following in the footsteps of the great German thinker requires big shoes. (@RadioNational)
2019-Feb-24thumbnailHoP 319 - Georgia on My Mind - Petritsi and the Proclus Revival
The Neoplatonist Proclus gets mixed reviews from Christians, as Nicholas of Methone refutes him but the Georgian philosopher Ioane Petritsi helps to revive his thought. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-23thumbnailPodchaser Interview of Mark Linsenmayer: Partially Examined Life and Nakedly Examined Music
Morgan DeLisle, writer for the PodChaser "Behind the Streams Blog," interviewed Mark for a feature of our podcasts. Learn about the origins of PEL and NEM, how we make the shows, and what's coming up. Listen to all of the PEL network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com, or subscribe to them individually on Apple Podcasts or via your preferred player. (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-22thumbnailPlanning is more important than worrying about outcomes
Epictetus wonders why people pay attention to outcomes, which are outside of their control, and not so much to planning, which very much is under their control. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-21thumbnailThe orchestra of your mind
Seneca draws a beautiful analogy between the harmonious sounds of an orchestra and the harmonious thinking of a well structured mind. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-20thumbnailShorts - E12: Scarcity
How much do you really want something? Is it worth the price? Who decides you want it anyway? In this Dawdlers Short, we explore our thoughts on scarcity. And to commemorate this topic, it will only be available for 100,000 days so get it while it lasts!! (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-20thumbnailIf you want to understand things, write them down
Seneca suggests that we should alternate between reading and writing in order to truly understand and internalize new concepts. Which, of course, is yet another way to achieve a major goal of Stoic training: arrive at better and better judgments. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-20thumbnailEthan Mills, "Three Pillars of Skepticism in Classical India: Nagarjuna, Jayarasi, and Sri Harsa" (Lexington Books, 2018)
Skepticism has a long history in the Western tradition, from Pyrrhonian Skepticism in the Hellenistic period to more contemporary forms of skepticism most often used as foils to theories of knowledge. The existence of skepticism in Indian Philosophy, however, has long been neglected in favor of dogmatic positions. In Three Pillars of Skepticism in Classical India: Nagarjuna, Jayarasi, and Sri Hars... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Feb-20thumbnail0G45: Star Trek Next Gen 4-22 and Cultural Relativism vs Ethical Pluralism
It's tempting to sweep into these show notes like a certain loudmouthed Betazoid and start spreading pate related puns, but it just doesn't feel right. This is a beautiful hour of television and y'all all deserve to go watch it unspoilered. Really the very best that Star Trek has to offer. Cultural Relativism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_relativism Ethical Pluralism: www.ethik.uzh.ch... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-19thumbnailEpisode 158: False Dichotomies and Oral Reciprocity
David and Tamler talk about the invasion of dual process theories in psychology. Why do we love theories that divide complex phenomena into just two categories? Is there any evidence to back up these theories? Are we distorting our understanding of the mind and morality? And what we can do to get out of this mess? Plus, Liam Neeson, moral pet peeves, and oral ethics. (@verybadwizards)
2019-Feb-19thumbnailRead books, it's good for you
Seneca gives this most sensical of advices: read books by others, especially if they disagree with you. Turns out, it's a good way to improve our judgments of things, a major goal of Stoic training. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-19thumbnailNEM#92: Steve Young (Hedflux): Electronica Breaking Club Conventions
Steve started producing tracks for dance clubs in 2007, changing his style in 2013 to slow down, carve out space for spontaneous performance, and develop "audio alchemy" over a few EPs and two recent albums. We discuss "Equinosis" from the Mercurial EP (2018), "Superluminal Sound" from his Soul Science album (2016), and the title track from his Wanderlust EP (2013). We conclude by listening to "Or... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-18thumbnailDoping
John William Devine/ Vanessa Heggie/ David Papineau Listen to the recording here or on YouTube World-class athletes push themselves beyond normal limits and transform their bodies through training... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Feb-18thumbnailEpisode 209: Francis Fukuyama on Identity Politics (Part Two: Discussion)
Continuing on Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). Fukuyama recommends a "creedal national identity" as a solution for tribalism; does this work? Is this "demand for recognition" that he describes foundational for the act of making an ethical claim? For self-consciousness itself? How does ideology prejudice the sort of theorizing that Fukuyama engages in? Listen ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-18thumbnailEpisode #53 - Christin on How Algorithms Actually Impact Workers
In this episode I talk to Angèle Christin. Angèle is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, where she is also affiliated with the Sociology Department and Program in Science, Technology, and Society. Her research focuses on how algorithms and analytics transform professional values, expertise, and work practices. She is currently working on a book on th... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Feb-18thumbnailPay attention to the past in order to tackle the future
Seneca reminds us that -- although we live in the here and now -- we profit from reflecting on our mistakes, so long as we do not indulge emotionally on them. Regret is not a Stoic value. Learning is. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-18thumbnail475: The 2019 Dionysus Awards
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/2019-dionysus-awards. What movies of the past year challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Josh and Ken talk to philosophers, film critics, and listeners as they present their sixth (mostly) annual Dionysus Awards for the most thoughtful films of the past year, including: • Least Superficial Superhero Movie ... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Feb-18thumbnailEpisode 34: Paul Bloom on Empathy, Rationality, Morality, and Cruelty
Within every person’s mind there is on ongoing battle between reason and emotion. It’s not always a battle, of course; very often the two can work together. But at other times, our emotions push us toward actions that our reason would counsel against. Paul Bloom is a well-known psychologist and author who wrote the provocatively-titled book Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion, an... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-18thumbnail34 | Paul Bloom on Empathy, Rationality, Morality, and Cruelty
Within every person’s mind there is on ongoing battle between reason and emotion. It’s not always a battle, of course; very often the two can work together. But at other times, our emotions push us toward actions that our reason would counsel against. Paul Bloom is a well-known psychologist and author who wrote the provocatively-titled book Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion, an... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-17thumbnailLIBERTARIANISM 3 War And The Elite
The first world war and economic crisis explode into the world in the 3rd part of our series on the ideologies of libertarianism and progressive liberalism. How do ideologies deal with huge system shocks like these? What is the role of elites in ideological creation and consumption? (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Feb-17thumbnailE26: Hofstadter's Scrumptious Edibles - Analogy as the Core of Cognition
Does A = A or not!? Or is it just approximate? Or none of it… We Dawdlers take a dip into the book Surfaces and Essences by Douglas Hofstadter and Emmanuel Sander on the significance of analogy-making in thinking. 00:04:40 – The book itself 00:14:30 – The man himself // Form and content 00:18:06 – The form of the content // The main thesis 00:25:15 – Analogy and category // Cat... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-17thumbnailEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part II - The Plot)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pr... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Feb-17thumbnailWalter Benjamin: multimedia prototype?
As an intellectual oddball in the early 20th century, Walter Benjamin appears to have been a precursor of the cross-disciplinary hybrid thinkers we celebrate today. Was he the first multimedia journalist? (@RadioNational)
2019-Feb-17thumbnailHAP 22 - Women Have no Tribe - Gender in African Tradition
What archeology and ethnography tell us about the diverse and often ambiguous roles of men and women in traditional African societies. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-16thumbnailRisky Business
How many innocent people should we be allowed to arrest and jail in order to prevent a single dangerous person from being free? The Supreme Court has refused to answer this question, but algorithms have, and many courts across the country are going with the algorithm.  At different stages of the criminal justice system, computerized risk-assessment algorithms are slowly replacing bail hearing... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Feb-15thumbnailEV - 081 23andVoid
Today, Aaron and GW discuss relevant topics like the terribleness of Black Face, and why you shouldn't blindly trust 23andMe. We look at not only the privacy issues, but the philosophical issues with a DNA database.Open Invocation:The Ones Who Walk Away From OmelasHero of the Week???:Philosophers in Space / Embrace The Void Facebook group  (@ETVPod)
2019-Feb-15thumbnailLife is more like wrestling than dancing
We take a look at one of the most famous metaphors in Stoicism, the notion put forth by Marcus Aurelius that life is a bit like wrestling: we need to be prepared and alert, because the next move may be unexpected. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-14thumbnailThe Matrix: The Value of Reality
The original Matrix film has become a cultural phenomenon, one that seems only to gain further relevance with age. A film originally released in 1999 was ahead of its time for the questions it raised. The question I want you to consider today: is it so crazy to plug into the Matrix? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Feb-14thumbnailToo much logic is not good for your health
Seneca reminds us that logic is crucial in order to figure out how to live a good life. But logic chopping is actually deleterious to it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-13thumbnailBeing an Ally
Carys Afoko/ Dawn Foster/ Sridhar Venkatapuram Listen to the recording here or on YouTube Many people see themselves as allies, not themselves marginalized but nonetheless standing alongside members... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy)
2019-Feb-13thumbnailShorts - E11: Authority
Are you talkin' to me? This week the Dawdlers contemplate asymmetrical power dynamics regarding behavioral modification; from parent/child to peace officer/citizen, how do we feel about and deal with exertions of Authority? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-13thumbnailNot all indifferents are created equal
Seneca reminds us that there is a difference among the so-called indifferents. Life, health, and education, for instance, are a bit more highly ranked than your favorite gelato flavor. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-13thumbnailOG44: Bandersnatch and the Ethics of Mental Illness Representation, Part 2
Like Netflix, we're going to soak this thing for all its worth. How many hours of your life can we steal making you click through episodes trying to find easter eggs?! Really though, for all the innovations in this episode, it feel painfully underdeveloped in the arguably unethical way it makes use of tropes that are harmful to people with mental illness, and it felt like that deserved a main segm... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-12thumbnailEpisode 58 - Deborah Mayo
On Episode 58, Nick chats with Deborah Mayo, Professor Emerita in the Department of Philosophy at Virginia Tech, about how she learned to apply statistics to key problems in the philosophy of science, how to think about replication and other pressing statistical issues in the social and biological sciences, and her new book, Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Stati... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Feb-12thumbnailThe difference between Stoicism and stoicism
In our 300th episode we look at how Seneca very clearly separates Stoicism (the philosophy) from stoicism (the attitude of going through life with a stiff upper lip). Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-11thumbnail474: What Do We Owe Future Generations?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-do-we-owe-future-generations. We talk about owing future generations a better world. We might also think that we should do things for future generations even if our actions might not benefit present-day people. But is it possible to have obligations to people who are not yet born? Can people who do not exist be said to have rights that we shou... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 044: Laura Pérez on Seeing Corruption
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Laura Pérez about visual experiences and social institutions, how is corruption inherent in our visual experiences, corruption and authenticity, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 043: Serena Parekh on Refugees
Myisha Cherry chats with Serena Parekh about refugees and statelessness, the harms of statelessness, our ethical obligations, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 042: Kathryn Norlock on Complaining & Shaming
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kathryn Norlock about complaining, its prohibitions, what it does, how to do it well, its connection to shaming, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 041: Yolonda Wilson on Health Justice
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Yolonda Wilson about health disparities, factors that contribute to it, race, class, and medical treatment, health justice, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 040: Erin Tarver on Sports and Identity
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Erin Tarver about sports fandom, hero worship vs mascotting, the logics of white supremacy and misogyny in sports, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 039: Kris Sealey on Bad Faith
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kris Sealey about decolonialism, the role of the stereotype, Bad Faith's subversive potential, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 038: Carrie Jenkins on Love & Happiness
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Carrie Jenkins about the nature of love and happiness, can you have one without the other, what is love-crafting in private and public, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 037: Michele Moody-Adams on Monuments & Memorials
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Michele Moody-Adams about monuments and memorials, their similarities and differences, arguments for their destruction, the democratic possibilities of both, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 036: Colleen Murphy on Reconciliation
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Colleen Murphy about reconciliation, its connection with forgiveness, its role in transitional justice, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 035: Kate Manne on HIMpathy
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kate Manne about over-sympathy for men, its connection to misogyny, why women are prone to it, some strategies to resist it, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailBe magnanimous toward others
Seneca reminds us that we should interpret other people's actions and words in a generous manner, instead of conjuring the worst possible scenario. It is, after all, the way we would like to be treated. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailJonathan Birch, "The Philosophy of Social Evolution" (Oxford UP, 2017)
It seems to go against evolutionary theory for an individual to give up its own chances at reproducing in order to increase the fitness of others. Yet social behavior is found throughout nature, from bacteria and social insects to wolves, whales, and of course humans. What makes self-sacrifice to any degree even possible, given that self-interested behavior is the default? In The Philosophy of Soc... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 33: James Ladyman on Reality, Metaphysics, and Complexity
Reality is a tricky thing. Is love real? What about the number 5? This is clearly a job for a philosopher, and James Ladyman is one of the world’s acknowledged experts. He and his collaborators have been championing a view known as “structural realism,” in which real things are those that reflect true, useful patterns in the underlying reality. We talk about that, but also about a couple of ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-11thumbnail33 | James Ladyman on Reality, Metaphysics, and Complexity
Reality is a tricky thing. Is love real? What about the number 5? This is clearly a job for a philosopher, and James Ladyman is one of the world’s acknowledged experts. He and his collaborators have been championing a view known as “structural realism,” in which real things are those that reflect true, useful patterns in the underlying reality. We talk about that, but also about a couple of ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-11thumbnailEpisode 209: Guest Francis Fukuyama on Identity Politics (Part One)
Talking to the author about Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). What motivates people? Frank points to thymos, the demand for recognition, as at the root of both the "end of history" (i.e., democracy as demand for equal recognition) and our current tribalist stalemates, involving desires to be seen—in virtue of group membership—as superior. Thymos may in fac... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-10thumbnailShorts - E10: End ofs
How 'bout another Short!? This time the Dawdlers go off about "End ofs". You know, the "End of the World" type ideas. Consider us ambivalent. Enjoy for the world will soon be over! (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-10thumbnailEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part I - The Life of Kafka)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around traveling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pre... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Feb-10thumbnailAgeing
Getting older: comedy or tragedy? Martha Nussbaum and Saul Levmore—co-authors of Aging Thoughtfully: Conversations About Retirement, Romance, Wrinkles and Regret—talk about older bodies, intergenerational resentment, and a certain Shakespearean geriatric. (@RadioNational)
2019-Feb-10thumbnailHoP 318 - Oliver Primavesi on Greek Manuscripts
Peter's Munich colleague Oliver Primavesi tells us how Greek manuscripts are used to establish the text of authors like Aristotle. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-09thumbnailLIBERTARIANISM 2 Evolution And Equilibrium
In the second part of my series on the history of libertarianism I look at how the competition between libertarianism and progressive liberalism escalated to competition over scientific metaphors. The origin, and ideological weaponization of, the phrase “survival of the fittest”, and the introduction to the ideological fight of Newtonian mechanics. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Feb-09thumbnailEp82 - BC16 - On Addams and Dewey
In this 82nd episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 16th “breadcrumb” episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Marilyn Fischer back on the show to talk about the relationship between Jane Addams and John Dewey. As a reminder, Marilyn is a Professor Emerita at the University of Dayton where she specializes in political philosophy and American Pragmatism. She focuses especial... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Feb-08thumbnailNEM#91: Rachel Taylor Brown's Decorated Aphorisms
Portland-based singer-songwriter Rachel has released 10 albums of off-kilter, usually piano-based, lyric-heavy indie rock since the mid '00s. We discuss "Maker" and "God" (plus the intro "Gyre") from Run Tiny Human (2018), "Taxidermy" from World so Sweet (2011), and "Ormolu" from Ormolu (2006), and also listen to "We'll Have A" from Falimy (2014). For more, see racheltaylorbrown.com. Hear more Nak... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-08thumbnailDo you still need somebody to wipe your nose?
Epictetus, with his sarcastic sense of humor, reminds a student that he doesn't need to pray to deal with a bad situation. He already has all the tools he needs: courage, fortitude, and endurance. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-07thumbnailVirtue is its own reward
If the Pope or the Dalai Lama say that being good is its own reward, usually people take it at face value. But if a Stoic says it, they demand logical proof. Let's discuss this. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-07thumbnailEV - 080 How To Not Be Like Spock With Massimo Pigliucci Part 2
And now the continuation of our interview with Massimo.Opening Invocation: Evan Matthews and Ben OldhamHero of the Week: Why we shouldn't use the word Hero. (@ETVPod)
2019-Feb-07thumbnailAristotle's Biology
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable achievement of Aristotle (384-322BC) in the realm of biological investigation, for which he has been called the originator of the scientific study of life. Known mainly as a philosopher and the tutor for Alexander the Great, who reportedly sent him animal specimens from his conquests, Aristotle examined a wide range of life forms while by the Sea of M... (@BBCInOurTime)
2019-Feb-07thumbnailEpisode #127 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 3 - Anti-Oedipus
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Gilles Deleuze. (@iamstephenwest)
2019-Feb-06thumbnailShorts - E9: Stupidity
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. ~Albert Einstein The only way to comprehend what mathematicians mean by Infinity is to contemplate the extent of human stupidity. ~Voltaire Present audience excepted-- surely --but Carlo Cippola, George Carlin, and Jonathan Swift aren't the only ones who think that there's a bit too much Stupidit... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-06thumbnailHow much are you worth?
Seneca gets to the bottom line of Stoic philosophy: If you wish to set a value on yourself, put away your money, your estates, your honors, and look into your own character. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-06thumbnail0G43: Bandersnatch and Quantum Immortality
Welp, for better or worse, you're in the timeline where the will of the collective has pulled the pod suddenly back to Black Mirror. Everyone spent some portion of their holiday deep in some Bandersnatch, and we're here to stack meta analysis on meta analysis till the whole thing becomes a satirical singularity, which I'm now calling a Satirelarity (that's terrible, don't ever use that). If you fe... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-05thumbnailEpisode 157: Notes From Underground (Pt. 2)
David and Tamler continue their discussion of Dostoevsky's funny, sad, philosophical novella Notes From Underground. We focus on part 2 this time - three stories from the Underground Man's past - and explore what the stories tell us about his existentialist rants in part 1. Is he consumed with guilt over his treatment of Liza? Is he ashamed of his social awkwardness, low status, and self-destructi... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Feb-05thumbnailGet rid of fear of death and poverty
Seneca agrees with Epicurus: fear of death and poverty is crippling, and we need to work toward overcoming it.  Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-04thumbnailA Simplified History of Western Philosophy
This episode is an oversimplified, hopefully, more fun version of the history of Western philosophy. Have I missed things? Yes, many. But this episode is a bite-sized version of the history. Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https... (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Feb-04thumbnailEpisode 208: Epicurus on Seeking Pleasure (Part Two)
More on the ethics-related fragments of Epicurus and accounts by Martha Nussbaum and Tim O'Keefe. What would a purely therapeutic philosophy consist of? Does philosophy as pursuit of pleasure mean that you eschew political action or other substantial goals? Mark, Wes, and Dylan try to figure out which of our desires are vain and whether society is compatible with human happiness. Listen to part on... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Feb-04thumbnailThree simple steps to live a good life
Seneca reminds us that the tools for becoming a better person are simple and inexpensive. In this episode we discuss the three basic tools of the Stoic practitioner. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-04thumbnailEpisode 32: Naomi Oreskes on Climate Change and the Distortion of Scientific Facts
Our climate is in the midst of dramatic changes, driven largely by human activity, with potentially enormous consequences for humanity and other species. That’s why science tells us, anyway. But there is an influential contingent, especially in the United States, who deny that reality, and work hard to prevent policy action that might ameliorate it. Where did this resistance come from, and what ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-04thumbnail32 | Naomi Oreskes on Climate Change and the Distortion of Scientific Facts
Our climate is in the midst of dramatic changes, driven largely by human activity, with potentially enormous consequences for humanity and other species. That’s why science tells us, anyway. But there is an influential contingent, especially in the United States, who deny that reality, and work hard to prevent policy action that might ameliorate it. Where did this resistance come from, and what ... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Feb-03thumbnailHaunting the Margins - E2: Terence McKenna
We all dull and enhance our senses in various ways. Some of us, few of us can explore the extremes of sensory manipulation. Even fewer can understand what it means. The Dawdlers return to the theme of Haunting the Margins. This time they take a trip with Terence McKenna, the late hallucinagenic experimentalist of the 20th Century. Uncle Terence had loads of ideas and a remarkably lucid penchant ... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Feb-03thumbnailEpisode 54, Why Buddhism is True with Robert Wright (Part II)
Currently Visiting Professor of Science and Religion at Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, Robert Wright’s work in journalism, psychology and philosophy has been deeply influential. Robert is the author of many best-selling books including ‘The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology’, ‘Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny’, ‘... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Feb-03thumbnailDevotion, democracy and Duterte
Is religious language incompatible with democratic politics, as philosopher Richard Rorty believed? Not in the Philippines, where religion and democracy are working together as close allies—with troubling implications for justice and human rights. (@RadioNational)
2019-Feb-03thumbnailHAP 21 - The Doctor Will See You Now - Divination, Witchcraft, and Knowledge
Special forms of knowledge and the explanation of misfortunes in African tradition. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Feb-02thumbnailESCAPING THE POLITICAL A Conversation With Rupert Read (2)
In the second part of my conversation with Rupert Read we cover private language, essential contestability and political ideologies. We also discuss if it is possible to escape political ideologies or the use of power: Can we carve out true friendships separate from the forms of oppression that surround us? (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Feb-02thumbnailThe Battle over CSOCs
On this bonus episode, I go into some of the history between the LAPD police commission and the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, and feature some of the tape from the Central station CSOC protest that didn't make it into the episode, including some creepy stuff that happened toward the end of the protest. I then talk to Sarah Brayne about the possibility of using surveillance technology to monitor the ... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Feb-02thumbnail(Bonus) The Battle over CSOCs
On this bonus episode, I go into some of the history between the LAPD police commission and the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, and feature some of the tape from the Central station CSOC protest that didn't make it into the episode, including some creepy stuff that happened toward the end of the protest. I then talk to Sarah Brayne about the possibility of using surveillance technology to monitor the ... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Feb-02thumbnailEV - 079 How To Be Like Spock with Massimo Pigliucci Part 1
In this installment we bring on a very special guest Massimo Pigliucci to discuss Stoicism. He has a PhD in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Connecticut and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Tennessee. Opening Invocation:Seneca, On Earthquakes (@ETVPod)
2019-Feb-01thumbnailEpisode 57 - Julia Bursten
On Episode 57, Nick chats with Julia Bursten, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Kentucky, about how her interactions with philosophers, physicists, and chemists led her toward a research career in the philosophy of nanoscience, doing socially-engaged philosophy of science with a regional focus, and her involvement as co-chair in the Philosophy of Science Asso... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Feb-01thumbnailWhy we need to focus on our own improvement
A quote from Marcus Aurelius sounds a lot like what Ayn Rand would say. But it couldn't be further from it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Feb-01thumbnailHenry S. Richardson, "Articulating the Moral Community: Toward a Constructive Ethical Pragmatism" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Even those among us who think that morality is rooted in timeless normative truths will acknowledge that the overall moral fabric that binds us to one another is subject to various kinds of renovation and expansion.  To take a simplistic example, the advent of the Internet has occasioned a host of new moral concepts attuned to the new ways in which people are able to treat each other -- ... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jan-31thumbnailThe Precrime Unit
Predictive policing technology is spreading across the country, and Los Angeles is the epicenter. A small group of LA activists are in a lopsided campaign against billions of dollars in city, federal, and Silicon Valley money using algorithms to predict where and when the next crime is going to occur, and even who the perpetrators are going to be. Barry embeds with the Stop LAPD Spying coalition f... (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Jan-31thumbnailFortuna is your sparring partner
Seneca reminds us that it may be just as difficult to deal with good fortune as with the bad variety. Regardless, everything life throws at us is an opportunity to exercise our virtue. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-30thumbnailShorts - E8: Artificial Intelligence
Are there inherent limits to the behavioral capacities of artifacts? How would that differ from human bodies? Are not both arrangements of universe, of "stuff"? Why would one substrate permit abilities inaccessible to others? In this week's Short the Dawdlers muse about Artificial Intelligence: what are its limits, if any-- and should we fear? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-30thumbnailPractical exercises in self-deprivation
Seneca says that doing without things for a while renews our appreciation for them. In this episode we examine five exercises in mild self-deprivation guaranteed to reset your hedonic treadmill. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-30thumbnailEpisode #52 - Devlin on Sex Robots and Moral Panics
 In this episode I talk to Kate Devlin. Kate is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Digital Humanities at King's College London. Kate's research is in the fields of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), investigating how people interact with and react to technology in order to understand how emerging and future technologies will affect us and the society in whi... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Jan-30thumbnail0G42: Today I am Paul and AI Elder Care
::alters chassis into show notes mode:: Hello. In keeping with my programming, I've done my best to anticipate all your needs as a podcast consumer. My empathy net tells me you'll desire a link to our subject: Today I am Paul: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/shoemaker_08_15/ and to maximize your comfort here is an audio version: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/audio_08_15/ I've also located a pa... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-29thumbnailAre you sick? You can be brave about it
Seneca reminds us that courage is not just for the battlefield, but for the everyday difficulties of life, like being sick. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-28thumbnail473: Envy – Vice or Virtue?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/envy-vice-or-virtue. Bertrand Russell said that envy was one of the most potent causes of unhappiness, and it's well known as one of the seven deadly sins. But is envy always a bad thing? Is it simply a petty emotion we should try to avoid, or could envy help us understand ourselves more? Is envy rooted in unhealthy comparison with others, or does ... (@philtalkradio)
2019-Jan-28thumbnailEpisode 208: Epicurus on Seeking Pleasure (Part One)
On the extant fragments of Epicurus (341–270 BCE) dealing with ethics, including his "Letter to Menoceus," “The Principal Doctrines,” and “The Vatican Collection of Epicurean Sayings.” Plus Tim O’Keefe’s Epicureanism (2010) and Martha Nussabum’s The Therapy of Desire (1994). How are we supposed to act once we understand nature as atoms bouncing and swerving around in the void, temp... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-28thumbnailEpisode 31: Brian Greene on the Multiverse, Inflation, and the String Theory Landscape
String theory was originally proposed as a relatively modest attempt to explain some features of strongly-interacting particles, but before too long developed into an ambitious attempt to unite all the forces of nature into a single theory. The great thing about physics is that your theories don’t always go where you want them to, and string theory has had some twists and turns along the way. On... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-28thumbnail31 | Brian Greene on the Multiverse, Inflation, and the String Theory Landscape
String theory was originally proposed as a relatively modest attempt to explain some features of strongly-interacting particles, but before too long developed into an ambitious attempt to unite all the forces of nature into a single theory. The great thing about physics is that your theories don’t always go where you want them to, and string theory has had some twists and turns along the way. On... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-28thumbnailPay attention to the good parts of your life
A contemporary theory of consciousness, proposed by philosopher Jesse Prinz, recalls Seneca's treatment of the emotions, and teaches us how to avert painful thoughts by focusing on the good things that happen to us. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailEpisode 111: Greg Kobele discusses mathematical linguistics
In this episode, Greg Kobele discusses how abstract mathematics can be useful for arriving at a unified theory of what patterns a person has mastery over when they can speak a language. (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailh_1400
f_auto/https://assets.pippa.io/shows/57b498490b5f3f772a76004a/cover.jpg (@ElucidationsPod)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailETV - 078 Better Know Judith Jarvis Thomson
Time for another installment of our Better Know a Philosopher serise. We dive into Judith Jarvis Thomson, author of the famous Trolly Problem thought experiment and has an interesting thought experiment on abortion.Opening Invocation:Absurdist ExistentialismHero of the Week:Teachers  (@ETVPod)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailE25: A Fetish of Fallacies - Are All Fallacies Created Equal?
