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TrueSciPhi

Philosophy Podcast Episodes (Ranked)

A list of episodes from the trailing year of selected podcast series with associated Twitter feeds. Also see series listing.

Updated: 2019-Nov-12 12:20 UTC. Listed episodes: 1038. Minimum length: 5 minutes. Hide descriptions. Rank is based on episode age and number of members of this list following podcast's indicated Twitter feed (see scores). Switch to chronological view. Search these podcasts. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

#  Episode details
1.podcast imageEmily Thomas on Wildly Implausible Metaphysics
Some philosophers have drawn very strange conclusions about the nature of reality. Despite this Emily Thomas believes that their work may still be worth studying. They usually have had good reasons for what they concluded. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast she discusses several wildly implausible metaphysical theories with Nigel Warburton. We are grateful for support from the Marc S... (@philosophybites, 20 minutes, 2019-Oct-21)
2.podcast imageHAP 39 - Doris Garraway on the Haitian Revolution
An interview with Doris Garraway on the background, intellectual basis, and legacy of the Haitian Revolution. (@HistPhilosophy, 32 minutes, 2019-Nov-10)
3.podcast imageJames Wilson
Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face. We are grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our supporters on Patreon. (@philosophybites, 20 minutes, 2019-Sep-21)
4.podcast image21/10/2019 – Glen Pettigrove on Ambition, Love, and Happiness
Glen Pettigrove is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Glasgow, occupying the Chair in Moral Philosophy previously held by Glasgow’s favourite son, Adam Smith. Before joining the Glasgow department Glen was Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Auckland. He specializes in moral psychology, normative ethics, and early modern philosophy. He has a particular interest in the ... (@Aristotweets, 58 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
5.podcast imageHoP 335 - Sabrina Ebbersmeyer on Emotions in Renaissance Philosophy
An interview with Sabrina Ebbersmeyer about the relation of emotion to reason and the body, and panpsychism, in the Renaissance. (@HistPhilosophy, 29 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
6.podcast imageThe Rise and Fall of Sex | Dapha Joel, Barry Barnes, Stuart Ritchie
Although most of us are critical of gender stereotypes, few deny the existence of two discrete biological sexes. Yet biology itself shows dozens of combinations of human sex chromosomes. Could biological sex itself then be an illusion, constructed from human categories? Or is this a futile attempt to deny the reality of two biological sexes? In this episode of Philosophy for our Times, Head of Psy... (@IAI_TV, 36 minutes, 2019-Nov-12)
7.podcast imageOut of the Vat #4 – Brian Glenney
Brian Glenney specialises in the philosophy of perception, with a specific interest in Molyneux's Question. In this episode we talk to Brian about perception, illusion and (literally) seeing the... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natural ... (@LSEPhilosophy, 33 minutes, 2019-Nov-12)
8.podcast imageA Right to a Home?
Cara Nine / Yousif M. Qasmiyeh / Beth Watts Listen here or on YouTube ‘Home’ means more than a roof over our heads. It can be crucial to our sense of ourselves and our well-being. So what might it... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Nov-06)
9.podcast image491: Hobbes and the Ideal Citizen
More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/hobbes-and-ideal-citizen. Seventeenth century philosopher Thomas Hobbes believed that without government to control our worst impulses, life would be 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.' Consequently, he thought that absolute monarchy is the best form of government. So is Hobbes’ ideal citizen simply someone who is willing to submit to absolute aut... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Nov-04)
10.podcast imageHAP 38 - My Haitian Pen - Baron de Vastey
The Baron de Vastey unveils the horror of colonialism as a system and defends the monarchy of King Christophe in the tense early years of Haiti’s independence. (@HistPhilosophy, 24 minutes, 2019-Oct-27)
11.podcast imageThe Mystery of Life | Nick Lane, Monica Grady, Ralph Cordey
As we explore the planets of the solar system and look out at those beyond, researchers hope they will find evidence of life. But would it be like life on earth? Or is the wish to find other life forms a science fiction fantasy that serves Hollywood well but has little to do with reality? Biochemist and author of The Vital Question Nick Lane, Head of Future Missions at Airbus Ralph Cordey, and le... (@IAI_TV, 45 minutes, 2019-Nov-05)
12.podcast image72 | César Hidalgo on Information in Societies, Economies, and the Universe
Maxwell's Demon is a famous thought experiment in which a mischievous imp uses knowledge of the velocities of gas molecules in a box to decrease the entropy of the gas, which could then be used to do useful work such as pushing a piston. This is a classic example of converting information (what the gas molecules are doing) into work. But of course that kind of phenomenon is much more widespread --... (@seanmcarroll, 77 minutes, 2019-Nov-11)
13.podcast imageRobert Talisse, "Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place" (Oxford UP, 2019)
In the United States in particular, there is almost no social space today, whether that’s Thanksgiving dinner or going shopping, that has not become saturated with political meaning. In Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019), Robert Talisse argues that contrary to what many democratic theorists have argued, democracy is something we can do too mu... (@NewBooksPhil, 71 minutes, 2019-Nov-11)
14.podcast imageEp. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Two)
Continuing on René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628), covering rules 7 through the first part of the lengthy rule 12. We try to figure out what he means by "enumeration;" the faculties of imagination, sense and memory; the virtues of perspicacity and sagacity; his psychology of the senses, the "common sense" where all sense data comes together, and the understanding; how Descartes... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Nov-11)
15.podcast imageJoker
An analysis of the new Joker film. What does it say about what leads one to violent acts? Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://bit.ly/2Z0rAjA Social Links: Discord Squad: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendenweber_ Email List: htt... (@philosophyguy2, 13 minutes, 2019-Nov-11)
16.podcast imageRationally Speaking #243 - Bryan Caplan on "The Case for Open Borders"
Economist Bryan Caplan makes a compelling case for open borders in his new graphic nonfiction book, "Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration," illustrated by cartoonist Zach Weinersmith. (@Rspodcast, 49 minutes, 2019-Nov-12)
17.podcast imageEpisode 68, The Olly Thorn Interview (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Oliver Thorn is an actor and educator, best known as the creator and host of the popular YouTube channel Philosophy Tube. Boasting around half a million subscribers, Olly’s channel is notorious for its well-researched content and colourful presentation. With over six years of videos under his belt, it is fair to say that Olly is going over and above in his goal of giving away his philosophy degree... (@ThePanpsycast, 42 minutes, 2019-Nov-10)
18.podcast imageEpisode 120: Robin Dembroff on going beyond the gender binary
Ever wonder what 'gender non-binary' means? Don't worry--Robin Dembroff (Yale University) is here to walk us through the relevant terminology, along with the everyday moral issues that are tied up with the gender concepts we use. (@ElucidationsPod, 33 minutes, 2019-Nov-10)
19.podcast imageINEQUALITY Q&A
I take on a range of audience questions and comments from my economic inequality episode: Diminishing marginal returns, poverty vs inequality, long run growth, and the morality of capitalism. (@PolPhilPod, 75 minutes, 2019-Nov-09)
20.podcast imagePhilosophy in the wake of Empire pt. 2: Migrants and other Others
As refugees from the former colonies make their way to Europe, notions of “European life” and “European values” are facing unprecedented challenges. As postcolonial subjects, how should these migrants be received and understood? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Nov-10)
21.podcast imageHoP 334 - Chance Encounters - Reviving Hellenistic philosophy
The rediscovery of Epicurus, Lucretius, and Sextus Empiricus spreads challenging ideas about chance, atomism, and skepticism. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Oct-20)
22.podcast imageGenetic Selection and Enhancement
Professor Julian Savulescu and Dr Katrien Devolder discuss the use of genetic testing to select which children to bring into the world. Should we use genetic testing to choose which children to bring into the world, and if so, how should we choose? Is it acceptable to choose a deaf child? Should we choose our children on the basis of non-disease traits such as intelligence or fitness, if we can? D... (@ethicsinthenews, 56 minutes, 2019-Nov-04)
23.podcast imageEV - 115 Automation and Utopia with John Danaher
My guest this week isJohn Danaher, author of Automation and Utopia: Human Flourishing in a World Without Work. We go long to do a deep dive into every word in that title, and a few other topics as well. I really enjoyed John's book and highly recommend it to folks interested in the map of possible futures.Automation and Utopia: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674984240Invocation: ... (@ETVPod, 85 minutes, 2019-Nov-07)
24.podcast imageA Mad World | Richard Bentall, Ann John, Lucy Johnstone
An ever growing number of people are being treated for mental illness. Some blame the modern world, yet critics warn that psychiatrists and big pharma have an interest in describing normal human behaviour as an illness or disorder. Might we do better to give up the notion that mental distress implies illness? Author of Madness Explained, Richard Bentall, clinical psychologist Lucy Johnstone, and ... (@IAI_TV, 39 minutes, 2019-Oct-29)
25.podcast image71 | Philip Goff on Consciousness Everywhere
The human brain contains roughly 85 billion neurons, wired together in an extraordinarily complex network of interconnected parts. It’s hardly surprising that we don’t understand the mind and how it works. But do we know enough about our experience of consciousness to suggest that consciousness cannot arise from nothing more than the physical interactions of bits of matter? Panpsychism is the idea... (@seanmcarroll, 95 minutes, 2019-Nov-04)
26.podcast imageEp. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)
On René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628). Is there a careful way to approach problems that will ensure that you'll always be right? What if you just never assert anything you can't be sure of? This is Descartes's strategy, modeled on mathematics. We likewise carefully move step-by-step through this text. This is part 1 of 3; get the whole discussion now via the Citizen Edition no... (@PartiallyExLife, 50 minutes, 2019-Nov-04)
27.podcast imageKathryn Conrad on University Press Publishing
As you may know, university presses publish a lot of good books. In fact, they publish thousands of them every year. They are different from most trade books in that most of them are what you might called "fundamental research." Their authors--dedicated researchers one and all--provide the scholarly stuff upon which many non-fiction trade books are based. So when you are reading, say, a popular hi... (@NewBooksPhil, 40 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
28.podcast imageWhat happened when the Berlin Wall came down?
The fall of the Berlin Wall thirty years ago is celebrated across the Western world as a world-historical moment: the triumph of freedom over tyranny, of democracy over communism. But is this justified? And why the fascination in the West? Professor of International Relations Sarah Percy joins Waleed and Scott to discuss what the 'fall' of the Berlin Wall revealed, and concealed. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Nov-06)
29.podcast image0G79: The Ones Who Stay and Fight and The Paradox of Tolerance
Now imagine an even greater and glorious afrofuturist podcast, where everyone gets equitable access to boxes. What price would you be willing to pay for that podcast?! Could you truly enjoy such a podcast knowing that those who challenge the podcast are summarily executed? What if we call their objections a disease that must be cut out at the root? Better or worse? This week we're doing the N.K. J... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Nov-06)
30.podcast image7/10/2019 – 112th PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: Helen Steward on Free Will and External Reality: Two Scepticisms Compared
As the first talk for the 2019-20 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Helen Steward (University of Leeds) as the 112th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Helen Steward is Professor of Philosophy of Mind and Action at ... (@Aristotweets, 59 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
31.podcast imageSam Harris Responds
Long ago, Zach published a critique of Sam Harris (https://thevimblog.com/2018/09/21/wake-up-sam-harris/) that accused Sam of a point of hypocrisy with respect to his treatment of Islam and race. Shockingly, Sam released a recent podcast in which he responds to arguments quite similar to Zach’s. So in a certain sense, Sam has responded to Zach. This episode outlines the disagreement and expl... (@thevimblog, 75 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
32.podcast imageElijah Millgram, "John Stuart Mill and the Meaning of Life" (Oxford UP, 2019)
According to an intuitive view, lives are meaningful when they manifest a directedness or instantiate a project such that the disparate events and endeavors “add up to” a life. John Stuart Mill’s life certainly was devoted to a project in that sense. Yet Mill’s life was in many respects unsatisfying – riven with anxiety and trauma. What does Mill’s life teach us about meaningful lives? In Joh... (@NewBooksPhil, 69 minutes, 2019-Nov-01)
33.podcast imageEpisode 68, The Olly Thorn Interview (Part I - Behind Philosophy Tube)
Oliver Thorn is an actor and educator, best known as the creator and host of the popular YouTube channel Philosophy Tube. Boasting around half a million subscribers, Olly’s channel is notorious for its well-researched content and colourful presentation. With over six years of videos under his belt, it is fair to say that Olly is going over and above in his goal of giving away his philosophy degree... (@ThePanpsycast, 38 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
34.podcast image490: Conscious Machiness
More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/conscious-machines. Computers have already surpassed us in their ability to perform certain cognitive tasks. Perhaps it won’t be long till every household has a super intelligent robot who can outperform us in almost every domain. While future AI might be excellent at appearing conscious, could AI ever actually become conscious? Would forcing conscious rob... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Oct-21)
35.podcast imageHAP 37 - Liberty, Equality, Humanity - The Haitian Revolution
In an age of revolutions and revolutionary ideas, the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 stands out as the most radical of them all. (@HistPhilosophy, 23 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
36.podcast imagePhilosophy in the wake of Empire pt. 1: The white way to think
The West has a history of colonisation and empire-building. How has this shaped the discipline of philosophy? This week – first in a five-part series – we look at racism and the unfortunate legacy of Immanuel Kant, who believed the non-white races were incapable of philosophical reflection. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Nov-03)
37.podcast imageA (Re)Examined History of Western Philosophy
So this is a completely revamped, redone, and improved version of my history of Western philosophy episode. Enjoy! Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://bit.ly/2Z0rAjA Social Links: Discord Squad: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Twitter: https://twitter.com/brende... (@philosophyguy2, 32 minutes, 2019-Oct-31)
38.podcast imageEV - 114 Neuro-Yogacara with Bryce Huebner
My guest this week is Bryce Huebner (@distributedcog),  a Provost's Distinguished Associate Professor in Philosophy at Georgetown University. We discuss the distributed nature of cognition from both an analytic and Yogacara buddhist perspective, plus we talk meditation and metal!Bryce's personal page: https://brycehuebner.weebly.com/Yogacara: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YogacharaInvocation:... (@ETVPod, 61 minutes, 2019-Oct-31)
39.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #17: Comedy as Philosophy w/ Daniel Lobell
Are stand-up comedians the Modern Day Philosophers? This is the premise of Daniel's podcast, but really, only some comedians express original claims; many just tell jokes. Are those exceptional comics philosophizing? Does telling the whole, tragic truth rule out being funny? Daniel, Mark, Erica, and Brian consider Carlin, Gadsby, Chappelle, and others. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus... (@PartiallyExLife, 46 minutes, 2019-Oct-29)
40.podcast imageThe New Moralism | Matthew Taylor, Rebecca Roache, Hilary Lawson
Many would argue that for at least a century we have been moving away from the moral certainties of traditional Christianity. Yet now a new form of moral certainty is reappearing, with much of our culture seemingly gripped by a focus on virtue and a tightly policed sense of right and wrong. Should we welcome this return to virtue and embrace a new moralism that will purge society of its newly foun... (@IAI_TV, 39 minutes, 2019-Oct-22)
41.podcast imageEpisode 175: At Least We Didn’t Talk About Zombies (Nagel’s “What is it Like to be a Bat?”)
We try (with varying success) to wrap our heads around Thomas Nagel’s classic article “What is it Like to be a Bat?" Does science have the tools to give us a theory of consciousness or is that project doomed from the outset? Why do reductionist or functionalist explanations seem so unsatisfying? Is the problem that consciousness is subjective, or is it something about the nature of conscious exper... (@verybadwizards, 103 minutes, 2019-Oct-29)
42.podcast image70 | Katie Mack on How the Universe Will End
Cosmologists are always talking excitedly about the Big Bang and all the cool stuff that happened in the 14 billion years between then and now. But what about the future? We don't know for sure, but we know enough about the laws of physics to sketch out several plausible scenarios for what the future of our universe will hold. Katie Mack is a cosmologist who is writing a book about the end of the ... (@seanmcarroll, 83 minutes, 2019-Oct-28)
43.podcast imageEp. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part Two)
Continuing on Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010) with guest Coleman Hughes. Racial classifications vary geographically, therefore race is socially constructed. Given this, can we retain the posi... (@PartiallyExLife, 48 minutes, 2019-Oct-28)
44.podcast imageEpisode #136 ... Hannah Arendt - The Banality of Evil
Today we discuss the work of Hannah Arendt. (@iamstephenwest, 29 minutes, 2019-Oct-31)
45.podcast imageWhat moral obligations does feminism impose on men?
Feminism is undeniably one of the most significant political movements of the last century. So what does feminism demand of men? Meagan Tyler joins Scott and Waleed to discuss whether men can be "feminists"? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Oct-30)
46.podcast image0G78: Omelas and Distributive Justice
Imagine a great and glorious golden podcast, filled with as many or as few boxes as your heart could desire. What price would you be willing to pay for that podcast? I don't mean on patreon, I'm talking cost in human suffering. Could you truly enjoy such a podcast knowing that it relied on the constant pain of one poor co-host at the hands of the other cohost? Would you continue to partake of the ... (@0gPhilosophy, 43 minutes, 2019-Oct-30)
47.podcast imageRationally Speaking #242 - Keith Frankish on "Why consciousness is an illusion"
Philosopher of mind Keith Frankish is one of the leading proponents of "illusionism," the theory that argues that your subjective experience -- i.e., the "what it is like" to be you -- is a trick of the mind. (@Rspodcast, 43 minutes, 2019-Oct-29)
48.podcast imageMargot Strohminger (Oxford): “Supposition, Imagination and Offline Belief”
Margot Strohminger (Oxford) presents “Supposition, Imagination and Offline Belief” at Senate House in London (23/10/2019, 16-18:00) for the London Aesthetics Forum. Please do not cite or reproduce without permission. (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Oct-28)
49.podcast imageNEM#108: Mike Watt's Punk Operas
Ace bassist Mike started with punk legends MINUTEMEN in the early '80s, broke into the majors with fireHOSE going into the 90s, and was so beloved by the alternative music scene that his first solo album in '94 was star-studded, with Eddie Vedder and Dave Grohl in the supporting tour. Mike has released three concept albums over the years and has collaborated on dozes of projects as well as backing... (@PartiallyExLife, 58 minutes, 2019-Oct-25)
50.podcast imageJ. Neuhaus, "Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers" (West Virginia UP, 2019)
The things that make people academics -- as deep fascination with some arcane subject, often bordering on obsession, and a comfort with the solitude that developing expertise requires -- do not necessarily make us good teachers. Jessamyn Neuhaus’s Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers (West Virginia University Press, 2019) helps us to id... (@NewBooksPhil, 33 minutes, 2019-Oct-24)
51.podcast imageE38: Cognitive Combinatorialism - What Makes Humans Special?
What makes humans special? Is it language? Culture? Throwing? Semiotics? Impossible burgers? Ryan thinks it’s the extent to which we combine ("meat", cheese, bun - see!?). In this episode we Dawdlers discuss this in this “short long” and will perhaps revisit it again sometime. Join hands and feel our infinite combinatorial power, people! -The Dawdlers ~~~ 00:01:13 – Ryan’s deep passions ... (@dawdlerspodcast, 55 minutes, 2019-Oct-28)
52.podcast imageEpisode 67, Flowers for Algernon (Part V - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Report: March 2nd After the successes we have had with Algernon, and with much deliberation, I have officially chosen our first research subject. Charlie Gordon, 32, was recommended to us by Alice Kinian from the Beekman School for Retarded Adults and she has assured us of his desire to increase his intellect. I have scheduled for Charlie to come to the lab over the next few days where Burt S... (@ThePanpsycast, 32 minutes, 2019-Oct-27)
53.podcast imageHoP 333 - Difficult to Be Good - Humanist Ethics
Humanists from Bruni and Valla to Pontano and Castiglione ask whether ancient ethical teachings can still help us learn how to live. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Oct-06)
54.podcast imageAssessing the Moral Status of Robots: A Shorter Defence of Ethical Behaviourism
[This is the text of a lecture that I delivered at Tilburg University on the 24th of September 2019. It was delivered as part of the 25th Anniversary celebrations for TILT (Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society). My friend and colleague Sven Nyholm was the discussant for the evening. The lecture is based on my longer academic article ‘Welcoming Robots into the Moral Circle: A Defence o... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Oct-15)
55.podcast imageJoseph LeDoux on the 4 Billion Year Journey to Our Conscious Selves
Joseph LeDoux is a celebrated neuroscientist whose latest book is a work of quite staggering ambition - it traces the ‘Four Billion Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains’. He reveals the profound similarities between us and bacteria, as well as offering a brilliant, overarching account of what makes us unique in the animal kingdom; how we developed the capacity for emotion and self-consciousne... (@NSthepodcast, 62 minutes, 2019-Oct-27)
56.podcast image427: The Space-Time Continuum
More at https://philosophytalk.org/shows/space-time-continuum. Strange things are said about time: that it's illusory, that it has no direction. But what about space, or the space-time continuum? What exactly is space-time? Are space and time fundamental features of the world? How do Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity change our understanding of space-time? Is there a disti... (@philtalkradio, 51 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
57.podcast imageBREXIT, CONGRESS, & CULTURE
I develop an original account how how different political cultures, & different ways of conceptualizing politics, have developed in the US and UK. How they have recently become inversions of each other. And argue that the current chaos is the shape fo things to come. (@PolPhilPod, 101 minutes, 2019-Oct-25)
58.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #16: 25 Years After FRIENDS
Mark, Erica, and Brian examine the conventions, techniques, and staying power of the beloved '90s sitcom. Are we supposed to identify with, or idolize, or merely like these people? What makes the formula work, did it sustain itself over its 10-year run, was it successfully replicated, and what parts haven't aged well? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreo... (@PartiallyExLife, 43 minutes, 2019-Oct-22)
59.podcast imageEV - 113 Expressivist Kantianism with Florence Bacus
My guest this week is Florence Bacus (@morallawwithin),  a grad student in the Tufts terminal masters program and an impressive consumer of great philosophical works. We discuss some of her recent work on epistemology as well as a deep dive into Kantian ethics and expressivist metaethics, with the tantalizing idea that maybe they're compatible in some way.Florence's Curious Cat page: https://... (@ETVPod, 60 minutes, 2019-Oct-24)
60.podcast imageInto the Unknown | Martin Rees, Tony Milligan, Elizabeth Seward
Fifty years ago we landed on the moon, and imagined that in 2001 we would be travelling vast distances through space. But the fantasy died, and we went nowhere. Now a new age of space exploration is underway - this one driven by companies, billionaires, and new players like China and India. Is it an essential trait of being human to reach out into the unknown? Astronomer Royal Martin Rees, philoso... (@IAI_TV, 35 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
61.podcast image69 | Cory Doctorow on Technology, Monopoly, and the Future of the Internet
(@seanmcarroll, 78 minutes, 2019-Oct-21)
62.podcast imageEp. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)
On Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010). With guest Coleman Hughes. Don't wait for part two; get your full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsors: NativeDeodorant.com (code PE... (@PartiallyExLife, 43 minutes, 2019-Oct-21)
63.podcast imageDilek Huseyinzadegan, "Kant’s Nonideal Theory of Politics" (Northwestern UP, 2019)
In Kant’s Nonideal Theory of Politics (Northwestern University Press, 2019), Dilek Huseyinzadegan analyzes Kant’s political writings by attending to the role of history, anthropology, and geography in his thought. She shows that Kant employs teleology as a means to orient us within the chaotic contingency of experience in order to plan and navigate a path to just political orders from our current ... (@NewBooksPhil, 57 minutes, 2019-Oct-21)
64.podcast imageDoes democracy have a problem with conspiracies?