“Live” but “not live”, that’s what The Dawdler’s Philosophy Podcast is. “Live” in that it is generally unscripted where we tend to not know exactly what the other host will say. And “not live” in that you can’t listen to it as it is unfolding for the first time. We’re fine with this; obviously, or we would change it. But it does require some preparation in order to pull it ... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailEpisode 54, Why Buddhism is True with Robert Wright (Part I)
Currently Visiting Professor of Science and Religion at Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, Robert Wright’s work in journalism, psychology and philosophy has been deeply influential. Robert is the author of many best-selling books including ‘The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology’, ‘Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny’, ‘... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailDisability and dignity
Philosophers have been slow to address disability - which is odd, because disability raises a host of fascinating and challenging issues around justice, rights and fairness. (@RadioNational)
2019-Jan-27thumbnailHoP 317 - Made by Hand - Byzantine Manuscripts
Without handwritten copies produced by Byzantine scribes, we would know almost nothing about ancient philosophy. How and why were they made? (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-26thumbnailWITTGENSTEIN, LANGUAGE, AND POWER A Conversation With Ruper Read
Dr. Rupert Read returns to the podcast to provide an introduction to Wittgenstein’s philosophy of language. We cover Wittgenstein’s life, his approach to philosophy, his value to us, and the metaphors of family resemblances, word games, and money. https://www.patreon.com/PoliticalPhilosophyPodcast (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jan-25thumbnailNEM#90: Sam Phillips Brings Intuition Out of Dreams
Sam has released sixteen albums of catchy, textured pop music since 1983. We discuss "I Want to Be You" and "Tears in the Ground" from World on Sticks (2018), "How to Dream" from Fan Dance (2001), and conclude by listening to "When I’m Alone" from Push Any Button (2013). Intro: "Baby I Can’t Please You" from Martinis and Bikinis (1994). For more, visit samphillips.com. Hear more Nakedly Examin... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-25thumbnailEp81 - BC15 - Listener Vmail: Addams on Immigrants from Europe versus Africa
In this 81st episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 15th “breadcrumb” episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Marilyn Fischer back on the show to talk about a great voicemail message that we received from Dr. Vance Ricks of Gilford College, who had called in about Marilyn's first chat with us, in episode 67. As a reminder, Marilyn is a Professor Emerita at the University o... (@PhilosophyBB)
2019-Jan-25thumbnailEpisode 56 - Kevin Zollman
On Episode 56, Nick chats with Kevin Zollman, Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University, how his early interests in the mathematics of poker informed his approach to doing philosophy of science, understanding social behavior through game theory and mathematical modeling, and his co-authored book, "The Game Theorist’s Guide to Parenting.” (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Jan-25thumbnailYour "happiness" is up to you, really
Epictetus reminds us that the only things that are truly good or bad for us are our judgments, which are under our control. It follows that "happiness," in the sense of a life worth living, is also under our control. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-24thumbnailWhat's a good reason to endure hardship?
Seneca reminds us that athletes willingly subject themselves to harsh regimes in order to succeed. But when it comes to becoming a better person most of us think it's just too difficult. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-23thumbnailShorts - E7: Anything is Possible
No, this isn't a New Age affirmation. It isn't a derisive denouncement of low likelihood. It's the Dawdlers giving their takes on modal logic! Herein are considered types of possibility, and how responsible epistemology might interface with metaphysical musings. Who has the arguments to back up absolute impossibility claims? If not us, then, well, as far as we know: Anything is Possible! (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-23thumbnailTurn regrets into learning opportunities
Seneca reminds us that to indulge in regret is irrational, as the past is outside of our control. That doesn't mean we can't learn from it, though. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-23thumbnail0G41: A Christmas Carol and Moral Motivation
What's this? Is it possible? Could Brian have managed to edit the surprise episode all in one night?! It's a space Santa miracle! You there, young listener! Tell me, are everyone's favorite childhood movies still sitting in the window at the butchers? Run and purchase them all, and buy some new intro quotes for yourself! I've been such a fool. Basic and broad are good things. I love them now, espe... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-22thumbnailEpisode 156: Notes From Underground (Pt. 1)
We’re sick men. We’re spiteful men. We’re unpleasant men. We think our livers are diseased (especially Tamler’s). So we talk about Dostoevsky’s wild, complex, stream of consciousness masterpiece Notes From Underground. For this episode we focus on part 1 of the novella, and the philosophy behind it. Is the underground man an existentialist hero affirming his freedom in the face of a dete... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jan-22thumbnailBad Philosophy: The Big Bang Theory
In today's episode, I examine the bad philosophy presented in the hit tv show, The Big Bang Theory. Does the Big Bang Theory misrepresent nerd culture? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https://amzn.to/2C6nnCT Email: [email protected] (@philosophyguy2)
2019-Jan-22thumbnailEverything depends on opinion
Seneca tells us that our happiness, or lack thereof, is a matter of our own opinion. No, he's not making a relativist or post-modernist argument on the nature of knowledge. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-21thumbnailEpisode 207: Herder on Art Appreciation (Part Two)
Continuing on Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), then moving to “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect? A Divine Colloquy” (1785), and and some of Critical Forests: Fourth Grove (written 1769). With guest rock god John "Jug... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-21thumbnailEpisode 30: Derek Leben on Ethics for Robots and Artificial Intelligences
It’s hardly news that computers are exerting ever more influence over our lives. And we’re beginning to see the first glimmers of some kind of artificial intelligence: computer programs have become much better than humans at well-defined jobs like playing chess and Go, and are increasingly called upon for messier tasks, like driving cars. Once we leave the highly constrained sphere of artifici... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-21thumbnail30 | Derek Leben on Ethics for Robots and Artificial Intelligences
It’s hardly news that computers are exerting ever more influence over our lives. And we’re beginning to see the first glimmers of some kind of artificial intelligence: computer programs have become much better than humans at well-defined jobs like playing chess and Go, and are increasingly called upon for messier tasks, like driving cars. Once we leave the highly constrained sphere of artifici... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-21thumbnailNASA1: Battlefield Earth
We watched Battlefield Earth so you don't have to! Except maybe you should, you silly rat brain man animals! In order to delight in our pain, sign up at patreon.com/0G at the $10 level or above! (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-21thumbnail40 years or 10,000, makes little difference
Marcus says that once we have observed human affairs for 40 years, it's the same as having observed them for 10,000 years. Surely he is wrong? Not necessarily... Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-20thumbnailE24: In Lieu of Arguments - The Gettier Problem
In art, genius is forgiven if it isn't consistent. Hell, it's probably revered more if it's inconsistent. It's fluid. Not so in philosophy. Consistency is king. Without it one becomes lost and strays from the path. In this episode the Dawdlers (well, Harland, mostly) try their best to explain why a cherished method and paper are inconsistent and are representative of bad philosophy. It's a famou... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-20thumbnailEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jan-20thumbnailHAP 20 - I Am Because We Are - Communalism in African Ethics and Politics
Emphasis on the value of community as a major theme in African philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-19thumbnailLIBERTARIANISM An Ideological History (1)
By audience selection, I cover the intellectual and ideological history of libertarianism. What were its origins and what was is reacting against? I also attempt to place these developments in their historical context and discuss how they affected the world, our current institutions, and even how we think now. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jan-18thumbnailOn the importance of friendship
The Stoics, the Epicureans, and Aristotle all agreed on one thing: friends are important. In this episode we talk about why, and how the Stoics differ from the other two schools on this topic. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-18thumbnailSeason 3 Preview
After two successful seasons, philosophy in story form comes to Slate on January 31st, 2019.  On Season 3, we look at stories of risk, experiments in democracy, the reality of social categories, illusions of the senses.  (@HiPhiNation)
2019-Jan-17thumbnailEV - 077 Losing My Religion
This week we're joined by Marie D'Elephant from Everyone's Agnostic Podcast. Marie talks about leaving her religion and how that impacted her to this day. We also discuss a myriad of topics relating to religion, death, and polyamory.Opening Invocation: The World Has Turned And Left Me Here by WeezerHero of the Week: Marie's cat (and our pets in general) (@ETVPod)
2019-Jan-17thumbnailLife's a play, act well
Seneca uses a metaphor that later became famous with Shakespeare: life is like a play, so what counts is not its length, but how well we act our parts. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-16thumbnailShorts - E6: What Came First: Thinking or Language?
Ever try and prank someone but it back fires and they just go about their business as if they were not even remotely aware of what just didn’t happen? Yeah, that’s this episode. (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-16thumbnailThe asymmetry of being dead
Seneca points out that people regret not being alive a thousand years from now, and yet are not bothered by the thought of not having been alive for the past thousand years. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-16thumbnail0G40: Total Recall and Locke's Theory of Personal Identity, Part 2
Was 0G39 a little too short for you? Did you feel ultimately unfilled after listening to it? Well, good news! Here at Podcall, we can implant a part two that will feel so real and lifelike and enriching, it will make you forget your drab existence before hearing it. And that's not all! Pay extra and we'll throw in some paranoid delusions. Already feeling them? That's how you know it's working. Won... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-15thumbnailEpisode #51 - Moen on the Unabomber's Ethics
In this episode I talk to Ole Martin Moen. Ole Martin is a Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Oslo. He works on how to think straight about thorny issues in applied ethics. He is the Principal Investigator of “What should not be bought and sold?”, a $1 million research project funded by the Research Council of Norway. In the past, he has written articles about the ethics of pro... (@JohnDanaher)
2019-Jan-15thumbnailMaria Kronfeldner, "What's Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist, and Interactive Account of a Contested Concept" (MIT Press, 2018)
Much of the debate about the roles of nature vs. nurture in the development of individual people has settled into accepting that it's a bit of both, although what each contributes to a given trait or feature, how much, and they interact are still matters of dispute. In What's Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist, and Interactive Account of a Contested Concept(MIT Press, 2018), Mari... (@NewBooksPhil)
2019-Jan-15thumbnailDistribute your wealth like after a banquet
Seneca recalls an ancient Roman custom according to which the host of a banquet would distribute gifts to his friends at the end. Consider doing the same after your life has ended. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailEpisode 207: Herder on Art Appreciation (Part One)
On Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect? A Divine Colloquy” (1785), and some of Critical Forests: Fourth Grove (written 1769). With guest rock god John "Jughead" Pierson. What is aesthet... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailAre We Prejudiced Against Machines?
This episode is a bit unusual. It is a talk that Zach gave to some students at University of Cincinnati on Oct. 18, 2018. However, since we’ve been wanting to do a technology episode for a while, we thought we’d release it. In the talk Zach explains the concept of ‘substratism’, prejudice on the basis of material substrate, which Zach also calls the “coming oppression.” So the qu... (@thevimblog)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailEpisode 29: Raychelle Burks on the Chemistry of Murder
Sometimes science is asking esoteric questions about the fundamental nature of reality. Other times, it just wants to solve a murder. Today’s guest, Raychelle Burks, is an analytical chemist at St. Edward’s University in Texas. Before becoming a full-time academic, she worked in a crime lab using chemistry to help police track suspects, and now she does research on building new detectors for u... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-14thumbnail29 | Raychelle Burks on the Chemistry of Murder
Sometimes science is asking esoteric questions about the fundamental nature of reality. Other times, it just wants to solve a murder. Today’s guest, Raychelle Burks, is an analytical chemist at St. Edward’s University in Texas. Before becoming a full-time academic, she worked in a crime lab using chemistry to help police track suspects, and now she does research on building new detectors for u... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailEpisode 55 - Helen Longino
On Episode 55, Nick chats with Helen Longino, the Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University, about her early upbringing and bohemian mindset, learning how to bridge methods in analytic philosophy with history and contextual factors, her activity in anti-war and women's liberation movements in the late 1960s and 1970s, early feminist scholarship, the resistance she and ot... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailHelen Beebee on Possible Worlds
Philosophers often talk about possible worlds. Is this just a way of describing counterfactual situations? As Helen Beebee explains, some of them believe that possible worlds actually exist. This episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast is supported by the Marc Sanders Foundation and by Patreon donations. (@philosophybites)
2019-Jan-14thumbnailA little philosophy is a dangerous thing
Epictetus warn us that a little knowledge of philosophy, without proper guidance, can actually turn us onto even more stubborn fools than we were before. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-13thumbnailE23: The Moonlight Walks - Aesthetics in Science
Yeats repeats “a terrible beauty is born” in his poem “Easter, 1916”. The poem expresses the emotional limbo of Yeats as he grapples with the post World War I Irish rebellion in response to the broken promise of Irish liberation. Out of acts of violence, comes the hope of freedom. Or is it the hope of freedom that fuels acts of violence? Whence progress? Do we make progress with ideas,... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-13thumbnailEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part III - Beyond Good and Evil)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jan-13thumbnailHoP 316 - Just Measures - Law, Money, and War in Byzantium
Legal and economic thought in Byzantium: the sources of the law’s authority, the relation of church and civil law, just price, and just war. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-13thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 206 Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part Three)
http://partiallyexaminedlife.com (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-12thumbnailTHE FOUNDATIONS OF LIBERALISM A Conversation With Shadi Hamid (2)
In the second part of our conversation, Shadi Hamid and I get into a conversation about the contradictions of liberal universality. Should we want Islamists to become liberals for instance? Shadi argues for a liberalism that can appeal to the most possible people and I argue that, given we can never escape contestable premises, a liberalism based on progress best makes sense of these contradicti... (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jan-12thumbnailEV - 076 A Quiet Box
A Quiet Place vs Birdbox. Aaron and GW evaluate each of these very void'y movies in terms of their believability, how they approached essentially the same story differently, and go over parts that may be problematic in some ways.Opening Invocation:Shardik thanks to Eric Brewer and Shannon Slayton Hero of the Week:Nancy Pelosi (@ETVPod)
2019-Jan-11thumbnailEvery good life is complete
Seneca argues that life is not like a journey. Whenever it is interrupted it is a whole life, if we have been living it virtuously. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-10thumbnailA prepared mind tackles adversity better
Today's quote from Seneca is the root of the modern Stoic technique of premeditatio malorum, a meditation in which we try to get mentally prepared to tackle adversity. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-09thumbnailShorts - E5: Reproducing
Ya like how last week we did death? This week we do birth. It also sucks! Can a Dawdler catch a break? What's that? Is that what we are basically known for? Look, don't be a hater. We mean, hustler... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-09thumbnailThe real stature of people
Seneca uses a beautiful analogy to argue that some people may look impressive while they aren't, and other people truly are impressive and yet remain overlooked. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-09thumbnail0G39: Total Recall and Locke's Theory of Personal Identity, Part 1
Imagine if you could clean up any part of your memories, would you? Are there any days in the past few years, perhaps, that you might wish to remember differently? Would you worry that changing the memory would result in a different you? Would you worry it was wrong to trade a real memory for a fake one? Good, now hop in, cause we're going to mars! That's right, it's Total Recall time, and we've g... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-08thumbnailEpisode 155: Alfred Hitchcock's Money Shot
David and Tamler dive deep into Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 hallucinatory classic, Vertigo. Why does this movie seem to gain stature among critics and academics every year? Is this a really a exploration of Hitchcock's own obsessions and sexual repression? Is it a story about filmmaking and celebrity? Or is it just a twisty noir thriller about a man who has no job and can't kiss to save his life? Plus... (@verybadwizards)
2019-Jan-08thumbnailNavigating between good and bad fortune
Seneca tells us that virtue is useful not just in order to handle bad fortune, but also, counter intuitively, to deal with good fortune. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-07thumbnailEpisode 28: Roger Penrose on Spacetime, Consciousness, and the Universe
Sir Roger Penrose has had a remarkable life. He has contributed an enormous amount to our understanding of general relativity, perhaps more than anyone since Einstein himself -- Penrose diagrams, singularity theorems, the Penrose process, cosmic censorship, and the list goes on. He has made important contributions to mathematics, including such fun ideas as the Penrose triangle and aperiodic tilin... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-07thumbnail28 | Roger Penrose on Spacetime, Consciousness, and the Universe
Sir Roger Penrose has had a remarkable life. He has contributed an enormous amount to our understanding of general relativity, perhaps more than anyone since Einstein himself -- Penrose diagrams, singularity theorems, the Penrose process, cosmic censorship, and the list goes on. He has made important contributions to mathematics, including such fun ideas as the Penrose triangle and aperiodic tilin... (@seanmcarroll)
2019-Jan-07thumbnailEpisode 206: Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part Two)
More on Lucretius’s poem about Epicurean science: On the Nature of Things from the first century BCE. We talk more about how macroscopic phenomena are supposed to come out of the interaction of atoms, including mind and its processes of knowledge and illusion, including the illusion of love. One conclusion: life after death is not possible. Can the properties of the atoms themselves be explained... (@PartiallyExLife)
2019-Jan-07thumbnailEpisode 54 - Cailin O'Connor
On Episode 54, Nick chats with Cailin O’Connor, Associate Professor in the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine, about transitioning from studying Film and Environmental Studies at Harvard and a career in the arts to studying philosophy of science, the relevance of game theory to biology, the sciences, and to resolving old philosophical problems, ... (@SciPhiPod)
2019-Jan-07thumbnailWe are all going to die, but until then?
Marcus Aurelius takes for granted that death is a natural and unavoidable end. The real question is what you are going to do between now and then. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-06thumbnailE22: A Farewell to Armchairs - Philosophy Without Intuitions
Imagine a beginner's luck without a point of reference, without any obvious design and you'll have a better picture of intuition and the role it plays in ego and illusion. So there is no luck. There is no accident. Some thinkers are just so in touch with the universe they need not appeal to another authority because they ARE the authority. In this episode we Dawdlers try to critique how intuit... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-06thumbnailEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part II - Thus Spoke Zarathustra)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast)
2019-Jan-06thumbnailHAP 19 - Behind the Mask - African Philosophy of the Person
Traditional African ideas about personhood, which challenge assumptions about the relation between mind and body, self and other. (@HistPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-05thumbnailWHAT ISLAMISTS BELIEVE A conversation with Shadi Hamid
Shadi Hamid discusses the different types of Islamism and their beliefs about government, democracy, and Islamic law. We also cover perceptions of Islam and its relationship with liberalism. (@PolPhilPod)
2019-Jan-04thumbnailEV - 075 Void Punishment
We ring in the new year with Jon from the Wayward Willis Podcast as we discuss a range of topics surrounding religion. We focus quite a bit on Jon's experience growing up in a very Christian household, and then later raising a child in a secular household.Hero of the Week:People Losing Their Heros  (@ETVPod)
2019-Jan-04thumbnailWould you buy a car based on its color?
Seneca explains that there are certain attributes of things and people that are important, and others that are irrelevant. Somehow, we keep focusing on the irrelevant ones. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-03thumbnailWhy virtue is the only good
In this episode we explore a quote from Seneca presenting the Stoic argument for why virtue is the only true good. And if it is, then shouldn't you pursue it above all else? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-02thumbnailShorts - E4: Mortality
Tick, tick, tick, tick... Happy New Year! Tick, tick, tick... The clock doesn't stop ticking when the ball drops. Another trip around the sun and we're all another year older. They haven't fixed aging yet. Death still seems a likely part of our future. What's your take on that? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2019-Jan-02thumbnailVirtue will not fall upon you by chance
Seneca already understood two millennia ago that there is no such thing as a self-made man, because luck is needed for externals. But not in order to be virtuous. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-02thumbnail0G38: Terminator 2 and Roko's Basilisk, Part 2
WARNING: THIS PODCAST CONTAINS A THOUGHT EXPERIMENT THAT MAY CAUSE FUTURE VERSIONS OF YOU TO BE TORTURED BY A ROBOT GOD. ^Technically not a joke. Okay, if you're still reading, you're a brave soul indeed. This week we're wrapping up Terminator 2 with a discussion of one of the wildest thought experiments of the modern age, Roko's Basilisk, an idea so terrifying it was banned from the Lesswrong web... (@0gPhilosophy)
2019-Jan-01thumbnailBad judgment is a disease, Stoic practice is the cure
Seneca says that people arrive at wrong judgments about what is valuable or desirable, and a major goal of Stoic training is, accordingly, to make us less unwise about values and desires. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2019-Jan-01thumbnailEp80 - BC14 - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Sports Fandom
In this 80th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 14th "breadcrumb" episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Erin Tarver back on the show to talk with us about a great listener voicemail that we received from Julia from New Hampshire. We call this breadcrumb episode "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Sports Fandom." Erin was our guest in episode 31 of the show, titled "Sport... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Dec-31thumbnailEpisode 206: Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part One)
On Lucretius’s poem about Epicurean science: On the Nature of Things a.k.a. De Rerum Natura from the 1st century BC. How does the world work? Lucretius presents a system that is surprisingly modern, and raises philosophical issues that are still on point today: What are the basic building blocks of the universe? How could these give rise to minds? What ethical views does a mechanistic world-view... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-31thumbnail472: The ExaminedYear – 2018
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/examined-year-2018. A new year offers an opportunity to reflect on the significant events of the previous year. So what happened over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Join the Philosophers as they celebrate the examined year with a philosophical look back at the year that was 2018. ... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Dec-31thumbnail472: The Examined Year – 2018
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/examined-year-2018. A new year offers an opportunity to reflect on the significant events of the previous year. So what happened over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Join the Philosophers as they celebrate the examined year with a philosophical look back at the year that was 2018. ... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Dec-31thumbnailChange your mind, if reason prompts you
Epictetus chastises one of his students for wanting to stick with a decision just because he said he would. Which leads us to a discussion of the roles of reason and emotion. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-31thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 205 Durkheim et al on Suicide (Part Three)
Mark and Wes discuss Durkheim's Suicide (1897), getting into more of the details of his account and exploring comparative modes of explanation: Are there really "sociological facts" distinct from mere generalizations about psychological facts? Get the full discussion as a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter! (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-30thumbnailE21: Ever Since the Universe Invented Imagination - What Do You Believe but Can't Prove?
We are as much our biases as we are our perception to others. Fallibility. It works in mysterious ways. This week the Dawdlers present a discussion from an earlier time than the present moment. It's a conversation they've been meaning to have but not really sure when to have it. But they did...eventually. The topic? An Edge.org annual question: 2005's What do you believe is true even though yo... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-30thumbnailEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part I - The Life of Nietzsche)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Dec-30thumbnailHoP 315 - Wiser Than Men - Gender in Byzantium
The role of women in Byzantine society and the complex attitudes surrounding eunuchs: did they make up a “third gender”? (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-29thumbnailBlack Mirror Bandersnatch: The Illusion of Choice
In today's episode, I do a philosophy quick take on the new Netflix addition of Black Mirror: Bandersnatch. I examine its commentary on the idea of free will and the illusion of choice. Are our lives predetermined just like films, tv shows, and video games? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophy... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Dec-29thumbnailCHARACTER A Conversation With Christian Miller
Christian Miller joins the podcast to discuss his book The Character Gap. What does it mean to have good character? What are, if any, the meta ethical foundations of this? Why should we develop character, and what are the factors that determines if people exhibit positive character traits in any given situation? (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Dec-29thumbnail#044 Reflecting On The Year That Was
Celebrating the one year anniversary of the Happier Hour by looking back at 2018 through the lens of each guest and philosophy featured on the show. From Resolutions to Love to Rebellion to Money to Creativity to Discovery to Revelry to Legacy, in this episode you'll hear the best of philosophy to help life suck less. Happy New Year! #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappirHour Tw... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-28thumbnailPractice, practice, practice
Stoicism is a practical philosophy, but how does that work, exactly? Not very differently from the practice of religions like Christianity and Buddhism. Find out in this episode! Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-27thumbnailHere and now
Seneca reminds us that the past is not under our control, and neither is the future. Our only locus of action is the present, and that's where our attention should be. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-27thumbnailEV - 074 Cabin In The Void
Aaron and GW review the cult classic Cabin In The Woods. The satire and tentacles make it a prime Voidy movie.Opening Invocation: Mary Elizabeth Frye (last couplet lovingly added by Aaron)Hero of the Week: Greta Thunberg (@ETVPod)
2018-Dec-26thumbnailShorts - E3: Time Travel
The Dawdlers offer some takes on the concept, possibility, and consequences of time travel. Not the kind we're all doing every day [real time "forward"], but that kind from the movies where you can go at high speeds in both directions on the entropic autobahn. Does the idea even make sense? What might happen if we succeeded? What's your take? (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-26thumbnailHow to behave during a storm at sea
Seneca reminds us that those who study philosophy are human beings, subject to the physiological responses and emotions of the case. The difference is in how they reflect on and react to circumstances. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-26thumbnail0G37: Terminator 2 and the Bootstrap Paradox, Part 1
Download me if you want to live! J/K nothing can save you from the impending robopocalypse, but at least you can hear us talk about how the causal narrative makes no sense and John Connor is even better than Jesus because he appears to spring fully formed into the universe at some point. Maybe you can chat about it with the murderbot on the way to the human camps. That would actually be great, we'... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-24thumbnail399: The AncientCosmos – When the Earth Stood Still
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ancient-cosmos. Even in ancient Greek society, philosopher-scientists engaged in heated debate about the origin, composition, and structure of our universe. Tracking our understanding of cosmology from then until now shows monumental shifts in thinking. So what did the Ancients think was the fundamental nature of the cosmos, and what kind of eviden... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Dec-24thumbnailHoliday Message 2018
There won't be any regular episodes of Mindscape this week or next, as we take a holiday break. Regular service will resume on Monday January 7, 2019. In the meantime, here is a special Holiday Message. Most likely it will be of interest to very few people -- there's no real substantive content, just me talking about the State of the Podcast and some other things I've been doing. Thanks to everyo... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-24thumbnailRetreat into your Inner Citadel
Marcus Aurelius reminds us that, when we need to regain serenity, we may retreat into ourselves and recharge our batteries. In this episode, learn about the ruling faculty and its neural correlates. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-24thumbnailEpisode #50 - Loi on Facebook, Justice and Data as the New Oil
In this episode I talk to Michele Loi. Michele is a political philosopher turned bioethicist turned digital ethicist. He is currently (2017-2020) working on two interdisciplinary projects, one of which is about the ethical implications of big data at the University of Zurich. In the past, he developed an ethical framework of governance for the Swiss MIDATA cooperative (2016). He is interested in b... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Dec-24thumbnailHarry Potter: Love and Death
What is choices role in Harry Potter? What does it mean to accept or deny death? What role does our understanding of death play in our understanding of love? Why does this matter? What is the contrast between Voldemort and Harry in relation to death? What does the Harry Potter series ultimately say about love and death? All of this discussed, tune in! Some info mentioned: Aristotle, Greek Mytho... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Dec-23thumbnail#043 Legacy Q&A: On Sacrifice, Success, and Selfies
In this episode you’ll hear from all three guests (Scott Barry Kaufman, Barry Lam, and Mary Pilon) in the series on LEGACY as they answer questions from the audience on topics including: success, American culture, religion and spirituality, and the psychological concept of The Dark Triad. #TheHappierHour Website: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappierHour Twitter.com/MissMMcCarthy Instagram.... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-23thumbnailE20: The Great Silliness - Consciousness Does Not Exist
Harland and Ryan were born on the same day 3 years apart. December 22. To celebrate they're doing an episode on consciousness and how you, yes you, dont have it!! Happy birthday to us, eh? Eh... They don't know philosopher Keith Frankish's birthday, but he doesn't think you have consciousness either even if he doesnt say it explicitly. C'mon Keith!! It's the Dawdlers' birthday!! Jerk. Here's d... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-23thumbnailEpisode #46 - Minerva on the Ethics of Cryonics
 In this episode I talk to Francesca Minerva. Francesca is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ghent. Her research focuses on applied philosophy, specifically lookism, conscientious objection, abortion, academic freedom, and cryonics. She has published many articles on these topics in some of the leading academic journals in ethics and philosophy, including the Journal of Medical Ethic... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Dec-23thumbnailEpisode 52, Existentialism and Romantic Love with Skye Cleary (Part II)
Dr Skye Cleary is a philosopher and author, best known for her work in the field of existentialism. As well as teaching at Columbia, Barnard College and the City College of New York, Skye is also the associate director of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University. Skye’s contribution to the world of public philosophy has been extensive, writing for a wealth of publicatio... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Dec-23thumbnailHAP 18 - One to Rule Them All - God in African Philosophy
Is traditional African religion in some sense monotheist, despite the worship of many divinities? (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-22thumbnailEpisode 205: Suicide with Dr. Drew (Durkheim et al) (Part Two)
http://partiallyexaminedlife.com (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-22thumbnailEpisode #126 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 2 - Immanence
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Dec-21thumbnailVirtue, virtue, everywhere!
Seneca tells us that virtue can be present at all levels, from nations to individuals, and in all circumstances, from wealth to poverty. Let's find out what, precisely, the Stoics meant by virtue and why it's so important. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-20thumbnailEV - 073 Abundant Peter Coffin's Part 2
Continuing with Peter Coffin.Opening Invocation:The Resistible Rise of Auturo UiHero of the Week:Nadia Murad  (@ETVPod)
2018-Dec-20thumbnailThe length of a virtuous life does not matter
Seneca reminds us that a life can be virtuous regardless of its length. And since we have no idea how long we are going to live, the question is: what are you going to do between now and then? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-19thumbnailNEM#88: Lincoln Barr's Off-Center Vulnerability
Lincoln established the Seattle-based singer/songwriter vehicle Red Jacket Mine in 2003, made three albums and an EP with them, and in 2017 released his first solo album, the jazzy, live-in-studio Trembling Frames. We examine "Desperate Tormentors" and hear "How To Escape" and a bit of "Memory Up and Die" from that album, and discuss Red Jacket Mine: "Apricot Moon" from Lovers Lookout (2009) and "... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-19thumbnailLove reason!
Seneca warmly invites us to love reason, which will arm us against the greatest hardships. These days, though, reason doesn't have a great reputation. Find out why we should go back to it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-19thumbnailShorts - E2: Determinism
In this episode, the Dawdlers take on determinism. Are killers gonna kill? Haters gonna hate? Chefs gonna cook? Eh...Anyway, Harland plays therapist and Ryan plays games because they're fun. And this is just the way it is because it has to be, as all things must be in the Determiverse. (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-19thumbnail#042 Achievement With Friedrich Nietzsche and Mary Pilon
In this episode you’ll learn what the controversial German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche can teach us about taking charge of our own legacies. You’ll also hear from author and investigative reporter Mary Pilon about Olympic athletes, our culture’s obsession with winners, and why we should welcome the long road to success. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Twitter: @MissMMcCarthy IG: @Miss... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-19thumbnail0G36: The Matrix and Skepticism, Part 2
What if I were to tell you that everything you know is wrong? What if I told you that the story you know is a system of control made up by people who want to keep you from the one real truth: The Matrix lacks a clear message on the problem of skepticism. On its own, it's kind of a confused mess of messaging. We dive into this issue, starting with a discussion of Plato's allegory of the cave and mo... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-18thumbnailEpisode 154: Metaphysical Vertigo (Borges's "Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius")
In the famous words of the idealist philosopher George Berkeley, “To exist is to be perceived.” Our ideas and perceptions are the fundamental objects in the universe; there is no real world beyond them. Hume wrote (I think) that Berkeley’s arguments don’t admit of the slightest refutation, and they don’t inspire the slightest conviction. On Earth, that may be true. On Tlön, it’s false... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Dec-18thumbnailDon't be proud of things you didn't accomplish
Seneca gives a splendidly clear and cogent description of the Stoic concept of preferred "indifferents," external things that are not under our complete control, and which Fortuna can take away at any moment. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-17thumbnail471: Foreign Aid – or Injury?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/foreign-aid-or-injury. Many of us might think that developed nations should lead the effort to end global poverty. But decades of foreign aid—from governments and non-governmental organizations—has failed to produce sustainable growth in the developing world. How can we empower local actors to become self-sufficient rather than dependent on for... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailEpisode 27: Janna Levin on Black Holes, Chaos, and the Narrative of Science
It's a big universe out there, full of an astonishing variety of questions and puzzles. Today's guest, Janna Levin, is a physicist who has delved into some of the trippiest aspects of cosmology and gravitation: the topology of the universe, extra dimensions of space, and the appearance of chaos in orbits around black holes. At the same time, she has been a pioneer in talking about science in inter... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-17thumbnail27 | Janna Levin on Black Holes, Chaos, and the Narrative of Science
It's a big universe out there, full of an astonishing variety of questions and puzzles. Today's guest, Janna Levin, is a physicist who has delved into some of the trippiest aspects of cosmology and gravitation: the topology of the universe, extra dimensions of space, and the appearance of chaos in orbits around black holes. At the same time, she has been a pioneer in talking about science in inter... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailEpisode 53 - Stathis Psillos
On Episode 53, Nick chats with Stathis Psillos, Professor of Philosophy of Science and Metaphysics in the Department of Philosophy & History of Science in the University of Athens, about writing his first thesis on Aristotle and quantum mechanics, developing and defending “selective realism,” creating a dictionary of philosophy of science, “Philosophy of Science A-Z,” what it’s like ... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailAnd off they go, alleging slander!
Epictetus notes that nobody tells a doctor that they are rude if the doctor says they are sick and need medicine. But if the philosopher does that with one's moral health... Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailSam Harris' Hypocrisy
The trilogy is complete! In this episode, Zach makes his case that Sam Harris’ attitude on racism is hypocritical. Zach thinks that Harris’ critique of religious moderates should lead him, by the same logic, to critique people with moderate attitudes on racism (like Harris himself). Big if true, surely. The episode is based on Zach’s article called “Wake Up, Sam Harris.” It can be ... (@thevimblog)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailThe Hypocrisy of Sam Harris
The trilogy is complete! In this episode, Zach makes his case that Sam Harris’ attitude on racism is hypocritical. Zach thinks that Harris’ critique of religious moderates should lead him, by the same logic, to critique people with moderate attitudes on racism (like Harris himself). Big if true, surely. The episode is based on Zach’s article called “Wake Up, Sam Harris.” It can be ... (@thevimblog)
2018-Dec-17thumbnailEpisode 205: Suicide with Dr. Drew (Durkheim et al) (Part One)
We are rejoined by Drew Pinsky to discuss philosophical and psychological readings by Seneca, Arthur Schopenhauer, Sigmund Freud, Emile Durkheim, Albert Camus, plus two 2017 survey papers on predictors of suicide. Is suicide ever morally permissible? If it's a symptom of mental illness rather than a chosen behavior, is it even appropriate to morally evaluate it? Check the PEL Store for our Wall Ca... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-16thumbnailE19: The Muck Raker's Son-in-Law - R.A. Fisher's Science and Statistics
People love to talk about the pitfalls of statistics and how we can "lie" with it. Those people don’t do statistics. In science, statistics is often quite difficult. It's there to help us with very complicated problems, not to hurt others with simple craven power leveragings. The Dawdlers discuss the positive side of this dichotomy through a paper by the mid-to-late 20th Century statistician G... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-16thumbnail#041 Storytelling With David Hume and Barry Lam
When is fiction more important that fact? In this episode with Vassar philosophy professor and host of the Hi-Phi Nation podcast, Barry Lam, you’ll learn what the 18th century Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume can teach us about storytelling and the importance of emotions and storytelling in a polarized world. #TheHappier Hour Website: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappierHour T... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-16thumbnailEpisode 52, Existentialism and Romantic Love with Skye Cleary (Part I)
Dr Skye Cleary is a philosopher and author, best known for her work in the field of existentialism. As well as teaching at Columbia, Barnard College and the City College of New York, Skye is also the associate director of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University. Skye’s contribution to the world of public philosophy has been extensive, writing for a wealth of publicatio... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Dec-16thumbnailHoP 314 - Katerina Ierodiakonou on Byzantine Commentaries
A chat about commentaries on Aristotle from Byzantium with guest Katerina Ierodiakonou. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-15thumbnailTHE BIRTH OF ETHICS A Conversation With Philip Pettit (2)
In the second part of our conversation Philip Pettit gives his answer to the challenge of the first; creating a reconstructive account of morality that explains its nature, the origins of desirability and responsibility, and why we should be moral. As mentioned in the intro I’ve decided not to accept offers for paid advertisements for the podcast and will be attempting to fund it solely t... (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Dec-15thumbnailEpisode 110: Chike Jeffers discusses the social and political philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
What is the best way forward for a group of people fairly recently freed from slavery? Booker T. Washington emphasized economic enfranchisement, whereas W.E.B. Du Bois thought it was necessary to achieve political enfranchisement alongside economic enfranchisement. Join us as our guest discusses how threads from this 100-year-old debate persist in today's discussions about racial justice in Americ... (@ElucidationsPod)
2018-Dec-14thumbnailWhat are you going to do with your luck?
Seneca conjures a vivid image of the goddess Fortuna showering mortals with gifts, which are ruined by the eager crowd, or badly used, and that at any rate do not produce happiness. That's because people lack wisdom, necessary to truly enjoy Fortuna's gifts. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-14thumbnailSamuel Schindler, "Theoretical Virtues in Science: Discovering Reality Through Theory" (Cambridge UP, 2018)
A fundamental problem in science, and in philosophy of science, is that of theory choice. Scientists propose theories to explain data, but when two scientific theories can both explain the same data, what criteria do scientists use to choose between them? And given that even very popular scientific theories can turn out to be wrong, how are the criteria for theory choice related to truth? Do scien... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Dec-13thumbnailEp78 - Demons and Other Unusual Mental States
In this 78th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Tadd Ruetenik, Professor of Philosophy at Saint Ambrose University, on "Demons and Other Unusual Mental States." Tadd is the author of The Demons of William James: Religious Pragmatism Explores Unusual Mental States, out this year with Palgrave MacMillan. Tadd is the winner of the 2018 Ila and John Morr... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Dec-13thumbnailTry inward happiness
Seneca explains that if our happiness depends on externals, like fame or money, we are in the hands of Fortuna, who could take those things away at any moment. But if we are happy because we are good, then Fortuna is powerless. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-13thumbnailEV - 072 Abundant Peter Coffin's Part 1
This is part one of a two part episode with Peter Coffin. A YouTube Documentarian, Author, and self-proclaimed Marxist. We first dive into capitalist systems, the open source movement, humans as labor, the state vs. the government, pokemon as a commentary on society, and so much more.Opening Invocation:Gestalt Buddhism (@ETVPod)
2018-Dec-12thumbnailDon't judge a pilot by the size of her ship
Seneca states very clearly that wealth is an indifferent, in Stoic terms. It can be pursued if it allows us to do good, but it should be avoided if it corrupts our moral fiber, making us greedy toward luxury and power. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-12thumbnailShorts - E1: Does Everyone Have a Right to Their Opinions?
Hello World. It’s us Dawds, trying out yet another new thing. We thought we’d discuss a kinda off-the-cuff, shootin’-from-the-hip type format in addition to the usual 2+ hours we do. It’s more of a relaxed stroll with intermittent skipping as opposed to the marathons we’ve been doing so far. This time the Dawdlers wanna get each other’s take on whether or not everyone has a “right... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-12thumbnail#040 Practice With William James and Scott Barry Kaufman
What does it mean to leave a legacy and how can we practice being better people starting today? In this episode you’ll learn how the American philosopher and leader of the Pragmatism Movement, William James, can teach us about habits, and what psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman has discovered in his research on self-actualization. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-12thumbnailOG35: The Matrix and Skepticism, Part 1
Do you hear that? That's the sound of conceptual inevitability. We all know this was coming, so grab your bondage gear and chug some red pills, cause Kansas is going bye bye! We're doing The Matrix and Skepticism. There's so much skepticism packed into this classic, we're gonna spread it out and let it breathe some. For part one, we cover the Cartesian style external world skepticism and the sim... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-11thumbnailInception: Contradictions with a Purpose
In this episode, we analyze the philosophy of Inception. We look at an obvious contradiction that is present throughout the film. But what is its purpose? This question inevitably brings up, is the entire film in the mind of Cobb? If true, does this destroy the meaning of the film? What is the meaning of the film? All of this discussed, tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Dec-11thumbnailIt is either extinction or change
Marcus Aurelius contemplates whether death is a resolution of atoms or a final annihilation. He doesn't seem bothered by either possibility. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-10thumbnailEpisode 26: Ge Wang on Artful Design, Computers, and Music
Everywhere around us are things that serve functions. We live in houses, sit on chairs, drive in cars. But these things don't only serve functions, they also come in particular forms, which may be emotionally or aesthetically pleasing as well as functional. The study of how form and function come together in things is what we call "Design." Today's guest, Ge Wang, is a computer scientist and elec... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-10thumbnail26 | Ge Wang on Artful Design, Computers, and Music
Everywhere around us are things that serve functions. We live in houses, sit on chairs, drive in cars. But these things don't only serve functions, they also come in particular forms, which may be emotionally or aesthetically pleasing as well as functional. The study of how form and function come together in things is what we call "Design." Today's guest, Ge Wang, is a computer scientist and elect... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-10thumbnailEpisode 204: The Bhagavad Gita's Hindu Theology (Part Two)
More on this classic text by (perhaps) Vyasa, with guest Shaan Amin. Should we acquire good karma or behave "beyond good and evil"? How can everything be Krishna while Krishna is also the an element of virtue we're supposed to pursue? How does this compare with Stoicism? Plus, behold Krishna unveiled and be freaked out! Listen to part one first or get the full, unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. P... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-09thumbnailE18: Wittgenstein's Inner Parliament
There are these people in workplaces who have a talent for completing assigned tasks well. Their results are basically always excellent and up to the specifications and requirements for getting the job "done right". Worker bees, we call them. And they are essential for the consistent and routine operation of a workplace. Without them the riffraff hand in a suboptimal and incomplete product. What... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-09thumbnailE18: Wittgenstein's Inner Parliament - Exploring "On Certainty"
There are these people in workplaces who have a talent for completing assigned tasks well. Their results are basically always excellent and up to the specifications and requirements for getting the job "done right". Worker bees, we call them. And they are essential for the consistent and routine operation of a workplace. Without them the riffraff hand in a suboptimal and incomplete product. What... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-09thumbnail#039 Revelry Q&A: On Beauty, Bacchae, and Becoming
In this episode you’ll hear what all three guests on the topic of REVELRY have to say in the audience Q&A. From beauty to movies to dancing to immigration and Latinx culture, revelry has a role to play. You’ll also learn what the ancient Greek tragedy The Bacchae can teach us today. Woa, that rhymes! #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-09thumbnailEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Dec-09thumbnailReparation
When individuals and communities today still suffer the consequences of past wrongs – slavery, dispossession, invasion, the theft of land and resources – what exactly is owed to them, and who should pay? (@RadioNational)
2018-Dec-09thumbnailHAP 17 - Event Horizon - African Philosophy of Time
John Mbiti’s influential and controversial claim that traditional Africans experience time as having “a long past, a present, and virtually no future.” (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-08thumbnailNEM#87: Chris Cacavas Fronts His Depression
Chris rose to fame on keys for Arizona's country punks Green on Red from '81-'87 and has since then been fronted 12 albums while doing session keyboard work. We discuss "Pale Blonde Hell" by Chris Cacavas and Junkyard Love from Pale Blonde Hell (1994), "Do Me No Favors" from Anonymous (1997), and "Don't Think Twice" from Bumbling Home from the Star (2002). We listen to "I Won't Feel Well" from Lov... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-08thumbnailRECONSTRUCTING MORALITY A Conversation With Philip Pettit
Philip Pettit returns to the podcast to discuss his latest work The Birth of Ethics. We set of the challenge of resolving the seeming paradox of ethical truth in a naturalistic universe: In a world explained by science with 'nothing spooky' going on, how, and why, would morality emerge? (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Dec-08thumbnailEpisode #125 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 1 - What is Philosophy?
Today we begin our discussion on Gilles Deleuze with a special thanks to Felix Guatarri. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Dec-07thumbnailAmbition is not a Stoic value
Seneca warns us against ambition, understood not as the will to accomplish things, but as the pursuit of fame, money, and power. Modern politicians should be like Cato the Younger, not Alcibiades. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-06thumbnailEpisode 52 - Federica Russo
On Episode 52, Nick chats with Federica Russo, Assistant Professor in Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam, about the relationship between probability and causality, the role of philosophy of science in science, how the Russo-Williamson Thesis sparked a lively debate on causation in medicine, and the role technology plays on knowledge itself.FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Dec-06thumbnailEV - 071 Better Know Epicurus
Let's get to know Epicurus who is definitely not Epictetus. This is the first time we've taking a close up look at one of the old Greek philosophers.Opening Invocation:South Wales Wassiling folk customHero of the Week:Luo Xixi  (@ETVPod)
2018-Dec-06thumbnailAvoid busyness
Seneca advises us to be careful how we spend our time, and especially how we respond to other people's demands for it. Life is short, surely you won't regret, on your deathbed, not having attended one more useless office meeting... Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-05thumbnailDon't be like a dog waiting for another morsel of meat
Seneca says that people are like dogs who eagerly await the next tasty morsel from Fortuna, swallow it quickly, then eagerly await the next one. Don't be like a dog, that way lies perennial dissatisfaction with life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-05thumbnail#038 Sexy Time with Michel Foucault and Jezebel Express
Are we too repressed? In this episode you’ll learn what the philosopher historian Michel Foucault had to say about oppression, resistance, and power, and what NYC burlesque dancer and instructor Jezebel Express can teach us about taking ownership of our own bodies. #TheHappierHour Website: TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Dec-05thumbnailListener Qs 6
Listener Q's 6, or 5 pt.2 depending on how you keep count. We get through every question and patron name there is! Plus, it's looking like we're gonna have a fun special guest next week back on the Patron feed. Stay tuned! Principia Discordia: https://principiadiscordia.com/ Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-05thumbnail0G34: The Good Place and Moral Luck
Well, the cats out of the bag now. Everyone knows this is really The Bad Show. You'd think all the bickering between Thomas and I would have given it away sooner, but it's a relief to have it out in the open. Kidding! Everything is great! We're doing season two of The Good Place, a show we both think is great, and we're talking about Moral Luck, something you will all soon think is great! I strong... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-04thumbnailEpisode 153: Progress in Psychology: A Reply to BootyBootyFartFart
David dies for science’s sins and addresses the failed replication of one of his studies (conducted with three former VBW guests) by the Many Labs Project. But first, the guys try to gauge their intuitions about the phenomenal experience of their molecule-for-molecule mirror reflection duplicate in a universe with a non-orientable topology. Could this spell doom for e-categoricalism? Plus, the ... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Dec-04thumbnailOf sickness and wisdom
Seneca says that lacking wisdom is like being sick. Although we can imagine what it would be like to be perfectly healthy, in reality we can be happy if we manage to be less sick than before. That's progress, folks! Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailEpisode 204: The Bhagavad Gita's Hindu Theology (Part One)
On the classic Hindu text (ca. the 3rd century B.C.E.), part of the Indian Epic poem Mahabharata, attributed to Vyasa, using Keya Maitra's 2018 translation/commentary. What is it to live wisely? What grounds duty? Listen as the supreme God Krishna convinces archer hero Arjuna that it's OK for him to kill his relatives because, you know, reincarnation and determinism and caste-related duties. Lots ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailEpisode 25: David Chalmers on Consciousness, the Hard Problem, and Living in a Simulation
The "Easy Problems" of consciousness have to do with how the brain takes in information, thinks about it, and turns it into action. The "Hard Problem," on the other hand, is the task of explaining our individual, subjective, first-person experiences of the world. What is it like to be me, rather than someone else? Everyone agrees that the Easy Problems are hard; some people think the Hard Problem ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-03thumbnail25 | David Chalmers on Consciousness, the Hard Problem, and Living in a Simulation
The "Easy Problems" of consciousness have to do with how the brain takes in information, thinks about it, and turns it into action. The "Hard Problem," on the other hand, is the task of explaining our individual, subjective, first-person experiences of the world. What is it like to be me, rather than someone else? Everyone agrees that the Easy Problems are hard; some people think the Hard Problem ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Dec-03thumbnail470: Foucault and Power
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/foucault-and-power. Michel Foucault was a 20th century philosopher known for his work concerning power and knowledge. Foucault is often cited for his theory of knowledge and power, which are inextricably linked. But what exactly is Foucault's philosophy of power? Is it a universal theory intended to be applied in any context, or was Foucault simply... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailTheory is easy, practice requires effort
Epictetus reminds us that one does not become a good carpenter, or pilot, by simply studying the theory of carpentry or piloting. Mindful, repeated effort is needed to see results. The same goes with one's philosophy of life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailCarrie Figdor, "Pieces of Mind: The Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates" (Oxford UP, 2018)
We’re all familiar with cases where one attributes certain psychological states or capacities to creatures and systems that are not human persons.  For example, your cat might prefer a certain variety of cat food, and maybe your houseplants enjoy a certain corner of the room they’re in.  In many cases, these attributions pass by without much notice.  However, in certain regiment... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailEpisode #49 - Maas on AI and the Future of International Law
In this episode I talk to Matthijs Maas. Matthijs is a doctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen's 'AI and Legal Disruption' research unit, and a research affiliate with the Governance of AI Program at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute. His research focuses on safe and beneficial global governance strategies for emerging, transformative AI systems. This involves, in part, ... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Dec-03thumbnailSam Harris vs. Jordan Peterson. What's the difference?
Zach and Dylan are back with part 2 of their series on the “Intellectual Dark Web,” a group of thinkers/political figures held together by god-knows-what. Scroll back for part 1! In this episode, Dylan makes his case that Jordan Peterson and Sam Harris (the IDW’s biggest names) are fundamentally different types of thinkers. That is a strong claim because it means that they shouldn’t be mem... (@thevimblog)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailE17: The Final Induction
Ryan has kids. Kids have diseases and general poor hygiene. Thus, Ryan has diseases and sometimes poor hygiene. But he loves ‘em, those little rascals. In this episode, the Dawdlers explore this kind of parental affection, but for ideas. How much affection should we give to our brain children? The discussion centers around a little old paper that holds the key! And the key is as Harland sa... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailE17: The Final Induction - The Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses
Ryan has kids. Kids have diseases and general poor hygiene. Thus, Ryan has diseases and sometimes poor hygiene. But he loves ‘em, those little rascals. In this episode, the Dawdlers explore this kind of parental affection, but for ideas. How much affection should we give to our brain children? The discussion centers around a little old paper that holds the key! And the key is as Harland sa... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailRick & Morty: The Psychology of Rick
In this episode, I consider the Psychology of Rick. Is Rick destined to be miserable because of his intelligence? Can being smart make you miserable? I consider some research in psychology to help answer these questions. Is this question a matter of nature or nurture? What does being intelligent have to do with being creative? Is any of this an excuse for Rick's bad behavior? All of this discus... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part III - The Second Sex)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailThe vice of fear
Is fear such a bad thing? Nobody likes to experience it, but fear can be a spur to virtuous action, and overcoming fear is the essence of courage. But not everyone takes such a benign view. (@RadioNational)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailHoP 313 - Queen of the Sciences - Anna Komnene and her Circle
Princess Anna Komnene makes good use of her political retirement by gathering a circle of scholars to write commentaries on Aristotle. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailSacred and Profane Love Episode 13: Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life
  Download Episode 13: Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life   In episode 13 of Sacred & Profane Love, “Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life, I speak with professor Karen Stohr of Georgetown University about how Austen brings into relief the social dimensions of virtue in her novels. We discuss the … Continue reading Sacred and Profane Love Episode 13: Jane Auste... (@jennfrey)
2018-Dec-02thumbnailLookism
Francesca Minerva says discrimination based on looks is a serious problem. (@DavidEdmonds100)
2018-Dec-01thumbnailFREE WILL, RACE & IQ, AND OTHER LISTENER QUESTIONS
I Answer listener questions on a range of topics then give extended answers defending my views on free will (and how they relate to my views on religion and social justice and explaining my I think the arguments that race and IQ are linked are both flawed and dangerous. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Nov-30thumbnailPhilosophy is a lifelong commitment
Seneca makes the startling claim that philosophy is a lifelong commitment that cannot be indulged only in our spare time. He doesn't mean academic studies, but rather practice, just like a Christian or Buddhist would do it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-30thumbnailEV - 070 Skepticism with Michael Marshall
We're joined by the esteemed Michael Marsh Marshall of the Be Reasonable podcast. Aaron and Marsh dive into many areas including: the Socratic method, placebo affect, skepticism, and cannibalism.Opening Invocation: The Holocaust (@ETVPod)
2018-Nov-29thumbnailInstead of conquering the world, conquer yourself
Seneca says that he hasn't conquered any enemy but his own greed, ambition, and fear of death. If more people, especially the leaders of the world, were to take that attitude, perhaps there would be no need to conquer enemies. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-29thumbnail#037 Fiestas & Solitude With Octavio Paz and Daniel Campos
Are fiestas an answer to combating loneliness? In this episode you’ll learn what the poet and diplomat Octavio Paz can teach us about belonging and why philosophy professor Daniel Campos believes partaking in revelry is especially important for immigrant communities. #thehappierhour Show notes: thehappierhour.org (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Nov-28thumbnailEpisode 51 - Hasok Chang
On Episode 51, Nick chats with Hasok Chang, the Hans Rausing Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, about deciding to leave Seoul, South Korea at the age of sixteen to study physics in the U.S., running up against physicists at Caltech who discouraged philosophical thinking, finding encouragement and a home in HPS within the Stanford School of Philosophy of ... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Nov-28thumbnailIn order to make progress you have to desire progress
The goal of Stoic training is to become a better person, not a perfect one. But the first step, as always in life, is to want to make progress. If you wish to better yourself, the game is afoot, you need to start now. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-28thumbnailListener Qs 5
Hey y'all! No jokes on this one, just a sincere thank you to our listeners and especially our patrons for keeping us in orbit. We had so much fun doing these, and as you'll here there's more fun on the way! Principia Discordia: https://principiadiscordia.com/ Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion grou... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-28thumbnail0G33: Aliens and The Second Sex
Hop to, marines! We've got feminist critiques to drop on some unsuspecting sex monsters. We're breaking down the blockbuster hit Aliens, and putting it through the ringer in ways that make me deeply uncomfortable, given I was raised on this movie. Luckily we have Thomas on hand to remind us how terrible it is. Here are some links on The Second Sex: The Second Sex: https://plato.stanford.edu/entrie... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-27thumbnailPhilosophy of The Big Lebowski
In this episode, I analyze the cult classic, The Big Lebowski. Is the film providing commentary on postmodernism? Or is it a more Stoic take on life? What is the philosophy of The Dude? Should we be more like The Dude? All of this discussed, tune in! Please subscribe, rate and review to help out the show! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Tw... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Nov-27thumbnailPaul Sagar on Scepticism about Philosophy
Throughout its history there have been challenges to the status of philosophy. Paul Sagar discusses some of these in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation in making this podcast, and for donations from Patreon patrons. (@philosophybites)
2018-Nov-27thumbnailIn a few words: virtue is the only good
Seneca provides us with a very short and to the point summary of Stoic philosophy: virtue is the only good, it depends on our ability to reason correctly, and it leads to good judgment. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-26thumbnailEpisode 24: Kip Thorne on Gravitational Waves, Time Travel, and Interstellar
I remember vividly hosting a colloquium speaker, about fifteen years ago, who talked about the LIGO gravitational-wave observatory, which had just started taking data. Comparing where they were to where they needed to get to in terms of sensitivity, the mumblings in the audience after the talk were clear: “They’ll never make it.” Of course we now know that they did, and the 2016 announcemen... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-26thumbnail24 | Kip Thorne on Gravitational Waves, Time Travel, and Interstellar
I remember vividly hosting a colloquium speaker, about fifteen years ago, who talked about the LIGO gravitational-wave observatory, which had just started taking data. Comparing where they were to where they needed to get to in terms of sensitivity, the mumblings in the audience after the talk were clear: “They’ll never make it.” Of course we now know that they did, and the 2016 announcemen... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-26thumbnail469: The Creative Life
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/creative-life. Parents and students alike often think that a college major defines possible career options. Yet what distinguishes today's work world from bygone times is that it's quite common for adults to have a variety of different careers in a single lifetime. So what can students do now to ensure happiness and fulfillment in all possible futu... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Nov-26thumbnailBe grateful for what you have, but don't get too attached to it
Marcus Aurelius reminds himself to be grateful for the things he has, which he would long for if he didn't have them. At the same time, everything is impermanent, so we should be prepared for our losses. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-26thumbnail#036 Nostalgia With Svetlana Boym and Not Your Average Cotton
Can nostalgia help us be happier? In this episode you’ll learn the difference between good and bad nostalgia according to Russian philosopher Svetlana Boym, and how a toy cotton candy machine became a side hustle for the founders of Not Your Average Cotton. #thehappierhour Website: thehappierhour.org (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Nov-26thumbnailEpisode 203: Kristeva vs. Lovecraft on Horror and Abjection (Part Two)
Concluding on Julia Kristeva's Powers of Horror (1980) and focusing on H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" (1928). Does Lovecraft's presentation of nameless terror capture (or improve upon) what Kristeva means by "abjection"? End song: "The Other" by Mark Lint feat. Lucy Lawless. Read about it and support the project. Listen to part one first, or go back to ep. 202 first. Become a PEL Citizen t... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-25thumbnailHaunting the Margins - E1: Robert Anton Wilson
"If you don't mind haunting the margins, I think there is more freedom there. It's like being a politician in opposition; that's where you can be most sincere. But, of course, you sometimes look at people taking lead parts and think they've got all the gravy." -Colin Firth Unremitting travelers rarely play it safe. How could they? They are in motion. Momentum is both a liberator and a killer. Bu... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-25thumbnailEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part II - The Ethics of Ambiguity)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Nov-25thumbnailPlato, Buddhism and storytelling
At a glance, Platonic philosophy and Buddhism might seem to have little in common. But their ideas on moral development and "turning the soul" towards reality have fascinating congruences. (@RadioNational)
2018-Nov-25thumbnailHAP 16 - Samuel Imbo on Okot p'Bitek and Oral Traditions
A conversation with Sam Imbo on approaching oral traditions as philosophy and the Ugandan thinker and poet Okot p'Bitek. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-24thumbnailRACE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY A Conversation With Glenn Loury
What role should race play in how we think of ourselves as Americans? I discuss the race debate with Professor Glenn Loury. We cover the role of culture, the wealth gap, high levels of inner city-violence, the case for reparations, and police killings. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Nov-23thumbnailSagehood is rare, but progress is up to us
Seneca tells Lucilius that he himself is far from being a wise person, which is as rare as the mythical phoenix. Nevertheless, we can all be "proficientes," those who make progress. Which is the whole point of Stoic training. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-22thumbnailHope
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the philosophy of hope. To the ancient Greeks, hope was closer to self-deception, one of the evils left in Pandora's box or jar, in Hesiod's story. In Christian tradition, hope became one of the theological virtues, the desire for divine union and the expectation of receiving it, an action of the will rather than the intellect. To Kant, 'what may I hope' was one o... (@BBCInOurTime)
2018-Nov-21thumbnailStoicism is not a "manly" philosophy
We hear a lot of nonsense about Stoicism being tough and therefore only for men. But Seneca clearly explains that virtue doesn't make us invulnerable to pain and suffering, and that women are just as capable as men to become virtuous. Go figure. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-21thumbnailEV - 069 The World Is Doomed and GW Is In The Void
With GW not being around, Bethany Furtrell joins Aaron to talk about the election results. They also talk about Aaron's woes of Monster Island and how the finical crisis is about to start its reunion tour.Opening Invocation: Kobe BryantHero of the Week: Eileen and Todd (@ETVPod)
2018-Nov-21thumbnail#035 DISCOVERY Q&A: On Cruises, Knowledge, Books, and Brains
In this Q&A episode with all three guests on the topic of DISCOVERY you’ll learn: Does taking a cruise count as traveling? What does consciousness have to do with social media? What knowledge is needed to discuss philosophy? What is luck? Which books have had the biggest impact? #thehappierhour Website: thehappierhour.org Facebook: Facebook.com/thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Nov-21thumbnail0G32: Alien and The Corporation as Sociopath
This week we're breaking out the big guns, except not really because one of the greatest horror movies of all time ain't got no guns. Just some ineffective flamethrowers misused by some schluby rockhoppers. Best in class on all fronts, Alien! We're mixing it up with the 2003 cultural touchstone The Corporation. A book/movie about how corporate persons are functionally sociopaths. We attempt some p... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-20thumbnailEpisode 152: Ruthlessness, Public and Private
Tamler and David continue their Nagel-gazing by discussing another essay from Mortal Questions: "Ruthlessness in Public Life." Why do we treat the immorality of politicians, military leaders, and others in power differently than the immorality of individuals? Why does it seem less aversive to shake the hand of someone responsible for the death of thousands of civilians through military action than... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Nov-20thumbnailDining with a tyrant, are you?