If conspiracism is the consequence of particular conceptions of truth, knowledge, agency, power in democratic politics, is it a problem that can be solved? Professor Sophia Rosenfeld joins us to discuss whether conspiracism become an inescapable, all-pervasive feature of modern life. (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2019-Oct-23)
65.podcast image0G77: DS9 Heart of Stone and Deontology
Hey friends, show notes guy here. This one's a feels show so I'm gonna play it straight. Aron Eisenberg, the actor who played Nog on DS9, passed away recently. He was a beloved member of the Star Trek community and we wanted to do a tribute episode to pay our respects. So, we brought on the perfect person to guide us through, Callie Wright. Besides being an amazing podcaster, Callie is very active... (@0gPhilosophy, 45 minutes, 2019-Oct-23)
66.podcast imageE37: The Memory of an Old Idea No One Ever Had - Derrida's Hauntology
To be or not to be, that’s the question, isn’t it? In this episode, we Dawdlers discuss Jacques Derrida’s idea “Hauntology.” Not an easy philosopher to understand, we do our best to work out what spooks a Frenchman. In the end, this was but a first foray into the thoughts of an intellect that dealt in as much enigma as he did in misunderstanding. Happy Halloween you cavity-riddled chompers! ... (@dawdlerspodcast, 69 minutes, 2019-Oct-23)
67.podcast image2019 Uehiro Lectures (1/3): What Has Gone Wrong? Populist politics and the mobilization of fear and resentment
Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face. I diagnose the deterioration of public discourse regarding basic facts to the rise of populist politics, which is powered by the activation of id... (@ethicsinthenews, 55 minutes, 2019-Oct-17)
68.podcast image2019 Uehiro Lectures (2/3): Improving Political Discourse (1): Re-learning how to talk about facts across group identities
Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t I argue that citizen science and local deliberation within internally diverse micro-publics offer models of how political discourse can be re-or... (@ethicsinthenews, 64 minutes, 2019-Oct-17)
69.podcast image2019 Uehiro Lectures (3/3): Improving Political Discourse (2): Communicating moral concern beyond blaming and shaming
Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t People often resist facts because accepting facts exposes them to shame and blame. Yet, when the point of raising facts is to orient others to ... (@ethicsinthenews, 59 minutes, 2019-Oct-17)
70.podcast imageCan there be a Left-wing Authoritarianism?
Justin and Zach reunite to consider the question of whether there an be a left-wing authoritarianism. In the previous episode, they discussed what it means to have an authoritarian personality, to be someone inclined to support authoritarian candidates. And it is a fact of the research that authoritarians are sorting themselves into the Republican party. But must that be the case? Justin and Zach ... (@thevimblog, 79 minutes, 2019-Oct-20)
71.podcast imagePhilosophy as Therapy?
Beverley Clack / Molly Macdonald / John Skorupski Listen here or on YouTube There is a rich tradition of claiming therapeutic powers for philosophy, but if philosophy is the love of wisdom, is... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Oct-09)
72.podcast imageHAP 36 - Sons of Africa - Quobna Ottobah Cugoano and Olaudah Equiano
Quobna Ottobah Cugoano and Olaudah Equiano advance the goals of the abolitionist movement through a groundbreaking political treatise and an influential autobiography. (@HistPhilosophy, 30 minutes, 2019-Sep-29)
73.podcast image489: The Allure of Authoritarianism
More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/allure-authoritarianism. In George Orwell’s 1984, the party’s “final, most essential command” was “to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears.” Authoritarian regimes call on us to accept as fact whatever they tell us; or worse, as Hannah Arendt says, they get us to a point where we no longer know—or care about—the difference between fiction and reality. ... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
74.podcast imageEpisode 67, Flowers for Algernon (Part IV - The Meaning)
Report: March 2nd After the successes we have had with Algernon, and with much deliberation, I have officially chosen our first research subject. Charlie Gordon, 32, was recommended to us by Alice Kinian from the Beekman School for Retarded Adults and she has assured us of his desire to increase his intellect. I have scheduled for Charlie to come to the lab over the next few days where Burt S... (@ThePanpsycast, 41 minutes, 2019-Oct-20)
75.podcast imageThe problem with humanism
How well does humanism's account of itself hold up in philosophical terms? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Oct-20)
76.podcast imageIntroducing The Next Big Idea
Ideas are coming at you every day from all directions. How can you process it all? You can start with The Next Big Idea. Host Rufus Griscom and thought leaders Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, Dan Pink, and Susan Cain, will be your personal “idea” curators. Open your mind and get ready for something big, because the right idea--at the right moment--has the power to trans... (@seanmcarroll, 9 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
77.podcast imageBernardo Kastrup Live!
Join me for a discussion with Bernardo Kastrup, an independent philosopher who holds a Ph.D. in philosophy (ontology, philosophy of mind) and another Ph.D. in computer engineering (reconfigurable computing, artificial intelligence), as we discuss his argument against physicalism and his version of Objective Idealism. Bernardo’s website Windt & Metzinger paper on metacognition in dreaming... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-16)
78.podcast imageModern Crises and Ancient Gods | David King, Sister Jayanti, Natalie Bennett
For much of human history, nature was our god. We worshipped the sun, the moon, or in Northern Europe the tree gods. Human gods followed. Then science arrived, and seemed to sweep them all away. Yet now science and technology, which once we used to tame nature, are increasingly seen as plundering the planet and wrecking the climate. And the Gaia gods are back in fashion. Were the ancients right, a... (@IAI_TV, 46 minutes, 2019-Oct-08)
79.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #15: Opera as Pop
Opera used to be a central part of European pop culture, Pavarotti was as big a pop star as they come. But still, it's now the quintessential art-form of the wealthy and snobbish. What gives? Guest Sean Spyres from Springfield Regional Opera joins his sister Erica along with Mark and Brian to discuss opera's place in culture (including its film appearances), how it's different from music theater, ... (@PartiallyExLife, 41 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
80.podcast imageEV - 112 Leftist Martial Arts with Sam Yang
My guest this week is Sam Yang (@StuffFromSam), cohost of the Southpaw podcast and a strong advocate for more leftist philosophy in the world of marital arts. We grapple with the challenges in that Joe Rogan dominated community. Sam does a great job pinning down some tricky points.Southpaw Podcast: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/must-triumph/southpaw-2Invocation: Jean-Luc Godard (suggested by th... (@ETVPod, 61 minutes, 2019-Oct-17)
81.podcast imageEpisode 174: More Chiang for Your Buck ("Anxiety is the Dizziness of Freedom" Pt. 2)
Is character destiny, or can fluky decisions or tiny shifts in weather patterns fundamentally change who we are? Does the existence or non-existence of alternate universes have any bearing on freedom and responsibility? David and Tamler conclude their discussion of Ted Chiang’s “Anxiety is the Dizziness of Freedom” along with another very short piece by Chiang called “What’s Expected of Us” that w... (@verybadwizards, 106 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
82.podcast imageECONOMIC EQUALITY
Is the current distribution of ecumenic resources in the US morally defensible? How should a mature moral or political theory think about this? I give my personal views. (@PolPhilPod, 71 minutes, 2019-Oct-17)
83.podcast image68 | Melanie Mitchell on Artificial Intelligence and the Challenge of Common Sense
Artificial intelligence is better than humans at playing chess or go, but still has trouble holding a conversation or driving a car. A simple way to think about the discrepancy is through the lens of “common sense” — there are features of the world, from the fact that tables are solid to the prediction that a tree won’t walk across the street, that humans take for granted but that machines have di... (@seanmcarroll, 82 minutes, 2019-Oct-14)
84.podcast imageEp. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part Two)
Continuing Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). We break down Hacking's typology of construction arguments: Are they exploring where our ideas came from or trying to change things? Are they trying to state facts about nature vs. nurture or essentially political solicitations for us to reconceptualize in healthier ways? Pl... (@PartiallyExLife, 66 minutes, 2019-Oct-14)
85.podcast imageImagination and the Importance of Creative Madness
Today, I discuss the importance of imagination and creative thinking! And maybe, more importantly, its relation to thinking about philosophy, ideas, the world, and yourselves. Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://bit.ly/2Z0rAjA Social Links: Discord Squad: htt... (@philosophyguy2, 27 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
86.podcast imageWas betrayal inevitable?
What obligations does the United States have to the Kurds, and indeed, to the region as a whole? Professor Nader Hashemi from the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Denver joins us to discuss the past, present and future of the Syrian conflict. (@Ariscottle_, 47 minutes, 2019-Oct-16)
87.podcast image0G76: The Golden Man and The Ubermensch
And lo, Philip K Dick descended from the mountaintop, perspiring heavily, to convey to the world that there were super hot wicked smart mutant Ubermensches coming for their wimmins, and only by acting like total nazis can humans avoid being holocausted by the mutant nazis Ubermensches. If you're not impressed by a half hour podcast that makes the previous sentence comprehensible, I got nothing. Bi... (@0gPhilosophy, 42 minutes, 2019-Oct-16)
88.podcast imageEpisode 119: Stephanie Kapusta discusses misgendering
In this episode, our guest argues that in addition to ordinary individual cases of misgendering, in which one person gets another person's gender wrong when they address them, there's a broader sense of the term. In the broader sense, a philosophical account of what gender is can also misgender people. How? The idea is that in signing yourself up for an incorrect philosophical account of gender, y... (@ElucidationsPod, 45 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
89.podcast imageRationally Speaking #241 - Thibault Le Texier on "Debunking the Stanford Prison Experiment"
On this episode, Thibault Le Texier and Julia discuss his findings on the Stanford Prison Experiment, how the experimenters got away with such a significant misrepresentation for so long, and what this whole affair says about the field of psychology. (@Rspodcast, 55 minutes, 2019-Oct-15)
90.podcast imageSusan Schneider Live!
Join me for a discussion with Susan Schneider, NASA-Baruch Blumberg Chair, Library of Congress and NASA, Distinguished Scholar Chair, Library of Congress (2019), Director, AI, Mind and Society (“AIMS”) Group, The University of Connecticut, and Associate Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science, University of Connecticut, as we discuss her new book Artificial You -AI and the Future... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-12)
91.podcast imageNEM#107: Barry Andrews (Shriekback): Objectifications of Groove
Barry started in '77 playing keys with XTC and after two albums started his own band Shriekback in '81, with whom he's had 14 releases plus some solo albums. He's known for inventive soundscapes placed over solid grooves and philosophical lyrics delivered in a low chant. We discuss three Shriekback tunes: "Such, Such Are the Joys" from Why Anything? Why This? (2018), "Amaryllis in the Sprawl" from... (@PartiallyExLife, 75 minutes, 2019-Oct-11)
92.podcast imageHoP 332 - Jill Kraye on Humanism
Jill Kraye returns to the podcast to discuss the nature of humanism, its relation to scholasticism, and its legacy. (@HistPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Sep-22)
93.podcast image488: Explanation at Its Best
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/explanation-its-best. In both everyday life and science, we often feel the pull of simpler, more elegant, or more beautiful explanations. For example, you notice the street is wet and infer the best explanation is that it rained earlier. But are we justified in assuming these tidy explanations are most likely to be true? What makes an explanation “... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Sep-30)
94.podcast imageMulticulturalism and Animal Ethics
David Grumett / Angie Pepper / Varun Uberoi Listen here or on YouTube The welfare and flourishing of animals is now enshrined in national and international law. But what should we do when cultural or... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Oct-01)
95.podcast imageJustin Garson, "What Biological Functions are and Why They Matter" (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Why do zebras have stripes? One way to answer that question is ask what function stripes play in the lives of zebras – for example, to deter disease-carrying flies from biting them. This notion of a function plays a central role in biology: biologists frequently refer to the functions of many traits of evolved organisms. But not everything a trait causes is its function – the stripes might disorie... (@NewBooksPhil, 69 minutes, 2019-Oct-10)
96.podcast imageEpisode 67, Flowers for Algernon (Part III - The Story: The Fall of Charlie Gordon)
Report: March 2nd After the successes we have had with Algernon, and with much deliberation, I have officially chosen our first research subject. Charlie Gordon, 32, was recommended to us by Alice Kinian from the Beekman School for Retarded Adults and she has assured us of his desire to increase his intellect. I have scheduled for Charlie to come to the lab over the next few days where Burt S... (@ThePanpsycast, 32 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
97.podcast imagePolitical Disagreement
Why do we disagree about political facts not just opinions? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Oct-05)
98.podcast imageEV - 111 Plato v Aristotle v Nagel with Fabien-Denis Cayer
My guest this week is Fabien-Denis Cayer (@OldAristocles), a PHD student at the University of Ottawa and a writer at buriedincontemplation.com. He joins me to dive deeper into our discussions on Plato, Aristotle, and Nagel. All favorites!Fabien's work: https://buriedincontemplation.com/Invocation: The Changing RoomEditing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.libsyn.com/s02e02... (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Oct-11)
99.podcast imageFeminism, ecology, motherhood
The climate debate isn't just about science; it's also about gender and power. Ecofeminism takes this seriously - but does it also perpetuate negative stereotypes about women's supposedly "natural" connection to the earth and to nurturing? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
100.podcast imageE36: The Man on the Street - A Definition of 'Definition'
In this episode Harland engages in some more of that pesky normative semantics and proposes a new definition of the word 'definition' (n): a paraphrastic replacement function. Huh? Well then he defines all those words too! The primary intent is to provide a pragmatically, anthropologically useful interpretation of current usage while not relying on a putatively unsupportable definition that i... (@dawdlerspodcast, 56 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
101.podcast image010 – Do We Live in a Simulation?
Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? A veritable landslide of such questions await you in this episode, which Elena and Ian wish to clarify is surprisingly, and almost entirely, Matrix-free™. If you liked this episode, subscribing/following means you'll get the next one automatically. We'd love it if you could leave us a review on iTunes too. And if you want to get in touch with us, you ca... (@wondercupboard, 60 minutes, 2019-Oct-13)
102.podcast imageFrom Eugenics to Human Gene Editing: Engineering Life in China in a Global Context
In November 2018, a Chinese scientist announced the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies and sparked outrage across the world. Professor Nie considers how China's complex socio-ethical approach paved the way for this controversial experiment. Among numerous ethical issues, editing heritable germline genomes of otherwise healthy embryos for natural resistance to HIV constitutes an effort o... (@ethicsinthenews, 47 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
103.podcast imageMasters of the Universe | Natalie Kofler, Steve Fuller, Angela Saini
Ever since the discovery of DNA, we have fanstasised about creating new species of animals, or even 'improved' humans. But it is only in the last few years that a new gene editing technology, CRISPR, has made this a reality. Many claim it is already unstoppable, that we will always demand solutions to diseases if they are possible. Is CRISPR the key to improving health and defeating ageing? Will i... (@IAI_TV, 36 minutes, 2019-Oct-01)
104.podcast imageAxel Cleermans Live!
Join me for a discussion with Axel Cleermans, a professor of cognitive psychology, as we discuss his radical plasticity theory of consciousness Axel’s website (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-09)
105.podcast imageMatthias Michel Live!
Join me for a discussion with Matthias Michel, currently a postdoctoral associate at New York University, as we discuss the history of consciousness science, phenomenological overflow, optimism v. pessimism about the detection of consciousness, the relation of attention and consciousness, underdetermination of theory by evidence, the role of prefrontal cortex in consciousness, the reputation of &#... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-09)
106.podcast imageJoshua Tan Live!
Join me for a discussion with Joshua Tan, an astronomer at LaGuardia and based at the Museum of Natural History, as we discuss life in the universe, quantum mechanics, and consciousness (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-09)
107.podcast imageStephen Fleming Live!
Join me for a discussion with Steve Fleming, a cognitive neuroscientist and psychologist at the University College London, as we discuss science communication, different notions of metacognition, metacognition in animals and humans, levels of consciousness, the status of cognitive neuroscience, the use of reports in consciousness science, Steve’s model of awareness as inference in a … ... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-09)
108.podcast imageKeith Frankish and Philip Goff Live!
Join me for a discussion with Keith Frankish and Philip Goff as we discuss all things Illusionism (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-09)
109.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #14: UFOs on TV with Investigative Journalist Paul Beban
TV news reporter Paul Beban (ABC, Al Jazeera, Yahoo, and now featured on the Discovery Network's Contact) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss the appeal of UFO narratives. Do you have to believe to be entertained? What's the connection to humor, religion, and anti-government venom? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast... (@PartiallyExLife, 39 minutes, 2019-Oct-08)
110.podcast image67 | Kate Jeffery on Entropy, Complexity, and Evolution
Our observable universe started out in a highly non-generic state, one of very low entropy, and disorderliness has been growing ever since. How, then, can we account for the appearance of complex systems such as organisms and biospheres? The answer is that very low-entropy states typically appear simple, and high-entropy states also appear simple, and complexity can emerge along the road in betwee... (@seanmcarroll, 73 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
111.podcast imageRuth Millikan Live!
Join me for a discussion with Ruth Millikan, a self-professed retired philosopher who is still writing (in addition she has won the Schock Prize, The Jean Nicod prize, the Rescher prize, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences), as we discuss her theory of perception as interpretation of signs, Swamp … Continue reading Ruth Millikan Live! (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-08)
112.podcast imageEp. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part One)
On Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). Guest Coleman Hughes from Dilemma joins us to survey the types of social construction arguments: the "culture wars" (e.g. race, gender) and the "science wars" (scientific findings are not read off the world but emerge from history). Something can be constructed, yet still be an obje... (@PartiallyExLife, 46 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
113.podcast imageRousseau on Education
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) on the education of children, as set out in his novel or treatise Emile, published in 1762. He held that children are born with natural goodness, which he sought to protect as they developed, allowing each to form their own conclusions from experience, avoiding the domineering influence of others. In particular, he wa... (@BBCInOurTime, 52 minutes, 2019-Oct-10)
114.podcast imageAUDIENCE QUESTIONS
I field listener questions including: language, ideology, booking guests, volunteering, and am I an anti-white racist? (@PolPhilPod, 99 minutes, 2019-Oct-09)
115.podcast imageThe Spiritual Brain
What is spirituality? What is religiousness? And what is their purpose? I thought of a better way to explain this, that I figured out at the end of the episode, where it's explained. So hang in! Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://bit.ly/2Z0rAjA Social Links: ... (@philosophyguy2, 24 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
116.podcast imageAre You an Authoritarian?
Justin and Zach discuss what it means to have an authoritarian personality. The topic is not strong men who lead governments but the sort of people who are inclined to support them. How do political scientists detect authoritarian personalities? Why have authoritarians sorted themselves into the Republican party? Listen to find out! Stay tuned for an upcoming episode about whether there can ... (@thevimblog, 69 minutes, 2019-Oct-07)
117.podcast imageKeith Frankish Live!