Seneca gives us another Stoic "paradox": it may be better to be tortured than to sit at the dinner table. Well, not normally, but surely if you are being tortured to protect innocent lives, or sit at dinner with a tyrant. It all depends on context. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-19thumbnailEpisode 203: Kristeva vs. Lovecraft on Horror and Abjection (Part One)
More on Julia Kristeva's Powers of Horror (1980) plus H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" (1928). What is the object of fear? Mark, Seth, and Dylan get clearer on Kristeva's view of the establishment and loss of the integrity of the self, what the "object" of abjection is, and what this all might have to do with feminism. Most of the Lovecraft goodness is in part 2, so don't wait! Get the unbro... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-19thumbnailEV - 068 TERF's and Trans Athleticism
Today we are lucky to have Dr. Rachel McKinnon to talk about the term TERF (Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminist) and Trans Athletes. Rachel, herself, is a philosopher who's very qualified to speak about TERF, and is a world class cyclist who knows an immense amount about Biology as it relates to non-cis athletes.Trans Athletes LectureQueerMealsOpening Invocation:Angel  (@ETVPod)
2018-Nov-19thumbnailNo need to be anxious even in front of a king
Epictetus explains why king Antigonus was anxious to meet Zeno, the founder of Stoicism, and not vice versa. The king had not yet internalized the fundamental principle of the dichotomy of control: making a good impression on others is not up to us. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-19thumbnailEpisode 23: Lisa Aziz-Zadeh on Embodied Cognition, Mirror Neurons, and Empathy
Brains are important things; they're where thinking happens. Or are they? The theory of "embodied cognition" posits that it's better to think of thinking as something that takes place in the body as a whole, not just in the cells of the brain. In some sense this is trivially true; our brains interact with the rest of our bodies, taking in signals and giving back instructions. But it seems bold to ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-19thumbnail23 | Lisa Aziz-Zadeh on Embodied Cognition, Mirror Neurons, and Empathy
Brains are important things; they're where thinking happens. Or are they? The theory of "embodied cognition" posits that it's better to think of thinking as something that takes place in the body as a whole, not just in the cells of the brain. In some sense this is trivially true; our brains interact with the rest of our bodies, taking in signals and giving back instructions. But it seems bold to ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-19thumbnailIntroduction to the "Intellectual Dark Web"
In this first of three episodes on the so-called “Intellectual Dark Web,” Dylan and Zach start with the basics. - What is this group? - What unites them? - What makes them intellectual? - What makes them dark? We focus mainly on Sam Harris and Jordan Peterson. In the coming episodes, we get more specific. Part 2 is about Dylan’s article: https://thevimblog.com/2018/08... (@thevimblog)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailE16: Episodic Synchrony
“I suppose most scientists—most authors—have one piece of work of which they would say: It doesn’t matter if you never read anything else of mine, please at least read *this*.” Richard Dawkins wrote that in a note to a 1989 paperback edition of his book "The Extended Phenotype". Ryan appeals to this sentiment when it comes to the idea he outlines in this episode. Poor Harland has to si... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailE16: Episodic Synchrony - Diversity in Consumer-Resource Systems
“I suppose most scientists—most authors—have one piece of work of which they would say: It doesn’t matter if you never read anything else of mine, please at least read *this*.” Richard Dawkins wrote that in a note to a 1989 paperback edition of his book "The Extended Phenotype". Ryan appeals to this sentiment when it comes to the idea he outlines in this episode. Poor Harland has to si... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailThe Other by Mark Lint Feat Lucy Lawless
Support this project at patreon.com/marklint!https://patreon.com/marklint (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 202 Follow-Up: Close Reading of Kristeva's "Approaching Abjection"
Mark takes a very close look at pages 1–4 of the first chapter of On Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (1980) as a supplement to episode 202. Get the full, 55-minute experience as a PEL Citizen, or get it by supporting us on Patreon for a mere $1! (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part I - The Life of Simone de Beauvoir)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailAre we getting anywhere?
Is philosophy more about questions than answers? Not necessarily. It all depends on how you conceive of philosophy in the first place, particularly with regard to its institutional setting. (@RadioNational)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailNEM#86: Seth Swirsky Provides Instant Pleasure
Seth Swirsky was a highly successful staff songwriter for over 20 years and has put out three solo albums and three albums as The Red Button since 2004. He's a huge Beatles fan and has released a Beatles documentary Beatles Stories and has multiple books about psychology and baseball. We discuss his heavily covered and sound-tracked tune "Love Is a Beautiful Thing"; you'll hear the version by Al G... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-18thumbnailHoP 312 - Past Masters - Byzantine Historiography
The larger meaning of history in the chronicles written by Michael Psellos, Michael Attaleiates, Anna Komnene, and Niketas Choniates. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-17thumbnailKNOWLEDGE AND PSEUDO KNOWLEDGE A Conversatin With Brain Earp (2)
In the second part of my conversation with Brian Earp we discuss replicability, pre-registration, pseudoscience, science in popular culture, and the limits of scientific knowledge. We also apply this epistemically cautious empiricism to the difficult cases of implicit bias, affirmative action, and workplace diversity quotas. Website: https://www.politicalphilosophypodcast.com Suppo... (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Nov-17thumbnailEpisode 50 - Justin Garson
On Episode 50, Nick chats with Justin Garson, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College-CUNY, about chairing a session with Daniel Dennett on memetics at the 2018 Philosophy of Science Association meeting, his work on biological functions in psychiatry and how symptoms of mental disorders like anxiety and schizophrenia might be useful to us, taking part in a summer meeting that brought s... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Nov-16thumbnailTake the view from above
A quote from Seneca leads us into a discussion of the difference between Stoicism and modern philosophies of despair. For the Stoic, knowledge of the vastness of time and space is no excuse for nihilism, but simply a way to put things in perspective and get back to the task of living well. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-15thumbnailNot just endurance, but tranquillity of mind
Seneca tells Lucilius how Cato, after losing an election, went out to play; and how, before taking his own life, he retired to his room to read a book. Stoicism isn't just about enduring things, it's about achieving serenity in the face of ill fortune. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-15thumbnailShannon Spaulding, “How We Understand Others: Philosophy and Social Cognition” (Routledge, 2018))
Social cognition includes the ways we explain, predict, interpret, and influence other people. The dominant philosophical theories of social cognition–the theory-theory and the simulation theory–have provided focused accounts of mindreading, the more specific practice of ascribing beliefs, desires, and intentions to others in order to predict and explain their behavior.... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Nov-14thumbnailBoJack Horseman on Loneliness, Depression, and Self
Today's episode I analyze the Netflix show BoJack Horseman and the philosophy of it. Focussing on the show's commentary of loneliness, depression, and the self through the lens of the main character, BoJack Horseman. Tune in! Please subscribe, rate and review to help out the show! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ A... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Nov-14thumbnailPhilosophy is serious business
Seneca invites his friend Lucilius to consider that philosophy is too serious a business to be left only to professional philosophers, especially those who engage in clever wordplay and logic chopping just to show how smart they are. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-14thumbnail0G31: Snow Crash and Universal Language, Part 2
Ai Oh EH ME PA TI Congrats, you're all our language slaves now. We learned the secret words of the Ur language developed by the ancient masters to code the behavior of their followers and now our cult is going to really kick in to high gear. Hope you enjoy this part two, featuring both a new set of intro quotes and our returning special guest Noah Lugeons of Puzzle in a Thunderstorm fame. Universa... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-13thumbnailEp77 - Justifications for Intellectual Property & Copyright Law
In this 77th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview law professor Brian Frye on "Justifications for Intellectual Property and Copyright Law." Brian is the host of The Bindle on WRFL 88.1 FM and is the Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky's College of Law. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Berkeley and then went on to ... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Nov-13thumbnailDecide on the big picture, the details come later
Seneca makes an argument for why we should adopt a philosophy of life (be it Stoicism or something else). It provides us a framework to make decisions and prioritize things. The rest is details. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-12thumbnail468: Does Reputation Matter?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/does-reputation-matter. We think about about our own reputation all the time, and we constantly reference the reputations of the people we meet and interact with. But why do we care so much about reputation? Is it rational for us to rely on reputation so heavily in our day-to-day lives? Are judgments about reputation just a handy social screening m... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Nov-12thumbnailEpisode 22: Joe Walston on Conservation, Urbanization, and the Way We Live on Earth
There's no question that human activity is causing enormous changes on our planet's environment, from deforestation to mass extinction to climate change. But perhaps there is a tiny cause for optimism -- or at least, the prospect of a new equilibrium, if we can manage to ameliorate our most destructive impulses. Wildlife conservationist Joe Walston argues that -- seemingly paradoxically, but not r... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-12thumbnail22 | Joe Walston on Conservation, Urbanization, and the Way We Live on Earth
There's no question that human activity is causing enormous changes on our planet's environment, from deforestation to mass extinction to climate change. But perhaps there is a tiny cause for optimism -- or at least, the prospect of a new equilibrium, if we can manage to ameliorate our most destructive impulses. Wildlife conservationist Joe Walston argues that -- seemingly paradoxically, but not r... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-12thumbnailSeneca on suicide
Seneca elaborates on how the Stoics see suicide: nature gave us one entrance into life, but many exits. And it is the existence of these exits that guarantees our freedom. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-12thumbnailEpisode 202: Julia Kristeva on Disgust, Fear and the Self (Part Two)
Continuing on Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection, ch. 1 and 2. We try to get clearer on Kristeva's talk of "object," the relationship between language and abjection, how Kristeva is advancing on Freud, how to be a mom that allows a kid to separate in a healthy way, and how abjection plays into religion and writing. Listen to part one first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition, and do... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-11thumbnailE15: The Rolling Wall of Fog
There may not be philosophy-free science, but there *is* radical-free philosophy. Harland tries it out for as long as he can in this episode on the possible differences between science and philosophy. Buckle your chin straps, Truth Seekers! 00:04:50 – Science? Philosophy?/Thought experiments/Provisionalism vs Definitionalism 00:42:48 – Modes of Indeference/Progress 01:02:26 – “Soci... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-11thumbnailE15: The Rolling Wall of Fog - Science v. Philosophy
There may not be philosophy-free science, but there *is* radical-free philosophy. Harland tries it out for as long as he can in this episode on the possible differences between science and philosophy. Buckle your chin straps, Truth Seekers! 00:04:50 – Science? Philosophy?/Thought experiments/Provisionalism vs Definitionalism 00:42:48 – Modes of Indeference/Progress 01:02:26 – “Soci... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-11thumbnailEpisode 50, ‘The Golden Age of Female Philosophy’ with Rachael Wiseman (Part II)
Rachael Wiseman is a lecturer of philosophy at the University of Liverpool and previously an Addison Wheeler Research Fellow at Durham University. She, and her colleague Dr Clare MacCumhaill, are co-leaders on the British Academy funded project, In Parenthesis, which explores the work and friendship of the philosophical wartime quartet: Mary Midgley, Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, and Iris Mur... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Nov-11thumbnailPlaying around
Video games helps us to engage philosophically with issues of ethics, identity and more. This makes them potentially useful as a classroom learning tool — but what about all that violence? (@RadioNational)
2018-Nov-11thumbnailHAP 15 - Heard it Through the Grapevine - Oral Philosophy in Africa
An introduction to the “ethnophilosophy” approach inaugurated by Placide Tempels, its promises and potential pitfalls. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-10thumbnailTHE REPLICATION CRISIS A Conversation With Brian D. Earp
The replication crisis has rocked the world of academic physiology but how far do its implications go? In this episode, I cover the incentive structures, institutional patterns, and faulty ways of thinking about statistics and evidence that lead to this with Brian Earp. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Nov-09thumbnailThe Stoic argument for assisted suicide
Seneca continues his discussion of suicide with his friend Lucilius, arguing that maintaining agency and exercising our judgments are fundamental ingredients of a good life. It follows that we should be in charge of when and how to quit. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-09thumbnailThe Stoic argument for the right to suicide
Seneca continues his discussion of suicide with his friend Lucilius, arguing that maintaining agency and exercising our judgments are fundamental ingredients of a good life. It follows that we should be in charge of when and how to quit. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-08thumbnailSacred and Profane Love Episode 12: Meaning, Murder, and Divine Madness
  Download Episode 12: Meaning, Murder, and Divine Madness In Episode 12 of Sacred & Profane Love, “Meaning, Murder, and Divine Madness,” I speak with the eminent moral theologian, Fr Michael Sherwin, O.P., about Donna Tartt’s breakout bestseller, The Secret History. We discuss how the novel is best situated within both the Southern Gothic and the Southern Catholic Goth... (@jennfrey)
2018-Nov-08thumbnailLife: it isn't about length, it's about quality
Seneca makes a point that is still controversial two millennia later. The important thing about life is not its length, but its quality. And it is up to the individual to judge the quality of her own life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-07thumbnailHow to avoid temptation and practice virtue
Seneca gives some very commonsensical advice, backed up by modern psychological research, on how to best avoid temptation. Which leads us to a discussion of what we should avoid, and what, by contrast, we should seek out in order to act virtuously. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-07thumbnail0G30: Snow Crash and Libertarianism, Part 1
Grab your poons and crank your toons, we're blasting into the wild world of Snow Crash. With the help of our amazing special guest, Noah Lugeons from the Puzzle in a Thunderstorm crew, we're diving deep into the political symbolism of Stevenson's most famous work, and next week we'll be back to talk the philosophy of language in Snow Crash. Wiki on Anarcho-Capitalism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-06thumbnailStoicism in Pop Culture and Politics
In today's episode, I analyze the recent and rising cultural movement of the Stoic school of thought. What's this mindset all about? Is Stocism helpful? What are the shortcomings of Stoicism? Who is embracing this type of thinking? Is this way of thanking being transferred into our political discourse? All of this discussed, tune in! Please subscribe, rate and review to help out the show! ... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Nov-06thumbnailEpisode 151: Viddy Well, My Listeners (Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange")
There was me, that is Tamler, and my droog, that is David, and we sat in our living rooms on Skype trying to make up our rassoodocks what Stanley Kubrick's a Clockwork Orange was really about? Free will? We didn't think so. Punishment? Yeah but what about punishment? And what about the old ultraviolence - can it still shock us in the modern age? Then suddenly we viddied that thinking was for the g... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Nov-06thumbnailWe are all sick, but we can help each other
Seneca says to his friend Lucilius that he is no wise man or doctor, but rather an unwise and sick person. Which brings us to a discussion of Stoic humility and how it is that we can all make progress toward wisdom. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailEpisode 202: Julia Kristeva on Disgust, Fear and the Self (Part One)
On Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (1980), ch. 1 and 2. What is horror? Kristeva writes about "abjection," where we violently reject things like corpses, bodily wastes and other fluids, and the Lovecraftian unnameable that lurks at the edge of our awareness. Her book is also all about the self, suggesting modifications to Freud's Oedipal complex and Lacan's mirror-stage story. With guest K... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailEpisode 21: Alex Rosenberg on Naturalism, History, and Theory of Mind
We humans love to tell ourselves stories about why things happened the way they did; if the stories are sufficiently serious, we label this activity "history." Part of getting history right is simply an accurate recounting of the facts, but part of it is generally taken to be some kind of explanation about why. How much should we trust these explanations? This is a question with philosophical imp... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-05thumbnail21 | Alex Rosenberg on Naturalism, History, and Theory of Mind
We humans love to tell ourselves stories about why things happened the way they did; if the stories are sufficiently serious, we label this activity "history." Part of getting history right is simply an accurate recounting of the facts, but part of it is generally taken to be some kind of explanation about why. How much should we trust these explanations? This is a question with philosophical impl... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 201 Marcus Aurelius's "Meditations" (Part Three)
Mark and Seth get further into the specifics of Marcus's metaphysics and how this is supposed to relate to behavior. Can his directives really come solely "from reason" as he claims? How does this interact with the behaviors that we pursue "by nature," i.e., without conscious deliberation required? Seth is concerned with how individualistic the philosophy is. Mark is concerned that if you discard ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailThe difference between tranquillity and flat calm
Seneca argues that tranquillity of mind is the result of an active, but realistic, engagement with the problems posed by life. By contrast, refusing to rise up to challenges simply leads to a flat and meaningless calm. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailDavid Rondel, “Pragmatist Egalitarianism” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Pragmatism is a longstanding philosophical idiom that advocates public-facing philosophy – philosophy that abandons merely academic puzzles and addresses itself to the social and political problems of the day. This commitment is perhaps most firmly manifest in John Dewey. Unsurprisingly, Dewey wrote extensively in social and political philosophy, focusing in... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailThe Vim's Voter Guide
Not your typical voter guide! We are always eyeing the next election. So the Vim is here to give you some guidance in the ballot box. Zach lays out his theory of 'democratic holism': we should vote on behalf of a whole, like the planet, groups of countries, or our country. We shouldn’t be self-interested in the ballot box. Dylan and Zach discuss some basic values around voting and democracy... (@thevimblog)
2018-Nov-05thumbnailDISCRIMINATION AND FREE SPEECH A Conversation With Existential Comics' Corey Mohler
In the final episode of my conversation with Corey, we discussed the role of discrimination in our society. I also gvae a relpy to concerns raised by Jorden Peterson fans. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Nov-04thumbnailE14: Nietzsche's Rich Pageant
If we're lucky, we're able to add a little sumptin'-sumptin' to the end of the line. Maybe it's a good twist or we bring more than a few threads together. But every once in a while someone comes along and braids so far ahead they leave us all behind. Perhaps one day we'll arrive at Nietzsche's fray...again, if we're lucky. Until then we just have to try and keep moving forward, try to understand... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-04thumbnailE14: Nietzsche's Rich Pageant - Exploring "Will to Power"
If we're lucky, we're able to add a little sumptin'-sumptin' to the end of the line. Maybe it's a good twist or we bring more than a few threads together. But every once in a while someone comes along and braids so far ahead they leave us all behind. Perhaps one day we'll arrive at Nietzsche's fray...again, if we're lucky. Until then we just have to try and keep moving forward, try to understand... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Nov-04thumbnailThink global
Writing a global history of philosophy is a tricky business - but that hasn't stopped this week's guest from taking it on. (@RadioNational)
2018-Nov-04thumbnailEpisode 50, ‘The Golden Age of Female Philosophy’ with Rachael Wiseman (Part I)
Rachael Wiseman is a lecturer of philosophy at the University of Liverpool and previously an Addison Wheeler Research Fellow at Durham University. She, and her colleague Dr Clare MacCumhaill, are co-leaders on the British Academy funded project, In Parenthesis, which explores the work and friendship of the philosophical wartime quartet: Mary Midgley, Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, and Iris Mur... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Nov-04thumbnailHoP 311 - The Elements of Style - Rhetoric in Byzantium
Psellos and other experts in rhetoric explore how this art of persuasion relates to philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Nov-02thumbnailETV - 067 Better Know Mary Wollstonecraft
Today episode we dive into Mary Wollstonecraft, a philosopher from the enlightenment period. We look at her writings and take a macro look at how her work set the pace for later feminist writings leading up to the suffrage movement. Opening Invocation:FalloutHero of the Week:Stacy Abrams (Running for Georgia's Governor) (@ETVPod)
2018-Nov-02thumbnailRacism and Stoic compassion
Marcus Aurelius reminds us that people do and say things not because they are evil, but because they are mistaken. The proper response, then, is education and pity, not hatred. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-01thumbnailGelato and the Cynic wing of Stoicism
Musonius Rufus advises us to follow a minimalist life style, closer to the so-called "Cynic" wing of the Stoic movement. Why is that? Because reducing temptations helps us practicing virtue, as we'll see by way of an example featuring gelato. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Nov-01thumbnailEpisode #48 - Gunkel on Robot Rights
In this episode I talk to David Gunkel. David is a repeat guest, having first appeared on the show in Episode 10. David a Professor of Communication Studies at Northern Illinois University. He is a leading scholar in the philosophy of technology, having written extensively about cyborgification, robot rights and responsibilities, remix cultures, new political structures in the information age and ... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Oct-31thumbnailThe most important mental trick of your life
Epictetus says that a lyre player plays beautifully when he practices on his own. But gets very nervous in front of an audience. That's because he wants something that is not under his control. Learn and internalize this lesson and your life will be happy and serene. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-31thumbnail0G29: Ex Machina and the AI Box Problem, Part 2
Welcome back to our thrilling conclusion of Ex Machina. Since this was a such a heavily requested fan favorite we took suggestions for topics for this part two, so we end up spending a fair bit of time discussing the AI Box problem and male gaze. Don't forget to post quotes for the intro on the patreon thread, and get your hopes up about a special guest for next show! AI Box problem: https://ratio... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-30thumbnailRick and Morty: Thinking like Rick
How does Rick think? How does Rick view the world? Should we think like Rick? What is First Principles thinking? Should we take things literally? The problem with following our minds assumptions. All of this discussed, tune in! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https://amzn.to/2C6nnCT E... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Oct-30thumbnailThe unity of virtue thesis
Seneca argues that the four cardinal virtues are a tightly coordinated council, which makes the best possible decisions for us. In this episode we explore the Stoic concept of the unity of virtue, and make sense of it by analogy with going to the gym to improve our health. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-30thumbnail#034 Your Brain On Avicenna and Shannon Odell
In this episode with neurologist and comedian Shannon Odell, you’ll learn how your brain shapes your experiences and how your brain processes social media. You’ll also learn about the parallels between self-discovery in neuroscience and the ideas posed by the ancient Islamic scientist and philosopher Avicenna, who is often described as one of the most influential philosophers of all time. #the... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-29thumbnailEpisode 201: Marcus Aurelius's Stoicism with Ryan Holiday (Part Two)
More on The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius (ca. 180 CE) plus Ryan's The Daily Stoic (2016). We talk Stoicism as "pre-mourning," love of fate, the divine plan, political ethics, ethical models, and overwriting your brain with the Stoic operating system. Hear part 1 first, or get the full, unbroken Citizen Edition, as well as the follow-up discussion. Please support PEL! End song: "Any Way the Wind ... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-29thumbnailTackle illness with virtue
Illness is not something to look forward to, as Stoics are not mad. But it is a fact of life, and so it becomes a question of how we deal with it: by kicking and screming, or as a test of our virtue of temperance? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-29thumbnailEpisode 20: Scott Derrickson on Cinema, Blockbusters, Horror, and Mystery
Special Halloween edition? Scott Derrickson is a film-lover first and a director second, but he's been quite successful at the latter -- you may know him as the director and co-writer of Marvel's Doctor Strange. (When I was younger, Doctor Strange was one of my favorite comic characters, along with Green Lantern. At least one of them got a great movie.) Scott was gracious enough to take time from ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-29thumbnail20 | Scott Derrickson on Cinema, Blockbusters, Horror, and Mystery
Special Halloween edition? Scott Derrickson is a film-lover first and a director second, but he's been quite successful at the latter -- you may know him as the director and co-writer of Marvel's Doctor Strange. (When I was younger, Doctor Strange was one of my favorite comic characters, along with Green Lantern. At least one of them got a great movie.) Scott was gracious enough to take time from ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-29thumbnailNEM#85: John Etheridge (Soft Machine) is For Everything!
John is an amazing guitarist who started in the late-'60s British blues boom, had his first compositions set to tape with Darryl Way's Wolf in the early '70s, then joined the latter line-ups of jazz-prog legends Soft Machine (replacing Alan Holdsworth) in the late '70s. He's collaborated with luminaries like violinist Stéphane Grappelli, guitar great John Williams, and Andy Summers from The Polic... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-29thumbnail415: Election Special
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/election-special. In this re-broadcast of our special episode from the lead-up to the 2016 election, John and Ken look beyond the horse races at some of the bigger questions raised by our electoral process. • Do we always have a duty to vote? with Stanford political scientist Emilee Chapman • Can our democracy survive the amount of money... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Oct-28thumbnailE13: Footnotes to Fermi
So, this guy Enrico trolled humanity once and it’s left us reeling ever since. This week the Dawdlers discuss the implications of this troll and explore a few threads on why we don’t get no satisfaction from our attempts to catch signals emitted by extraterrestrial intelligences. A hope and a calculation, but no USS Enterprise. Grab your ankles if you want, but get comfortable at least. It m... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-28thumbnailE13: Footnotes to Fermi - The Aliens Episode
So, this guy Enrico trolled humanity once and it’s left us reeling ever since. This week the Dawdlers discuss the implications of this troll and explore a few threads on why we don’t get no satisfaction from our attempts to catch signals emitted by extraterrestrial intelligences. A hope and a calculation, but no USS Enterprise. Grab your ankles if you want, but get comfortable at least. It m... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-28thumbnailLearning Confucius
How's your Confucianism? If the answer is "a little rusty", then you're not alone. Confucianism and Chinese philosophy are niche subjects in Australia, even among students of Chinese background. (@RadioNational)
2018-Oct-28thumbnailHAP 14 - Souleymane Bachir Diagne on Islam in Africa
Peter speaks to Souleymane Bachir Diagne about Islamic scholars in West Africa. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-28thumbnailEpisode 49, Corey Mohler: Behind Existential Comics (Part II)
Corey Mohler is a software engineer from Portland, Oregon, USA. With no formal education in philosophy, it might come as a surprise that Corey is the author of the incredibly popular philosophy webcomic, Existential Comics. Founded in December 2013, Existential Comics describes itself as “a philosophy webcomic about the inevitable anguish of living a brief life in an absurd world. Also jokes.... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Oct-27thumbnailEp76 - Evil, Suffering, God, & Ethics
In this 76th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Jack Symes, host of The Panpsycast philosophy podcast, on the theme "Evil, Suffering, God, and Ethics." Jack graduated from the University of Liverpool in philosophy (BA and MA) and went on as a postgraduate in Teaching Studies at the University of Birmingham. Jack is currently teaching philosophy at Kin... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Oct-27thumbnailHARRIS, PETERSON, AND PINKER A Conversation With Existential Comics Corey Mohler
In this episode, I discuss the 'Intelectual Dark Web' with Existential Comic's Corey Mohler. We cover Sam Harris, Jordan Peterson, and Steven Pinker, arguing that for supposed free thinkers, they often just seem to want to maintain the world of their youth. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Oct-26thumbnailBe prepared to endure prosperity
Seneca argues that, strange as it may seem, prosperity is to be endured, just as bad times are. It's yet another Stoic "paradox," of which we make sense in this episode. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-25thumbnailEpisode 49 - Vincent Hendricks
On Episode 49, Nick chats with Vincent Hendricks, Professor of Formal Philosophy and Director of the Center for Information and Bubble Studies at the University of Copenhagen, about the importance of reasoning through illustrations, applying ideas from finance and economics to questions in philosophy of science, the ways in which our children influence our philosophical thinking, and his latest bo... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Oct-25thumbnailEpictetus gets punched on the nose
Epictetus tells the story of when he first started preaching, instead of teaching, philosophy. It did not go well, and he got punched on the nose. He quickly learned the difference between preaching and teaching. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-25thumbnailEV - 066 You Done Messed Up A-Aron!
he wonderful world of pedagogy. In this episode we discuss different teaching philosophies, class models, grading, and education systems. Both Aaron and GW dive into their personal teaching techniques.Opening Invocation:Underoath - The Created VoidHero of the Week:Brian Banks (@ETVPod)
2018-Oct-25thumbnailThe Fable of the Bees
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) and his critique of the economy as he found it in London, where private vices were condemned without acknowledging their public benefit. In his poem The Grumbling Hive (1705), he presented an allegory in which the economy collapsed once knavish bees turned honest. When republished with a commentary, The Fable of the Bees was seen as ... (@BBCInOurTime)
2018-Oct-25thumbnailEpisode #124 ... Simulacra and Simulation
Today we begin our discussion of Jean Baudrillard's book Simulacra and Simulation. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Oct-24thumbnailThe last day of Epicurus
Seneca recounts the last, painful day, of the life of the rival philosopher Epicurus, who claimed that even that day he was happy. Which leads us into a discussion of what the Stoics and Epicureans meant by happiness. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-24thumbnail#033 It's All Relative With Albert Einstein and Dr. Elise Crull
In this episode with professor Elise Crull, you’ll hear what just what the heck metaphysics is, how Einstein’s disciplinary education and interests improved his scientific discoveries, how his view of science inspired his dedication to civil rights, and the relationship between philosophy and technology. #thehappierhour Show notes: thehappierhour.org Facebook: @thehappierhour Twitter/IG: @Miss... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-23thumbnailEpisode 150: Paul Bloom Insisted That We Talk About Sex Robots
What better way to celebrate our 150th episode than to bring back our favorite guest – Paul Bloom! We riff on a series of topics: the new “grievance studies” hoax, sex robot brothels, perverse desires, and perverse beliefs. Then we get a little navel gazey (OK maybe more than a little) and talk about podcasting as a form of media and discussion, good teaching, and what we’ve learned about ... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Oct-23thumbnail0G28: Ex Machina and Mary the Color Scientist, Part 1
You requested, and requested, and requested, and we finally got there! Ex Machina, one of the strongest horror sci-fi movies to come out in the past decade. There is so much wonderful content to this movie we're spreading it out over two episodes. For this first one, we focus on the thought experiment of Mary in the colorless room, and how it relates to the problem of consciousness for AI that we ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-23thumbnailAll good people are equally worthy
Seneca states the fundamental Stoic principle that the measure of a person has nothing to do with externals like wealth, health or good looks. It depends on one thing and one thing only: goodness of character. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-22thumbnailThe Truth about Post-Truth
“Post-truth” was the 2016 word of the year, inspired by Trump and Brexit. But what does it mean? Is it coherent? Can we ever actually be post-truth? If so, are we now? Dylan and Zach subject the concept to some analysis. They base their discussion on an interview in Vox of a philosopher called Simon Blackburn. 0:00- Housekeeping 3:40- Introducing post-truth 5:30- Prolegomenon t... (@thevimblog)
2018-Oct-22thumbnailVirtue is nothing but right reason
Seneca gives a straightforward, simple, yet rich definition of virtue to his friend Lucilius. It has huge consequences for every one of us, every day. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-22thumbnailEpisode 201: Marcus Aurelius's Stoicism with Ryan Holiday (Part One)
On The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius (ca. 180 C.E.) plus Ryan's The Daily Stoic (2016). What does Stoicism look like in practice, in both ancient and modern contexts? You might think that eschewing the shallow, out-of-our-control trappings of fame and wealth in favor of personal cultivation would make one unambitious, but Ryan uses Marcus as a prime example of how to be a Stoic while trying to ac... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-22thumbnailEpisode 19: Tyler Cowen on Maximizing Growth and Thinking for the Future
Economics, like other sciences (social and otherwise), is about what the world does; but it's natural for economists to occasionally wander out into the question of what we should do as we live in the world. A very good example of this is a new book by economist Tyler Cowen, Stubborn Attachments. Tyler will be well-known to many listeners for his long-running blog Marginal Revolution (co-created... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-22thumbnail19 | Tyler Cowen on Maximizing Growth and Thinking for the Future
Economics, like other sciences (social and otherwise), is about what the world does; but it's natural for economists to occasionally wander out into the question of what we should do as we live in the world. A very good example of this is a new book by economist Tyler Cowen, Stubborn Attachments. Tyler will be well-known to many listeners for his long-running blog Marginal Revolution (co-created ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-22thumbnail467: Can Reason Save Us?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/can-reason-save-us. To an optimist, things are constantly getting better: disease and extreme poverty are down; life expectancy, literacy, and equality are up; and it’s all thanks to the glory of human reason. But a pessimist would point to the continuing presence of injustice, oppression, and war, and the dangers of global warming and nuclear an... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Oct-21thumbnailE12: Daniel Dennett's Easy Problems
This time the Dawdler’s examine Daniel Dennett’s book “Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking” (2013). Regardless of all that, these two tools think they think. Topics explored are philosophical zombies, Occam’s Razor, black boxes, and sorta operators. Do you smell that? It’s the sweet potpourri of Dennettian thinkadinks. -Dawds 00:08:24 – Thinking Tools 00:39:32 – Fo... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-21thumbnailE12: Daniel Dennett's Easy Problems - Content, Consciousness, and Intuition Pumps
This time the Dawdler’s examine Daniel Dennett’s book “Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking” (2013). Regardless of all that, these two tools think they think. Topics explored are philosophical zombies, Occam’s Razor, black boxes, and sorta operators. Do you smell that? It’s the sweet potpourri of Dennettian thinkadinks. -Dawds 00:08:24 – Thinking Tools 00:39:32 – Fo... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-21thumbnail#032 Bonus Episode: Well-Placed Travels with Jessica Parker
In this Happier After Hours Bonus Episode you’ll learn about travel through the lens of the destination with travel public relations consultant Jessica Parker. How does a place become a “brand” and how does one get to the essence of a destination? This is a follow up episode to #031 with travel writer David Farley about travel and transformation and the lessons of philosopher George Santayan... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-21thumbnailalt-Nietzsche
Few serious Nietzsche scholars today regard him as having been any sort of proto-Nazi. But that hasn’t stopped alt-right extremists today from "rediscovering" Nietzsche and claiming him as a philosophical ally. (@RadioNational)
2018-Oct-21thumbnailHoP 310 - Purple Prose - Byzantine Political Philosophy
Byzantine political thought from the time of Justinian down to the Palaiologos dynasty wrestles with the nature and scope of imperial power. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-21thumbnailEpisode 49, Corey Mohler: Behind Existential Comics (Part I)
Corey Mohler is a software engineer from Portland, Oregon, USA. With no formal education in philosophy, it might come as a surprise that Corey is the author of the incredibly popular philosophy webcomic, Existential Comics. Founded in December 2013, Existential Comics describes itself as “a philosophy webcomic about the inevitable anguish of living a brief life in an absurd world. Also jokes.... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Oct-20thumbnailCOMEDY AND PROPAGANDA A Conversation With Existential Comics' Corey Mohler
In this episode, I talk with Corey Mohler, author of the popular philosophy webcomic existential comics. We discuss the role of jokes in philosophy and politics, why he hates George Carlin, the state of the Democratic party in the US, and more. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Oct-20thumbnailEpisode #47 - Eubanks on Automating Inequality
 In this episode I talk to Virginia Eubanks. Virginia is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of several books, including Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor and Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age. Her writing about technology and social justice has appeare... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Oct-20thumbnailEp79 - BC13 - One-Sheet - Clutter
This 79th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread is a short breadcrumb episode serving simply as a reading of SOPHIA's "One-Sheet" on "Clutter," by Dr. John Lachs, and with questions by Caroline A. Buchanan, Derek Daskalakes, Erik Jarvis, James William Lincoln, and Eric Thomas Weber. The Lexington SOPHIA Chapter got together to talk about this one-sheet on September 18 of 2018. SOPHIA "One-Sheet" docu... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Oct-19thumbnailPhilosophy of Mission Impossible Fallout
In today's episode, we examine the philosophy of Tom Cruise's latest installment in the Mission Impossible series, Fallout. Should we kill one person to save many? Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https://amzn.to/2C6nnCT Email: [email protected] Venmo tip jar: @brenden-weber (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Oct-18thumbnailEV - 065 Voidy Outcasts
Today we're joined by Felicia Entwistle where Aaron struggle to pronounce her name. If that isn't enough reason to listen to this episode, well we also talk about her work with Utah Outcasts.Opening Invocation:Torsten PihlHero of the Week:Renia (@ETVPod)
2018-Oct-17thumbnailBe charitable toward others
Marcus Aurelius says that other people do wrong out of lack of wisdom, and so do we, which means we should be forgiving toward others. Besides, life is short, and others can't harm the most important thing: our faculty of judgment. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-17thumbnail#031 The Road Less Travelled With Santayana and David Farley
This episode kicks of The Happier Hour Season 2 as well as our conversations on DISCOVERY. You’ll learn how travel writer David Farley and the philosopher George Santayana can help us find more meaning in our lives by looking at how and why we travel. You’ll also hear unconventional advice about travel writing and the ways in which travel has the ability to transform us. #thehappierhour Show n... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-17thumbnail0G27: Galaxy Quest and Toxic Fandom, Part 2
Never give up your fandom! Never surrender shipping! Today we're fanning out over the amazing Galaxy Quest, a gem that just keeps getting better with age. We talk about how it was a roadmap for the kinds of fandom that have since gone from fringe to mainstream. Then we discuss some of the textbook features of toxic fandom and practices fans can engage in to enjoy their art without it becoming harm... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-17thumbnailEpisode 48 - Ann-Sophie Barwich
On Episode 48, Nick chats with Ann-Sophie Barwich, Visiting Professor in the Cognitive Science Program at Indiana University Bloomington, about growing up studying literature in East Germany, finding her voice as a researcher, and the importance of thinking about the sense of smell as a model for neuroscience and the senses.FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPTTimestamps: 0:15 Hello and welcome / 2:07 Ann ... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Oct-16thumbnailDo like Socrates, have a dialogue instead of a dispute
Epictetus reminds us that Socrates made an effort to talk to people while avoiding rudeness and invectives. Imagine if we did the same today, instead of indulging in the current climate of acrimony about social and political issues. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-15thumbnail398: The Ethics of Debt
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ethics-debt. According to a report from the Jubilee Debt Campaign, there are currently 24 countries facing a full-blown debt crisis, with 14 more on the verge. Globally, there is about $200 trillion of debt on the books. Although the poor and disenfranchised of the world play no role in negotiating these loans, in debt crises they usually end up pa... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailEpisode 200: Kant/Mendelssohn/Foucault on Enlightenment (Part Two)
Continuing on "What Is Enlightenment" by Immanuel Kant (1784), "On Enlightening the Mind" by Moses Mendelssohn (1784), and "What Is Enlightenment" by Michael Foucault (1984). We finish up Kant (the courage to know!) and lay out the Mendelssohn (cultivation vs. enlightenment) and Foucault (ironically heroize the present!). Will this conversation enlighten you? Who knows? Listen to part one first or... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailEpisode 18: Clifford Johnson on What's So Great About Superstring Theory
String theory is a speculative and highly technical proposal for uniting the known forces of nature, including gravity, under a single quantum-mechanical framework. This doesn't seem like a recipe for creating a lightning rod of controversy, but somehow string theory has become just that. To get to the bottom of why anyone (indeed, a substantial majority of experts in the field) would think that r... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-15thumbnail18 | Clifford Johnson on What's So Great About Superstring Theory
String theory is a speculative and highly technical proposal for uniting the known forces of nature, including gravity, under a single quantum-mechanical framework. This doesn't seem like a recipe for creating a lightning rod of controversy, but somehow string theory has become just that. To get to the bottom of why anyone (indeed, a substantial majority of experts in the field) would think that r... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailLove requires virtue, not externals
Seneca says that one shouldn't love a person because they are rich, or strong, but because they are virtuous. Which gets us into a discussion of the meaning of the word "axia," referring to things that have value but are not crucial. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailRobert A. Wilson, “The Eugenic Mind Project” (MIT Press, 2017)
For most of us, eugenics — the “science of improving the human stock” — is a thing of the past, commonly associated with Nazi Germany and government efforts to promote a pure Aryan race. This view is incorrect: even in California, for example, sterilization of those deemed mentally defective was... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailBONUS: More on the Uninformed President
We bring you an unusual, first of its kind, bonus episode. It is kinda like a behind the scenes look. In the last episode, Justin and Zach explored the consequences of having an uninformed president—or rather, a president who takes no interest in learning, isn’t concerned with having beliefs that are responsive to reality, and whose interaction with the world is only in terms of what is best f... (@thevimblog)
2018-Oct-15thumbnailIntellectual Arrogance
Are we becoming incapable of respecting other people's opinions? (@DavidEdmonds100)
2018-Oct-14thumbnailE11: I Just Wanna Get off the Bus
Typically, people may describe a “wide-ranging” podcast conversation as covering topics from A to Z to あ. Maybe that’s the case for those podcasts. Us dawdlers? Eh… Ryan thinks this episode is on the psychology of “over”-population and Malthusian growth dynamics. Harland thinks Ryan just doesn’t like being one-of-many and is heavily invested in the narrative of Lockean individual... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-14thumbnailE11: I Just Wanna Get off the Bus - The Overpopulation Episode
Typically, people may describe a “wide-ranging” podcast conversation as covering topics from A to Z to あ. Maybe that’s the case for those podcasts. Us dawdlers? Eh… Ryan thinks this episode is on the psychology of “over”-population and Malthusian growth dynamics. Harland thinks Ryan just doesn’t like being one-of-many and is heavily invested in the narrative of Lockean individual... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-14thumbnailHospital ethics
What happens when doctors and ethicists get together – particularly when the patient under discussion is a young child? And how can philosophy help? (@RadioNational)
2018-Oct-14thumbnailHAP 13 - Renewing the Faith - the Sokoto Caliphate
Uthman Dan Fodio and his family were scholars, poets, and warriors whose jihad in 19th century Nigeria created the Sokoto Caliphate. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-14thumbnailEpisode 48, Rebecca Goldstein: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away (Part II)
Professor Rebecca Newberger Goldstein is one of the most influential thinkers in the world of public philosophy. Amongst many other philosophical texts, Goldstein is the author of The Mind-Body Problem, Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity, 36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction and Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away. For many, Goldstein... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Oct-13thumbnailEpisode 109: Bonus Episode with Matt Teichman and Toby Buckle
Bonus episode! In this joint edition of Elucidations and the Political Philosophy Podcast, Matt Teichman and Toby Buckle sit down and have a freeform conversation about why we do podcasts, the nature of moral disagreement, and the existence of political divides. (@ElucidationsPod)
2018-Oct-13thumbnailUNIVERSAL MORALITY A Crossover with The Elucidations Podcast
In this episode, I talk with Matt Teichman, host of the elucidations podcast. We debate if there is such a thing as a universal morality that's common to all cultures, and what we learn from the diversity of moral and political thought in history. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Oct-12thumbnailEV - 064 Better Know: Simone de Beauvoir
In our latest installment of Better Know a Philosopher we talk about Simone de Beauvoir. A French philosopher who lived during the Suffrage movement and had interesting ideas about Feminism.Opening Invocation:Source: Thomas Smith's QuestionHero of the Week:The Philosopher Queens  (@ETVPod)
2018-Oct-12thumbnailRich vs poor
Seneca says that being rich does not make you a good person, nor does being poor make you a bad one. We then use this quote to explore the relationship between externals and virtue. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-11thumbnailJoy vs pain
Seneca says that it is natural to seek joy and avoid pain. But the virtue involved in both cases is the same. In the quote we examine today, then, there are a lot of crucial Stoic concepts to be parsed out. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-10thumbnailWhat is virtue, anyway?
Seneca tells us that virtue lies in how you handle things, both good and bad. If you are sick, be gentle with those who are taking care of you. If you get a promotion, don't brag to your colleagues. It's the virtuous thing to do. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-10thumbnail0G26: Pickle Rick and Toxic Fandom, Part 1
Wub a lub a dub dub and other overused catchphrases! What up my squanches? This week we dive into the beating heart of Rick and Morty fandom. We're talking Pickle Rick, arguably the best episode in the best season of one of the best shows in any possible universe. We talk about the whole arc of the show and why some fans who identify strongly with Rick have trouble keeping up with the character's ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-09thumbnailPhilosophy of The Good Place
In today's episode, we analyze the philosophy of the NBC hit comedy The Good Place! Can we learn to be moral? How do we learn to be moral? Discussing the metaethics of The Good Place! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https://amzn.to/2C6nnCT Email: [email protected] Venmo tip ja... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Oct-09thumbnailTalk to people like Socrates would
Epictetus reminds us that it is senseless to talk to others just in order to score points. That way we don't learn, understand, or persuade; we just puff ourselves up and waste opportunities. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-08thumbnailEpisode 17: Annalee Newitz on Science, Fiction, Economics, and Neurosis
The job of science fiction isn't to predict the future; it's to tell interesting stories in an imaginative setting, exploring the implications of different ways the world could be different from our actual one. Annalee Newitz has carved out a unique career as a writer and thinker, founding the visionary blog io9 and publishing nonfiction in a number of formats, and is now putting her imagination t... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-08thumbnail17 | Annalee Newitz on Science, Fiction, Economics, and Neurosis
The job of science fiction isn't to predict the future; it's to tell interesting stories in an imaginative setting, exploring the implications of different ways the world could be different from our actual one. Annalee Newitz has carved out a unique career as a writer and thinker, founding the visionary blog io9 and publishing nonfiction in a number of formats, and is now putting her imagination t... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-08thumbnailEpisode 200: Kant/Mendelssohn/Foucault on Enlightenment (Part One)
On "What Is Enlightenment" by Immanuel Kant (1784), "On Enlightening the Mind" by Moses Mendelssohn (1784), and "What Is Enlightenment" by Michael Foucault (1984). At the end of the historical period known as The Enlightenment, a Berlin newspaper asked what exactly that is, and Kant and Mendelssohn responded. Both were concerned with whether too much enlightenment among the public can cause social... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-08thumbnail397: White Privilege and Racial Injustice
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/white-privilege-and-racial-injustice. “White privilege” has become a buzzword in discussions about racial inequality and racial justice. The call to “check your privilege” appeals to those privileged to acknowledge the various ways they receive special treatment that others don’t. But when white people explicitly acknowledge their privile... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Oct-08thumbnailBonus: (sub)Text#4: Freud's "Mourning and Melancholia" (Part One)
Wes Alwan is joined by Tracy Morgan and Louis Scuderi to discuss Freud's classic 1917 essay. Note: Part two will NOT be appearing on this feed. Become a PEL Citizen to get the full discussion. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. Listen to more (sub)Text. (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-08thumbnail#030 Lessons Learned: On Podcasting & Philosophy
In this series finale of The Happier Hour: Season 1, creator and host Monica McCarthy shares some of the lessons she’s learned so far about podcasting and about philosophy. If you’ve ever thought about creating a show, or wondered how philosophy can help in today’s world, you’ll want to listen to this episode. #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-08thumbnailAll virtues are related
Seneca states the classic Stoic view that all virtues are aspects of a single underlying one: wisdom. In this episode we explore what that means in practice, every day. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-08thumbnailThe Uninformed President
Justin and Zach sit down to talk about what it means to have a fundamentally uninformed president. There are more philosophical issues here than you might think. What does it mean to be informed? How informed should we expect a president to be? Is there nonpartisan agreement over the value of educating oneself on issues? Zach argues that Trump basic disinterest in information makes us ... (@thevimblog)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailKatherine Hawley on Trustworthiness
Is it always good to be trustworthy? Can trustworthiness come into conflict with other values, such as generosity? Katherine Hawley discusses these and other questions about trustworthiness with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon subscribers for this episode. (@philosophybites)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailE10: The Argument Argument
The free world is kind of a mess right now. Seems we've lost something in a trade or hit a wall. We're so team oriented sending and receiving messages is like exchanging alien signals. Naturally, if we are to decode these strange outbursts, it's time to get innovative. We have a suggestion! As one can probably surmise from the title, this episode is about arguing. We explore some of Harland's th... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailE10: The Argument Argument - Walking the Tightrope 'twixt Truth and Nihilism
The free world is kind of a mess right now. Seems we've lost something in a trade or hit a wall. We're so team oriented sending and receiving messages is like exchanging alien signals. Naturally, if we are to decode these strange outbursts, it's time to get innovative. We have a suggestion! As one can probably surmise from the title, this episode is about arguing. We explore some of Harland's th... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailAfrican philosophy and the West
How do you articulate African philosophy in a Western academic environment? And what gets lost in the project of “translating” the former into the categories of the latter? (@RadioNational)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailHoP 309 - Hooked on Classics - Italos and the Debate over Pagan Learning
The trial of John Italos and other signs of Byzantine disquiet with the pagan philosophical tradition. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-07thumbnailEpisode 48, Rebecca Goldstein: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away (Part I)
Welcome to 'Episode 48 (Part I)', where we'll be talking to Rebecca Newberger Goldstein about the nature and purpose of philosophy. Professor Rebecca Newberger Goldstein is one of the most influential thinkers in the world of public philosophy. Amongst many other philosophical texts, Goldstein is the author of The Mind-Body Problem, Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity, 36 Arg... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Oct-06thumbnailTHE CASE FOR REPARATIONS A Conversation With Colleen Murphy (2)
We continue our discussion of transitional justice with Colleen Murphy, comparing the end of apartheid in South Africa with the civil rights movement in the US. From this contrast, we explore the idea of reparations for lynching and redlining in the form of truth and reconciliation commissions and financial payments. Website: https://www.politicalphilosophypodcast.com Patreon: https://w... (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Oct-06thumbnailEV - 063 Unreasonable Doubt
Today we bring on the host of Habeas Humor Podcast, Charone Frankel. We discuss the philosophy of "beyond a reasonable doubt". Is it appropriate? What does it actually mean?References:https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-02/trump-says-it-s-a-very-scary-time-in-america-for-menhttps://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&arti... (@ETVPod)
2018-Oct-06thumbnailEp75 - All Philosophy's a Stage
In this 75th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Monica McCarthy, host of the Happier Hour podcast, on the theme "All Philosophy's a Stage." Monica is a thespian, a playwright, the founder of Cheshire Parlour, and the creator and host of “The Happier Hour” podcast. Monica has acted on Broadway and in television programs, film, advertisements, inclu... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Oct-05thumbnailWhat matters is how you handle things
Seneca tells us of one of the well known Stoic paradoxes (i.e., uncommon opinions): it is equally good to be joyful or to endure torture. How can we make sense of this? Find out in this episode. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-04thumbnailPhilosophy of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
A philosophical analysis of the Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind! Is their relationship healthy? Should you get your memories zapped to forget pain? Is there relationship predetermined? How does the Experience Machine relate to the film? What's the utilitarian perspective for the film? Under what circumstance, if any, would be justified in erasing our memories? If they had... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Oct-04thumbnailEpisode 47 - Angela Potochnik
On Episode 47, Nick chats with Angela Potochnik, Associate Professor of Philosophy and the Director of the Center for Public Engagement with Science at the University of Cincinnati, about her time studying in Vienna and how she came to love the history of logical empiricism, her co-written work, “Recipes for Science” on scientific methods and reasoning from a philosophical perspectiv... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Oct-04thumbnailDeath is change and not to be feared
Seneca is at peace with the notion of death, and in this episode we talk about why the Stoic attitude toward this natural process of cosmic recycling makes a lot of sense. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-04thumbnail#029 CREATIVITY Q&A: On Art, Madness, and the Middle East