Join me for a discussion with Keith Frankish, an Honorary Reader at the University of Sheffield, UK, a Visiting Research Fellow with The Open University, UK (where I was formerly a Senior Lecturer), and an Adjunct Professor with the Brain and Mind Programme at the University of Crete, as we discuss dual process theory, the nature of … Continue reading Keith Frankish Live! (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-06)
118.podcast imageIs optimism dangerous for democratic politics?
Modern democratic politics have taken what could be called an 'optimistic turn': a kind of hyperbolic cheeriness in the face of a purported threat; an assurance that the future will be bright, and that only the man at the helm can deliver it. So there’s no need to be anxious. Political philosopher Romand Coles joins Waleed and Scott to discuss why this optimism is the antithesis of genuine democra... (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Oct-09)
119.podcast image0G75: Repo Men and Organ Markets
REEEEEEPPPPPOOOOO MEEEENNNNN!!! Sorry, still got those killer tunes stuck in my head from our NASA9 coverage of Repo! The Genetic Opera. Highly recommend for the original improvised music by Thomas. For this week we have the non-musical version, Repo Men starring Jude Law and Forest Whittaker. It's a much more banal kind of bad, but it's a great basis for discussing the ethics of buying and sellin... (@0gPhilosophy, 43 minutes, 2019-Oct-09)
120.podcast imageR. Scott Bakker Live!
Join me for a discussion with R. Scott Bakker, an author and independent philosopher, as we discuss concepts of consciousness, his Blind Brain theory of consciousness, eliminativism and illusionism, folk psychology, the intentional stance, Transhumanism, neural enhancement, Fermi’s Paradox, Greg Carrusso’s Public Health Model of criminal justice, and the semantic apocalypse. Scott̵... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-05)
121.podcast imageMichael Silberstein Live!
Join me for a discussion with Michael Silberstein, a professor at Elizabethtown College, as we discuss relativity theory, quantum mechanics, the relational block world, ontological structural realism, the ‘science first’ approach to ontology, string theory, the principle of sufficient reason, the multiverse, dark matter, subjectivity, the neutrality of Neutral Monism, panpsychism, Russ... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-05)
122.podcast imageNEM#106: John Colpitts (aka Kid Millions/Man Forever): Heavy Meditations
John founded the Brooklyn space-rock cooperative Oneida in the mid 90s and has put out 13 albums with them plus four as his solo project Man Forever and several others as collaborations or as Kid Millions. We discuss two tracks by Man Forever from Play What They Want (2017): "You Were Never Here" and "Twin Torches" (feat. Laurie Anderson), then Oneida's "All in Due Time" from Romance (2018), and l... (@PartiallyExLife, 73 minutes, 2019-Oct-04)
123.podcast imageHAP 35 - Letters from the Heart - Ignatius Sancho and Benjamin Banneker
Ignatius Sancho and Benjamin Banneker make their mark on the history of Africana thought through letters that reflect on the power of sentiment. (@HistPhilosophy, 29 minutes, 2019-Sep-15)
124.podcast imageEpisode 135 ... Leo Strauss - Ancients vs. Moderns
Today we talk about the work of Leo Strauss. (@iamstephenwest, 26 minutes, 2019-Oct-08)
125.podcast imageKnowing What We Know (And What We Don't)
More at https://philosophytalk.org/shows/knowing-what-we-know. It seems like we know many facts about ourselves and the world around us, even if there vastly many others we know that we don’t know. But how do we know if what we believe to be true is really knowledge? Can our beliefs be both justified and true, yet still not count as genuine knowledge? If so, then how much confidence should we... (@philtalkradio, 51 minutes, 2019-Sep-23)
126.podcast imageRomina Padró Live!
Do you ever get tired of talking explicitly about consciousness? Join me for a discussion with Romina Padró, director of the Kripke Center at the Graduate Center of CUNY, as we discuss the epistemology of logic and the adoption problem -the question of whether we are able to consciously adopt an ‘alternative’ system of logic. … Continue reading Romina Padró Live! (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-04)
127.podcast imageMonica Gagliano Live!
Join me for a discussion with Monica Gagliano, a Research Associate Professor in Evolutionary Ecology, Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia, Research Affiliate at the Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney & Senior Research Fellow at the Biological Intelligence (BI) Lab, University of Sydney, as we discuss her work on plant cognition, plant intellig... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-04)
128.podcast imageMichael Rodriguez Live!
Join me for a discussion with Michael Rodriguez, an artist at Laguardia Community College, as we discuss all things art. *note* the audio for this one was recorded on my desktop microphone and so is not the greatest, sorry! -but the video has lots of art in it :)* Michael’s website (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-04)
129.podcast imageEpisode 67, Flowers for Algernon (Part II - The Story: The Rise of Charlie Gordon)
Report: March 2nd After the successes we have had with Algernon, and with much deliberation, I have officially chosen our first research subject. Charlie Gordon, 32, was recommended to us by Alice Kinian from the Beekman School for Retarded Adults and she has assured us of his desire to increase his intellect. I have scheduled for Charlie to come to the lab over the next few days where Burt S... (@ThePanpsycast, 39 minutes, 2019-Oct-06)
130.podcast imageMiguel Ángel Sebastián Live!
Join me for a discussion with Miguel Sebastian, a philosopher working as Associate Research Fellow at the Instituto de Investigaciones Filosóficas at the UNAM, as we discuss first-person representations, unconscious perception, taxonomizing representational theories of consciousness, the phenomenology of the self, regress problems for higher-order theories, teleosemantics, zombies, 2D semantics, p... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-03)
131.podcast imageEp86 - French Toast Episode
In this 86th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread, called “French Toast Episode,” Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio return to some tasty bread morsels from past episodes, voicemails, and recordings, moistening them with some egg, sugar, and cinnamon for a tasty treat. In the first segment, we revisit a number of voicemails that we hadn’t had a chance to respond to in past episodes. Then, in segme... (@PhilosophyBB, 76 minutes, 2019-Sep-27)
132.podcast imageGenetically obsolete
The prospect of human genetic enhancement raises moral concerns. Will a genetically enhanced human in 2060 will be rendered “obsolete” by technological advances that come along in 2070? What happens when we blur the distinction between person and product? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Oct-06)
133.podcast imageShorts - E23: Discordianism
Fnord. This week the Dawdler's dip a toe into the wild and wacky world of parody religion and spread a few memes and participate in their small way to the Pan-Pontification Project. Duck! Here comes a golden apple, thrown into our little party. Let's not fight over it, k? ~The Dawds The Principia Discordia Online: https://principiadiscordia.com/book/1.php (@dawdlerspodcast, 29 minutes, 2019-Oct-06)
134.podcast imageIs Morality Objective?
This is essentially a post-debate solo discussion about morality. Is morality objective or subjective? I wanted to explain my points more here. However, I'm still not completely happy with how I presented it, so I'm open to your thoughts. I wanted to post it anyway because I think it has some value. As always thanks for listening. Debate link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g84YgziY91w&t=1319s... (@philosophyguy2, 29 minutes, 2019-Oct-03)
135.podcast imageThe Right To Offend | David Aaronovitch, Joanna Williams, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown
Should we seek to eradicate offence? Last year Ireland voted to get rid of its blasphemy laws, and most applauded the new right to offend the Catholic Church. We also expect our press and our comedians to be viciously critical of, even offensive to, our leaders. Yet to avoid giving offence, student campuses are introducing no-platforming and safe spaces. Should we seek to eradicate offence to crea... (@IAI_TV, 37 minutes, 2019-Sep-24)
136.podcast imageAxel Seemann, "The Shared World: Perceptual Knowledge, Demonstrative Communication, and Social Space" (MIT Press, 2019)
Much of what we are able to accomplish in our day-to-day lives depends on the ability to act and think in concert with others. Often this involves not only the capacity to perceive together the surrounding world—we must also know that we perceive together. In other words, there must be perceptual common knowledge. Philosophical questions mount quickly: How is this kind of knowledge possible? H... (@NewBooksPhil, 64 minutes, 2019-Oct-01)
137.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #13: TV Revivals Revived!
Revivals (not to be confused with reboots) can bring us back to the comfort of old friends, who are now really old. But is reviving a show really ever a good idea? Mark, Erica, and Brian consider some successes, failures, and hypotheticals. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcas... (@PartiallyExLife, 40 minutes, 2019-Oct-01)
138.podcast imageEV - 110 Community Atheism with Stephanie Zvan
My guest this week is Stephanie Zvan, cohost of the Minnesota Atheists’ radio show and podcast, a regular contributor at The Orbit, and a board member of Secular Woman and Minnesota Atheists. She graciously cheers me up about the direction of the atheist movement.The Orbit: https://the-orbit.net/Invocation: The Book of GenesisEditing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.libsy... (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Oct-03)
139.podcast imageRobert Hopkins (NYU): “Artistic Style as the Expression of Artistic Ideals”
Robert Hopkins (NYU) presents “Artistic Style as the Expression of Artistic Ideals” at Senate House in London (02/10/2019, 16-18:00) for the London Aesthetics Forum. Please do not cite or reproduce without permission. (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Oct-04)
140.podcast imageEpisode 173: Talking to Your (Alternate) Self [Ted Chiang's "Anxiety is the Dizziness of Freedom"]
David and Tamler dive back into the Ted Chiang well and explore the fascinating world described in "Anxiety is the Dizziness of Freedom." What if you could interact with alternate versions of yourself - versions that made different choices, had different jobs, or different partners? Would you get jealous of your other selves if they were more successful? Would you want them to be unhappy so you co... (@verybadwizards, 100 minutes, 2019-Oct-01)
141.podcast image66 | Will Wilkinson on Partisan Polarization and the Urban/Rural Divide
The idea of “red states” and “blue states” burst on the scene during the 2000 U.S. Presidential elections, and has a been a staple of political commentary ever since. But it’s become increasingly clear, and increasingly the case, that the real division isn’t between different sets of states, but between densely- and sparsely-populated areas. Cities are blue (liberal), suburbs and the countryside a... (@seanmcarroll, 113 minutes, 2019-Sep-30)
142.podcast imageJavier Gomez-Lavin Live!
Join me for a discussion with Javier Gomez-Lavin, a Provost Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, working in the Department of Philosophy with Lisa Miracchi and the MIRA group, as we discuss consciousness and working memory. Javier’s website: https://jgomezlavin.com (@onemorebrown, 2019-Oct-01)
143.podcast imageEp. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part Two)
Continuing on Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). We cover more of Bacon's "idols" and how Bacon divides religion from science (and what this means politically). We then move on to book 2, including Bacon's novel update of the term "form," and take a look at Bacon's method of doing science by filling out tables before actually doing experiments. Start with part one or get the full, unbroken Ci... (@PartiallyExLife, 64 minutes, 2019-Sep-30)
144.podcast imagePOPPER VS ADORNO 2 Positivism and Pluralism
What is ‘Positivism’ and why was it so important so Adorno to label Popper as one? Popper’s response, and what can we learn from this failure to communicate? (@PolPhilPod, 94 minutes, 2019-Oct-02)
145.podcast image#64 - Munthe on the Precautionary Principle and Existential Risk
In this episode I talk to Christian Munthe. Christian is a Professor of Practical Philosophy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He conducts research and expert consultation on ethics, value and policy issues arising in the intersection of health, science & technology, the environment and society. He is probably best-known for his work on the precautionary principle and its uses in ethica... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Sep-19)
146.podcast imageWayne Wu Live!
Join me for a discussion with Wayne Wu, an associate professor in, and associate director of, The Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University, as we discuss attention, action, consciousness, phenomenal overflow, and introspection. Wayne’s webpage: https://philpeople.org/profiles/wayne-wu Boxtel, Tsuchiya, Koch Opposing effects of consciousness and attention: http://w... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-29)
147.podcast imageShould Donald Trump be impeached? (take two)
Is the damage that Trump is inflicting on US political culture and the office of the executive so egregious that legislative sanction is more important than electoral advantage? We explore the normative and pragmatic considerations of impeaching this president, with Professor Joshua Cohen. (@Ariscottle_, 52 minutes, 2019-Oct-02)
148.podcast image0G74: Cloud Dragon Skies and Geoengineering
Those who can't accept the state of reality are doomed to dissatisfaction. Those who can accept the state of reality are doomed to things being as they are. We're reading N.K. Jemisin's short story Cloud Dragon Skies, which I highly recommend you read carefully before the episode and then reread after the episode because we have a very interesting difference of experiences on how we read it that w... (@0gPhilosophy, 45 minutes, 2019-Oct-02)
149.podcast imageHoP 331 - Literary Criticism - Lorenzo Valla
Lorenzo Valla launches a furious attack on scholastic philosophy, favoring the resources of classical Latin. (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2019-Sep-08)
150.podcast imageJumana Yahya Live!
Join me for a discussion with Jumana Yahya, a PhD Candidate at the University of Osnabruck in the Institute of Cognitive Science, and a LaGuardia Alumnus, as we discuss situated cognition, self-control, emotion, motivation, addiction, and free will. (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-28)
151.podcast image425: Queerness
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual… it is safe to say that new ideas of gender and sexuality have broken into mainstream consciousness within the past few decades. What underlies each of these identities, however, is the notion of Queerness. But what defines what it means to be queer? Is it as much a political identity as it is a sexual or gender identity? How does ‘queerness’ subver... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Sep-16)
152.podcast imageEpisode 67, Flowers for Algernon (Part I - Daniel Keyes: Life and Context)
Report: March 2nd After the successes we have had with Algernon, and with much deliberation, I have officially chosen our first research subject. Charlie Gordon, 32, was recommended to us by Alice Kinian from the Beekman School for Retarded Adults and she has assured us of his desire to increase his intellect. I have scheduled for Charlie to come to the lab over the next few days where Burt S... (@ThePanpsycast, 59 minutes, 2019-Sep-29)
153.podcast imageRichard Rorty and transcendence
A professional academic philosopher, the American neo-pragmatist Richard Rorty was also a provocative critic of his own discipline. He had little time for what he saw as the pretensions of analytic philosophers and their ambitions to transcendence. But his work is tangled up in its own ambitions and fascinating contradictions. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Sep-29)
154.podcast imageShorts - E22: Self-Evidence
Do we need to explain to you what breathing is? It's obvious. The evidence is in the doing. Or is it? In this Short, we discuss Harland's disdain for the phrase and its strange loopiness. Song: Can't Get Used To Losing You Artist: Andy Williams (@dawdlerspodcast, 17 minutes, 2019-Sep-29)
155.podcast imageThe Prejudice of Facts | Barry Barnes, Joanna Kavenna, John Ellis
In a world obsessed with Trump, alternative facts have not had a great press. But it is a century and more since Nietzsche claimed 'there are no facts, only interpretations' - and fifty years since Thomas Kuhn argued that facts were theory dependent. Is an insistence on 'the facts' the dogmatic prejudice of believers in their particular truth? Do we have to give up the idea that facts decide the... (@IAI_TV, 38 minutes, 2019-Sep-17)
156.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #12: Once Upon a Tarantino Film
Wes Alwan joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood in the context of Tarantino's other films. We consider T's strange sense of pacing, his comic violence, his historical revisionism, and casting choices. Is this a brilliant film or a fundamentally misguided idea badly in need of an editor? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for... (@PartiallyExLife, 47 minutes, 2019-Sep-24)
157.podcast imageEV - 109 Human Biodiversity with Kevin Bird
My guest this week is Kevin Bird (@itsbirdemic), a PhD student in evolutionary systems biology. Kevin helps guide me through the level of hell that is learning about the Human Biodiversity "Movement". Careful what you say about this one on twitter. They're listening.Kevin's Website: https://kevinabird.github.io/Invocation: Lovecraft's "Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family"Editing... (@ETVPod, 65 minutes, 2019-Sep-26)
158.podcast imageThe Illusions Around Death
So today, I’m going to discuss death and humans comprehension of it, using ideas by Ernest Becker, the cultural anthropologist, philosopher, and psychologist. The Denial of Death by Ernest Becker: https://amzn.to/2lIFDfF Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://bit.... (@philosophyguy2, 22 minutes, 2019-Sep-25)
159.podcast image65 | Michael Mann on Why Our Climate Is Changing and How We Know
We had our fun last week, exploring how progress in renewable energy and electric vehicles may help us combat encroaching climate change. This week we’re being a bit more hard-nosed, taking a look at what’s currently happening to our climate. Michael Mann is one of the world’s leading climate scientists, and also a dedicated advocate for improved public understanding of the issues. It was his rese... (@seanmcarroll, 77 minutes, 2019-Sep-23)
160.podcast imageJorge Morales Live!
Join me for a discussion with Jorge Morales, a philosopher and cognitive scientist currently at Johns Hopkins university, as we discuss mental strength -the felt intensity of our phenomenology-, pain asymbolia, dental fear, introspection, signal detection theory, attention, and the neural correlates of consciousness. Jorge’s website (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-24)
161.podcast imageEp. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part One)
On Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). Bacon claims to have developed a new toolset that will open up nature to inquiry in a way that wasn't possible for ancient and modern natural philosophy. Mark, Wes, and Dylan consider how much what Bacon describes resembles modern scientific method, talk through Bacon's "four idols" that interfere with impartial inquiry, and consider how Bacon's method fi... (@PartiallyExLife, 44 minutes, 2019-Sep-23)
162.podcast imagePOPPER VS ADORNO (1) Context & History
I revisit an acrimonious exchange between two very different public intellectuals. The first part sets the stage with the intellectual history. (@PolPhilPod, 61 minutes, 2019-Sep-25)
163.podcast imageKate Kirkpatrick on the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir
In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Kate Kirkpatrick, author of a new biography of Beauvoir, Becoming Beauvoir, discusses the relationship between the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir. Beauvoir is often portrayed as applying Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialism to the condition of women. Is this a fair assessment? We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation. (@philosophybites, 17 minutes, 2019-Jul-08)
164.podcast imageFree riding: Why act, when acting is likely to make no difference?
Are there reasons to act in a particular way, to willingly make some sacrifice, do something which may be good, and which we may even be committed to, when our actions (or lack of action) are likely to be of no consequence? Is size detrimental to democratic community? Professor Roger Crisp joins us to discuss whether the free rider problem highlights the limitation of moral philosophy. (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Sep-25)
165.podcast imageHAP 34 - New England Patriot - Lemuel Haynes
Preacher and Revolutionary War soldier Lemuel Haynes argues that the principles of the American Revolution demand the abolition of slavery. (@HistPhilosophy, 27 minutes, 2019-Sep-01)
166.podcast image0G73: Snowpiercer and Social Contract Theory, Part 2
We live in a train. A train called society. The train is the leviathan, the great beast that keeps us alive by keeping us in chains. Within the train there are many narratives. They may all be lies. The question is, do we keep the train as is, do we try to change it, or do we blow it to bits? This is the history of Western Social Contract Theory, on a train. Social Contract Theory: https://www.ie... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-Sep-25)
167.podcast imageShould You Get Married?
Kevin, Sarah, Gabe, Zach, and Yohana discuss the philosophy of marriage. What does marriage mean? What political implications does it have? If marriage as an institution is unjust, is there something wrong with participating in it? These are issues that touch our lives. Let us know what you think. The open relationships episodes: https://thevimblog.com/2018/09/18/rejecting-monogamy-embr... (@thevimblog, 83 minutes, 2019-Sep-22)
168.podcast imageMalcolm Keating, "Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy" (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Philosophy of Language was a central concern in classical Indian Philosophy. Philosophers in the tradition discussed testimony, pragmatics, and the religious implications of language, among other topics. In his new book, Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Mukula's 'Fundamentals of the Communicative Function'(Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), Malcolm Keating looks at th... (@NewBooksPhil, 69 minutes, 2019-Sep-20)
169.podcast image487: Changing Minds on Climate Change
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/changing-minds-climate-change. There is consensus among scientists that global warming is real and that it’s caused by human activity. Despite the overwhelming evidence and the urgency to act, there are still many who are skeptical of or flat-out deny climate change. Are these climate deniers simply impervious to scientific evidence? Or have ... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Sep-09)
170.podcast imageEpisode 66, Niccolò Machiavelli (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
No book can teach you how to tame the raging river of fortune, for it has many plans contrary to ambitious minds. Yet to submit powerlessly to fate with lamentation, as if God has not instilled you with freedom of the will, is a sign of disrespect and the ultimate folly of our kind. For the river splits into many paths and those that appear to drag us towards the abyss, may, in the end, lead us to... (@ThePanpsycast, 60 minutes, 2019-Sep-22)
171.podcast imageThe Reality Illusion | Donald Hoffman, Maria Baghramian, Hilary Lawson
"Seeing is believing". "Seeing is the truth". Yet cognitive scientists seem to have uncovered these views as incorrect. Evolution led us to perceive what is best for survival and it turns out this has little to do with what we call 'reality'. Is reality then a creative construct that helps us to live but doesn't reflect the world? Are physical objects a useful hallucination? Or is the very idea of... (@IAI_TV, 46 minutes, 2019-Sep-10)
172.podcast imageClassical ethics, modern problem
Plato and Aristotle were acute observers and analysts of the world around them, but they never had to deal with climate change. Trust, virtue and reason seem to be in short supply today. Can the ancients show us how to recover these essential aspects of social harmony? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Sep-22)
173.podcast imageE35: An Irenic Kind of Fellow - A Discussion on Illusionism with Keith Frankish
A first for the Dawdlers, they speak to a third person. No longer are they experiencing what it’s like to be a duo. Keith Frankish is here to tell them their duality is but a mere illusion and he is the proof! Something like that. Enjoy their conversation with Dr. Frankish as Harland and Keith plumb the depths of their degrees of eliminitivism on consciousness. Song: Ritual of a Take Artist:... (@dawdlerspodcast, 91 minutes, 2019-Sep-22)
174.podcast imageCarlos Montemayor Live!