In this final episode of our series on Creativity, you’ll hear from all three guests: Amber Baldet, Gwena-lin Grewal, and Adam Valen Levinson as they answer audience questions. From how to define creativity, to the relationship to art and madness, to authentic culture around the world. #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-03thumbnailLet us celebrate those truly worth celebrating
Seneca suggests that we should remember and honor the people that have made positive contributions to humanity, and I add that perhaps, conversely, we should get away from modern "celebrity" culture. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-03thumbnail0G25: Minority Report and Time Paradoxes
As sometimes happens, we've generated a minority report to last episode's majority report. The differences between the short story and the movie are substantial, including a reversal in the outcome. While we have much debate over whether this minority report reflects a flaw in the system or a feature, we're putting it forward in the spirit of transparency and to avoid space fascism. By listening t... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Oct-02thumbnailEpisode 149: Death, Immortality, and Porn (Intuition) Pumps
Is living forever a good thing? Could we maintain our values and personal attachments throughout eternity? Would we be motivated to accomplish anything? Can we make sense of a human life that doesn't have a fixed endpoint? We try to alleviate David's paralyzing fear of death by examining two articles - one on how immortality is worse than we think, and the other providing evidence that dying might... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Oct-02thumbnailI want something on which I may test my endurance
Seneca is asking for trouble. Well, not exactly. But he reminds us that Stoicism is about constant practice, so we shouldn't just be prepared to meet a challenge, but positively welcome it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-02thumbnail#028 Facing Our Fears With Montaigne and Adam Valen Levinson
In this episode in our series on CREATIVITY with the writer Adam Valen Levinson you’ll learn how overcoming our fears can lead to a more creative life. You’ll also learn what Levinson and the French philosopher Michel de Montaigne have in common and why humor can help us creatively connect with humanity. #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Oct-01thumbnail466: The New Golden Age of Television
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/new-golden-age-television. They called it a “vast wasteland” in the 1960s, but TV is very different today. Freedom from the broadcast schedule means TV makers can create longer, more complex, more philosophical stories, while binge-watching and on-demand viewing have changed the way we see those stories. Josh and Ken talk to philosophers and ot... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Oct-01thumbnailEpisode 199: Elizabeth Anderson on Equality (Part Three: Discussion)
Mark, Wes, Seth, and Dylan continue to discuss “What Is the Point of Equality?” (1999) and how it lays foundations for Private Government (2017). What is democratic equality, and can a Rawlsian/liberal/neutral-with-regard-to-defining-the-good state consistently advocate for this ideal? Our interview starts in Part One. You can get all three parts together, and more with a PEL Citizenship or $5... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-01thumbnailEpisode 16: Coleen Murphy on Aging, Biology, and the Future
Aging -- everybody does it, very few people actually do something about it. Coleen Murphy is an exception. In her laboratory at Princeton, she and her team study aging in the famous C. Elegans roundworm, with an eye to extending its lifespan as well as figuring out exactly what processes take place when we age. In this episode we contemplate what scientists have learned about aging, and the prospe... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-01thumbnail16 | Coleen Murphy on Aging, Biology, and the Future
Aging -- everybody does it, very few people actually do something about it. Coleen Murphy is an exception. In her laboratory at Princeton, she and her team study aging in the famous C. Elegans roundworm, with an eye to extending its lifespan as well as figuring out exactly what processes take place when we age. In this episode we contemplate what scientists have learned about aging, and the prospe... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Oct-01thumbnailNEM#83: Rat Scabies's Damned Drumming
Christopher Millar played for about two decades with first-generation British punk band The Damned starting in 1976, and has now released his debut solo album, P.H.D. (Prison, Hospital, Debt). We discuss "Dazy Bones" and "Rat's Opus" from that 2018 album, then look back to The Damned's "History of the World (Part One)" from The Black Album (1980), then end by listening to Rat's cover of the Kraftw... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Oct-01thumbnailWhatever can happen at any time can happen today
Seneca says that we have no idea when Fortuna will take friends and loved ones away from us, so the sensible way to live our lives is to take full advantage of every moment we spend with them. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Oct-01thumbnailCandice Delmas, “A Duty to Resist: When Disobedience Should Be Uncivil” (Oxford UP, 2018)
According to a long tradition in political philosophy, there are certain conditions under which citizens may rightly disobey a law enacted by a legitimate political authority. That is, it is common for political philosophers to recognize the permissibility of civil disobedience, even under broadly just political conditions. There are, of... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Sep-30thumbnailE9: Megadeath
Once again, Earth gets the bullet too! This episode the Dawdlers yammer on about Mass Extinction. Ryan is trying not to screw up and Harland is working on his impromptu pun skills. Hopefully something is learned but likely it's just not nothing. Oh, and we've now a little ditty. Enjoy the Good Death, The Dawdlers (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-30thumbnailE9: Megadeath - The Mass Extinction Episode
Once again, Earth gets the bullet too! This episode the Dawdlers yammer on about Mass Extinction. Ryan is trying not to screw up and Harland is working on his impromptu pun skills. Hopefully something is learned but likely it's just not nothing. Oh, and we've now a little ditty. Enjoy the Good Death, The Dawdlers (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-30thumbnailEvolution is evolving
For 160 years now, Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection has been baffling and blowing minds - and it’s not done yet. Evolution is still evolving, carrying us into an age of post-intelligent design – which brings danger as well as opportunity. (@RadioNational)
2018-Sep-30thumbnailHAP 12 - From Here to Timbuktu - Subsaharan Islamic Philosophy
The spread of Islamic scholarship in subsaharan Africa, focusing on intellectuals of the Songhay empire around the Niger River in the 15th-17th centuries. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-30thumbnailEpisode 47, Hedda Hassel Mørch: Consciousness and Integrated Information Theory (Part II)
Hedda Hassel Mørch is a philosopher and post-doc at the University of Oslo, previously at The Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness at New York University. Dr Mørch’s research focuses on panpsychism, neutral monism and liberal conceptions of physicalism. More specifically, how such views can respond to problems in philosophy of mind and metaphysics, such as the hard problem of consciousnes... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Sep-29thumbnailEpisode 46 - Francesco Guala
On Episode 46, Nick chats with Francesco Guala, Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Milan, about how he came to study the philosophy of experimental economics, how philosophers of science can open the door to successful collaborations with scientists (hint: don’t preach), his latest book, “Understanding Institutions: The Science and Philosophy of... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Sep-29thumbnailTRANSITIONAL JUSTICE A Conversation With Colleen Murphy
In this episode professor Colleen Murphy discusses justice in countries attempting to transition to democracy following conflict or repression. Professor Murphy argues that the demands of transitional justice are distinct from other forms of justice such as retributive, corrective, or distributive. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Sep-29thumbnailEp74 - Outdoor Education
This 74th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread was recorded on Apeiron Expeditions' Philosophy Bakes Bread canoe trip, which ran from July 29th to August 1st of 2018, and in it Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Ben Vockley, Seth Walton, and Dr. Alejandro Strong about "Outdoor Education." Ben is an instructor with Outward Bound. Seth is a high school teacher and a registered Maine guide.... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Sep-28thumbnailEV - 062 Innocence in the Void
Presumption of innocence in the law vs. society. He said, she said, but apparently only "he" is telling the truth?In this episode we go to where the rubber of philosophy meets the road of our daily lives. We discuss the Judge Kavanaugh hearings from a philosophical angle, and of course, more about octopi.Opening Invocation:AaronHero of the Week:Octopuses on MDMA  (@ETVPod)
2018-Sep-28thumbnailMake friends, oppose Fortuna
Seneca says that making friends is one way to counter the doings of Fortuna, because having friends is one of the great consolations in life, no matter what happens to us. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-27thumbnail#027 Reflections In Wonderland with Gwenda-lin Grewal
In this episode you’ll learn about creativity as a way of revealing and reflecting our true selves. The guest, Dr. Gwenda-lin Grewal, is a professor of philosophy, a writer, and a fashion designer who specializes in ancient Greek philosophy. By the end of this episode you’ll discover what philosophy, fashion, and “Alice and Wonderland” can teach us about creativity in our everyday lives. #... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-27thumbnailNothing good comes out of a static universe
Marcus Aurelius reflects on the famous concept the Stoics inherited from the pre-Socratic Heraclitus: panta rhei, everything changes. What would happen if we took this seriously, in our everyday life? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-26thumbnailDon't make fun of others, be helpful
Epictetus says that if we encounter someone who is lost we don't make fun of him, but give him directions. Why, then, do we engage in sarcasm against people who disagree with us? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-26thumbnail0G24: Minority Report and Prescient Utilitarianism
This episode will serve as our majority report on the movie Minority Report. We cover the movie's relationship to Utilitarianism and the common objection that we can't predict the future. Next week we will present our minority report on the short story Minority Report, where we'll cover how the story addresses prescience and determinism. The major difference is that this episodes content is beefed... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-25thumbnail#026 The Third Way With Émilie Du Châtelet and Amber Baldet
What does it mean to be creative? In this episode you’ll hear what Blockchain expert Amber Baldet can teach us about authenticity, corporations, and challenging assumptions. You’ll also learn what Amber has in common with the 18th century French philosopher Émilie du Châtelet and why most of us are thinking about creativity wrong. #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-25thumbnailPractice self control to become more virtuous
Musonius Rufus reminds us that self control is a crucial component of the cardinal virtue of temperance. This doesn't mean we cannot enjoy pleasures, only that we need to do it in proper measure. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-24thumbnail396: Jean-Paul Sartre
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/sartre. Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the first global public intellectuals, famous for his popular existentialist philosophy, his works of fiction, and his rivalry with Albert Camus. His existentialism was also adopted by Simone de Beauvoir, who used it as a foundation for modern theoretical feminism. So what exactly is existentialism? How is man co... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Sep-24thumbnailEpisode 199: Guest Elizabeth Anderson on Private Government (Part Two)
Continuing on Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (2017) and “What Is the Point of Equality?” (1999). Should the amount of respect that a worker gets be proportional to his or her market value? Our guest tells us more about how all citizens have the right to have their interests considered and what this means for how the relationship between employers and employees might change. W... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-24thumbnailEnjoy your friends and loved ones, now
Seneca says that we should greedily enjoy our loved ones, right now. Because we have no idea how long we will enjoy the privilege of their company and affection. Pay attention to the here and now. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-24thumbnailEpisode #123 ... Michel Foucault pt. 3 - Power
Today we talk about the work of Michel Foucault. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Sep-24thumbnailEpisode #122 ... Michel Foucault pt. 2 - The Order of Things
Today we talk about the work of Michel Foucault. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Sep-23thumbnailE8: Curing this Guy's Headache
Hey you! Yeah you, dummy. You know what time binding is? No? Good! We (Ryan) don’t either. This episode the Dawdlers get in over their heads with Alfred Korzybski’s General Semantics. Well, Ryan is in over his head. Harland just can’t get his out of his bum. Badum ching! Rim shot! Pun intended. Anyway, it’s the thought that counts and the thoughts count mostly when spoken properly. And... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-23thumbnailE8: Curing this Guy's Headache - Alfred Korzybski's General Semantics
Hey you! Yeah you, dummy. You know what time binding is? No? Good! We (Ryan) don’t either. This episode the Dawdlers get in over their heads with Alfred Korzybski’s General Semantics. Well, Ryan is in over his head. Harland just can’t get his out of his bum. Badum ching! Rim shot! Pun intended. Anyway, it’s the thought that counts and the thoughts count mostly when spoken properly. And... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-23thumbnail#025 And The Tree Was Happy: A Story of Generosity
In this bonus episode you’ll learn how the worldview of generosity has changed over the years and how you can support the future of The Happier Hour. Also, you’ll hear Monica cry when she described one of her favorite children’s books, but not to worry because all’s well the ends well! #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-23thumbnailForgiveness
“To err is human, to forgive divine” – a popular notion, but what are we really doing when we forgive? Operating at the highest level of human sensibility? Or denying the wrongdoer an opportunity for valuable self-reflection? This week we’re picking at one of the less-interrogated areas of ethics. (@RadioNational)
2018-Sep-23thumbnailHoP 308 - Dominic O'Meara on Michael Psellos
Dominic O'Meara speaks to Peter about Michael Psellos, focusing especially on his political philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-23thumbnailEpisode 47, Hedda Hassel Mørch: Consciousness and Integrated Information Theory (Part I)
Hedda Hassel Mørch is a philosopher and post-doc at the University of Oslo, previously at The Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness at New York University. Dr Mørch’s research focuses on panpsychism, neutral monism and liberal conceptions of physicalism. More specifically, how such views can respond to problems in philosophy of mind and metaphysics, such as the hard problem of consciousnes... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Sep-22thumbnailCIVIL RIGHTS FROM NIXON TO OBAMA A Conversation With Mary Frances Berry
CIVIL RIGHTS FROM NIXON TO OBAMA A Conversation With Mary Frances Berry by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Sep-21thumbnailThe Stoic approach to grief
Stoicism is often accused of counseling to suppress emotions. This quote from Seneca clearly shows it doesn't. Then again, we don't want to wallow in grief and let it paralyze us, because we have duties toward the living. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-20thumbnailEV - 061 This Is Where The Suffering Begins
We are once again fortunate enough to bring on Jesse Rabinowitz for this discussion on Mind Body Dualism. This time we jump right into the weeds so think you can't see the tails from the Velociraptors.Opening Invocation: Jesse (@ETVPod)
2018-Sep-20thumbnailConverse with the best minds, read a book
Seneca reminds us that one of the simplest and cheapest of pleasures is to engage in a continuous conversation with the best minds humanity has ever produced. By reading a (good) book. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-20thumbnail#024 Money Q&A: The Value of Currency
In this audience Q&A episode, you’ll hear from all three guests in the series on MONEY about a shocking statistics regarding money and civic responsibility, followed by a question about meaning in work, and concluding with a question about universal basic income. #thehappierhour Facebook: @thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-20thumbnailEp73 - The Character Gap
In this 73rd episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Christian Miller on "The Character Gap," the title of his recent book. Christian is the A. C. Reid Professor of Philosophy at Wake Forest University, where he has been the recipient of grant support from the John Templeton Foundation and the Templeton World Charity Foundation ... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Sep-19thumbnailAre you really that busy?
Seneca suggests that we should change our attitude toward being busy: don't surrender yourself to your affairs, but loan yourself to them and you will live a happier life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-19thumbnailEpisode 148: Am I Wrong?
Tamler wades into a Twitter controversy about Serena Williams - could this be his fast-track pass into the IDW? And since we're talking about that, why not throw in a discussion of Louis CK's surprise set at the Comedy Cellar? In the second segment, we step outside of last week's social media culture wars to discuss "But I Could Be Wrong," a paper by philosopher George Sher from Rice University. W... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Sep-19thumbnail0G23: Harrison Bergeron and Equality of Outcome
Throw off your shackles, sheeple! This is the podcast the gubment doesn't want you to hear. We're discussing the famous short story Harrison Bergeron and why it seems like people so often interpret it in problematic ways. Paper arguing for revising our interpretation of Harrison Bergeron: http://coffmanenglish1.wikispaces.com/file/view/HB+Criticism.pdf Article on reclaiming Harrison Bergeron: http... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-18thumbnailEpisode #45 - Vallor on Virtue Ethics and Technology
 In this episode I talk to Shannon Vallor. Shannon is the Regis and Diane McKenna Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Santa Clara University, where her research addresses the ethical implications of emerging science and technology, especially AI, robotics and new media. Professor Vallor received the 2015 World Technology Award in Ethics from the World Technology Network. She has... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Sep-18thumbnailGreed leads to unhappiness
Seneca says that for many people the furnishings of their lives are more than enough, but they keep wanting more, thus dooming themselves to unhappiness and turmoil. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-18thumbnail#023 Making Money Work With Voltaire And Jill Schlesinger
In this episode with financial expert Jill Schlesinger you’ll learn how most of us are making mistakes when it comes to our finances, and what you can do to empower your financial prowess. You’ll also learn why you shouldn’t leave your fortune to fate and instead, in the words of the philosopher Voltaire, “cultivate your garden.” #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-18thumbnailSacred and Profane Love Episode 11: The Contemplative Realism of Marilynne Robinson
Download Episode 11: The Contemplative Realism of Marilynne Robinson   In episode 11 of the Sacred and Profane Love Podcast, I speak with Scott Moringiello, assistant professor of Catholic Studies at DePaul University, in Chicago, Illinois, about Robinson’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, Gilead. Among other things, we discuss the connection between contemplation, love, grace, and the &#... (@jennfrey)
2018-Sep-17thumbnail465: The Psychology of Cruelty
Mora at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/psychology-cruelty. Throughout history, people have committed all kinds of cruel, degrading, and evil acts toward other people. Many believe that for evil acts like genocide to be even possible, the victims must first be dehumanized by the perpetrators, starting with dehumanizing language or propaganda. But is this lack of empathy always at the hea... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Sep-17thumbnailEpisode 199: Guest Elizabeth Anderson on Private Government (Part One)
The U. of Michigan prof joins us to discuss Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don't Talk about It) (2017) and “What Is the Point of Equality?” (1999). What is a government? Liz argues that this includes companies, and that we should thus apply political science concepts in evaluating their power. Her egalitarianism involves everyone retaining a minimum level of inali... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-17thumbnailHow to think about life and death
Seneca clarifies one of the famous Stoic paradoxes: no, you shouldn't live every day as if it were your last. But you should live every day to the fullest because you don't know which one will be your last. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-17thumbnailAnjan Chakravartty, “Scientific Ontology: Integrating Naturalized Metaphysics and Voluntarist Epistemology” (Oxford UP, 2017)
A scientific ontology is a view about what a scientific theory says exists. Longstanding philosophical debate on this issue divides into two broad camps: anti-realists, who think scientific theories are committed to the existence only of those things that can be observed, and realists, who hold that these theories are... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Sep-16thumbnailE7: Summer at Aphelion
Hot topic alert! This episode the Dawdlers pull focus on planet Earth. They talk about Earth processes, especially climate. I guess one could say this is the climate change episode. Yaaay! Earth gets the bullet too! BUT they spend much of their time on the science and much less on the politics. So if you came in wanting to hear the familiar repetition in the echo chamber, y’ain’t gonna fin... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-16thumbnailE7: Summer at Aphelion - The Climate Change Episode
Hot topic alert! This episode the Dawdlers pull focus on planet Earth. They talk about Earth processes, especially climate. I guess one could say this is the climate change episode. Yaaay! Earth gets the bullet too! BUT they spend much of their time on the science and much less on the politics. So if you came in wanting to hear the familiar repetition in the echo chamber, y’ain’t gonna fin... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-16thumbnailEpisode 46, Peter Adamson and the History of Women in Philosophy (Part II)
Peter Adamson is Professor of Late Ancient and Arabic philosophy at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and the host of the History of Philosophy without and gaps podcast. The range of Peter’s expertise is phenomenal. The depth and breadth of his podcast History of Philosophy without any gaps is simply unrivalled, and the success of Peter’s projects has led him to publish a range of bo... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Sep-16thumbnail#022 Act II: Existential Angst and Career Change
What happens when your dream career is no longer the dream? How much of what we do is who we are? In this bonus episode, Monica shares the secrets for successful career change that she learned from interviewing actors who left acting behind, and successfully pivoted into completely different careers. Whatever change you might be considering, this episode is for the existential crisis in all of us.... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-16thumbnailDignity and enhancement
Human dignity is one of those ideas that seem to have been around for as long as humans themselves, and few people would take issue with it. But like most ideas, human dignity has a philosophical pedigree, and there are in fact those who say we should abandon the notion—or at least modify its invocation. (@RadioNational)
2018-Sep-16thumbnailHAP 11 - Teodros Kiros on Ethiopian Philosophy
Teodros Kiros discusses the history of Ethiopian thought and how it has influenced his own work in political philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-15thumbnailEpisode 108: Mariam Thalos discusses freedom
What do you think of yourself as? A musician? A mother? A political organizer? In this episode, our guest argues that your ability to act and reason freely is premised on your ability to shape and sometimes even invent the labels you apply to yourself. (@ElucidationsPod)
2018-Sep-15thumbnailROME, CHRIST, AND THE WESTERN MIND A Conversation With Orlando Patterson (3)
ROME, CHRIST, AND THE WESTERN MIND A Conversation With Orlando Patterson (3) by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Sep-14thumbnailPhilosophy of Handmaid's Tale: Is it Anti-Religion?
Today's episode dives in the philosophy of the Hulu show Handmaid's Tale. This episode focuses on raising the question, is Handmaid's Tale anti-religion? Would society be better off without religion? Would lack of religion make these events less likely? Could something like this actually happen? What is the religion? Do the positives outweigh the negatives of religion? Patreon Support Page, p... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Sep-14thumbnailAre you dead before the time, by your own choice?
Seneca reminds Lucilius that a full human life is about being useful, and particularly about helping others. Sure, you can withdraw from the world and live in peace, but then you are arguably already dead. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-14thumbnailNEM#82: Byron Isaacs Emerges From Bassland
Byron is an in-demand session/touring bassist whose main band since 2004 has been NYC's Ollabelle. We talk about "Losing You" and "Gypsy Wind" from his debut solo album, Disappearing Man (2018), plus "Gone Today” by Ollabelle from Riverside Battle Songs (2007), and finish with"Horizontal Man" by Lost Leaders from their 2014 eponymous album. Intro: “Heaven’s Pearls” by Levon Helm from Elect... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-13thumbnailEpisode 45 - Anna Alexandrova
On Episode 45, Nick chats with Anna Alexandrova, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Science at Cambridge, about coming of age in Russia during the collapse of the USSR, succeeding in philosophy when she had “no other options,” and her book, “A Philosophy for the Science of Well-being.”Timestamps:0:15 Hello and welcome / 1:50 Anna fills us in on her summer aka the Cambridge “research t... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Sep-13thumbnailEV - 060 Better Know Angela Davis
For this months segment of Better Know A Philosopher, we talk about Angela Davis. A highly dynamic figure who's still making speeches and continuing her activist path from the Black Panthers, to Occupy Wall Street.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrSIm2RXN4oOpening Invocation:"The Book of Disquiet" by PessoaHero of the Week:This thing: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/bnpv85/the-emerging-fetish-o... (@ETVPod)
2018-Sep-13thumbnailNo matter what, keep your emerald color
Marcus tells us that, regardless of how people around us behave, we should keep following our moral compass, just like an emerald keeps its color regardless of what others are doing. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-13thumbnail#021 Moral Money With Adam Smith and Jennifer Morton
Does morality have a role to play in economics? In this episode you’ll learn what philosophy professor Dr. Jennifer Morton has to say about the ethical costs of upward mobility, and how Adam Smith changed the way we think about economic distribution and decision making today. #thehappierhour Twitter/IG: MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-13thumbnailPREVIEW-Ep 198 Plato's "Parmenides" (Part Three)
http://partiallyexaminedlife.com (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-12thumbnailObjections to Open Relationships. And Replies
Justin, Alex, and Zach return to respond to all of your objections—well, 10 of them. If you are skeptical of the idea that you should reject monogamy and be in an open relationship, the vimmers follow up to assuage your doubts. See the article (https://thevimblog.com/2018/08/26/open-relationships/) for written responses to the objections. Listen with an open mind. Some transparency- ... (@thevimblog)
2018-Sep-12thumbnailEpictetus asks a student a trick question...
Epictetus engages in a short dialogue with one of his students, asking him a trick question. How would you answer the question of whether pleasure is a good thing, something to be proud of? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-12thumbnail0G22: Gattaca and Genetic Determinism
Our first ever patron selected episode topic, and suspiciously Thomas's favorite. I'm sure that has nothing to do with it winning the tie vote over Aaron's choice, Minority Report. Kidding! We love all our topics equally. This is a really fun one and we cover several important ethical and philosophical issues relating to genetic programming. Also, we're happy to announce the winners of our book ra... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-11thumbnailThe right thing to do is often painful
Musonius Rufus articulates the Stoic equivalent of "no pain, no gain," in part as a rebuke to the Epicureans. Engaging in social and political life is painful, but it's the right thing to do. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-11thumbnail#020 Do The (Side) Hustle With Epicurus and Chris Guillebeau
This episode of The Happier Hour kicks off a two-week series on MONEY. Hear what Epicurus (the non-conformist philosopher) has in common with Chris Guillebeau (the non-conformist author, entrepreneur, and world traveller) and how both fellas can help you rethink the way you value, earn, and spend your hundred (or one) dollar bills, y’all. #thehappierhour Show notes: thehappierhour.org Twitter/IG... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-11thumbnailShelley Tremain, “Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability” (U Michigan Press, 2017)
How should we understand disability? In Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability (University of Michigan Press, 2017), Dr. Shelley Tremain explores this complex question from the perspective of feminist philosophy, using the work of Michel Foucault. The book is a fascinating critique of much contemporary philosophy and policy, providing a detailed, but easy... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Sep-10thumbnailEpisode 198: Plato's Forms in the "Parmenides" (Part Two)
We get down to the specific questions considered this perplexing Platonic dialogue: Are there forms for all adjectives? Does the form of a property itself have that property? How do Forms connect with particulars? How can we mortals have any connection to heavenly Forms anyway? Listen to part one first or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition along with the follow-up episode. Please support PEL! E... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-10thumbnail391: Your Lying Eyes - Perception, Memory, and justice
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/your-lying-eyes. The criminal justice system often relies on the testimony of eyewitnesses to get convictions. Yet more and more, psychological science demonstrates how unreliable eyewitness reports can be. Moreover, jurors have all kinds of cognitive biases and unconscious influences, and they rely on dubious folk psychological theories when asses... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Sep-10thumbnailOn exotic food consumption
Seneca is critical of the fact that many ships are required to convey the requisites for a single meal, bringing them from no single sea. Still today so many people indulge in pleasures that cost a lot and cause much environmental damage. Time to revise our priorities about where our food comes from? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-10thumbnailShould You Reject Monogamy?
Justin and Alex join Zach to discuss his claim that open relationships are for everybody. They define some terms—like amatonormativity, dyadic, monogamy, and open relationships—and then set out some arguments for why we should reject monogamy. But if we do, where does that leave us? What would our relationships look like outside of the institution of monogamy? The vimmers do some philoso... (@thevimblog)
2018-Sep-09thumbnail#019 The Write Life With Jenny Blake
In this bonus episode you'll hear how author, podcast host, and coach, Jenny Blake deals with writers block, organizes her writing projects, and overcomes her inner critic. You'll also learn how her outlook correlates with principles in Buddhism. Whether you're writing a book or writing emails, this episode is full of actionable advice for allowing more ease and fun into your writing practice (and... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailE6: NME Skepticism
Last time the Dawdlers had an original idea it was pretty goofy. This time it is less goofy. So “less goofy” in fact, anyone who listens might get downright pissed off. How dare us! For shaaaame… Anyhoo, this topic is a take on skepticism. Some may say it’s radical. Harland would probably be fine with that. But in any case, it is—we think—important. Trying to change the world here fo... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailE6: NME Skepticism - Pyrrho was Right!