Join me for a discussion with Carlos Montemayor, a philosopher at San Francisco State University whose research focuses on the intersection between philosophy of mind, epistemology and cognitive science, as we discuss consciousness, memory, the experience of time passing, attention, and artificial consciousness. Carlos’ website Christopher Mole’s review of Carlos’ book On the Evo... (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-18)
175.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #11: The Live Music Experience
Dave Hamilton (from Gig Gab) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to weigh concert-going (and theater-going) against the technological alternatives. Why are tickets so pricey? Do tribute bands fulfill our needs? Should audiences ideally be on drugs? These are but a few of the questions we breeze through. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. T... (@PartiallyExLife, 49 minutes, 2019-Sep-17)
176.podcast imageEV - 108 Logical Positivism with Dr. Liam Bright
My guest this week is Dr. Liam Bright, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the London School of Economics and a thought leader on philosophy twitter (@Lastpositivist). Liam joins me for an informal installment in our "better know a philosopher series" where he puts in a heroic effort to rehabilitate my dim view of the Logical Positivists.Liam's Page: https://www.liamkofibright.c... (@ETVPod, 61 minutes, 2019-Sep-19)
177.podcast imageWho Created God? — A Response to Capturing Christianity
In today's episode, I address Capturing Christianity's (Cameron Bertuzzi) video about, who created God? I contemplate the question, who created the universe? And maybe a better question, does the universe even need a cause? Addressing some points made by the cosmological argument. Maybe something always existed. Check out the end of the podcast where I put forward a more abstract explanation... (@philosophyguy2, 32 minutes, 2019-Sep-18)
178.podcast imageEpisode 172: Are You Free (to like the Chappelle special)?
David and Tamler start out with a discussion of the new Chappelle special and the negative reaction from many critics. Is Chappelle trolling his audience? Has he lost touch with the powerless people he used to champion? Or have critics missed his larger point, and failed to approach the new special as an art form? Then they address the latest development in the literature around Benjamin Libet's f... (@verybadwizards, 101 minutes, 2019-Sep-17)
179.podcast image64 | Ramez Naam on Renewable Energy and an Optimistic Future
The Earth is heating up, and it’s our fault. But human beings are not always complete idiots (occasional contrary evidence notwithstanding), and sometimes we can even be downright clever. Dare we imagine that we can bring our self-inflicted climate catastrophe under control, through a combination of technological advances and political willpower? Ramez Naam is optimistic, at least about the techno... (@seanmcarroll, 77 minutes, 2019-Sep-16)
180.podcast imageEp. 225: Simone Weil on War and Oppression (Part Two)
Continuing on Simone Weil's essays "The Iliad, or the Poem of Force" (1939) and "Analysis of Oppression" (1934) with guest Corey Mohler. We talk about the self-contradictions of power, why oppression and war are so intractable, and her positive solution (what there is of it here). Weil cuts through our left-right political dichotomy in a way that might interest you. Plus, why the Iliad is so great... (@PartiallyExLife, 62 minutes, 2019-Sep-16)
181.podcast imagePhilip Goff Live!
Join me for a discussion with Philip Goff, a philosopher and consciousness researcher at Durham University, UK, as we discuss physicalism, panpsychism, and cosmopsychism Philip’s website Philip’s blog Richard Dawid paper Daniel Stoljar’s review of Philip’s book (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-15)
182.podcast imageNational security or xenophobic conspiracy?
Is the Australian media’s coverage of China having the effect of both alienating Chinese Australians and promoting a kind of countervailing pro-China nationalism? Professor Wanning Sun joins us to discuss why it is that China has acquired the status in the national imagination of not just a geopolitical threat, but a source of almost existential anxiety. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Sep-18)
183.podcast image0G72: Snowpiercer and Environmental Injustice, Part 1
All aboard the endless train of symbolism. We'll be passing through, but not making stops in: locomotive dad jokes, environmental injustice, Plato's Republic, Social Contact Theory, revolutionary change, and various flavors or dooooom! If you can't follow the train of thought, it's cause the podcast is a closed system and we can only be as coherent as the sci-fi vehicle that we're currently hurtli... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-Sep-18)
184.podcast imageRationally Speaking #240 - David Manheim on "Goodhart's Law and why metrics fail"
In this episode, decision theorist David Manheim explains the dynamics behind Goodhart's Law ("When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to become a good measure") and some potential solutions to it. (@Rspodcast, 59 minutes, 2019-Sep-17)
185.podcast imageMILL VS RAWLS
Should we justify liberalism from appeals to political precepts or normative understandings of human nature? I consider two ways of thinking about liberalism's philosophical foundations. (@PolPhilPod, 87 minutes, 2019-Sep-16)
186.podcast imageMasafumi Oizumi and Hakwan Lau Live!
Join me for a discussion with Masafumi Oizumi, a theoretical neuroscientist at the University of Tokyo, and Hakwan Lau, a cognitive neuroscientist at UCLA, as we discuss the Integrated Information Theory, Global Workspace Theory, and Higher-Order theories of consciousness Oizumi on Twitter: @oizumim Hakwan on Twitter: @hakwanlau Oizumi’s website IIT 3.0 Hakwan’s website (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-13)
187.podcast image483: Summer Reading (and Misreading)
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/summer-reading-and-misreading. What should you be reading this summer—and how should you be reading it? We’re often told that fiction offers us entertainment, moral examples, and lessons about life. But are we getting too quick to dismiss complicated fiction—the kind that doesn’t have straightforward heroes and happy endings? Josh and Ken talk to w... (@philtalkradio, 15 minutes, 2019-Sep-01)
188.podcast imageEpisode 66, Niccolò Machiavelli (Part III - Machiavellianism Today)
No book can teach you how to tame the raging river of fortune, for it has many plans contrary to ambitious minds. Yet to submit powerlessly to fate with lamentation, as if God has not instilled you with freedom of the will, is a sign of disrespect and the ultimate folly of our kind. For the river splits into many paths and those that appear to drag us towards the abyss, may, in the end, lead us to... (@ThePanpsycast, 48 minutes, 2019-Sep-15)
189.podcast imagePatricia Churchland on How We Evolved A Conscience
Patricia Churchland is the queen of neurophilosophy. She’s on fine form in this interview - charming, funny and occasionally savage as we range over her views on the nature of philosophy, the neuroscience and evolution of morality, and consider what’s wrong with the two major ethical traditions in western thought: utilitarianism and Kantianism. 1.43 - Is philosophy just a kind of science in its i... (@NSthepodcast, 61 minutes, 2019-Sep-15)
190.podcast imageEvolution After Darwin | Massimo Pigliucci, Zanna Clay, Tim Lewens
The brutal mechanism of natural selection gave rise to all life on our planet. Or so the Darwinian story goes. But from mice to great whales, it now appears that animals inherit socially acquired characteristics. Is the theory of natural selection a Victorian relic, about to be replaced by a new science of cultural evolution? Or does the promised paradigm shift provide no real challenge to Darwin... (@IAI_TV, 41 minutes, 2019-Sep-03)
191.podcast imageOut of the Vat #3 – Katherine Furman
Katherine Furman is a Philosopher of Public Policy at University College Cork – soon to move to the University of Liverpool. In this episode Katherine talks about AIDS denialism, expertise and... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natural an... (@LSEPhilosophy, 18 minutes, 2019-Sep-03)
192.podcast imagePhilosophy on the couch
Sigmund Freud had mixed feelings about philosophy – he thought that philosophers and people experiencing psychosis had a lot in common. So how has contemporary philosophy come to owe such a huge debt to the father of psychoanalysis? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Sep-15)
193.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #10: The Handmaid's Tale
Mark, Erica, and Brian take on both Margaret Atwood's 1985 novel plus the TV series, getting into the transition from page to screen, taking the work as political speech vs. art, Atwood's phenomenology and neologisms (prayvaganza!), plus the roles of race and (lack of) comic relief in the story. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. Th... (@PartiallyExLife, 47 minutes, 2019-Sep-10)
194.podcast imageChiara Russo Krauss, "Wundt, Avenarius and Scientific Psychology: A Debate at the Turn of the Twentieth Century" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019)
At the start of the 19th century, the field we now call psychology was still the branch of philosophy that studied the soul. How did psychology come to define itself as a separate area of inquiry, and how did it come to be a science? In Wundt, Avenarius and Scientific Psychology: A Debate at the Turn of the Twentieth Century (Palgrave MacMillan 2019), Chiara Russo Krauss considers the conceptual f... (@NewBooksPhil, 66 minutes, 2019-Sep-10)
195.podcast imageEV - 107 Gender Wars in the Void with Dr. Rachel McKinney
This week I'm joined by Dr. Rachel McKinney, Program Director for Politics, Philosophy & Economics atSuffolk University and Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Suffolk University. Dr. Mckinney studies the relationship between language, knowledge, and power. She also deals with the realities of communication every day debating the issue of trans rights and the science of gender on twitter. We ... (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Sep-12)
196.podcast image63 | Solo -- Finding Gravity Within Quantum Mechanics
I suspect most loyal Mindscape listeners have been exposed to the fact that I’ve written a new book, Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime. As I release this episode on Monday 9 September 2019, the book will officially be released tomorrow, in print, e-book, and audio versions. To get in the mood, we’ve had several podcast episodes on quantum mechani... (@seanmcarroll, 110 minutes, 2019-Sep-09)
197.podcast imageEp. 225: Simone Weil on War and Oppression (Part One)
On Simone Weil's essays "The Iliad, or the Poem of Force" (1939) and "Analysis of Oppression" (1934). How do circumstances oppress and dehumanize us? Weil describes the mechanisms that keep people at war and maintain oppression even through revolutions as inherent to the logic of power. With guest Corey Mohler. Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!... (@PartiallyExLife, 48 minutes, 2019-Sep-09)
198.podcast image(Contemplating) The Self
Trying provide some insight to consider into your own life, your own perception of yourself, your values, and why you do the things you do....and why I do the things I do. Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process, philosophy thoughts, and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosoph... (@philosophyguy2, 15 minutes, 2019-Sep-10)
199.podcast imageWhy Politicians' Lies are Especially Bad
A special re-release of an early Vim podcast episode that was initially in two parts but has here been fused into one. No need to break the flow! Justin, Dylan, Justin Clardy, and Zach unite to discuss politicians' lies and what makes them so bad. Dylan has some insights about it. The discussion happens to be just as relevant as it was when it was first released. Simply update some of t... (@thevimblog, 90 minutes, 2019-Sep-10)
200.podcast imageEpisode 118: Tyler Cowen discusses Stubborn Attachments
In this episode, Tyler Cowen lays out an interesting normative ethical theory according to which we should be utilitarians, but with a twist: we should be utilitarians who care just as much about the humans of the future as we care about people now. Re-emphasizing our commitment to future people, he argues, has the effect of allowing us to embrace utilitarianism wholeheartedly without having to fe... (@ElucidationsPod, 53 minutes, 2019-Sep-12)
201.podcast imageDick Passingham Live!
Join me for a discussion with Dick Passignham, a “retired professor of Cognitive Neuroscience”, as we discuss brain imaging, the replication crisis in psychology, the function of the prefrontal cortex, and, of course, consciousness. Notes and links Passingham on Twitter: @dick_retired Books by Passingham Review of The Phenomenon of Man DeepMind paper (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-09)
202.podcast imageSTATECRAFT with Cecile Fabre (2)
How do we enforce rights under uncertainty? Does America's long history of human rights violations prevent it from acting as a force for good today? (@PolPhilPod, 49 minutes, 2019-Sep-11)
203.podcast image#63 - Reagle on the Ethics of Life Hacking
In this episode I talk to Joseph Reagle. Joseph is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at Northeastern University and a former fellow (in 1998 and 2010) and faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. He is the author of several books and papers about digital media and the social implications of digital technology. Our conversation focuses on his ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Aug-28)
204.podcast imageHakwan Lau Live!
Join me for a discussion with Hakwan Lau, a cognitive neuroscientist at UCLA, as we discuss the Integrated Information Theory of consciousness and differences between the ASSC and Tucson conferences Hakwan’s lab at UCLA Hakwan’s blog Hakwan on guitar (@onemorebrown, 2019-Sep-08)
205.podcast imageHas virtue become irrelevant to democratic politics?
If liberal democracies are now ailing, maybe even failing, what might a recovery of a politics of virtue look like? We explore the politicisation of morality with guest, Adrian Pabst. (@Ariscottle_, 47 minutes, 2019-Sep-11)
206.podcast image0G71: Willy Wonka and The Meritocracy Factory
Oopma loompa do-ba-dee-do We’ve got another topic for you. Oompa loompa do-ba-dee-de If you’ve got merit you’ll listen to me. What you get when you reward the best? Virtue for some and vice for the rest. Aiming for merit with your social policy Careful you don’t land on an oligarchy. Oompa loompa do-ba-dee-da Abandon meritocracy and you will go far. You will live like egalitarian too, Like the oom... (@0gPhilosophy, 42 minutes, 2019-Sep-11)
207.podcast image424: Freedom of Speech on Campus
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/freedom-speech-campus. In the last few years, conservatives and liberals alike have accused activists on college campuses of silencing contrary opinions. Many have argued—quite vociferously—that activists’ unwillingness to hear from people with opposing opinions endangers freedom of speech in higher education. But is there really an Orwellian threa... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Aug-26)
208.podcast imageBonus Episode: In Conversation with Saul Kripke and Timothy Williamson
Saul Kripke and Timothy Williamson discuss why language has come to dominate their field, why logic matters, and what the future for the Anglo-American tradition looks like. Saul Kripke has been described by many as the world's most influential living analytic philosopher and in the top 10 of the last 200 years. Timothy Williamson is the Wykeham Professor of logic at Oxford University - an institu... (@IAI_TV, 23 minutes, 2019-Aug-29)
209.podcast imageAaron's Sydney Skeptics Moral Luck Talk
Hey friends, here's the audio from my talk in Sydney at Skeptics in the Pub. We've got video but it needs a bit of editing together so in the meantime hope you enjoy. Thanks again to Sydney skeptics in the pub for having me, and if anyone else is interested in a skeptics themed ethics talk send me a message through a social media!Editing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.l... (@ETVPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Sep-07)
210.podcast imageEpisode 66, Niccolò Machiavelli (Part II - The Prince)
No book can teach you how to tame the raging river of fortune, for it has many plans contrary to ambitious minds. Yet to submit powerlessly to fate with lamentation, as if God has not instilled you with freedom of the will, is a sign of disrespect and the ultimate folly of our kind. For the river splits into many paths and those that appear to drag us towards the abyss, may, in the end, lead us to... (@ThePanpsycast, 67 minutes, 2019-Sep-08)
211.podcast imageThe Necessity of Morality | Justin Smith, Jason Alexander McKenzie, Barry C. Smith
“Most of the evil in the world is done with the best intentions”, said TS Eliot. And 9/11, the guillotine, and the Inquisition were inspired by those who thought they had the highest moral principles. Many philosophers have concluded that morality is a subjective human invention. Should we then simply encourage and argue for acts we support and do without morality altogether? Or is the authority o... (@IAI_TV, 43 minutes, 2019-Aug-27)
212.podcast imageGloomy Sunday
Our reactions to suicide often depend on the era in which it takes place: when practised by ancient philosophers, it has a noble lustre. When practised by modern celebrities, it’s an emblem of the emptiness of fame and fortune. And now, the advent of voluntary euthanasia is changing our perceptions once again. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Sep-08)
213.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #9: Cartoons with Dee Bradley Baker (Clone Wars, American Dad)
Are cartoons an inherently juvenile art form? A guilty pleasure when viewed by adults? Dee, whose voice can be heard in substantial portion of today's cartoons (especially animal/monster noises like Boots in the new big-screen adaptation of Dora the Explorer or Momo and Appa in The Last Airbender), defends cartoons as providing primal delights of humor, justice, and narrative meaning. For more, vi... (@PartiallyExLife, 55 minutes, 2019-Sep-03)
214.podcast imageAmy Olberding, "The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy" (Oxford UP, 2019)
Amy Olberding’s The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy (Oxford UP, 2019) is a joy to read, both entertaining and rich in ideas. The Wrong of Rudeness asks a key question for our times how do we interact with each other, especially in politically contentious situations? Olberding addresses this and related issues by bringing our moderns challenges into dialo... (@NewBooksPhil, 56 minutes, 2019-Sep-03)
215.podcast imageEV - 106 Taxiderming the Void with Brant MacDuff
This week I'm joined by Brant MacDuff, taxidermist and conservation activist. I had a great time chatting with Brant at NECSS and was happy to have him on the show to discuss how an art about death can inspire concern for life.Brant's website: https://www.immortalanimals.com/aboutInvocation: Will Price (feel better!)Editing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.libsyn.com/s02e... (@ETVPod, 66 minutes, 2019-Sep-05)
216.podcast image62 | Michele Gelfand on Tight and Loose Societies and People
Physicists study systems that are sufficiently simple that it’s possible to find deep unifying principles applicable to all situations. In psychology or sociology that’s a lot harder. But as I say at the end of this episode, Mindscape is a safe space for grand theories of everything. Psychologist Michele Gelfand claims that there’s a single dimension that captures a lot about how cultures differ: ... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Sep-02)
217.podcast imageEp. 224: Kierkegaard Critiques The Present Age (Part Two)
Continuing on "The Present Age" (1846), plus Hubert Dreyfus’s "Nihilism on the Information Highway: Anonymity vs. Commitment in the Present Age" (2004) with guest John Ganz. Does K's critique actually apply to our present age? We address K's view of humor, romance, authenticity, actual community vs. "the public," the leveling that occurs without anyone specific actually doing it, and the virtue of... (@PartiallyExLife, 66 minutes, 2019-Sep-02)
218.podcast imagePatricia Marino, "Philosophy of Sex and Love" (Routledge, 2019)
For those who think that philosophy must speak to everyday experience and ordinary life, it would seem that philosophical questions occasioned by love and sex should take center stage. Moral, epistemic, metaphysical, and political issues surrounding sex and love pervade our culture. Where would pop music, television, and fine art be without the dilemmas at the intersection of love and sex? And ... (@NewBooksPhil, 63 minutes, 2019-Sep-02)
219.podcast imageA Leader Returns
In this unusual episode, Justin, the long lost founder of the Vim Podcast, makes his triumphant return. Dylan and Zach join him to discuss the circumstances of his mysterious absence, why he has returned, and the profundities of the philosophy of returning to things. The moral is that you should keep an eye out for upcoming episodes in which Justin leads us through some vital political scien... (@thevimblog, 35 minutes, 2019-Sep-02)
220.podcast imageWhere's the threat to democracy: Boris Johnson or the British Parliament?
In some ways the peculiarities of the Brexit debacle are just the latest manifestation of a much older political tension between democracy and representation. Tim Lynch joins us to discuss whether democracy is about more than 'representation'. (@Ariscottle_, 50 minutes, 2019-Sep-04)
221.podcast image423: Philosophy Behind Bars
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-behind-bars. In 1994, Congress eliminated federal funding for college education in prisons. It was, they argued, unjust for prisoners to be eligible for Pell grants when ordinary citizens could not afford higher education. However, research suggests that education in prisons has positive consequences, such as lower recidivism rates and a... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Aug-19)
222.podcast imageListener Qs 10
It's the 10th iteration of our Listener Thank You Q and As. Thank you all for supporting the show and if you like what you're hearing and have questions you want answered, you know what to do for next time. Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): https:... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Sep-04)
223.podcast imageRationally Speaking #239 - Saloni Dattani on "The debate over whether male and female brains are different"
Several recent books have argued there's no difference between male and female brains. Saloni Dattani, a PhD in psychiatric genetics, discusses some of the problems with the argument, and what we really know so far about gender and the brain. (@Rspodcast, 48 minutes, 2019-Sep-03)
224.podcast imagePROPERTY RIGHTS, SANCTIONS, & AID with Cécile Fabre
Cécile Fabre returns to the podcast to discuss her latest book, Economic Statecraft. We discuss rights, property rights, free trade, sanctions, conditional aid, and conditional borrowing. (@PolPhilPod, 71 minutes, 2019-Sep-01)
225.podcast imageWhat's It All For? | Helen Lederer, Julian Baggini, Susan Neiman, Janne Teller
We admire achievers, from James Watt to Mandela, Marie Curie to Emmeline Pankhurst, and we school and encourage our children to be similarly focussed. Yet many spend their lives waiting for weekends and holidays. And does not play, both as sex, drugs and rock and roll, and as creative and physical endeavour provide us with the most memorable events in life? Should we embrace play as the most im... (@IAI_TV, 35 minutes, 2019-Aug-20)
226.podcast imageEp. 3 - Not All Who Ponder Count Costs
Welcome to the third episode of Upon Reflection, a podcast about what we think as well as how and why we think it. In this podcast, I'll be reading my paper about moral dilemmas entitled, "Not all who ponder count costs: Arithmetic reflection predicts utilitarian tendencies, but logical reflection predicts both deontological and utilitarian tendencies". In th... (@byrd_nick, 80 minutes, 2019-Sep-02)
227.podcast imageEpisode 66, Niccolò Machiavelli (Part I - Life and Context)
No book can teach you how to tame the raging river of fortune, for it has many plans contrary to ambitious minds. Yet to submit powerlessly to fate with lamentation, as if God has not instilled you with freedom of the will, is a sign of disrespect and the ultimate folly of our kind. For the river splits into many paths and those that appear to drag us towards the abyss, may, in the end, lead us to... (@ThePanpsycast, 68 minutes, 2019-Sep-01)
228.podcast imageEpisode 6: Aoife – Icelandic Sagas and moral philosophy
I didn't know much about Icelandic Sagas before I heard about Aoife's project, I just knew that they were long and complicated and involved feuds and fate. But Aoife, a philosophy student at Queen's University Belfast, knew a lot more and wanted to try to make sense of all the heavyweight moral decisions and decisive actions that go on in them. Her project is partly an investigation of a moral fra... (@DrJoeMorrison, 62 minutes, 2019-Aug-30)
229.podcast imagePolitics at the extremes
Politics has never been a gentle pursuit - but these days the gloves are well and truly off. How did we get here? What are the implications for political philosophy, and for politics in general? As for where we might be headed, there are fascinating – if rather terrifying – clues in the work of French thinker René Girard. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Sep-01)
230.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #8: Spider-Man: Far From Home (and Elsewhere)
Mark, Erica, and Brian discuss the function of super-hero films and how this new one fits in. Do we need "realism" in such stories? When does a premise like this get too old to keep recycling? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode, and more episodes in advance, at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is ... (@PartiallyExLife, 50 minutes, 2019-Aug-27)
231.podcast imageEV - 105 Public Philosophy in the Void with Greg Sadler
This week I'm joined by Greg Sadler (@philosopher70). Greg is a public philosopher and cofounder of ReasonIO. We discuss the shifting trends in public philosophy and how philosophy can help us address important parts of our lived experiences, especially involving anger.ReasonIO: https://reasonio.wordpress.com/Editing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.libsyn.com/s02e02-rex-... (@ETVPod, 68 minutes, 2019-Aug-29)
232.podcast image61 | Quassim Cassam on Intellectual Vices and What to Do About Them
All of us have been wrong about things from time to time. But sometimes it was a simple, forgivable mistake, while other times we really should have been correct. Properties that systematically prevent us from being correct, and for which we can legitimately be blamed, are “intellectual vices.” Examples might include closed-mindedness, wishful thinking, overconfidence, selective attention, and so ... (@seanmcarroll, 70 minutes, 2019-Aug-26)
233.podcast imageEpisode 171: How Do You Solve a Problem Like Theodicy? (The Book of Job)
David and Tamler dive back into the Bible, this time to the perplexing and poetic Book of Job. What does this book have to say about the theodicy, the problem of evil? Why does Job (and his children) have to suffer so much just so God can prove a point to Satan? Are the speeches of Job's friends meant to be convincing? Does Job capitulate in the end? Does God contradict himself in the last chapter... (@verybadwizards, 92 minutes, 2019-Aug-27)
234.podcast imageEp. 224: Kierkegaard Critiques The Present Age (Part One)
On Soren Kierkegaard's essay "The Present Age" (1846) and Hubert Dreyfus’s "Nihilism on the Information Highway: Anonymity vs. Commitment in the Present Age" (2004). What's wrong with our society? Kierkegaard saw the advent of the press and gossip culture as engendering a systematic passivity and shallowness in his fellows, and Dreyfus thinks this is an even more apt description of the Internet Ag... (@PartiallyExLife, 49 minutes, 2019-Aug-26)
235.podcast imageEpisode 117: Brian L. Frye says to plagiarize this podcast
In this episode, Brian L. Frye (University of Kentucky) argues that we should think more carefully about our moral reaction to instances of plagiarism. (@ElucidationsPod, 38 minutes, 2019-Aug-30)
236.podcast imageResponsibility and Justice
Should the lifestyle choices we make affect our right to treatment? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Aug-19)
237.podcast image486: Reading the Troubled Past
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/reading-troubled-past. Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe lambasted Joseph Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness as a deeply racist work that should be removed from the Western canon. Defenders of Conrad say the novel is simply an expression of its time and not an endorsement of the racist attitudes it represents. So how do we judge the moral legitimacy of o... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Aug-12)
238.podcast imageCan climate science be communicated without compromising the science?
There is undoubtedly a great need for climate science research to be communicated to the public in a manner that is clear, compelling and that cannot readily be captured, let alone dismissed, by partisan politics. Andrew Pitman joins us to discuss whether climate research can be communicated without pandering to the epistemological and political deficiencies of our time. (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Aug-28)
239.podcast imageListener Qs 9
Hi all! We're back with another round of our interdimensionally renown Listener Thank You Q and As. We've got two episodes of great questions and hilariously mispronounced names with a healthy splash of in jokes. So thank you all for supporting the show and if you like what you're hearing and have questions you want answered, you know what to do for next time. Support us at Patreon: https://www.pa... (@0gPhilosophy, 44 minutes, 2019-Aug-28)
240.podcast imageHUMILIATION in Neo-Republican Ideology
I develop an original account of humiliation and argue that including it in the neo-republican ideological project enriches its structure and makes it more intuitive and relevant. (@PolPhilPod, 105 minutes, 2019-Aug-26)
241.podcast imageWill AI make thinking obsolete?
Would you choose an algorithm rather than a human to mark your exam papers? Would you welcome a translation app that replaced foreign language learning? Would you trust a marriage prediction app to choose your life partner? Professor Michael Sandel of Harvard University - Radio 4's 'Public Philosopher' - puts these and other questions to an audience of students at the London School of Economics an... (@BBCRadio4, 42 minutes, 2019-Aug-26)
242.podcast imageThe Meaning of the Multiverse | Cumrun Vafa, Mary-Jane Rubenstein, John Ellis
Talk of other universes has become fashionable amongst physicists and is popular with the public. But the numbers seem hardly credible: string theory predicts 10500 parallel universes and some argue that the very idea of other universes is nonsensical. Should we recognise ours as the only universe and give up on others as fantasy science? Or is slipping through a worm hole into another universe a... (@IAI_TV, 40 minutes, 2019-Aug-13)
243.podcast imageEpisode 65, 'The Awe-Some Argument' with Ryan Byerly (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
University of Sheffield philosopher, Assistant Professor Ryan Byerly is best known for his work in philosophy of religion, epistemology and virtue theory. Publishing widely in these areas, Ryan is also Reviews Editor for the European Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Treasurer for the British Society for Philosophy of Religion, and a member of Sheffield’s Centre for Engaged Philosophy. Amongst m... (@ThePanpsycast, 35 minutes, 2019-Aug-25)
244.podcast imageEpisode 5: Rupert – Ethical Egoism
We talk about ethical egoism, which Rupert seems to feel is dismissed a little bit too lightly, and we hear about how he's going to try to defend it. While Rupert’s talking about ethics and about what determines or fixes ethical truths – where they come from – at the same time in the background there are lot of other issues about political philosophy and authority and freedom and the state. I cut ... (@DrJoeMorrison, 25 minutes, 2019-Aug-23)
245.podcast imageEV - 104 Deeply Learning the Void with Michael Cogswell
I'm joined this week by a friend of a friend of the show. Michael Cogswell is currently studying Deep Learning at Georgia Tech, and he helps me work through some of the important basics of deep learning and what it can mean for life in the void.Deep Learning: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_learningEditing by Brian Ziegenhagen, check out his pod: http://youarehere.libsyn.com/s02e02-rex-manning-... (@ETVPod, 71 minutes, 2019-Aug-23)
246.podcast imageReligion, Science, Morality, God and the Great Unknown
A discussion about the points I made in a recent debate about anti-theism. Tune in! Debate link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTyg-IjuO9Y Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process, philosophy thoughts, and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: ... (@philosophyguy2, 35 minutes, 2019-Aug-22)
247.podcast imageDementia and deception
If you’re caring for a person with dementia, what do you do if they demand to see their spouse, who in fact died long ago? If you resort to telling the person that their spouse has just gone to the shops and will be back soon, you’re not alone. “Therapeutic deception” is a time-saver for carers, and it can also be humane, a means of alleviating distress. But like all lying, it’s morally problemati... (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Aug-25)
248.podcast imageJohn T. Lysaker, "Philosophy, Writing, and the Character of Thought" (U Chicago Press, 2018)
What is the relationship between the form of writing and what can be thought? How is a writer’s thinking shaped by form? How is a reader’s? Does this matter for philosophy? In Philosophy, Writing, and the Character of Thought (University of Chicago Press, 2018), John T. Lysaker explores the importance of the praxis of writing for philosophy. Essaying a variety of forms, the book invites the reader... (@NewBooksPhil, 73 minutes, 2019-Aug-20)
249.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #7: Native Representation with Jonathan Joss (King of the Hill, Parks & Rec)
Jonathan built his career playing 19th century Indians on horseback, was John Redcorn III in King of the Hill, Chief Ken Hotate in Parks and Recreation, was featured in The Magnificent Seven and True Grit, and is currently playing Sitting Bull in Annie Get Your Gun (also featuring Erica) in Sag Harbor. He talks about Hollywood's record portraying indigenous Americans, his own struggles to get nat... (@PartiallyExLife, 41 minutes, 2019-Aug-20)
250.podcast image60 | Lynne Kelly on Memory Palaces, Ancient and Modern
Memory takes different forms. Memories can be encoded in the strength of neural connections in our brains, but there’s a sense in which photographs and written records are memories as well. What did people do before such forms of memory even existed? Lynne Kelly is a science writer and researcher who specializes in forms of memory in the ancient world, as well as a competitive memory expert in her... (@seanmcarroll, 76 minutes, 2019-Aug-19)
251.podcast imageHoP 330 - Republic of Letters - Italian Humanism
Coluccio Salutati and Leonardo Bruni combine eloquence with philosophy, taking as their model the refined language and republican ideals found in Cicero. (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2019-Jul-28)
252.podcast imageEp. 223: Guest Ned Block on Consciousness (Part Two)
We talk with Ned about a second Blockheads (2019) article, Michael Tyle's “Homunculi Heads and Silicon Chips: The Importance of History to Phenomenology," which provides a variation off of the David Chalmers fading qualia argument, and then Mark, Seth, Dylan, and Wes continue exploring the details uncovered by our interview after Ned leaves. Listen to part one first, or get the ad-free, unbroken C... (@PartiallyExLife, 56 minutes, 2019-Aug-19)
253.podcast imageKathleen Stock on What is a Woman?
'What is a woman?' has become a contentious question with practical implications. The philosopher Kathleen Stock gives an account of the category 'woman' and how we should think about it. She gives a different answer to this question which Amia Srinivassan addressed in a previous Philosophy Bites interview on this topic. (@philosophybites, 30 minutes, 2019-May-21)
254.podcast image485: The Doomsday Doctrine
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/doomsday-doctrine. The doctrine of mutually assured destruction is supposed to deter both sides in a war from launching the first nuclear strike. However, the strategy of the US, NATO, and other super powers has been to plan the destruction of nearly all life on Earth. If near total annihilation would be monstrous, ethically speaking, then what sho... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Aug-05)
255.podcast imageCan democracy survive the rise of surveillance capitalism?
Advertising has always been about creating desires, not just appealing to an existing demand. And the tension between capitalism and democratic culture is as old as capitalism itself. Soshana Zuboff argues there’s a new form of capitalism with tentacles extending deep into our private lives to influence and modify our behaviour for profit. (@Ariscottle_, 48 minutes, 2019-Aug-21)
256.podcast image0G70: The Power and Cyborg Feminism, Part 2
It's post cataclysm now, and we're one of the few "male studies" podcasts remaining in the world. Hannah Marcus (@sligers118 on Twitter) is here to womansplain The Power to us and take credit for our insights. This still feels better than the before time, though. Mass shootings are way down, and having functional paid family leave is pretty great. I'd call it a net win. Cyborg Theory: https://en.w... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Aug-21)
257.podcast imageWhen Will Machines Deserve Rights?
When is a machine deserving of moral consideration? When does it have rights? Zach and Dylan discuss these questions and more in this episode. It mainly focuses on Zach’s article, “Stop Talking about the Moral Status of Machines.” He has an argument that philosophical discussion of these topics is missing the more important issues. For instance, a prejudice (that Zach calls ‘substratism’) might lu... (@thevimblog, 52 minutes, 2019-Aug-18)
258.podcast imageRationally Speaking #238 - Razib Khan on "Stuff I've Been Wrong About"
It's rare for public intellectuals to talk about things they've gotten wrong, but geneticist Razib Khan is an exception. He and Julia discuss a list of 28 things he's changed his mind about in the last decade. (@Rspodcast, 51 minutes, 2019-Aug-20)
259.podcast imageTIME, POLITICS, & CITIZENSHIP With Elizabeth Cohen
Time. Founding moments. legitimacy. Commensuration. Liberal Democracy. The State. Immigration. Criminal Justice. (@PolPhilPod, 101 minutes, 2019-Aug-18)
260.podcast imageLost in Language | Saul Kripke, Hilary Lawson, Paul Boghossian, Silvia Jonas
Language is widely seen as the critical tool which has set our species apart. We assume that it is successful because our words are able to describe reality. Yet from Wittgenstein to Derrida, no satisfactory theory has been able to support this intuition. Might the problem be not with our theory of language, but with the very idea of reality? Or is reality necessary to make sense of the success of... (@IAI_TV, 42 minutes, 2019-Aug-06)
261.podcast imageEp. 2 - What We Can Infer About Implicit Bias From Debiasing Experiments
Welcome to the second episode of Upon Reflection, a podcast about what we think as well as how and why we think it. In this podcast, I'll be reading my paper entitled, "What We Can (And Can't) Infer About Implicit Bias From Debiasing Experiments". I argue that implicit bias is not entirely unconscious or involuntary, but it probably is associative. As with all of my papers, ... (@byrd_nick, 53 minutes, 2019-Aug-19)
262.podcast imageEpisode 65, 'The Awe-Some Argument' with Ryan Byerly (Part I - Pantheism)
University of Sheffield philosopher, Assistant Professor Ryan Byerly is best known for his work in philosophy of religion, epistemology and virtue theory. Publishing widely in these areas, Ryan is also Reviews Editor for the European Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Treasurer for the British Society for Philosophy of Religion, and a member of Sheffield’s Centre for Engaged Philosophy. Amongst m... (@ThePanpsycast, 31 minutes, 2019-Aug-18)
263.podcast imageEpisode 4: Aine – Pyrrhonic Scepticism
This is a conversation with a final-year student in Philosophy. Aine graduated from Queen's University Belfast in the summer of 2019, and like many students she used her final year of studies to work on an extended independent research project. Dissertation students write about a philosophical topic of their own devising, working alongside individual members of faculty who help to steer their pro... (@DrJoeMorrison, 22 minutes, 2019-Aug-16)
264.podcast imageEV - 103 The Panpsychic Void with Hunter Ash
I'm joined this week by Hunter Ash, longtime friend of the show and my go to source for a variety of sciency philosophy questions. He came to me with a really interesting argument to follow up on the brief discussion of panpsychism back in our Frankish episodes. I definitely recommend giving those a re-listen alongside this episode.Invocation: In the Metaphysicians office by Daniel CappellPanpsych... (@ETVPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Aug-16)
265.podcast image12 Essential Truths I've Learned About Life
Instead of reviewing Jordan Peterson's 12 rules for life....I give you my 12 rules. Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process, philosophy thoughts, and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw ... (@philosophyguy2, 16 minutes, 2019-Aug-15)
266.podcast imageWhy the Humanities?
In an era of university funding cuts, economic rationalism and the creeping perception that human progress comes to us principally via science and technology, who needs the Humanities? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Aug-18)
267.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #6: Adults Playing Video Games
Ian Maio (who's worked in e-sports marketing) joins Erica, Brian and Mark to talk about why adults play video games, types of gamers, gaming disorders, gamer shaming, inclusivity, and more. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode, and more episodes in advance, at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is cur... (@PartiallyExLife, 58 minutes, 2019-Aug-13)
268.podcast imageHAP 33 - Young, Gifted, and Black - Phillis Wheatley
Phillis Wheatley astonishes colonial Americans with her exquisite and precocious poetry and reflects on the liberating power of the imagination. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Jul-21)
269.podcast image59 | Adam Becker on the Curious History of Quantum Mechanics
There are many mysteries surrounding quantum mechanics. To me, the biggest mysteries are why physicists haven’t yet agreed on a complete understanding of the theory, and even more why they mostly seem content not to try. This puzzling attitude has historical roots that go back to the Bohr-Einstein debates. Adam Becker, in his book What Is Real?, looks at this history, and discusses how physic... (@seanmcarroll, 100 minutes, 2019-Aug-12)
270.podcast imageEpisode 170: Social Psychology Gets an Asch-Kicking
Is social psychology just a kid dressing up in grown-up science clothes? Are the methods in social psychology--hypothesis-driven experiments and model-building--appropriate for the state of the field? Or do these methods lead to a narrowing of vision, stifled creativity, and a lack of informed curiosity about the social world> David and Tamler discuss the strong methodological critique of psycholo... (@verybadwizards, 110 minutes, 2019-Aug-13)
271.podcast imageEp. 223: Guest Ned Block on Consciousness (Part One)
The climax and denouement of our summer philosophy of mind series: Ned Block visits to fill in the gaps about functionalism and attributing consciousness to machines and discuss essays from Blockheads (2019), focusing here on Brian McLaughlin’s “Could an Android be Sentient?” Don't wait for part 2! Get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Please go check out Modern Day Ph... (@PartiallyExLife, 52 minutes, 2019-Aug-12)
272.podcast image419: The Mystery of the Multiverse
More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/mystery-multiverse. At the foundation of modern theoretical physics lie the equations that define our universe, telling us of its beginnings, evolution, and future. Make even minor adjustments to the fundamental laws of the universe, and life as we know it would not exist. How do we explain this extraordinary fact that our universe is so uniquely fine-tune... (@philtalkradio, 52 minutes, 2019-Jul-29)
273.podcast imageDoctors and their conscience!
Should a doctor say NO on conscience? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Aug-04)
274.podcast imageWhat does it mean to be 'good'?