Last time the Dawdlers had an original idea it was pretty goofy. This time it is less goofy. So “less goofy” in fact, anyone who listens might get downright pissed off. How dare us! For shaaaame… Anyhoo, this topic is a take on skepticism. Some may say it’s radical. Harland would probably be fine with that. But in any case, it is—we think—important. Trying to change the world here fo... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailProof and beauty
Mathematicians routinely refer to complex proofs in aesthetic terms, citing their 'elegance' or 'beauty'. This has partly to do with the social aspect of such proofs—far from being a hermetic or exclusively cerebral practice, mathematics has never strayed too far from its roots in dialogue and debate. (@RadioNational)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailHoP 307 - Consul of the Philosophers - Michael Psellos
Michael Psellos and his attitude towards pagan philosophy and the political life. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailEpisode 46, Peter Adamson and the History of Women in Philosophy (Part I)
Peter Adamson is Professor of Late Ancient and Arabic philosophy at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and the host of the History of Philosophy without any gaps podcast. Peter’s main publications focus on Classical Philosophy, Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds, and Philosophy in the Islamic World, but the range of Peter’s expertise is phenomenal. The depth and breadth of... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Sep-09thumbnailEp72 - A Multicultural Manifesto
In this 72nd episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Bryan Van Norden on "A Multicultural Manifesto," the subtitle of his recent book Taking Back Philosophy. Bryan is currently Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple Professor at Yale-NUS College. A recipient of Fulbright, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Mellon fellowships, he ... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Sep-08thumbnailTHE UNIQUENESS OF ATHENS A Conversation With Orlando Patterson (2)
In the second part of the series Orlando Patterson to discuss the emergence of the value of freedom in Ancient Greece and its relation to slave society. We argue that Athens was unique in developing this value and western history was forever shaped by this, however uncomfortable we are with the seeming triumphalism of this narrative. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Sep-08thumbnailEpisode 15: David Poeppel on Thought, Language, and How to Understand the Brain
Language comes naturally to us, but is also deeply mysterious. On the one hand, it manifests as a collection of sounds or marks on paper. On the other hand, it also conveys meaning – words and sentences refer to states of affairs in the outside world, or to much more abstract concepts. How do words and meaning come together in the brain? David Poeppel is a leading neuroscientist who works in ma... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-08thumbnail15 | David Poeppel on Thought, Language, and How to Understand the Brain
Language comes naturally to us, but is also deeply mysterious. On the one hand, it manifests as a collection of sounds or marks on paper. On the other hand, it also conveys meaning – words and sentences refer to states of affairs in the outside world, or to much more abstract concepts. How do words and meaning come together in the brain? David Poeppel is a leading neuroscientist who works in man... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-08thumbnailEpisode 14: Alta Charo on Bioethics and the Law
To paraphrase Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park, scientists tend to focus on whether they can do something, not whether they should. Questions of what we should do tend to wander away from the pristine beauty of science into the messy worlds of ethics and the law. But with the ongoing revolutions in biology, we can’t avoid facing up to some difficult should-questions. Alta Charo is a world expert in... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-08thumbnail14 | Alta Charo on Bioethics and the Law
To paraphrase Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park, scientists tend to focus on whether they can do something, not whether they should. Questions of what we should do tend to wander away from the pristine beauty of science into the messy worlds of ethics and the law. But with the ongoing revolutions in biology, we can’t avoid facing up to some difficult should-questions. Alta Charo is a world expert in ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-08thumbnailEpisode 13: Neha Narula on Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, and the Future of the Internet
For something of such obvious importance, money is kind of mysterious. It can, as Homer Simpson once memorably noted, be exchanged for goods and services. But who decides exactly how many goods/services a given unit of money can buy? And what maintains the social contract that we all agree to go along with it? Technology is changing what money is and how we use it, and Neha Narula is a leader in ... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-08thumbnail13 | Neha Narula on Blockchain, Cryptocurrency, and the Future of the Internet
For something of such obvious importance, money is kind of mysterious. It can, as Homer Simpson once memorably noted, be exchanged for goods and services. But who decides exactly how many goods/services a given unit of money can buy? And what maintains the social contract that we all agree to go along with it? Technology is changing what money is and how we use it, and Neha Narula is a leader in t... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-07thumbnailThat which Fortuna has not given, she cannot take away
Let's talk about the ancient Roman goddess Fortuna, or what the Greeks called Tyche, to whom Seneca often refers in his letters to Lucilius. Why does she play such an important role in Stoic philosophy? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-06thumbnailEV - 059 A Philosopher Named Desire
For this weeks episode we welcome on Alonzo Fyfe, a philosopher and proponent of Desirism. We discuss this ethical model and how it relates to morality.References:Desirism FacebookAtheist EthicistDesirismOpening Invocation:Ben ThompsonHero of the Week:John McCain (@ETVPod)
2018-Sep-06thumbnailWe all want lasting joy
Seneca argues that we want joy in life, and we want it to last. And yet, we insist in seeking it in all the wrong places, from ephemeral pleasures to the fickle praise of others. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-06thumbnail#018 Rebellion Q&A: I’ll Have What She’s Having
In this audience Q&A episode of The Happier Hour, you’ll hear from all four guests on the latest topic of REBELLION as they answer questions ranging from racism to menstruation to incarceration. This wraps up two weeks of rebel-rousing conversations with the reminder that wherever there is oppression, there is an opportunity to rebel. #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-05thumbnailBeware of flattery, it gets in the way of genuine progress
Seneca claims that flattery is a subtle enemy of our work toward becoming better persons. Too readily we agree with those who tell us that we are good, sensible, holy even. What's a good attitude toward praise, then? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-05thumbnailOG21: DS9 Dax and Queer Personhood
I have seized the means of pod production and installed Callie Wright as our new leader. Long live Callie Wright! Thomas had a thing this week, so Callie and I recorded on the Deep Space Nine episode "Dax" (ep1.7 or 1.8 depending on service). We talk about queer theory and Star Trek, as well as persistence of personhood after radical changes in personality. And there should actually be new intro q... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-04thumbnailEpisode 12: Wynton Marsalis on Jazz, Time, and America
Jazz occupies a special place in the American cultural landscape. It's played in elegant concert halls and run-down bars, and can feature esoteric harmonic experimentation or good old-fashioned foot-stomping swing. Nobody embodies the scope of modern jazz better than Wynton Marsalis. As a trumpet player, bandleader, composer, educator, and ambassador for the music, he has worked tirelessly to keep... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-04thumbnail12 | Wynton Marsalis on Jazz, Time, and America
Jazz occupies a special place in the American cultural landscape. It's played in elegant concert halls and run-down bars, and can feature esoteric harmonic experimentation or good old-fashioned foot-stomping swing. Nobody embodies the scope of modern jazz better than Wynton Marsalis. As a trumpet player, bandleader, composer, educator, and ambassador for the music, he has worked tirelessly to keep... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Sep-04thumbnailEpisode 147: Effective Altruism and Moral Uncertainty (with The One True Scotsman, Will MacAskill)
Oxford philosophy professor Will MacAskill joins us to talk about effective altruism, moral uncertainty, and why you shouldn’t eat your grandmother (even if consequentialism is true). How should we act when we’re not sure which moral theory is the right one? Can we formulate a guide for behavior, modeled on decision theory, that maximizes expected moral value? How do we assign credences to eth... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Sep-04thumbnailPracticing philosophy is like going to spiritual gym
Seneca reminds Lucilius that we can't relegate our quest for becoming better persons to intervals between indulgences. It's like going to the gym: you have to do it regularly and often, or you won't get the benefits. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-04thumbnailListener Qs 4
Back again for part two of answering your questions and speaking your unspeakable names. Hope you enjoy! Next week we're back to our regular schedule with another top requested movie: Ex Machina! Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): https://www.facebo... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-04thumbnail#017 Making A Racket with Hypatia and Simone de Beauvoir
How can changing the narrative of shame around women's bodies change the way society impact the identities of all people? In this episode we'll hear from the founders of Racket, as well as what the philosophers Hypatia and Simone de Beauvoir can teach us about non-conformity. #thehappierhour Show notes: thehappierhour.org Facebook: @thehappierhour Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-03thumbnail439: A World Without Work
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/world-without-work. Work: a lot lot of people do it, and a lot of people don’t seem to like it very much. But as computers and artificial intelligence get increasingly sophisticated, more and more of our workers will lose their jobs to technology. Should we view this inevitability with hope or with despair? Without the order and purpose that mean... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Sep-03thumbnailAdversity is just a gym to exercise your virtue
Seneca says that the wise person (and, by extension, the practitioner of Stoicism) will deal with poverty, sorrow, disgrace or pain, because she is alert and fortified, ready to treat adversity as a way to improve her character. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Sep-03thumbnailEpisode 198: Plato's Forms in the "Parmenides" (Part One)
On the most peculiar Platonic dialogue, from ca. 350 BCE. Are properties real things in the world, or just in the mind? Plato is known for claiming that these "Forms" are real, though otherworldly. Here, though, using Parmenides as a character talking to a young Socrates, Plato seems to provide objections here to his own theory. What's the deal? Don't wait for part two! Get the full, ad-free Citiz... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailE5: This Reminds Me of Another Future
New rule: no new ideas after two hours! This time we talked about the idea of emergence and naturally, its counterpart, reductionism. Of course, supervenience was all thinking it’s host to this party like Rick Moranis in Ghostbusters, “Hiya doin’! Why don’t you have some of the brie. It’s at room temperature. You think it’s too warm in here for the brie?” But never mind, we soon ba... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailE5: This Reminds Me of Another Future - The Emergence Episode
New rule: no new ideas after two hours! This time we talked about the idea of emergence and naturally, its counterpart, reductionism. Of course, supervenience was all thinking it’s host to this party like Rick Moranis in Ghostbusters, “Hiya doin’! Why don’t you have some of the brie. It’s at room temperature. You think it’s too warm in here for the brie?” But never mind, we soon ba... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailBonus: (sub)Text #3: Spielberg's "AI: Artificial Intelligence": What Is It to Be Human? (Part One)
Wes discusses the film by Steven Spielberg with philosophy professor David Kyle Johnson. What is there to fear in artificial intelligence? How does this shed light on what it means to be fully human? Note: Part two will NOT be appearing on this feed. Become a PEL Citizen to get the full discussion. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Sep-02thumbnail#016 Labor Of Truth: Ain't I A Woman
In this Labor Day weekend bonus episode, you'll learn how the how the courage of former slave Sojourner Truth helped shape the rights of African Americans and the rights of all women. You'll also hear about ten current organizations led by women who are changing the lives of women and society in contemporary America, inspiring each of us to do something for the greater good. #thehappierhour Show n... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailKeeping them out
Most people agree that nation states don’t have any moral right to control the movement of citizens within their borders, or to prevent citizens from travelling beyond those borders. If states do see a need to exclude entry to refugees and immigrants, the reasons often appeal to a need to 'preserve' national values. But those arguments may not be so robust. (@RadioNational)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailHAP 10 - Think for Yourself - Walda Heywat
Walda Heywat’s reaction to the thought of his teacher Zera Yacob, and the dispute over the authenticity of these two Ethiopian philosophers. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Sep-02thumbnailEpisode 45, Christianity, Gender and Society (Part II)
Out now! Our audiobook ‘Developments in Christian Thought’ is free to download on all major podcast apps and at our website www.thepanpsycast.com/audiobook. For more information, take a little peak in the iTunes description (or at the bottom of this page). The audiobook is made up of 24-chapters, equally divided into 2-parts, which have been imaginatively named Part I and Part II. Part I conta... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Sep-01thumbnailSLAVERY AND FREEDOM A Conversation With Orlando Patterson (1)
The first part of a three part series: I'm joined by the great historical sociologist Orlando Patterson to discuss the nature and history of slavery and how this lead to the creation of the "strange and un-innocent" value of freedom. In the first part we discuss Professor Patterson's background, his account of slavery and the history of slavery in the earliest peoples. (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Sep-01thumbnailEp71 - The Not So Golden Rule
In this 71st episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dan Flores on "The Not So Golden Rule," the title of an essay that Dan published in Philosophy Now magazine. Dan is a Professor of Philosophy and also the Director of the Northwest Honors College at Houston community college. His interests are within the realm of metaphysics an... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Aug-31thumbnailOld age, frail and not
Seneca tells Lucilius that old age is natural and to be welcomed. So long as it maintains our mind in working order. If that's not the case, then the Stoics prefer to exit through the open door, as virtue itself becomes impossible to practice. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-31thumbnailBrian O’Connor, “Idleness: A Philosophical Essay” (Princeton UP, 2018)
Culturally, idleness is widely derided as laziness, uselessness, and sloth. Even within philosophy, the idle are criticized for being wasteful, selfish, and free-loading. Indeed, throughout the history of moral and political philosophy, it is frequently asserted (though not often argued) that humans must be perpetually active, busy, and, in a... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Aug-30thumbnailEV - 058 Can Art Go Too Far?
This episode could also be named, "Aaron and GW try to pronounce peoples names". We dive into this question about art going too far. Getting into the weeds of what constitutes too far objectively, and how that relates to our subjective opinions of too far.Reference Material:https://www.therichest.com/shocking/15-performance-artists-who-took-their-art-way-too-far/Opening Invocation:Grosse Pointe Bl... (@ETVPod)
2018-Aug-30thumbnailTake care of your body, with temperance
Seneca reminds us that we have some power to make our body last longer, by exercising temperance in our pleasures. Enjoy your next meal, just don't over do it. And remember, Stoics drink wine, but they don't get drunk. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-30thumbnail#015 Sinners and Saint Teresa of Avila with Dr. Christia Mercer
What can a Catholic Saint teach us about contemplation and grace? What is the correlation between illiteracy and crime? Will women ever get the credit they deserve? All this and more in today's episode with Dr. Christia Mercer of Columbia University and the work of St Teresa of Avila. Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Twitter/IG; @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @TheHappierHour #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-29thumbnailEpisode #44 - Fleischman on Evolutionary Psychology and Sex Robots
In this episode I chat to Diana Fleischman. Diana is a senior lecturer in evolutionary psychology at the University of Portsmouth. Her research focuses on hormonal influences on behavior, human sexuality, disgust and, recently, the interface of evolutionary psychology and behaviorism. She is a utilitarian, a promoter of effective altruism, and a bivalvegan. We have a long and detailed chat about t... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Aug-29thumbnailHow to excel at being human
Marcus Aurelius reminds us that there is no difference between acting according to nature and according to reason. What did he mean? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-29thumbnailListener Qs 3
We're taking two episodes to say thanks to all the people making this show possible and to answer their excellent questions. This episode is special too. Aaron drops the most radioactive take he has ever dropped on record. Definitely make sure you're on the Facebook group, as the fallout is likely to be Chernobleque. Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-29thumbnail0G20: Black Mirror, Hang the DJ, Part 2: Predicting Compatibility
Hang the DJ continues. Again and again and again, probably about 1000 times, depending on which number you're fixated on. There is a way you can tell it's a new version, though, cause we got all new intro quotes! Thanks so much for sending those in, such a great selection to choose from, and if you didn't hear yours, don't worry it is in the hopper for future rounds. A breakdown of Newcomb's Parad... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-28thumbnailSacred and Profane Love Episode 10: A Twitch Upon The Thread
Download Episode 10: A Twitch Upon the Thread   In episode 10 of the Sacred and Profane Love podcast, host Jennifer A. Frey has a conversation with scholar Paul Mankowski, SJ, about Evelyn Waugh’s popular novel, Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder. They discuss Charles Ryder’s experiences of love, freedom, grace, and … Continue rea... (@jennfrey)
2018-Aug-28thumbnailWhere philosophy begins
According to Epictetus philosophy gets started when we are genuinely interested in why people disagree about things. Not in terms of factual matters, which empirical evidence can settle, but about values and how we should think about the world and therefore act in it. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-28thumbnail#014 Radical Resistance With Hannah Arendt and Genesis Be
This episode kicks off two weeks on the topic of REBELLION. What does it mean to participate in civic engagement? Why are public discussions of opposing views so important? Hear what the rapper/activist Genesis Be has to say about conceptual resistance and why Hannah Arendt's political philosophy is still relevant today. #thehappierhour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Twitter/IG @MissMMcCarthy Face... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-27thumbnail464: The Athlete as Philosopher
More as https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/athlete-philosopher. For the ancient Greeks, sport was an integral part of education. Athletic programs remain in schools today, but there is a growing gap between the modern sports experience and enduring educational values such as self-discovery, responsibility, respect, and citizenship. Is there a way to bridge this gap? Can sports be a means to... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE4: The Tiger in the Bushes
Uh oh. We're talkin' 'bout the truth. There are various positions on the truth these days. Truth, post-truth; we take a different direction. We think it is a better direction. But, at this point, it's hard to remember what that direction was exactly. You'll just have to listen zero members of the audience. Also, we're at Harland's deeeeeep in Minnesota. It's basically Canada. And Canada is basic... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE4: The Tiger in the Bushes - The Truth Episode
Uh oh. We're talkin' 'bout the truth. There are various positions on the truth these days. Truth, post-truth; we take a different direction. We think it is a better direction. But, at this point, it's hard to remember what that direction was exactly. You'll just have to listen zero members of the audience. Also, we're at Harland's deeeeeep in Minnesota. It's basically Canada. And Canada is basic... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailEpisode 11: Mike Brown on Killing Pluto and Replacing It with Planet 9
Few events in recent astronomical history have had the worldwide emotional resonance as the 2006 announcement that Pluto was no longer considered a planet, at least as far as the International Astronomical Union was concerned. The decision was a long time coming, but no person deserves more credit/blame for forcing the astronomical community's hand than Caltech astronomer Michael Brown. He and his... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-27thumbnail11 | Mike Brown on Killing Pluto and Replacing It with Planet 9
Few events in recent astronomical history have had the worldwide emotional resonance as the 2006 announcement that Pluto was no longer considered a planet, at least as far as the International Astronomical Union was concerned. The decision was a long time coming, but no person deserves more credit/blame for forcing the astronomical community's hand than Caltech astronomer Michael Brown. He and his... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE3: Triamond Joy!
Triangles. Diamonds. Triamond Joy! In this episode the Dawdlers go deep into lesser known territory: original ideas. Truth Seekers, Game Players, Overseers, and Engineers are united in a unique interpretive mechanism for evaluating contributions to inquiry. Our number one fan is present but we tried to reduce the constant cheering using tek-nah-luh-gee. Unfortunately, this means Harland sounds l... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE3: Triamond Joy! - A World Beyond Truth Seeking
Triangles. Diamonds. Triamond Joy! In this episode the Dawdlers go deep into lesser known territory: original ideas. Truth Seekers, Game Players, Overseers, and Engineers are united in a unique interpretive mechanism for evaluating contributions to inquiry. Our number one fan is present but we tried to reduce the constant cheering using tek-nah-luh-gee. Unfortunately, this means Harland sounds l... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailEpisode 197: Parmenides on What There Is (Part Two)
Continuing with guest Peter Adamson with "On Nature" (475 BCE). We finally get to fragment 8, which describes why Being must be singular and eternal, given that the notion of Non-Being is nonsense. But how could we as individuals be asking these questions then? Does his "Way of Seeming" work to explain the appearances, as opposed to reality? Listen to part one first, or get the unbroken, ad-free C... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailWe should study broadly in order to increase understanding
Seneca tells Lucilius that he welcomes knowledge from all fields, not just philosophy. That's why he wrote books on natural questions, including on the nature of comets, earthquakes, thunderstorms, and the causes of the flooding of the Nile. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE2: An Immense Investment in the Utterly Obvious
Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance. Harland and Ryan tackle Stephen J Gould and Richard Lewontin’s paper “The Spandrels of San Marco” and discuss adaptationism’s benefits and flaws in evolutionary biology. This is a topic we thought we could shoot off. Well…hard to tell…it’s hard to tell if we just fucked off or if we got anywhere. Maybe we get somewhere in some pla... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE2: An Immense Investment in the Utterly Obvious - Gould and Lewontin's "Spandrels of San Marco"
Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance. Harland and Ryan tackle Stephen J Gould and Richard Lewontin’s paper “The Spandrels of San Marco” and discuss adaptationism’s benefits and flaws in evolutionary biology. This is a topic we thought we could shoot off. Well…hard to tell…it’s hard to tell if we just fucked off or if we got anywhere. Maybe we get somewhere in some pla... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE1: John Searle does not Understand Chinese
This time the Dawdlers are attempting to make sense of being in a room where they have to understand Chinese. John Searle sure can’t help! To remedy this, Harland and Ryan take a deep dive in a shallow pool, with a close consideration of John Searle’s Chinese Room Argument in the Philosophy of Mind from his 1980 paper “Minds, Brains, and Programs”. Can computers “understand”? What is t... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-27thumbnailE1: John Searle does not Understand - The Chinese Room Argument
This time the Dawdlers are attempting to make sense of being in a room where they have to understand Chinese. John Searle sure can’t help! To remedy this, Harland and Ryan take a deep dive in a shallow pool, with a close consideration of John Searle’s Chinese Room Argument in the Philosophy of Mind from his 1980 paper “Minds, Brains, and Programs”. Can computers “understand”? What is t... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-26thumbnailE0: Dawdlers & (but mostly) Hustlers
Dawdlers, Harland and Ryan, discuss The Dawdle. Admittedly a less popular concept in 2018 America than The Hustle, but this dichotomy is considered and arguments presented that perhaps too many underestimate the virtues of Dawdling. P.S. This is episode zero. Why? We don’t know! Guess it’s a thing we Dawdlers are not up to date on like those Hustlers out there. P.P.S. In this episode you w... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-26thumbnailE0: Dawdlers & (but mostly) Hustlers - Introducing the Dawdler's Philosophy
Dawdlers, Harland and Ryan, discuss The Dawdle. Admittedly a less popular concept in 2018 America than The Hustle, but this dichotomy is considered and arguments presented that perhaps too many underestimate the virtues of Dawdling. P.S. This is episode zero. Why? We don’t know! Guess it’s a thing we Dawdlers are not up to date on like those Hustlers out there. P.P.S. In this episode you w... (@dawdlerspodcast)
2018-Aug-26thumbnail#013 Embracing The Amateur
In this bonus episode you'll hear why Monica believes we should embrace our inner amateur. You'll also hear about examples of amateurs throughout history; from the fields of sports to science to art, who greatly changed their field of study or work. Speaking of work, by the end of this episode you'll understand why Monica hates the popular notion that doing things we love isn't hard work. Show not... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-26thumbnailWomen, autonomy and social justice in China
Women in China have better access to education and job opportunities than ever before—yet a woman’s identity and value is still strongly linked with her role in the family, as wife and mother. (@RadioNational)
2018-Aug-26thumbnailEpisode 45, Christianity, Gender and Society (Part I)
We've been working tirelessly on our upcoming audiobook, Developments in Christian Thought, which is due to be released, free of charge, on August 28th 2018. If you're listening to this past August 28th, you can find a link to the audiobook in the iTunes description (or at the bottom of this page). We can't wait to share it with you. So we decided to release one of our favourite chapters early. Wh... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Aug-25thumbnailTHE POINT OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY A Conversation With Tamler Sommers (2)
THE POINT OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY A Conversation With Tamler Sommers (2) by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Aug-25thumbnailEp70 - Human Rights and Political Philosophy
In this 70th episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio talk with Toby Buckle about "Human Rights and Political Philosophy." Toby works for Amnesty International, but in this episode he is representing only his own point of view. Toby is also the founder and host of the Political Philosophy Podcast, which, according to his Web site, is "a wee... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Aug-24thumbnailChoose your entertainment virtuously
Seneca tells Lucilius that we need rest and relaxation, but we can exercise virtue even in our choice of how we relax and entertain ourselves. Consider how you refresh your mind, the next time you pick a movie or organize a vacation! Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-23thumbnailEverything flows, so don't get attached
Seneca quotes the Pre-Socratic philosopher Heraclitus to the effect that everything changes all the time, panta rhei. It follows that it is futile to get attached to things, including our own bodies. Enjoy what you have, but consider it a temporary loan from the cosmos. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-23thumbnailEV - 057 Delightful Bitchcraft
Today we're joined by the lovely ladies from Delightful Bitchcraft and Secular Soup Podcast. We talk about everything from kids and bullying, the mormon church, and how the womb is your first apartment.https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/16/opinion/climate-change-parenting.htmlOpening Invocation:Natural History MuseumHero of the Week:Joe RadinovichAnonymous  (@ETVPod)
2018-Aug-23thumbnail#012 LOVE Q&A: Love, Loss, and Loving More
What can impermanence teach us about love? Can breakups lead to break throughs? In this episode, our previous guests on the topic of LOVE respond to a question asked by a member of the audience: "When it comes to love, what has been your biggest blessing in disguise?" TheHappierHour.org Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @TheHappierHour #TheHappierHour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-22thumbnailAlways do what is in harmony with the common interest
Marcus Aurelius talks about being helpful to society. And yet he was an emperor who waged war and presided over slavery. How do we reconcile his actions with his Stoicism? At least in three ways, explored in this episode. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-22thumbnail0G19: Black Mirror, Hang the DJ, Part 1: Newcomb's Paradox
We've returned to Black Mirror to talk about one of the episodes that started this all, Hand the DJ. Or maybe we're just yet another simulation of that in a test by a marketing brand to see if this show would work. Hard to say, really. Speaking of endless cycles, we're due for a new set of intro quotes so if you're a $5+ patron make sure you head over to the patreon site to submit suggestions and ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-21thumbnailEpisode 146: Sore Losers (Does Sports Make Us Unhappy?)
Is being a sports fan irrational? Does it lead to more suffering than happiness? David and Tamler discuss a recent study that suggests the answer is "yes." But does the study really capture the benefits of being fans? More generally, does science have the tools to truly measure the costs and benefits of rooting for your favorite teams? Plus, we talk about The Nation apologizing for publishing a po... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Aug-21thumbnailDo you think you know the difference between good and bad?
A splendid example of Epictetus' sarcasm by way of a bit of dialogue with one of his students. In the course of which we learn about the virtue of practical wisdom, the discipline of desire, and the dichotomy of control. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-21thumbnail#011 Commit To A Character with Aristotle and William Beteet
In this episode we’ll explore how Aristotle and improvisation can help us navigate dating in the Age of the App; or at least how to stay sane in the process. Stand-up comic and men's dating coach William Beetet shares what he's learned about committing to a character and acting "as if" in order to improve his love life, and life in general. TheHappierHour.org Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook:... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-20thumbnailTeresa Bejan on Civility
Civility is a conversational virtue that governs how people talk to each other. How important is it in political life? In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Teresa Bejan discusses this manner of speaking and writing and its history. We are grateful for sponsorship for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon patrons. (@philosophybites)
2018-Aug-20thumbnail460: Summer Reading List
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/summer-reading-list-2018. Summer is here – what philosophers, philosophies, or philosophical issues do you want to read up on? Heidegger's Being and Time may not be the obvious choice to take on vacation, but there are lots of readable, beach-friendly classics and non-classics to add philosophical depth to your summer reading. Host emeritus John ... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Aug-20thumbnailEpisode 197: Parmenides on What There Is (Part One)
On the fragments referred to as "On Nature" from ca. 475 BCE, featuring guest Peter Adamson from the History of Philosophy without Any Gaps podcast. Parmenides gives "the Way of Truth," which is that there is only Being, and talking of Non-Being is nonsense. So everything you experience is wrong! Don't wait for part two! Get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! Sponsors: Expl... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-20thumbnailEpisode 10: Megan Rosenbloom on the Death Positive Movement
We're all going to die. But while we are alive, it's up to us how we understand and deal with that fact. In the United States especially, there is a tendency to not face up to the reality of death, and to assume that our goal should be to struggle at all costs to squeeze every last minute out of life. The Death Positive movement aims to change that, helping people to both face up to death on a per... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-20thumbnail10 | Megan Rosenbloom on the Death Positive Movement
We're all going to die. But while we are alive, it's up to us how we understand and deal with that fact. In the United States especially, there is a tendency to not face up to the reality of death, and to assume that our goal should be to struggle at all costs to squeeze every last minute out of life. The Death Positive movement aims to change that, helping people to both face up to death on a per... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-20thumbnailThe difference between proto-emotions and fully formed ones
Seneca nicely explains what a proto-emotion is, and we discuss how proto-emotions can then develop into fully formed healthy or unhealthy emotions. It all comes down to what cognitive judgment we apply to our initial response. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-20thumbnailBonus: (sub)Text #2: Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse Five": Is There Such a Thing as a War Story? (Part One)
Episode 2 of Wes's new podcasting endeavor, featuring Mary from the Phi Fic podcast, who's also the managing editor of the PEL blog. Note: Part two will NOT be appearing on this feed. Become a PEL Citizen to get the full discussion. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-19thumbnail#010 Getting To The Good Place
In this Happier Ever After Hours Bonus Episode, you'll hear why the creator of the popular television show The Good Place developed specific rules for the writers for each episode, and how defining our own rules can help us clarify our personal values. You'll also hear the rules Monica created for The Happier Hour and why she believes we must "curate to make space to create." Show notes: TheHappie... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-19thumbnailEthics and absolutes in the classroom
The trouble with morality is that reasonable people keep disagreeing on what’s right and wrong. The science, as they say, isn’t settled. So that being the case, how can we argue for fixed moral standards to which everyone should sign up? And how should we introduce kids to this vexed field of inquiry? (@RadioNational)
2018-Aug-19thumbnailNEM#80: Rod Picott: Literary Workin' Man
Nashville singer/songwriter/fiction-writer Rod laid sheet rock for years before releasing his first album in 2001; he has now released ten albums of vivid Americana. We focus on his new double album Out Past the Wires, discussing "Take Home Pay" and "Date of Grace" (with intro/outro from "Be My Bonnie"), then look back to "Rust Belt Fields" from Welding Burns (2011) and finally listen to “You're... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-19thumbnailEpisode 44, The Steven Pinker Interview
As Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Steven Pinker’s list of accomplishments is incredible; he has been named Humanist of the Year, a top “100 Global Thinker” by Foreign Policy and included in Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World Today.” Steven has also been awarded eight honorary doctorates and his research on language, vision and social relations has... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Aug-18thumbnailCOLLECTIVE PUNISHMENT A conversation with Tamler Sommers
COLLECTIVE PUNISHMENT A conversation with Tamler Sommers by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Aug-18thumbnailEp68 - BC 12 - The Best of the Best or a Nice Variety of People at the Table?
This 68th episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a short, breadcrumb, in which Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invited Grace Joy Cebrero back on the show to talk about a listener’s voicemail. Grace was our guest in Episode 56 of the show, on “Inclusion and Philosophy.” At the end of that episode, Grace asked our listeners the following question: “Is it more i... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Aug-17thumbnailHow to get a good night's sleep
Seneca reminds us that real tranquillity comes from a relaxed mind with a clear conscience. Which is why Stoics engage in an evening meditation on the major events of the day, learning from their mistakes, and filing them away before going to sleep. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-16thumbnailEV - 056 Better Know David Hume
Another installment of Better Know A Philosopher. This time we're diving into David Hume. During out conversation we even go into the weeds of some ways philosophers talk and argue, and why slave owners suck.Opening Invocation:The AnimatrixHero of the Week:Susan Unterberg  (@ETVPod)
2018-Aug-16thumbnailSelf-sufficiency comes from inside, not from externals
Seneca challenges the common assumption that someone is self-sufficient if he has enough money, a nice place to live, and so forth. True self-sufficiency requires serenity, which comes from inner strength, not from externals. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-16thumbnail#009 Soulmates, Sartre, and Beauvoir with Skye Cleary
In this episode we explore how the Existentialists view the concepts of soul mates and marriage. Our guest, philosopher and author of Existentialism and Love, Dr. Skye Cleary shares her insights about Sartre, de Beauvoir, and whether or not we should really promise, "till death do us part." Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @TheHappierHour Sharing: #TheHappierhour... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-15thumbnailDeath is like pre-birth: there is nothing to be feared
Seneca agrees with Epicurus: death is a state of non-existence, therefore we do not feel anything, and there is nothing to be afraid of. Moreover, it is no different from the aeons before we were born, and we don't regret those, do we? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-15thumbnailKeya Maitra, “Philosophy of the Bhagavad Gita: A Contemporary Introduction” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018)
The Bhagavad Gita is one of the foundational texts of Hinduism and probably the one most familiar and popular in the West. The moral problem that motivates the text – is it right to kill members of one’s extended family if they are on the other side in a war?... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Aug-15thumbnail0G18: Dune Part Three, The Cycle of Politics
For the last (or is it?) part of our Dune saga, we look at the political aspects of the universe and dive into the theory that all societies go through cycles of government none of which are stable. Primary Text: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyklos Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make su... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-15thumbnailEpisode #121 ... Michel Foucault pt. 1
Today we begin talking about the work of Michel Foucault. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Aug-14thumbnailPractice philosophy constantly, life doesn't stop
Seneca tells us that philosophy, understood as a way of life, cannot be relegated to spare moments. Just like someone can't be a Christian only on Sunday mornings, so a Stoic applies her principles at every opportunity, big or small. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-14thumbnail#008 Your Love Blueprint and Sigmund Freud with Terri Cole
In this episode of The Happier Hour we'll hear from psychotherapist Terri Cole about how Sigmund Freud and the unconscious mind can help us navigate the murky feelings of LOVE. Whether calming the monkey mind with meditation, unearthing our unconscious mind with psychotherapy, or trying to not go out our minds with dating in in the age of the app, this episode is sure to help that crazy little thi... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-13thumbnail463: The Ethics of Algorithms
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/morality-algorithms. Recent years have seen the rise of machine learning algorithms surrounding us in our homes and back pockets. They're increasingly used in everything from recommending movies to guiding sentencing in criminal courts, thanks to their being perceived as unbiased and fair. But can algorithms really be objective when they are create... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Aug-13thumbnailEpisode 9: Solo -- Why Is There Something Rather than Nothing?