Is 'goodness’ still a term that we should be using? Is there a difference between the 'good' and the 'virtuous' character? What is the relationship between action and intention, between the inner and outer life? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2019-Aug-14)
275.podcast imageSamir Okasha, "Agents and Goals in Evolution" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Evolutionary biologists standardly treat organisms as agents: they have goals and purposes and preferences, and their behaviors and adaptive traits contribute to the achievement of their goals. This explanatory practice brings evolutionary biology into conceptual contact with rational choice theory, which provides models of how people make decisions and act on them. In Agents and Goals in Evolutio... (@NewBooksPhil, 60 minutes, 2019-Aug-09)
276.podcast image0G69: The Power and Cyborg Theory, Part 1
Finally! We've been waiting so long for this, I almost thought we'd never get here. And by here I mean the collapse of the patriarchy. If only pod notes made it so. No, this week and next we're cover Naomi Alderman's The Power. To keep us from mansplaining our way through a feminist classic, we're joined by our future gender overlord, Hannah Marcus (@sligers118 on Twitter), a MA student in cultura... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Aug-14)
277.podcast imageThe Problem with Love | Mark Salter, Helen-Ann Hartley, Phillip Blond
'Love conquers all' is a motto central to our culture and its Christian heritage. Yet Buddhists think love an obstacle to enlightenment. Nietzsche went further and called love barbaric ‘for it is practised at the expense of all others’. Is love for all an illusion? Might we be better to see love as a dangerous force that by its nature excludes others and gives rise to conflict? Or is love for our... (@IAI_TV, 37 minutes, 2019-Jul-30)
278.podcast imageBERNIE, HILLARY, & TRUMP With Angie Maxwell
The historical and ideological factors behind Trump's meteoric rise in 2016, divisions on the left, & I go on a rant. (@PolPhilPod, 86 minutes, 2019-Aug-11)
279.podcast imageEpisode 3: Nancy Jecker – the chronically ill, the newly deceased
Prof. Nancy Jecker came to Queen's University Belfast to speak at this philosophy conference (https://philevents.org/event/show/64710) on the ethics of chronic illness, and I used that opportunity to ask her about her philosophical interests and work. We talked about life and death – in particular, lives lived with chronic illneses, and the ways that a person's story doesn't end just at the mome... (@DrJoeMorrison, 29 minutes, 2019-Aug-09)
280.podcast imageEpisode 64, 'The Given - Experience and its Content' with Michelle Montague (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Michelle Montague is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. As well as publishing extensively in phenomenology and philosophy of mind, Michelle is also the author of Non-Propositional Intentionality, Cognitive Phenomenology, and our focus for this episode, her 2016 book, The Given: Experience and its Content. This episode is all about what some philosophers have ca... (@ThePanpsycast, 31 minutes, 2019-Aug-11)
281.podcast imageHoP 329 - Greeks Bearing Gifts - Byzantine Scholars in Italy
Bessarion and George Trapenzuntius, rival scholars from the Greek east who helped inspire the Italian Renaissance. (@HistPhilosophy, 19 minutes, 2019-Jul-14)
282.podcast imageBuddhism: Living Life with Compassion
An introduction to understanding Buddhism. This area of thought has seen a cultural trend, so this marks the first episode in various other coming related episodes. Contemplating whether or not the iconic film, Gladiator is Stoic? Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilos... (@philosophyguy2, 16 minutes, 2019-Aug-08)
283.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #5: True Crime with Lucy Lawless
Lucy Lawless (Xena the Warrior Princess, currently starring in My Life Is Murder) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to think about the true crime genre, of both the documentary and dramatized variety. What's the appeal? Why do women in particular gravitate to it? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode, and more episodes in advance, at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podc... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Aug-06)
284.podcast imageThe (other) melancholy Dane
Shakespeare’s Hamlet is perhaps the most famous Danish depressive, but Soren Kierkegaard gives him a run for his money. He wrote uncompromisingly difficult philosophical works, so it’s not surprising that he’s an outsize but rather remote figure in the popular cultural imagination. This week’s guest wants to change all that – she’s written a biography of Kierkegaard that brings the man and the wor... (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Aug-11)
285.podcast imageEV - 102 Social Progress in the Void with Bo Winegard pt.2
Part two of my debate with Bo Winegard, Assistant Professor at Marietta College, cohost of the psyphilopod podcast, and frequent contributor to Quillette. We've engaged in several disagreements on twitter and thought it could be valuable to debate some of these issues on the show. We focused our debate on the question "should society attempt to promote social progress by changing human nature".Inv... (@ETVPod, 79 minutes, 2019-Aug-08)
286.podcast image58 | Seth MacFarlane on Using Science Fiction to Explore Humanity
Fiction shines a light on the human condition by putting people into imaginary situations and envisioning what might happen. Science fiction expands this technique by considering situations in the future, with advanced technology, or with utterly different social contexts. Seth MacFarlane’s show The Orville is good old-fashioned space opera, but it’s also a laboratory for explo... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Aug-05)
287.podcast imageEp. 222: Debating Functionalism (Block, Chalmers) (Part Two)
Continuing on Ned Block's "Troubles with Functionalism" (1978) and David Chalmers's "Absent Qualia, Fading Qualia, Dancing Qualia" (1995). What would it be like to be halfway between person and machine? If you think the machine can't have consciousness, then Chalmers thinks that there's no sensible way to describe such an experience, ergo the machine (if functionally equivalent to the person) must... (@PartiallyExLife, 56 minutes, 2019-Aug-05)
288.podcast image416: Magical Thinking
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/magical-thinking. Have you ever avoided stepping on a crack, just in case you might break your mother’s back? Every day, people make decisions and act based on completely unfounded ideas and superstitions – even when they acknowledge that there is no evidence to support their reasoning. Why do we so often engage in this kind of magical thinking? Wh... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Jul-22)
289.podcast imageGladiator: Is it Stoic?
Contemplating whether or not the iconic film, Gladiator is Stoic? Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-p... (@philosophyguy2, 14 minutes, 2019-Aug-05)
290.podcast imageFacebook’s cryptocurrency — not such a bad idea after all?
The introduction of the Libra would undoubtedly increase Facebook’s power and would certainly disrupt our existing financial systems. But if it diminishes Facebook’s untrammelled sway over news distribution, political communication and the ‘information economy’, is this a price we should be willing to pay? (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2019-Aug-07)
291.podcast imageThe 50th Episode Extravaganza!!!
Zach and Dylan get reflective and autobiographical in this special episode. They discuss whether the Vim podcast is too dense or too difficult for non-philosopher listeners. Then they turn to talk about how they got into philosophy and give some recommendations for how you can get into philosophy too. They end with some thoughts about the choice to pursue philosophy as a career. 8:00 - intro... (@thevimblog, 78 minutes, 2019-Aug-04)
292.podcast imageEpisode #134 ... Consequences of Reason
Today we talk about the growing dissatisfaction with Enlightenment Reason during the early 20th century. (@iamstephenwest, 26 minutes, 2019-Aug-07)
293.podcast image0G68: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Grief
I'm getting a very Groundhog day "already written these show notes" vibe. I guess they didn't go well last time or something, so hopefully this time around will be better. We're joined by an amazing guest, the award eligible Tom from Cog Dis, to discuss Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, a movie we all really enjoyed and had largely forgotten. There's a lot to cover so we space it over two epi... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-Aug-07)
294.podcast imageRationally Speaking #237 - Andy Przybylski on "Is screen time bad for you?"
It's common wisdom that spending a lot of time on your smartphone, or checking social media like Facebook and Twitter, takes a psychological toll. But is there any research to back that up? Julia discusses the evidence with professor Andy Przybylski. (@Rspodcast, 53 minutes, 2019-Aug-06)
295.podcast imageAre You An Illusion? | Julian Baggini, Joanna Kavenna, Jan Westerhoff, Silvia Jonas
The self is an illusion, our passions a by-product of the brain. Or so neuroscientists and philosophers would have us believe. Yet, as the late philosopher Mary Midgley tirelessly argued, even if we had a plausible account of how such a complex illusion could evolve, our inner experience is undeniable. Is dismissing the self a mistake driven by the desire to uphold a purely material universe? Or c... (@IAI_TV, 44 minutes, 2019-Jul-23)
296.podcast imageQuassim Cassam, "Vices of the Mind: From the Intellectual to the Political" (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sometimes people are blameworthy or otherwise not admirable because of what they believe. And sometimes they are blameworthy or otherwise not admirable because of how they believe – broadly, their ways of thinking, inquiring, handling evidence, and managing information. We sometimes criticize others for being careless, dogmatic, gullible, and so on. These evaluations often have the form of apprais... (@NewBooksPhil, 71 minutes, 2019-Aug-01)
297.podcast imageEpisode 116: Tommy Curry discusses black male studies
In this episode, Tommy Curry argues that if we really want to understand gender-based oppression, we have to look at how black men have been targeted for it. (@ElucidationsPod, 59 minutes, 2019-Aug-05)
298.podcast imageTHE SOUTHERN STRATEGY with Angie Maxwell
How did appeals to racism, sexism, and religion shape American party politics and conservative ideology? (@PolPhilPod, 72 minutes, 2019-Aug-04)
299.podcast imageHAP 32 - Talking Book - Early Africana Writing in English
18th century black authors touch on philosophical themes in autobiographical narratives, poetry, and other literary genres. (@HistPhilosophy, 25 minutes, 2019-Jul-07)
300.podcast imageEpisode 2: Jonathan Webber – Freedom and Morality
This is part two of the interview with Jonathan Webber about his book 'Rethinking Existentialism', and in this one we talk about existentialist ideas around freedom and ethical action, which is why I'm calling it I'm calling it 'Freedom and Morality'. I asked him some questions about how he knew that he had a big enough idea to start thinking about the topic as a 'book' project rather than a seri... (@DrJoeMorrison, 40 minutes, 2019-Aug-02)
301.podcast imageEpisode 64, 'The Given - Experience and its Content' with Michelle Montague (Part I - The Given)
Michelle Montague is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. As well as publishing extensively in phenomenology and philosophy of mind, Michelle is also the author of Non-Propositional Intentionality, Cognitive Phenomenology, and our focus for this episode, her 2016 book, The Given: Experience and its Content. This episode is all about what some philosophers have ca... (@ThePanpsycast, 41 minutes, 2019-Aug-04)
302.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #4: "Chernobyl" and the Art of Suffering
Mark, Erica, and Brian consider the HBO mini-series, plus "based on a true story" and why do we enjoy witnessing suffering? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode, and more episodes in advance, at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com. (@PartiallyExLife, 45 minutes, 2019-Jul-30)
303.podcast imageRemembering Agnes Heller
Hungarian philosopher Agnes Heller was a Holocaust survivor, a dissident under Hungary’s communist regime, and one of the great modern political thinkers. She was also a wonderfully engaging speaker, and this week we hear her in conversation from 2013, as well as the reflections of a close friend and colleague. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Aug-04)
304.podcast imageE34: More Vice Than Virtue – Nelson Goodman’s Fake News
Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose… Been a bit, but the Dawdlers are back. And, yes, things change but we’re still the same ol’ Dawdlers. Yer welcome. This week enjoy our exploration of some mind bending philosophical musings from philosopher Nelson Goodman. Ryan thinks a scientific orientation can help. Harland thinks philosophy can find more problems for him. Nelson thinks these are ju... (@dawdlerspodcast, 101 minutes, 2019-Aug-04)
305.podcast imageEV - 101 Social Progress in the Void with Bo Winegard pt.1
My guest this week is Bo Winegard, Assistant Professor at Marietta College, cohost of the psyphilopod podcast, and frequent contributor to Quillette. We've engaged in several disagreements on twitter and thought it could be valuable to debate some of these issues on the show. We focused our debate on the question "should society attempt to promote social progress by changing human nature". The arg... (@ETVPod, 66 minutes, 2019-Aug-01)
306.podcast image57 | Astra Taylor on the Promise and Challenge of Democracy
“Democracy may not exist, but we’ll miss it when it’s gone” — or so suggests the title of Astra Taylor’s new book. We all know how democracy falls short, in practice, of its lofty ideals; but we can also appreciate how democratic values are crucial in the fight for a more just society. In this conversation, we dig into the nature of democracy, from its origins to the present day. We talk about who... (@seanmcarroll, 84 minutes, 2019-Jul-29)
307.podcast imageEpisode 169: A Bug's Life (Kafka's "The Metamorphosis")
David and Tamler try to control their emotions (with varying success) as they go deep into Franz Kafka's masterful novella "The Metamorphosis." What kind of a story is this? A Marxist or religious allegory? A work of weird fiction? A family drama? A dark comedy? Why does a story about a man who turns into a giant insect get under our skins so much? Plus a study that links insomnia to our fear ... (@verybadwizards, 110 minutes, 2019-Jul-30)
308.podcast imageA Meaning of Life
A journey into meaning. Thanks for listening, hit that subscribe button and leave a review! Bonus Feed (My thought process and support with duh monies): https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast: https://thephilosophyguy.fireside.fm/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-philosophy-guy-store Amazon Banner: htt... (@philosophyguy2, 18 minutes, 2019-Jul-31)
309.podcast imageEp. 222: Debating Functionalism (Block, Chalmers) (Part One)
On Ned Block's "Troubles with Functionalism" (1978) and David Chalmers's "Absent Qualia, Fading Qualia, Dancing Qualia" (1995). If mental states are functional states, there couldn't be zombies. Yet Block claims that there could be zombies: for example, a functional duplicate of you whose components are actually citizens of China obeying algorithmic rules. Even if the resulting system acts like yo... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Jul-29)
310.podcast imageDIVERSIFYING THE CANNON With Elizabeth Anderson
DIVERSIFYING THE CANNON With Elizabeth Anderson by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod, 54 minutes, 2019-Aug-01)
311.podcast image484: Is Postmodernism Really to Blame for Post-Truth?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/postmodernism-really-blame. Postmodernism is often characterized by its rejection of concepts championed by the Enlightenment, like meaning, truth, reason, and knowledge. Some philosophers blame postmodernism for making cynicism about truth and facts now respectable in political debate. So is postmodernism responsible for “fake news” and “alternati... (@philtalkradio, 9 minutes, 2019-Jul-15)
312.podcast imageResponsibility and effort
What is the link between responsibility and effort? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Jul-21)
313.podcast imageShould children be given the vote?
Cambridge historian and host of the Talking Politics podcast, David Runciman, has put forward a radical proposal to extend the vote to children as young as six. Waleed Aly and Scott Stephens discuss whether this is just what is needed to recover a healthy democratic culture. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Jul-31)
314.podcast image0G67: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Grief
I'm getting a very Groundhog day "already written these show notes" vibe. I guess they didn't go well last time or something, so hopefully this time around will be better. We're joined by an amazing guest, the award eligible Tom from Cog Dis, to discuss Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, a movie we all really enjoyed and had largely forgotten. There's a lot to cover so we space it over two epi... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Jul-31)
315.podcast imageThe End Of All Things | John Dupré, Subir Sarkar, Nancy Cartwright
We tend to think of physical, material things as the ultimate stuff of the universe. Yet contemporary physics has largely abandoned physical things in favour of energy and fields. And the late Mary Midgley argued that materialism was a profound mistake. Should we give up on our conviction that physical stuff is the bedrock of the world, or is such talk ivory tower nonsense? John Dupré, Subir Sar... (@IAI_TV, 46 minutes, 2019-Jul-16)
316.podcast imageHoP 328 - Old News - Introduction to the Italian Renaissance
A first look at the themes and figures of philosophy in the Italian Renaissance. (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
317.podcast imageWhat is Philosophy?
Getting back to some basics. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Main Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Podcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE96WnY7pzGmbIJ42SCJEQ Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/t... (@philosophyguy2, 5 minutes, 2019-Jul-26)
318.podcast imageEpisode 63, 'Pantheism and Panentheism' with Andrei Buckareff (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Andrei Buckareff is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Co-Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, and Associate Editor of the journal Science, Religion, and Culture. Andrei’s work focuses on a range of fascinating topics, from metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and the philosophy of action, to philosophy of religion, the afterlife, panth... (@ThePanpsycast, 45 minutes, 2019-Jul-28)
319.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #3: CONFORM w/ Yakov Smirnoff
Is media trying to brainwash us into being ALL THE SAME? Are the excesses of the mob scaring us into conformity? Mark, Erica, and Brian muse on cultural homogenization and are joined by comedian Dr. Yakov Smirnoff to talk about growing up in a repressive society and the shadow of political correctness over comedy. For more about this podcast, see prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this epis... (@PartiallyExLife, 74 minutes, 2019-Jul-23)
320.podcast imageRock star philosopher, and rocks
Early 20th century French thinker Henri Bergson was a celebrity. Today he’s a more obscure figure, but we're asking if his ideas should be restored to the intellectual map of the 20th century. Also: a philosopher-geologist on rocks, science and climate change. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jul-28)
321.podcast image56 | Kate Adamala on Creating Synthetic Life
Scientists can’t quite agree on how to define “life,” but that hasn’t stopped them from studying it, looking for it elsewhere, or even trying to create it. Kate Adamala is one of a number of scientists engaged in the ambitious project of trying to create living cells, or something approximating them, starting from entirely non-living ingredients. Impressive progress has already been made. Designin... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Jul-22)
322.podcast imageEV - 100 Getting Leitered in the Void with Nathan Oseroff-Spicer
We made it! We achieved a major arbitrary numeric goal! So glad to be celebrating with my guest this week, fellow philosophy twitter fiend Nathan Oseroff- Spicer, who joins me to discuss the darker sides of philosophy twitter before succumbing to our realism lightening round. Definitely follow him if you're not already: @nathanoseroffInvocation: The Power by Naomi AldermanIf you enjoy the show and... (@ETVPod, 56 minutes, 2019-Jul-25)
323.podcast imageEp. 221: Functionalist Theories of Mind (Putnam, Armstrong) (Part Two)
Continuing on functionalism with David M. Armstrong’s "The Causal Theory of the Mind" (1981). Your four hosts start afresh the day after Part One on Putnam to discuss this version of functionalism that is supposed to clear the way for the scientific identification of mental states with brain states. Mental states are defined by their causal relations with other states and with behavior, and the c... (@PartiallyExLife, 72 minutes, 2019-Jul-22)
324.podcast imageWhy the Trolley Problem is a Brilliant Question
A response to StoryBrain's video claiming the Trolley problem is a bad question. I discuss why the trolley problem is a brilliant exercise of thinking.... Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Main Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephi... (@philosophyguy2, 18 minutes, 2019-Jul-22)
325.podcast imageCan we overcome terminal disagreement in our politics and morality?
If the recent glut of "democracy in crisis" books is anything to go by, there is a sense that something has gone wrong in our common life. Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt has diagnosed the increasing 'tribalism' in and of our civic and political life particularly acutely, and he joins Waleed and Scott to discuss whether and how we might break free from its Manichean absolutism. (@Ariscottle_, 43 minutes, 2019-Jul-24)
326.podcast imageArendt on the Banality of Evil
Finally! 2 years later, we deliver on the promise to record another Arendt episode. Gabe, Kevin, Zach, and Yohana discuss the concept of the banality of evil, the subject of Hannah Arendt’s 1963 book Eichmann in Jerusalem. They start with some background information on Arendt and Eichmann and then explore some implications and possible interpretations of the banality of evil. - Does ev... (@thevimblog, 65 minutes, 2019-Jul-21)
327.podcast imageThe Fascination With Evil | Terry Eagleton, Susan Neiman, Stephen de Wijze
We may condemn tyrants and abhor serial killers, but we are obsessed with evil and violence. Our news and our entertainment focus on such material - one survey claimed the average American child has seen 8,000 fictional murders by adulthood. Yet none in real life. Are we fascinated by evil, violent characters because they make life more exciting? Or because they express our real nature? Should we ... (@IAI_TV, 36 minutes, 2019-Jul-09)
328.podcast image0G66: Striking Vipers and Multifaceted Virtual Identities
Sooooo, we introduced someone new into the podcast this week and things got...weird...We're joined by Heath of the PiaT crowd to discuss episode one of Black Mirror's new season. The BM episode is called Striking Vipers, but it really should have been called Mauling Bears. Lotta ursine erotica is what I'm saying. We also squeeze in a little bit of philosophy on the multifaceted nature of identity ... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Jul-24)
329.podcast imageHAP 31 - Justin Smith on Amo and Race in Early Modern Philosophy
Justin E.H. Smith joins us to discuss Anton Wilhelm Amo against the background of ideas about race in early modern philosophy, including Leibniz. (@HistPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-Jun-23)
330.podcast imageRationally Speaking #236 - Alex Tabarrok on "Why are the Prices So D*mn High?"
In this episode, economist Alex Tabarrok discusses his latest book, co-authored with Eric Heller, "Why are the Prices So D*mn High?," which blames rising costs on a phenomenon called the Baumol Effect. (@Rspodcast, 52 minutes, 2019-Jul-23)
331.podcast imageMolyneux’s Problem
Marjolein Degenaar/ Barry Ginley/ Brian Glenney Listen to the recording here or on YouTube William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Jul-05)
332.podcast imageEpisode 63, 'Pantheism and Panentheism' with Andrei Buckareff (Part I - The Divine Mind)
Andrei Buckareff is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Co-Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, and Associate Editor of the journal Science, Religion, and Culture. Andrei’s work focuses on a range of fascinating topics, from metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and the philosophy of action, to philosophy of religion, the afterlife, panth... (@ThePanpsycast, 52 minutes, 2019-Jul-21)
333.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #2: Binge Watching
What counts as binge watching? Why do we do it? Is it bad for us? Mark, Erica, and Brian think about what we get out of binge watching, whether it’s bad for us, what kind of shows taste better in bulk than others, and much more. For more about this podcast, see prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode, and more episodes in advance, at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is curate... (@PartiallyExLife, 54 minutes, 2019-Jul-16)
334.podcast imageWomen and the Dhamma
Buddhist teaching is radically egalitarian, and yet the need for a Buddhist feminism is pressing. Is gender irrelevant to Buddhist teaching? And for women who have been denied agency or a sense of identity, how reasonable is the doctrine of non-self? (@RadioNational, 29 minutes, 2019-Jul-21)
335.podcast image#62 - Häggström on AI Motivations and Risk Denialism
In this episode I talk to Olle Häggström. Olle is a professor of mathematical statistics at Chalmers University of Technology and a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA) and of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA). Olle’s main research is in probability theory and statistical mechanics, but in recent years he has broadened his research interests to focus applied ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Jul-03)
336.podcast image55 | A Conversation with Rob Reid on Quantum Mechanics and Many Worlds
As you may have heard, I have a new book coming out in September, Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime. To celebrate, we're going to have more than the usual number of podcasts about quantum mechanics over the next couple of months. Today is an experimental flipped podcast, in which I'm being interviewed by Rob Reid. Rob is the host of the After On podcast, of whi... (@seanmcarroll, 86 minutes, 2019-Jul-15)
337.podcast imageCORPORATE GOVERNMENT With Elizabeth Anderson
Is corporate power of form of government? How does it affect our lives and freedom? Professor Elizabeth Anderson joins the podcast discuss. (@PolPhilPod, 48 minutes, 2019-Jul-19)
338.podcast imageEV - 99 Dying in the Void with Dave Warnock
Death is a reoccurring topic on this show, but this week still feels a little different. I'm joined by Dave Warnock, who is currently engaged in a project called Dying Out Loud. Dave is living with a terminal diagnosis, and he's spending some of his remaining time generously communicating with others about the process of dying. Usually the title of this show is content warning enough, but in this ... (@ETVPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Jul-18)
339.podcast imageEpisode 168: The Big Lebowski vs Pulp Fiction (Pt. 2)
It's Part 2 of the Lebowski vs. Pulp Fiction showdown. This time we focus on the Dude, Walter, Donny, and most importantly Jesus Quintana. (Nobody fucks with the Jesus). What's the ethos of this stoner masterpiece? Is it a nihilstic movie? A deconstruction of masculinity? A cannabis infused Daoist parable? And is it fair to compare these two classics from the 90s? Fair? Who's the fucking nihilist ... (@verybadwizards, 93 minutes, 2019-Jul-16)
340.podcast imageEp. 221: Functionalist Theories of Mind (Putnam, Armstrong) (Part One)
On Hilary Putnam's "The Nature of Mental States" (1973). What is the mind? Functionalist theories identify the mental with not with the brain exactly, but with something the brain does. So some other creature without a brain (maybe a computer) might be able to do that same thing if it could duplicate the structure of what our brains do. Is this a satisfying account of the mind? Don't wait for part... (@PartiallyExLife, 54 minutes, 2019-Jul-15)
341.podcast imageStoicism: Escaping Mental Enslavement
So today’s episode we will dive back into some Stoicism and connecting it with the mental thinking blocks we face. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Podcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE9_6WnY7pzGmbIJ42SCJEQ Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Main Youtube: https://w... (@philosophyguy2, 13 minutes, 2019-Jul-16)
342.podcast image422: Reparations
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/reparations. The United States brutally enslaved African Americans for its first hundred or so years of existence. For the next hundred years, black Americans were lynched, deprived of basic rights, and widely discriminated against. Now, while there are still certainly racial injustices to deal with, how are we to respond to the racial injustices o... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
343.podcast imageResponsibility and Addiction
Are addicts responsible for harming their health? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Jul-07)
344.podcast imageHoP 327 - Michele Trizio on Byzantine and Latin Medieval Philosophy
The series on Byzantium concludes as Michele Trizio discusses the mutual influence of Byzantium and Latin Christendom. (@HistPhilosophy, 24 minutes, 2019-Jun-16)
345.podcast imageThe Right Way to Think | Paul Boghossian, Mary Jane Rubenstein, Alister McGrath
Reason was traditionally seen as the Enlightenment’s great legacy and the origin of our success. Yet reason is increasingly derided as just the rhetorical bluster of the educated elite, typically powerful and male. Is rationality just the prejudiced claim of those who are sure they are right? Were we mistaken to think that reason drives progress? Or is it an unassailable and essential tool for soc... (@IAI_TV, 39 minutes, 2019-Jul-02)
346.podcast imageCan Hong Kong’s democratic protests succeed?
Was the extradition bill the 'last straw' around which a torrent of popular discontent in Hong Kong has gathered? Political scientist Ngok Ma discusses whether these protests are aimed at a complete redrawing of the city's relationship to greater China. (@Ariscottle_, 40 minutes, 2019-Jul-17)
347.podcast image0G65: The Evitable Conflict and The Zeroth Law
I built a superintelligent robot to write these show notes, and it just kept repeating the word "meta" over and over and over again. Not sure if it's a feature or a bug. While we sort it out, enjoy our episode on Asimov's The Evitable conflict, where he first describes The Zeroth Law of robotics. We explain the law, the problems it faces, and how they connect to issues like virtue theory and quest... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Jul-17)
348.podcast imageSPACE & POLITICS With Ryan D Enos
Social geography. Space. Politics. Immigration. Race. Segregation. Racism. Trump. 2020. Ideology. Integration. (@PolPhilPod, 83 minutes, 2019-Jul-14)
349.podcast imageSusanna Schellenberg, "The Unity of Perception: Content, Consciousness, and Evidence" (Oxford UP, 2018)
How does perception result in thoughts about items in the world (such as dogs or flowers) and in conscious states of many kinds (such as experiences of seeing red)? How does perception provide evidence for our beliefs (such as the belief that there is a red rose in front of you)? In The Unity of Perception: Content, Consciousness, and Evidence (Oxford University Press, 2018), Susanna Schellenber... (@NewBooksPhil, 68 minutes, 2019-Jul-10)
350.podcast imageThe world in a different light: Iris Murdoch’s philosophical vision
In a century that produced a dizzying array of philosophers and philosophical approaches, few philosophers were as distinctive, and stood out quite so conspicuously, as Iris Murdoch (1919-1999). (@Ariscottle_, 30 minutes, 2019-Jul-15)
351.podcast imageEpisode 1: Jonathan Webber – projects and choices
It's the first episode! And that means all the work that's been building for over year gets unleashed RIGHT HERE and it's pretty exciting and terrifying at the same time. So where better to start than with a conversation with a lovely friendly philosopher, discussing his fascination with soul-searching French philosophy? Jonathan Webber is a professor of philosophy at the University of Cardiff. ... (@DrJoeMorrison, 38 minutes, 2019-Jul-12)
352.podcast imageEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part V. Further Analysis and Discussion)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast, 58 minutes, 2019-Jul-14)
353.podcast imagePretty Much Pop #1: Pop Culture vs. High Culture
What is pop culture? Does it make sense to distinguish it from high culture, or can something be both? Welcome to this new pop culture podcast hosted by Mark Linsenmayer, Erica Spyres, and Brian Hirt. This episode also features Tyler Hislop, our editor. For more, see prettymuchpop.com. Get involved from the start at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. We'll solicit your input for our episodes, release them... (@PartiallyExLife, 44 minutes, 2019-Jul-09)
354.podcast image54 | Indre Viskontas on Music and the Brain
It doesn’t mean much to say music affects your brain — everything that happens to you affects your brain. But music affects your brain in certain specific ways, from changing our mood to helping us learn. As both a neuroscientist and an opera singer, Indre Viskontas is the ideal person to talk about the relationship between music and the brain. Her new book, How Music Can Make You Better, digs int... (@seanmcarroll, 75 minutes, 2019-Jul-08)
355.podcast imageThe world in a different light: Iris Murdoch’s philosophical vision
In a century that produced a dizzying array of philosophers and philosophical approaches, few philosophers were as distinctive, and stood out quite so conspicuously, as Iris Murdoch (1919-1999). (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jul-14)
356.podcast image482: J.S. Mill and the Good Life
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/mill-and-good-life. John Stuart Mill was one of the most important British philosophers of the 19th century. As a liberal, he thought that individuals are generally the best judges of their own welfare. But Mill was also a utilitarian who thought that there were objectively lower and higher pleasures and that the good life was one which maximized h... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2019-Jun-24)
357.podcast imageEV - 98 The Shunyata of the Void with SomeStingray
We love talking emptiness of the self here in the void, and so I got the perfect not self to join me and discuss lots of fun topics in the world of Indian Philosophy. @SomeStingray is a must follow on philosophy twitter and we have a great time here, especially during the real/not real lightening round. Philosophy twitter will want to take careful notes in that section so you can troll the fish la... (@ETVPod, 61 minutes, 2019-Jul-11)
358.podcast imagePublic Leaders: The Power Structure of Echo Chambers
Bringing in Michel Foucault's idea of power to examine how talking heads and rising talking heads fall into being on top of these echo chambers. Looking at how their knowledge leads to power and then blocks them off to alternative knowledge! Tune in! Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Podcast Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE9_6WnY7pzGmbIJ42SCJEQ Thanks for listening, please sub... (@philosophyguy2, 20 minutes, 2019-Jul-10)
359.podcast imagePOSITIVE AND NEGATIVE FREEDOM
POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE FREEDOM by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod, 73 minutes, 2019-Jul-10)
360.podcast imageHAP 30 - Dualist Personality - Anton Wilhelm Amo
Anton Wilhelm Amo, brought to Germany from his native Ghana, defends a rigorous dualism of mind and body. Was this philosophy connected to his African origins? (@HistPhilosophy, 27 minutes, 2019-Jun-09)
361.podcast imageThe Free Speech Episode
Dylan, Gabe, Lisa, and Kevin unite to discuss free speech, deplatforming, and rights. What should we make of conservative complaints that their free speech is being trampled on by protestors? Is deplatforming a harm? Do social media companies have an obligation to respect a freedom of speech? It is a tricky tangle of issues. This episode focuses on an article by Gabe called, “Sadly, There Can... (@thevimblog, 56 minutes, 2019-Jul-08)
362.podcast imageThe Prejudice of Philosophy | Chakravarthi Ram Prasad, Nivi Manchanda, Timothy Williamson
Many see the search for universal truths about the world as the noble aim of philosophy. Yet our universities largely dismiss non-Western philosophy, and critics argue that British students are taught a narrow analytic approach. Are great ideas independent of time, place and tradition? Do African conceptions of the self or Chinese Mohist logic offer equally valid insights? Do we need to wake up to... (@IAI_TV, 40 minutes, 2019-Jun-25)
363.podcast imageEp. 220: 10-Year Retrospective of The Partially Examined Life
Mark, Seth, Dylan, and Wes reflect on the changing state of podcasting and public philosophy over the last decade, how our goals and interests have changed since we started we started. Why don't colleges pay their faculty to educate the public through regular, broadcasted conversations like ours? If you think we're snarky, take a look at actual philosophy faculty! Should we continue to do more lit... (@PartiallyExLife, 73 minutes, 2019-Jul-05)
364.podcast imageOut of the Vat #2 – Richard Ashcroft
Richard Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics and Deputy Head of the Department of Law at Queen Mary University of London. In this episode, Richard discusses his recent work on utopias, his love of... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natural ... (@LSEPhilosophy, 32 minutes, 2019-Jun-25)
365.podcast image3/6/2019: Kathleen Stock asks What is Sexual Orientation?
Kathleen Stock is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sussex. She works in philosophy of imagination and fiction, and has a growing interest in issues of gender, sex, and sexual orientation. She has also published on the nature of sexual and other kinds of objectification. Her most recent major publication is Only Imagine: Fiction, Interpretation and Imagination (Oxford 2017). This... (@Aristotweets, 49 minutes, 2019-Jun-07)
366.podcast imageVoice, Treaty, Truth: What would it mean to truly listen to the First Nations' call for justice?
The invitation of the Uluru Statement from the Heart is to set off on a journey of mutual attentiveness, of truth-telling and peace-making, without a clear sense of the shared destination. Marcia Langton joins us to discuss whether Australia’s political settlement accommodate such a strenuous moral task. (@Ariscottle_, 47 minutes, 2019-Jul-10)
367.podcast image0G64: I Am Mother and Care Ethics
And now another installment in the deeply caring relationship that is our show. Can caring be shared through podwaves? I like to think so. Feel the care just flow out over you. Try not to think about how this relationship also feels like creepy paternalistic programming. This is all totally normal. This week we're covering I Am Mother, a new piece of sci fi horror by Netflix. There's a lot of good... (@0gPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2019-Jul-10)
368.podcast image#61 - Yampolskiy on Machine Consciousness and AI Welfare
In this episode I talk to Roman Yampolskiy. Roman is a Tenured Associate Professor in the department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science at the Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville. He is the founding and current director of the Cyber Security Lab and an author of many books and papers on AI security and ethics, including Artificial Superintelligence: a Futuristic Approac... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Jun-20)
369.podcast imageEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part IV. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast, 38 minutes, 2019-Jul-07)
370.podcast imageEpisode 167: The Big Lebowski vs Pulp Fiction (Pt. 1)
There are only two kinds of people in the world, Pulp Fiction people and Big Lebowski people. Now Pulp Fiction people can like Big Lebowski and vice versa, but nobody likes them both equally. Somewhere you have to make a choice. And that choice tells you who you are. In the first episode of this two-parter, David and Tamler make that choice – and then go deep into the themes, performances, and p... (@verybadwizards, 68 minutes, 2019-Jul-03)
371.podcast image421: The Value of a College Education
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/value-college-education. With 43.3 million Americans burdened with a total of $1.3 trillion in student loan debt, high school students thinking about attending college are faced with a daunting decision. Should they risk joining the ranks of the indebted in order to get a college degree? The answer depends on the value of a college education. Are c... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jun-17)
372.podcast image53 | Solo -- On Morality and Rationality
What does it mean to be a good person? To act ethically and morally in the world? In the old days we might appeal to the instructions we get from God, but a modern naturalist has to look elsewhere. Today I do a rare solo podcast, where I talk both about my personal views on morality, a variety of “constructivism” according to which human beings construct their ethical stances starting from basic i... (@seanmcarroll, 125 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
373.podcast imageThinking the country
What constitutes a "philosophical" conversation? You might reasonably expect such a conversation to be conceptual, exploring abstract notions of self, time, being, ethics and so on. For indigenous Australian philosophers, the conversation gets real very fast. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jul-07)
374.podcast imageEV - 97 Dominating the Void with Toby Buckle
This week I'm joined by Toby Buckle of the Political philosophy podcast to discuss a particularly depressing theory of politics from his Machiavelli series centered around the desires to dominate/humiliate and the desires to avoid domination/humiliation. It feels very relevant to our current voidy moment.Invocation: Void Goddess Marianne Williamson's actual tweets.Political Philosophy Podcast: htt... (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Jul-04)
375.podcast imageEp. 219: The Harder Problem of Consciousness (Block & Papineau)
On Ned Block's "The Harder Problem of Consciousness" (2002) and David Papineau's "Could There Be a Science of Consciousness?" (2003). What would give us sufficient reason to believe that a non-human was conscious? Block thinks this is a harder problem that we might suspect. We can't know for sure exactly what consciousness in us is, so we can't know for sure what such a being might require (a brai... (@PartiallyExLife, 85 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
376.podcast imageChristian List, "Why Free Will is Real" (Harvard UP, 2019)
Given our modern scientific view of the world, how is freedom of the will possible? That is the classical problem of free will. Strategies for addressing this problem include the flat denial of free will, as well as various attempts to render free will consistent with a physically deterministic world. Among these latter, there’s a tendency to redefine free will in a way that dissolves the appar... (@NewBooksPhil, 66 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
377.podcast imageShorts - E21: Personal Accountability
“To remain the same in function, animals must change their form.” - Stephen Jay Gould, 1979 Gould wrote the quote above a couple times in different articles. Ryan likes it because he thinks it can apply to systems in general. Thus, to remain the same in function, systems should change their structure provided there are changes in their throughput. In organisms this happens with changes in scal... (@dawdlerspodcast, 30 minutes, 2019-Jul-07)
378.podcast imageVideo Games: Becoming Human
How do video games help us become more human? Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-philosophy-guy-store Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendenw... (@philosophyguy2, 18 minutes, 2019-Jul-03)
379.podcast imagePaternalism and public health challenges to patient autonomy
Should patient autonomy always be respected? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Jun-24)
380.podcast imagePhilip Pettit on the Birth of Ethics
Where did ethics come from? Philip Pettit tells an 'as if' story about the birth of ethics that is designed to illuminate what ethics is and why it evolved on this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from Patreon donors for this episode. (@philosophybites, 21 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
381.podcast imageChristian Miller on the Character Gap
Christian Miller believes that there is a character gap, a gap between what we think we are like morally and how we actually behave. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he explores the psychology of moral behaviour, and how we can become better people. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation. (@philosophybites, 21 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
382.podcast imageHoP 326 - Istanbul (Not Constantinople) - the Later Orthodox Tradition
When the Byzantine empire ended in 1453, philosophy in Greek did not end with it. In this episode we bring the story up to the 20th century. (@HistPhilosophy, 26 minutes, 2019-Jun-02)
383.podcast imageEpisode 67 - Thomas Pradeu
On Episode 67, Nick chats with Dr. Thomas Pradeu, CNRS Senior investigator (DR2), and Head of the group “Conceptual and theoretical analysis of immune activation and biological boundaries at the University of Bordeaux, about Philosophy in biology—an innovative way to combine the contributions of philosophy of biology, experimental biology, and medical biology—and how this approach enriches the con... (@SciPhiPod, 2019-Jul-01)
384.podcast imageThe Illusion of Now | Julian Barbour, Tim Maudlin, Emily Thomas
Past and future are worlds we can never inhabit. We live of necessity in the present. But physicists and philosophers with very different outlooks, from Einstein to Derrida, claim that the present is an illusion. Is time not a river at all, but instead a static dimension? Are we deluded by experience into imagining the present is real? Or are Einstein's spacetime universe, and Derrida's attack on ... (@IAI_TV, 42 minutes, 2019-Jun-18)
385.podcast imageHow do you solve a problem like Israel Folau?
Is the controversy surrounding Israel Folau just one more example of the tension between incommensurable rights claims: freedom of expression; freedom of religion; freedom from discrimination on the basis of religion or sexuality? Or has Folau simply exposed the limits of political project of liberal tolerance? Constitutional legal theorist and philosopher Patrick Emerton joins Waleed and Scott to... (@Ariscottle_, 43 minutes, 2019-Jul-03)
386.podcast image0G63: Fury Road and Ecofeminism
Witness our attempt to gain entry into a post gendered Valhalla! Led by the feminist valkyrie Jamie M. Lombardi (@euthyphro), Professor of philosophy at Bergen Community College, we EXPLODE the feminist symbolism and environmental messaging of Mad Max: Fury Road! ::fire guitar solo:: Seriously, this episode has everything. Top 10 action movie, progressive messaging, a guest who steals the show, an... (@0gPhilosophy, 42 minutes, 2019-Jul-03)
387.podcast imageTHE SURVIVAL OF EUROPEAN LIBERALISM With Ian Dunt
Brexit. Liberalism. J S Mill. Free speech. Living truths. Liberal democracy. Europe. Tony Blair. Journalism. Consent of the governed. Far right parties. Anti-liberalism. The future of Europe. (@PolPhilPod, 72 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
388.podcast image28/5/2019: Thomas Sattig on the Flow of Time in Experience
Thomas Sattig is Professor of Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Tübingen. He completed his D.Phil. at Oxford University, where he was also a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow and a Junior Research Fellow. Subsequently, he held positions as Assistant Professor at Tulane University and at Washington University in St. Louis. Sattig works primarily in metaphysics. He focuses on issues conc... (@Aristotweets, 43 minutes, 2019-May-28)
389.podcast imageEpisode 115: Katherine Ritchie discusses social groups
In this episode, Katherine Ritchie (CUNY Graduate Center, City College) lays out what it means to belong to a social group, and what kind of thing a social group is. (@ElucidationsPod, 40 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
390.podcast image481: The Limits of Tolerance
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/limits-tolerance. In order to reach compromise, people try to be tolerant of others with different beliefs. Despite its value, there are numerous factors that may hinder our exercise of tolerance. As the schisms between our beliefs grow larger, what happens when our moral and political ideals put us deeply at odds with your fellow citizens? Do we b... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jun-10)
391.podcast imageEpisode #133 ... Carl Schmitt on Liberalism pt. 2
Today we continue our discussion of the work of Carl Schmitt. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 22 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
392.podcast imageEpisode #132 ... Carl Schmitt on Liberalism pt. 1
Today we begin our discussion on the work of Carl Schmitt. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 24 minutes, 2019-Jul-01)
393.podcast imageEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part III. Modern Stoicism)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast, 51 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
394.podcast imagePhilosophy and Death
In today’s episode, we will dive into the relationship between philosophy and death have. And maybe see how philosophy really comes about from our fear of death. Also, a tangent on religions relation to death. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Yout... (@philosophyguy2, 15 minutes, 2019-Jun-27)
395.podcast image52 | Frank Lantz on the Logic and Emotion of Games
Games play an important, and arguably increasing, role in human life. We play games on our computers and our phones, watch other people compete in games, and occasionally break out the cards or the Monopoly set. What is the origin of this human impulse, and what makes for a great game? Frank Lantz is both a working game designer and an academic who thinks about the nature of games and gaming. We d... (@seanmcarroll, 65 minutes, 2019-Jun-24)
396.podcast imageEp. 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part Two)
Continuing on "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003). We finish Chalmers's account of the types of physicialism, then move on to dualism (including epiphenomenalism), and finally dally with panpsychism, the specialty of our guest, Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast. Listen to part 1 first or listen to the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "G... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Jun-24)
397.podcast imageWitnessing and translating
What happens when we take philosophy into the field? This week we’re talking archaeology, with focus on feminism, tensions between indigenous and Western scientific knowledge, and the principles of reconciliation. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
398.podcast imageEV - 96 Giving the Void an Argument with Ben Burgis
This week I'm joined by the verbose socialist Ben Burgis to discuss his book Give them an Argument: Logic for the Left. We talk best practices, the limits of discourse, and why we wish it were true that leftist teachers were actually rising up and seizing the means of education.Give the Right an Argument: https://www.amazon.com/Give-Them-Argument-Logic-Left-ebook/dp/B07RD8MZ4L/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2K0B... (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Jun-27)
399.podcast imageShorts - E20: The Monty Hall Problem
In this Short the Dawdlers play a game. Everyone loses. The end. (@dawdlerspodcast, 29 minutes, 2019-Jun-30)
400.podcast imageHAP 29 - Out of Africa - Slavery and the Diaspora
An introduction to Africana philosophical thought as it emerged from the modern experience of slavery and colonization by Europeans. (@HistPhilosophy, 28 minutes, 2019-May-26)
401.podcast imageYOLO Apologetics
Drake coined “YOLO,” short for “you only live once” in 2011, and then later apologized for all the douchiness it subsequently engendered. But the spirit is ancient, and cross-cultural, speaking deeply to the kind of decision-making that is supposed to make for the good life. It seems to be saying that risk and spontaneity should be valued above prudence and planning. Is that true? This week we ... (@HiPhiNation, 44 minutes, 2019-Jun-22)
402.podcast imageBlinded by Ideology
So today, we will get slightly political. Not biased political but more so an observation. Let me know what you think! Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.co... (@philosophyguy2, 19 minutes, 2019-Jun-25)
403.podcast imageFreedom of Political Communication, Propaganda and the Role of Epistemic Institutions in Cyberspace
Professor Seumas Miller defines fake news, hate speech and propaganda, discusses the relationship between social media and political propaganda. In this article I provide definitions of fake news, hate speech and propaganda, respectively. These phenomenon are corruptive of the epistemic (i.e. knowledge-aiming) norms, e.g. to tell the truth. I also elaborate the right to freedom of communication an... (@ethicsinthenews, 53 minutes, 2019-Jun-20)
404.podcast imageIs Oppression The Key To Creativity? | Lowkey, Joanna Kavenna, Andrew Motion
Freedom is often seen as the vital oxygen of creativity. Yet Shakespeare worked within a framework of censorship, Don Quixote was written from prison and Leonardo argued that at 'lives on constraint and dies of freedom'. Can oppression help produce masterpieces or do the free always write the greatest poetry? Do we need rules and constraints to fuel our creativity or should ever greater freedom be... (@IAI_TV, 38 minutes, 2019-Jun-11)
405.podcast imageOne Minute in Haditha: Neuroscience, Emotion and Military Ethics
In this special lecture, Professor Mitt Regan discusses the latest research in moral perception and judgment, and the potential implications of this research for ethics education in general and military ethics training in particular. In November 2005, an improvised explosive device destroyed a vehicle in a US Marine Corps convoy, killing one man and seriously injuring another. Less than a minute ... (@ethicsinthenews, 43 minutes, 2019-Jun-19)
406.podcast imageHarry Frankfurt's Bullshit
Is Trump a liar? Or is it more accurate to call him a 'bullshitter'? On occasion, people will talk about bullshit as a political phenomenon. And when they do, they will reference a philosopher called Harry Frankfurt. Frankfurt wrote the essay "On Bullshit" in 1986, but it is back in vogue. In this episode, Kevin, Gabe, Dylan, and Zach talk about the essay—what it is about, what it gets wrong... (@thevimblog, 79 minutes, 2019-Jun-23)
407.podcast imageIs democracy an impediment to addressing climate change?