It's fun to be in the exciting, chaotic, youthful days of the podcast, when anything goes and experimentation is the order of the day. So today's show is something different: a solo effort, featuring just me talking without any guests to cramp my style. This won't be the usual format, but I suspect it will happen from time to time. Feel free to chime in below on how often you think alternative fo... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-13thumbnail9 | Solo -- Why Is There Something Rather than Nothing?
It's fun to be in the exciting, chaotic, youthful days of the podcast, when anything goes and experimentation is the order of the day. So today's show is something different: a solo effort, featuring just me talking without any guests to cramp my style. This won't be the usual format, but I suspect it will happen from time to time. Feel free to chime in below on how often you think alternative for... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-13thumbnailLearn from teachers who do, not just talk
Seneca advices his friend Lucilius to pay attention to people who act right, not just talk right. When we pick a role model to improve our character, let's pick someone whose actions we want to imitate, they are a better guidance to virtue. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-13thumbnailEpisode 196: Guest Simon Blackburn on Truth (Part Two)
Continuing with Simon on his book On Truth (2018). We move to part two of the book, where we get down to the procedures used to obtain truth in art, ethics, and science. Yes, truth is objective, but it's not best described as correspondence, and in fact this elaboration of how truth is actually obtained is more enlightening than any abstract definition meant to cover all the different types of tru... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-12thumbnail#007 Ancient Wisdom For Modern Anxiety with Jules Evans
How can philosophy help us navigate social anxiety? In this interview with Jules Evans, you’ll learn about Stoicism, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, the problem of “peak experience addicts," and Evans’ current research into “ecstatic experiences” and “spiritual emergencies.” This off-the-cuff Happier Ever After Hours bonus episode is part of a weekly series highlighting how philosophy... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-12thumbnailThe Pragmatists
Should philosophy be the attempt to articulate truth? If you’re a pragmatist, the answer is No. William James wrote of truth as a subset of expediency, and of truth’s 'cash value'. Richard Rorty saw truth—philosophical, moral, even scientific—in terms of contingent 'vocabularies'. At a time when The Washington Post reports that the leader of the free world has made over 3,000 false claims ... (@RadioNational)
2018-Aug-12thumbnailEpisode 43, The Galen Strawson Interview (Part II)
Galen Strawson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. Amongst countless papers in metaphysics and philosophy of mind, Galen is the author of Freedom and Belief, The Subject of Experience, Consciousness and Its Place in Nature and most recently, Things That Bother Me: Death, Freedom, the Self, Etc. The widespread impact of these works cannot be understated. In the words o... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Aug-11thumbnailBonus Episode - Glenn Adamson on Material Intelligence
Peter's twin brother Glenn Adamson discusses the philosophical implications of craft. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-11thumbnailCIVILITY AND TONE POLICING A Conversation With Teresa Bejan
CIVILITY AND TONE POLICING A Conversation With Teresa Bejan by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Aug-10thumbnailEV - 055 Vaccines Make You A Muppet
Today we're joined with Eran Segev, the president of Australian Skeptics. We talk about what the organization does, their convention coming up in October, and the lovely anti-vaccination movement.Opening InvocationMuppets (Thanks to @Ghostwoods @MichaelToole @camgarrityHero of the Week:Anonymous  (@ETVPod)
2018-Aug-10thumbnailCompel Fortuna to play on equal terms
Seneca argues that we can force Fortuna, the goddess of luck, to deal with us on equal terms, by not being slaves to external things we cannot control. Cultivate equanimity, and Fortuna will play fair with you. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-09thumbnailBonus Episode Preview Westworld: From William to the Man in Black
This is a Patreon bonus feed preview, enjoy! In this episode, I analyze the Man in Black's meaning of life or outlook on life. How he changed from young William to the Man in Black. What made him put down the white hat and put on the black? Is he living in bad faith? Is he trying to free the host because of justice or the new world of possibilities their freedom can open for HIM? What would Jean... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Aug-09thumbnailPay attention to what others say, inhabit their minds
Marcus Aurelius gives some commonsensical advice on how to interact with other people, which leads us to a brief discussion of what counts as "Stoic" advice in the first place. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-09thumbnail#006 Resolutions Q&A: Plato, Seneca and Camus Walk Into A Bar
In this episode you'll hear what the Stoics and Existentialists have in common, the difference between belief and truth, and why having a word of the year can help us focus on our goals. This audience Q&A episode wraps up two weeks of exploring philosophy and Resolutions. Resources: TheHappierHour.org Sharing: Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @TheHappierHour #thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-08thumbnailRevenge is not justice
Epictetus reminds his students that engaging in a wrong act, even one done in response to an injustice, stains our own character, and therefore hurts us first and foremost. Stoics don't favor retributive justice systems. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-08thumbnailEpisode #43 - Elder on Friendship, Robots and Social Media
 In this episode I talk to Alexis Elder. Alexis is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Her research focuses on ethics, emerging technologies, social philosophy, metaphysics (especially social ontology), and philosophy of mind. She draws on ancient philosophy - primarily Chinese and Greek - in order to think about current problems. She is the author... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Aug-08thumbnailOG17: Dune Part Two, Kwisatz Haderach and Self-Perfection
The time for exposition is over! The one who can be in many places at once has finally arrived, metaphorically. Learn all about Aaron's crackpot theory for how to be the Kwisatz Haderach that you want to see in the world. More useful material on Virtue Theory: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle-ethics/#VirDefConInc Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter:... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Aug-07thumbnailEpisode 145: Lost in Borges' Garden
David and Tamler go deep into Borges’ labyrinth to discuss the fascinating, multi-dimensional story “The Garden of Forking Paths.” What is the underlying reality of this story? What demands does Borges make of his readers? What is Borges telling us about time, freedom, war, and art? Is the story itself a maze for readers to wander and lose their way? We don’t have all the answers, but it w... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Aug-07thumbnailWhat's the problem with the passions?
Seneca reminds us of the distinction between unhealthy and healthy emotions: being overwhelmed by the first ones tears us apart internally, while cultivating the second ones brings harmony to our psyche. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-07thumbnail#005 Just Your Imagination with Albert Camus and Rita J King
How can we find meaning in a meaningless world? In this episode on Albert Camus with futurist Rita J King, we explore the idea of absurdity and how the imagination can be our greatest resource for accomplishing our goals and resolutions. #TheHappierHour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Twitter/Instagram: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @TheHappierHour (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-06thumbnailEpisode 8: Carl Zimmer on Heredity, DNA, and Editing Genes
Our understanding of heredity and genetics is improving at blinding speed. It was only in the year 2000 that scientists obtained the first rough map of the human genome: 3 billion base pairs of DNA with about 20,000 functional genes. Today, you can send a bit of your DNA to companies such as 23andMe and get a report on your personal genome (ancestry, health risks) for about $200. Technologies lik... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-06thumbnail8 | Carl Zimmer on Heredity, DNA, and Editing Genes
Our understanding of heredity and genetics is improving at blinding speed. It was only in the year 2000 that scientists obtained the first rough map of the human genome: 3 billion base pairs of DNA with about 20,000 functional genes. Today, you can send a bit of your DNA to companies such as 23andMe and get a report on your personal genome (ancestry, health risks) for about $200. Technologies like... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Aug-06thumbnailNo pain no gain, says Musonius
Musonius Rufus, in an implicit rebuttal to the Epicureans, reminds us of all the things that is worth experiencing pain to achieve, most importantly being a good, just, and temperate person. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-06thumbnailEpisode 196: Guest Simon Blackburn on Truth (Part One)
The Cambridge/etc. prof joins Mark, Wes, and Dylan to discuss his book On Truth (2018). What is truth? Simon's view synthesizes deflationism and pragmatism to avoid relativism by fixing on the domain-specific procedures we actually engage in to establish the truth of a claim, whether in ethics, science, art, or whatever. A gift of clarity after two episodes threshing through the jungles of analyti... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Aug-06thumbnail390: Will Innovation Kill Us?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/will-innovation-kill-us. Innovation, be it social, economic, or technological, is often hailed as the panacea for all our troubles. Our obsession with innovation leads us to constantly want new things and to want them now. But past innovations are arguably the main reason for many of our current predicaments, which in turn creates a further need to... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Aug-06thumbnailSteven Gimbel, “Isn’t That Clever: A Philosophical Account of Humor and Comedy” (Routledge, 2018)
Humor and its varied manifestations—jesting joking around, goofing, lampooning, and so on—pervade the human experience and are plausibly regarded as necessary features of interpersonal interactions. As one would expect, these pervasive phenomena occasion philosophical questions. What renders some item or event humorous? Are funny jokes objectively so? As humor is... (@NewBooksPhil)
2018-Aug-05thumbnailTelling the story
Philosophy is usually thought of as the province of ideas and abstract thought. But this week’s guest is taking philosophy in a slightly different direction, yet makes perfect sense. US academic Barry Lam is the creator and host of Hi-Phi Nation, a podcast that bringing together philosophy and storytelling—the results are rather wonderful. (@RadioNational)
2018-Aug-05thumbnailEpisode 43, The Galen Strawson Interview (Part I)
Galen Strawson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. Amongst countless papers in metaphysics and philosophy of mind, Galen is the author of Freedom and Belief, The Subject of Experience, Consciousness and Its Place in Nature and most recently, Things That Bother Me: Death, Freedom, the Self, Etc. The widespread impact of these works cannot be understated. In the words o... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Aug-04thumbnailEARLY AMERICAN RELIGION A conversation with Teresa Bejan
EARLY AMERICAN RELIGION A conversation with Teresa Bejan by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Aug-03thumbnailEpisode 107: Linda Martín Alcoff discusses identity and history
In this episode, Linda Martín Alcoff discusses the subtle ways that things like your race, gender, sexual orientation, and class can influence your life. She argues that the best way to understand that kind of influence is by looking to the history of the relevant social group. (@ElucidationsPod)
2018-Aug-03thumbnailYou should live neither in a place of torture nor in a cafe
Seneca gives rare advice on one's abode. It should be a place that does not get in the way of practicing virtue, which means neither too uncomfortable (if we can avoid it) nor too luxurious or distracting. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-02thumbnailPhilosophy may be painful or a pleasure, but it's worth it
Seneca disagrees with Epictetus: the first says that philosophy is a pleasant medicine, the second that it is a painful one. And yet they agree that it is a remedy that, taken regularly, makes for a wholesome life. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-02thumbnailEV - 054 Steel vs. Straw Arguments
What is a Staw-man (or as we call it Staw-bot) fallacy? What about a Steel-bot? We dive into both of these types or arguments and dig into the importance of Steel-boting and why we do it.Opening Invocation:Jesse Rabinowitz from Zen BuddhismHero of the Week:Bo Burnham (film Eighth Grade) (@ETVPod)
2018-Aug-02thumbnail#004 How A Dinner Party Can Change Your Life
Once upon a time, Monica hosted a philosophy dinner party that started a new chapter in her life and led to The Happier Hour. In this bonus episode we'll hear why she believes in philosophy as conversations and not just as ideas, and her tips for how to have better conversations in your own life. Happier Ever After Hours are bonus episodes from real life that highlight how philosophy can help us b... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-02thumbnail#003 Keep Calm And Carry On with Seneca and Massimo Pigliucci
What can Seneca and the Stoics teach us about sticking to our resolutions? Professor Massimo Pigliucci explains why Stoicism is on the rise today, the relationship with CBT, and how all of us can improve ourselves everyday. The Happier Hour explores a different topic every two weeks. This week: Resolutions Resources: TheHappierHour.org Share: #TheHappierHour Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy Facebook: @T... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-02thumbnail#002 Beginnings with Plato and Dorie Clark
What can Plato teach us about making resolutions? Dorie Clark, our inagural guest, shares her tips for setting goals that set us up for success, and why Plato is totally not overrated. The Happier Hour explores a different topic every two weeks. This week: Resolutions Share: #TheHappier Hour Notes: TheHappierHour.org Facebook: @TheHappierHour Twitter/IG: @MissMMcCarthy (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Aug-02thumbnailHow neo-liberalism has twisted liberalism
Does neo-liberalism continue the values of classical liberalism? (@DavidEdmonds100)
2018-Aug-01thumbnailIs the problem with the place, or with you?
Seneca says that more often than we realize we blame our problems on the time and place we live in, without understanding that the fault may be with us, and that we should work on ourselves, instead of finding excuses. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Aug-01thumbnailOG16: Dune Part One, the Expositioning
For many episodes our people have waited for the poda al Gaib, the pod from the outer world. Finally, the prophecy is fulfilled. Yet many questions remain unanswered. Can we successfully explain the plot of Dune, and thereby avoid the podcast jihad? How many side characters with weird makeup choices do we have to cover before we can actually get to the philosophy? What philosophy are we even going... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Jul-31thumbnailFacebook Should End
The Californians return to talk about the ethics of Facebook. Zach follows up on his article, “Facebook Should Shut Itself Down,” and tries to convince Dylan and Adam of his radical claim. In the episode they discuss potential objections to the idea—for example, that Facebook isn’t all that special, that the idea is too radical, that Facebook has surely done plenty of good, and whether, pr... (@thevimblog)
2018-Jul-31thumbnailEpisode 44 - Kareem Khalifa
On Episode 44, Nick chats with Kareem Khalifa, Professor at Middlebury College in Vermont (USA), about what it's like to teach and do philosophy of science at a liberal arts college, transitioning from applied mathematics to hermeneutics to philosophy of science, his impressive musical career as a bass guitarist, his new book, 'Understanding, Explanation, and Scientific Knowledge," his current wor... (@SciPhiPod)
2018-Jul-31thumbnailYou want to change the world? Begin by changing yourself
Seneca argues that we are born with the ability to reason and to improve our reasoning. We are also naturally social, and prefer virtue over vice. Hard to believe, right? And yet, he's got a point. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-30thumbnailEpisode 7: Yascha Mounk on Threats to Liberal Democracy
Both words in the phrase "liberal democracy" carry meaning, and both concepts are under attack around the world. "Democracy" means that they people rule, while "liberal" (in this sense) means that the rights of individuals are protected, even if they're not part of the majority. Recent years have seen the rise of an authoritarian/populist political movement in many Western democracies, one that s... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Jul-30thumbnail7 | Yascha Mounk on Threats to Liberal Democracy
Both words in the phrase "liberal democracy" carry meaning, and both concepts are under attack around the world. "Democracy" means that they people rule, while "liberal" (in this sense) means that the rights of individuals are protected, even if they're not part of the majority. Recent years have seen the rise of an authoritarian/populist political movement in many Western democracies, one that sc... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Jul-30thumbnail450: The 2018 Dionysus Awards
more at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/dionysus-2018. Josh and Ken talk to philosophers, film critics, and listeners in presenting their fifth (mostly) annual Dionysus Awards for the most philosophically compelling movies of the past year. Categories include: • Most Searing Depiction of Humankind's Propensity to Dehumanize the Other • Most Philosophically Absurdist and Cinema... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Jul-30thumbnailA good life depends not on length, but on our use of it
Seneca argues that it is the quality, not the duration, of one's life that is important, and that we often live long when measured in years, and yet too little in terms of what we accomplish. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-30thumbnailEpisode 195: Truth-The Austin/Strawson Debate (Part Two)
Continuing on "Truth" by J.L. Austin and "Truth" by P.F. Strawson both from 1950. We proceed to the Strawson article, which critiques the notion of a "fact" as explaining why a sentence might be true. A "fact" is not a thing in the world! So what do we add when we change "The cat is on the mat" to "'The cat is on the mat' is true?" Listen to Part One first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edi... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Jul-29thumbnailRemembering Stanley Cavell
Stanley Cavell, who died on June 19, was one of the world’s foremost contemporary thinkers, yet he always considered himself something of a philosophical outsider. His work ranged across the philosophy of language, aesthetics, ethics and epistemology—but also literature, cinema, and music. And his 'ordinary language' style and interest in questions of quality and value could be about to experi... (@RadioNational)
2018-Jul-29thumbnailHoP 306 - Collectors’ Items - Photius and Byzantine Compilations
Photius, “the inventor of the book review,” and other Byzantine scholars who preserved ancient learning. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Jul-29thumbnailEpisode 42, The Nature or Attributes of God (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
For religious believers, considering the questions that surround the nature or attributes of God, is important in their attempt to form a coherent understanding of their creator. In the Summa Theologica, shortly after arguing for the existence of God, Saint Thomas Aquinas writes the following: “Having recognised that a certain thing exists, we have still to investigate the way in which it exists... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Jul-28thumbnailCONTAINMENT AND DETERRENCE A conversation with Gregg Caruso (2)
CONTAINMENT AND DETERRENCE A conversation with Gregg Caruso (2) by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Jul-27thumbnailPhilosophy of Westworld: Ford's View of Consciousness
In this episode, we dive deeper into Westworld's understanding of consciousness. Particularly focussing on Robert Ford's views on consciousness. Does Ford think consciousness exists? Is the self an illusion? Which philosophers share a similar perspective as Ford? All of this discussed, tune in! As I mentioned in the show please reach out to me by email to enter the book giveaway..which will be ... (@philosophyguy2)
2018-Jul-27thumbnailWhat's really important in your life?
A straightforward quote by Epictetus allows us to reflect on what a philosophy of life is, and why everyone needs one. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-27thumbnailEpisode #120 ... Logical Positivism
Today we talk about Logical Positivism. (@iamstephenwest)
2018-Jul-26thumbnailEV - 053 Embrace The Reckoning
Today we're joined by fellow podcaster Stephanie Lepp of Reckonings podcast. This wonderful podcast interviews people who've had a major life changing moment or moments that altered their ideology or belief of something. Opening InvocationJesse Rabinowitz Source: Zen BuddhismHero of the WeekAnonymous  (@ETVPod)
2018-Jul-26thumbnailEpisode #42 - Earp on Psychedelics and Moral Enhancement
 In this episode I talk to Brian Earp. Brian is Associate Director of the Yale-Hastings Program in Ethics and Health Policy at Yale University and The Hastings Center, and a Research Fellow in the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford. Brian has diverse research interests in ethics, psychology, and the philosophy of science. His research has been covered in Nature, Po... (@JohnDanaher)
2018-Jul-26thumbnailOn the difference between philosophy and logic chopping
Seneca says that he'd prefer to be told how to help people, rather than how many different meanings of the word "people" there may be. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-25thumbnailThings themselves have no power to form our judgments
Life is hard as it is, says Marcus Aurelius, there is no need to make ourselves more miserable by adding unnecessary opinions that increase our suffering. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-25thumbnailOG15: Orville and the Prime Directive
Prepare to have your destiny as a listener reshaped by paternalistic influences! We have on a wonderful guest, David Kyle Johnson of the Great Courses series to talk about the Season 1 Finale of The Orville (available on Hulu) and the ethics of the prime directive, a classic of the Star Trek Universe. Also, does anyone get a Brigadoon vibe from the planet in this episode? Didn't get to bring that ... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Jul-24thumbnailEpisode 144: Borges' Babylon
David and Tamler try to wrap their heads around Jorge Luis Borges' “The Library of Babel” – a short story about a universe/library that contains every possible book with every possible combination of characters. How many books would this library contain? Would some of the books justify our lives (if we could find them)? Can we know whether a book is deeply meaningful or deeply misleading? W... (@verybadwizards)
2018-Jul-24thumbnailReflect on the roles you play, and play them well
Epictetus introduced a major innovation in Stoic ethics with his theory of roles. We are first and foremost members of the human cosmopolis. But also fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, friends, colleagues. How do we balance the conflicting demands of such diverse roles in life? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-24thumbnail#001 It's About Time To Get Happier
Welcome! This is the teaser to entice you to hit SUBSCRIBE and join the fun. Equal parts philosophy and self-help, with a dash of humor thrown in for taste, The Happier Hour aims to make philosophy useful for the rest of us. Each episode will focus on a modern-day dilemma and calls on the greatest philosophers of all time for help. Like the joy that comes from a strong drink at half the price, thi... (@MissMMcCarthy)
2018-Jul-23thumbnailRobert B. Talisse on Overdoing Democracy
You can overdo most things, but can you overdo democracy? Political philosopher Robert B. Talisse thinks you can. He explains why in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are very grateful for sponsorship from the Marc Sanders Foundation for this episode. (@philosophybites)
2018-Jul-23thumbnail462: Does Science Over-reach?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/does-science-over-reach. We've all heard the phrase, "You can't argue with science." Appealing to scientific fact as a way to settle a question makes sense given the amazing advancements science has brought us in understanding how the world works. But should we take the accomplishments of science as evidence for scientism—the view that science is... (@philtalkradio)
2018-Jul-23thumbnailEpisode 6: Liv Boeree on Poker, Aliens, and Thinking in Probabilities
Poker, like life, is a game of incomplete information. To do well in such a game, we have to think in terms of probabilities, unpredictable strategies, and Bayesian inference. These are ideas that play a central role in physics and rationality as well as in poker, which makes Liv Boeree such a great person to talk about them. Liv is a professional poker player who studied physics as a university s... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Jul-23thumbnail6 | Liv Boeree on Poker, Aliens, and Thinking in Probabilities
Poker, like life, is a game of incomplete information. To do well in such a game, we have to think in terms of probabilities, unpredictable strategies, and Bayesian inference. These are ideas that play a central role in physics and rationality as well as in poker, which makes Liv Boeree such a great person to talk about them. Liv is a professional poker player who studied physics as a university s... (@seanmcarroll)
2018-Jul-23thumbnailChamber of Facts
Do people of opposing political parties believe in different facts? The mantra at the moment is that they do, because of media echo chambers, motivated reasoning, and ideological blindspots. But a more careful look reveals a different answer, with perhaps even more startling consequences. This week we follow two conservative Republicans who consumed a liberal newsfeed for two weeks, and we look at... (@HiPhiNation)
2018-Jul-23thumbnailWon't you be my neighbor?
Seneca reminds us that we can't live happily if we transform everything into a question of our own utility. We must live for your neighbour in order to live for ourselves. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-23thumbnailEpisode 195: Truth-The Austin/Strawson Debate (Part One)
On two articles in the "ordinary language" tradition of philosophy called "Truth" from 1950 by J.L. Austin and P.F. Strawson. Is truth a property of particular speech acts, or of the propositions expressed through speech acts? Does truth mean correspondence with the facts, or does the word "fact" make this definition totally uninformative? Does saying "is true" add any information content to a sen... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Jul-22thumbnailWhen work stops working
Why do we work? According to Judaeo-Christian tradition, work is the result of a divine curse—and for many people in today’s labour market that comes as no surprise. And as more and more jobs become automated, fewer and fewer people will have them. An ideal future is a 'post-work' world where everybody has access to a universal basic income—but maybe there's an even better way. (@RadioNational)
2018-Jul-22thumbnailHAP 09 - In You I Take Shelter - Zera Yacob
The 17th century Ethiopian rationalist Zera Yacob, hailed as the first modern Africana philosopher. (@HistPhilosophy)
2018-Jul-22thumbnailEpisode 42, The Nature or Attributes of God (Part III - Omnibenevolence)
For religious believers, considering the questions that surround the nature or attributes of God, is important in their attempt to form a coherent understanding of their creator. In the Summa Theologica, shortly after arguing for the existence of God, Saint Thomas Aquinas writes the following: “Having recognised that a certain thing exists, we have still to investigate the way in which it exists... (@ThePanpsycast)
2018-Jul-21thumbnailBonus: (sub)Text #1: Shakespeare's "The Tempest": Poesis as Revenge Forsaken (Part One)
Wes Alwan and Bill Youmans discuss the 1611 play about revenge, forgiveness, and authorship. Or maybe it's about exploitation, or how we react to changes in status, or perhaps how a liberal education can give you magical powers! Note: Part two will NOT be appearing on this feed. Become a PEL Citizen to get the full discussion. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Jul-21thumbnailNEM#78: Tara Lynch's Unflinchingly Honest Metal Debut
Tara has long been building her heavy metal guitar skills, but has only recently gone public, building a huge social media following and now releasing Evil Enough, an album featuring musicians who've played with Black Sabbath, Ozzy Osbourne, Yngwie Malmsteen, etc. We discuss "Antidote" and "Banished from My Kingdom," and close with "Unbreakable." Opening music: "Gui-Tara Rises." Hear more at taral... (@PartiallyExLife)
2018-Jul-21thumbnailTHE ILLUSION OF FREE WILL A conversation with Gregg Caruso
THE ILLUSION OF FREE WILL A conversation with Gregg Caruso by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod)
2018-Jul-21thumbnailEp67 - Jane Addams and Democratic Activism
In this 67th episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio talk with Dr. Marilyn Fischer about “Jane Addams and Democratic Activism.” Dr. Fischer is a Professor Emerita at the University of Dayton where she specializes in political philosophy and American Pragmatism. She focuses especially on Jane Addams’s philosophy. Marilyn has a strong... (@PhilosophyBB)
2018-Jul-20thumbnailPodcast: “Revelations of Love in John Steinbeck” | Sacred & Profane Love, Episode 9
Download Episode 9: “Revelations of Love in John Steinbeck”   In Episode 9 of Sacred & Profane Love “Revelations of Love in John Steinbeck,” Philosopher Jennifer A. Frey speaks with Thomist Theologian, Fr Michael Sherwin, OP, about John Steinbeck’s secular understanding of Christian caritas (charity) and how Steinbeck captures the beauty and power of love ... (@jennfrey)
2018-Jul-20thumbnailWhat do you think is truly good for you?
Marcus provides us three options for what sort of thing is truly good for you, and argues that a person of understanding will go for the third one. Have you reflected on what is good for you, and why? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-19thumbnailEV - 052 Better Know John Rawls
We kick off our first official Better Know A Philosopher with John Rawls. Essentially the father of modern liberalism. Aaron takes us through a bit of his life and we dive deep into his main argument.Opening Invocationlistener: Petra PartakeHero of the WeekSpeakers of Nexus 2018 (@ETVPod)
2018-Jul-19thumbnailOn family matters, take the high moral ground
Epictetus advises us to forgo issues of material resources and remember that family relationships in great part define who we are. After all, if we can't practice virtue with our brothers, sisters, and parents, with whom can we practice it? Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-18thumbnailEveryone who craves externals is a slave to them
Seneca says that if we are going after the satisfaction of lust, greed, ambition, and so forth, we make ourselves slaves to fortune. Not so if we regard what we have as loans from the universe, which the universe can take back at any moment, by any means. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-18thumbnailListener Qs 2
We take another week to answer your questions, as sponsored by the super fun game of torturing Aaron by making him say names out loud. Thank you all so so much for supporting the show and we will continue to periodically do these Q and A's, with plenty of heads up so you can all change your patreon names like the monsters that you are. Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us o... (@0gPhilosophy)
2018-Jul-17thumbnailCalibrate your desires, achieve serenity
Musonius Rufus reminds us that it is far easier to curb our desire for our neighbor's wife than to pursue it Not to mention that it is the right thing to do. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support (@mpigliucci)
2018-Jul-17thumbnailThe Decision
On July 16, 2018, the Massachusetts Supreme Court issued its decision in the case of Commonwealth versus Julie Eldred. I called lead counsel on the case, Lisa Newman-Polk, to get her reaction to the ruling and talk about its implications. This mini-episode is a follow-up to Episode 8: Willful Acts.  (@HiPhiNation)