Given democracy’s tendency to prioritise the short-term and appeal to voter self-interest, and given its inherent anthropocentrism, does our ecological crisis warrant bypassing democratic procedures. Political philosopher David Schlosberg argues we need more, not less, democracy. (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2019-Jun-26)
408.podcast imageCamisha Russell, "The Assisted Reproduction of Race" (Indiana UP, 2018)
Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) such as in vitro fertilization and surrogacy have been critically examined within philosophy, particularly by feminists and bioethicists, but the role of race—both in how the technologies are used and in the effects that they are having—has received less attention. In The Assisted Reproduction of Race (Indiana University Press, 2018), Camisha Russell unde... (@NewBooksPhil, 79 minutes, 2019-Jun-20)
409.podcast image0G62: One Punch Man and Process vs. Product
Ugh, woe is me. I used to find passion in the challenge of writing these show notes, but now that I've mastered the art of meta show notes-fu, there's no challenge left. I must seek out a show now with content so boring and straightforward that no amount of meta show notes will make it palatable. This is my hero's journey. Also, we're doing One Punch Man and discussing the tension between wanting ... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Jun-26)
410.podcast image41: Ethics Education with Thomas Wartenberg and Chris Robichaud
We often take for granted the active process of learning about ethics and morality, so today’s show focuses on the source of ethics education: the educators themselves. We hear from two superstar teachers: Chris Robichaud... The post 41: Ethics Education with Thomas Wartenberg and Chris Robichaud appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 20 minutes, 2019-Jun-26)
411.podcast imageARE IDEOLOGIES TRUE?
Is anyone really 'right' about political values, or does essentail​ contestability imply a strong relitavism​? (@PolPhilPod, 82 minutes, 2019-Jun-24)
412.podcast imageRationally Speaking #235 - Tage Rai on "Why people think their violence is morally justified"
We typically think of violence as being caused by a lack of control, or by selfish motives. But what if, more often than not, violence is intended to be morally righteous? Author Tage Rai debates this with Julia. (@Rspodcast, 60 minutes, 2019-Jun-25)
413.podcast image418: Matter and Energy: The Dark Side
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/matter-and-energy-dark-side. All the matter we have ever observed accounts for less than 5% of the universe. The rest? Dark energy and dark matter: mysterious entities that we only know about from their interactions with other matter. We infer their existence to satisfy our laws—but are we justified in making conclusions about what we cannot direct... (@philtalkradio, 51 minutes, 2019-Jun-03)
414.podcast image13/5/2019: Christian List on What’s Wrong with the Consequence Argument: A Compatibilist Libertarian Response
Christian List is Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at the London School of Economics and a Fellow of the British Academy. He works at the intersection of philosophy, economics, and political science, with a particular focus on individual and collective decision-making and the nature of intentional agency. Recently, a growing part of his work has addressed metaphysical questions, e.g.,... (@Aristotweets, 66 minutes, 2019-May-19)
415.podcast imageEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part II. The Discourses and The Enchiridion)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast, 65 minutes, 2019-Jun-23)
416.podcast imageHoP 325 - Platonic Love - Gemistos Plethon
Was Gemistos Plethon, the last great thinker of the Byzantine tradition, a secret pagan or just a Christian with an unusual enthusiasm for Platonism? (@HistPhilosophy, 23 minutes, 2019-May-19)
417.podcast image51 | Anthony Aguirre on Cosmology, Zen, Entropy, and Information
Cosmologists have a standard set of puzzles they think about: the nature of dark matter and dark energy, whether there was a period of inflation, the evolution of structure, and so on. But there are also even deeper questions, having to do with why there is a universe at all, and why the early universe had low entropy, that most working cosmologists don’t address. Today’s guest, Anthony Aguirre, i... (@seanmcarroll, 92 minutes, 2019-Jun-17)
418.podcast imageEating Responsibly
Should obese people be held responsible for being overweight? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Jun-10)
419.podcast imageEp. 218: The Hard Problem of Consciousness (Chalmers et al) (Part One)
On "Consciousness and Its Place in Nature" by David Chalmers (2003), with special guest Gregory Miller from the Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast. Can we explain human experience using the terms of brain physiology? Chalmers thinks not, and lays out the arguments against this and the range of positions philosophers have taken in response to these objections. Continues on part two, or get the full, ad... (@PartiallyExLife, 57 minutes, 2019-Jun-17)
420.podcast imageEpisode 166: Total Recall (Ted Chiang's "The Truth of Fact, the Truth of Feeling")
Memory is highly selective and often inaccurate. But what if we had an easily searchable video record of all our experiences and interactions? How would that affect our relationships? What would it reveal about our characters and our sense of who we are? Is there a kind of truth that can’t be determined by perfect objectivity? David and Tamler dive deep into Ted Chiang’s amazingly rich and poignan... (@verybadwizards, 109 minutes, 2019-Jun-18)
421.podcast imageEV - 095 The Void after Transition with Callie Wright
This week I'm joined by the wonderful Callie Wright (@calliegetsit), host of the Queersplaining podcast (@queersplaining), where she does in depth reporting on less visible stories within the LGBTQ community. We discuss going beyond the reoccurring narratives about LGBTQ lives, and how that plays out internally and in public forums like sports and politics.Invocation: The Power by Naomi AldermanEd... (@ETVPod, 60 minutes, 2019-Jun-20)
422.podcast imagePublic health and the open society
Karl Popper's idea of "the open society" promoted values of inclusivity, transparency and democratic freedom. Today, some fear that the open society is under threat, with negative consequences for a lot of things we've come to take for granted - including public health. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jun-23)
423.podcast imageE33: Massimo Pigliucci's Hard Problems - Multi-Level Selection & Cultural Evolution
Times change and the recent past can sometimes become obsolete as the gaze of the mainstream world focuses on its new moment. But it wasn’t long ago when Richard Dawkins was calling for “militant atheism” and Dubya Bush stood on an aircraft carrier in front of a banner that read “Mission Accomplished”. Heck, there was a time when the 90’s did a collective eye roll at the 80’s. Tigers once roamed I... (@dawdlerspodcast, 79 minutes, 2019-Jun-23)
424.podcast imageEpicureanism and the Problem of Premature Death (Audio Essay)
This audio essay looks at the Epicurean philosophy of death, focusing specifically on how they addressed the problem of premature death. The Epicureans believe that premature death is not a tragedy, provided it occurs after a person has attained the right state of pleasure. If you enjoy listening to these audio essays, and the other podcast episodes, you might consider rating and/or reviewing them... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Jun-02)
425.podcast imageEV - 094 Echoes in the Void with C. Thi Nguyen
This week I'm joined by C. Thi Nguyen (@add_hawk) to discuss echo chambers, how they're more dangerous than mere epistemic bubbles, and how gaming might help!Thi's article on Echo Chambers: https://aeon.co/essays/why-its-as-hard-to-escape-an-echo-chamber-as-it-is-to-flee-a-cultThi's website: https://objectionable.net/Invocation: Peter Chiykowski Shortstory.comPhilosophers in Space: https://0gphil... (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Jun-19)
426.podcast imageEpisode 66 - Caterina Marchionni
On Episode 66, Nick chats with Dr. Caterina Marchionni, University Lecturer in Practical Philosophy and member of TINT,  Centre for Philosophy of the Social Sciences, at the University of Helsinki, about her work in the philosophy and methodology of economics. (@SciPhiPod, 2019-Jun-18)
427.podcast imageDominic McIver Lopes (University of British Columbia) – Beyond the Pleasure Principle: Autonomy in Kant’s Aesthetics
(@aestheticsforum, 2019-Jun-20)
428.podcast imageHanne Appelqvist – Wittgenstein and Musical Formalism: A Case Revisited
(@aestheticsforum, 2019-Jun-20)
429.podcast imageThe Dark Side of the Universe | Erik Verlinde, Catherine Heymans, Sabine Hossenfelder
According to current theories, Dark Energy and Dark Matter make up 95% of all the stuff in the universe. Yet we still have no direct evidence for them, and have no idea what they consist. Is something radically wrong? Are the theories that led to the hypotheses of Dark Energy and Dark Matter mistaken? Might we need to rethink our account of the universe entirely? Or should we hold our nerve and be... (@IAI_TV, 40 minutes, 2019-Jun-04)
430.podcast imagePOSTMODERNISM, 2020, and Other Audience Questions
Machiavelli. Power. Stability. Postmodernism. Unions. Meritocracy. Prediction. Polling. Trump. 2020. (@PolPhilPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Jun-19)
431.podcast imageHelen Beebee on Possible Worlds
Philosophers often talk about possible worlds. Is this just a way of describing counterfactual situations? As Helen Beebee explains, some of them believe that possible worlds actually exist. This episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast is supported by the Marc Sanders Foundation and by Patreon donations. (@philosophybites, 17 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
432.podcast imageWhat if the greatest threat to a free media was from within?
Our lives are saturated with 'news'; but far from creating informed citizens, this is producing forgetful, inattentive citizens. Megan Le Masurier joins us to discuss whether "slow journalism" could help us remember what matters? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2019-Jun-19)
433.podcast image0G61: The Waldo Moment and Politics as Entertainment
After such a meta conversation like this about the intricate relationship of media and information, it's really hard to do a meta writeup without going double meta, so here we are. Some episodes we're very much on the same page, and in many places (partly cause of internet issues) we were not in this episode. And I think that's great! There's a lot of moving parts here and it's hard to slow them a... (@0gPhilosophy, 45 minutes, 2019-Jun-19)
434.podcast image417: John Dewey and the Ideal of Democracy
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/john-dewey. John Dewey is regarded by some as the American philosopher. In the first half of the 20th century, he stood as the most prominent public intellectual whose influence reached into intellectual movements in China, Japan, and India. Although we hear less of Dewey nowadays, his pragmatic political philosophy has influenced the likes of Rich... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-May-27)
435.podcast imageReplication Crisis?
Alexander Bird/ Laura Fortunato/ Marcus Munafò Listen here or on YouTube The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-May-28)
436.podcast imageHAP 28 - Chike Jeffers on Precolonial African Philosophy
Co-host Chike Jeffers and Peter chat about the themes and questions raised by the podcast so far. (@HistPhilosophy, 44 minutes, 2019-May-12)
437.podcast imageEpisode 62, Epictetus: A Guide to Stoicism (Part I. The Context and Life of Epictetus)
Imagine you are in an open field which stretches in every direction, further than your eyes can see. Since there is nothing of interest in your immediate surroundings, you set your sights on the horizon. You begin to walk with purpose; long strides eventually break into a run until you are sprinting as fast as you can. After a while, you begin to slow down. Not just because of a lack of breath, bu... (@ThePanpsycast, 55 minutes, 2019-Jun-16)
438.podcast image50 | Patricia Churchland on Conscience, Morality, and the Brain
It’s fun to spend time thinking about how other people should behave, but fortunately we also have an inner voice that keeps offering opinions about how we should behave ourselves: our conscience. Where did that come from? Today’s guest, Patricia Churchland, is a philosopher and neuroscientist, one of the founders of the subfield of “neurophilosophy.” We dig into the neuroscience of it all, especi... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Jun-10)
439.podcast imageNicholas Shea, "Representation in Cognitive Science" (Oxford UP, 2018)
In order to explain thought in natural physical systems, mainstream cognitive science posits representations, or internal states that carry information about the world and that are used by the system to guide its behavior. Naturalistic theories of representation provide explanations of what information, or content, these internal states carry, and how they come to have the contents that they do. I... (@NewBooksPhil, 61 minutes, 2019-Jun-10)
440.podcast imageKeeping them out
Most people agree that nation states don't have any moral right to control the movement of citizens within their borders, or to prevent citizens from travelling beyond those borders. So why should we accept that states have the right to exclude or restrict entry to refugees and immigrants? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jun-16)
441.podcast imageThe Morality of the Left and Right | Peter Hitchens, Sophie Walker, Chris Bryant
The left has traditionally seen itself as progressive, with history and morality on its side. But is history on anyone's side? And as for morality, don't all politicians think they're in the right? Should the left then give up its claim to the moral high ground and argue for policies on pragmatic grounds alone? Or would this be to undermine its very core and meaning? In association with the N... (@IAI_TV, 42 minutes, 2019-May-29)
442.podcast imageThe Illusionist
Pyotr Tchaikovsky composed and conducted his final symphony in 1893. He died 9 days later, after having knowingly drunk an unboiled glass of water during a cholera epidemic. Deep into the symphony, Symphony no. 6, there is a paradoxical passage that, when played, no one will be able to hear. This is because Tchaikovsky scored it to contain a musical illusion. We uncover the mystery of why he put ... (@HiPhiNation, 37 minutes, 2019-Jun-08)
443.podcast image(sub)Text #1: Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”: Poesis as Revenge Forsaken
At last, the full, public release of this discussion between Wes Alwan and Bill Youmans covering Shakespeare's 1611 play about revenge, forgiveness, and authorship. Or maybe it's about exploitation, or how we react to changes in status, or perhaps how a liberal education can give you magical powers! Listen and decide for yourself! (@PartiallyExLife, 70 minutes, 2019-Jun-08)
444.podcast image29/4/2019: Cheshire Calhoun on Responsibilities and Taking On Responsibility
Cheshire Calhoun is CLAS Trustee Professor of Philosophy at Arizona State University and chair of the American Philosophical Association’s board of officers. Her work spans the philosophical subdisciplines of normative ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of emotion, feminist philosophy, and gay and lesbian philosophy. She has recently published a collection of previously published essays under th... (@Aristotweets, 54 minutes, 2019-May-07)
445.podcast imageMACHIAVELLI 3 Chaos, Freedom, and Glory
MACHIAVELLI 3 Chaos, Freedom, and Glory by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod, 82 minutes, 2019-Jun-12)
446.podcast imageIs the President Above the Law?
Is the president above the law? We've all been wondering. Ishan, Dylan, and Zach discuss what a phrase like 'above the law' could mean. This is the final installment in a trilogy on the Mueller Report. Listen to the other episodes here: https://thevimblog.com/2019/04/28/philosophy-and-the-mueller-report/ Reach out to us with your thoughts, critiques, arguments at [email protected] ... (@thevimblog, 45 minutes, 2019-Jun-10)
447.podcast imageA free press, sure, but free from what? And free for what?
The media plays a vital role in a representative democracy by acting as a check on political power and powerful interests. But is it enough for the free press to provide scrutiny and surveillance? Peter Greste joins us to discuss the ethics of press freedom. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Jun-12)
448.podcast image414: This Is Your Brain on Art
More at philosophytalk.org/shows/your-brain-art. Humans actively seek to create and consume art, and the philosophical branch of aesthetics has long investigated its fundamental questions: What is beauty? What is art? What is good taste? Now researchers are applying the tools of neuroscience in an attempt to find answers to these questions. But can the scientific method truly be applied to th... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2019-May-20)
449.podcast imageHoP 324 - United We Fall - Latin Philosophy in Byzantium
Thomas Aquinas finds avid readers among Byzantines at the twilight of empire, and is used by both sides of the Hesychast controversy. (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2019-May-05)
450.podcast image0G60: Voyager and Procreation
This week we're bring together a variety of fan favorites: 1. The best Star Trek captain 2. The right to procreate 3. Substrate Chauvanism Hopefully this will be enough fan service to pay off the rage we'll likely incur with next weeks episode. The topic for this week is Voyager season 2, episode 13: Prototype. It's one of many in the constellation of AI reproduction trek episodes and a fun intro ... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Jun-12)
451.podcast imagePaul Sagar on Scepticism about Philosophy
Throughout its history there have been challenges to the status of philosophy. Paul Sagar discusses some of these in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation in making this podcast, and for donations from Patreon patrons. (@philosophybites, 21 minutes, 2018-Nov-27)
452.podcast image#60 - Véliz on How to Improve Online Speech with Pseudonymity
In this episode I talk to Carissa Véliz. Carissa is a Research Fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at the University of Oxford. She works on digital ethics, practical ethics more generally, political philosophy, and public policy. She is also the Director of the research programme 'Data, Privacy, and the Individual' at the IE's Center ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-May-20)
453.podcast imageThe Philosophers’ Book Club: Deborah Levy’s The Cost of Living
Edward Harcourt / Kathryn Hughes / Deborah Levy Listen here or on YouTube At the Philosophers’ Book Club, we select a work of fiction or non-fiction and our panel discusses its philosophical themes.... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-May-20)
454.podcast imageEV - 92 The Mind’s Void with Dr. Keith Frankish pt.1
As far as I can tell, I'm having the phenomenal sensation of joy at finally getting to have this conversation with Dr. Keith Frankish. Keith is a brilliant proponent of the theory of Illusionism with regard to the existence of phenomenal state. I've read many of his papers and think they're excellent, and while Keith and I come from "different churches" when it comes to philosophy of mind, we agre... (@ETVPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Jun-07)
455.podcast imageEV - 93 The Mind's Void with Dr. Keith Frankish pt. 2
Part two of my rousing conversation with Dr. Keith Frankish, where we try to answer the ageless question "Where is my mind? Where is my mind?". Keith is a brilliant proponent of the theory of Illusionism with regard to the existence of phenomenal state. I've read many of his papers and think they're excellent, and while Keith and I come from "different churches" when it comes to philosophy of mind... (@ETVPod, 47 minutes, 2019-Jun-07)
456.podcast imageEpisode 61, David Pearce on Transhumanism (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Co-founder of Humanity+, formerly known as the World Transhumanist Association, David Pearce is a leading figure of the transhumanist movement. David is perhaps best known for his 1995 manifesto, The Hedonistic Imperative, in which he argues that we can, and will, abolish suffering throughout the living world. Following The Hedonistic Imperative, David has published extensively on topics surroundi... (@ThePanpsycast, 53 minutes, 2019-Jun-09)
457.podcast image49 | Nicholas Christakis on Humanity, Biology, and What Makes Us Good
It’s easy to be cynical about humanity’s present state and future prospects. But we have made it this far, and in some ways we’re doing better than we used to be. Today’s guest, Nicholas Christakis, is an interdisciplinary researcher who studies human nature from a variety of perspectives, including biological, historical, and philosophical. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Orig... (@seanmcarroll, 114 minutes, 2019-Jun-03)
458.podcast imageEpisode 217: Discussing Calderón's "Life Is a Dream"
On the 1636 comedy by Pedro Calderón de la Barca, considering destiny (Christian vs. Ancient Greek), skepticism, meta-theater, and the ethic of honor. Listen to our performance first. With guests Bill Youmans and Erica Spyres. End song: "Pulling Apart" by Jonathan Segel. Hear him on Nakedly Examined Music #38. Please fill out our bonus material survey at partiallyexaminedlife.com/bonus. Please sup... (@PartiallyExLife, 109 minutes, 2019-Jun-03)
459.podcast imageEpisode 165: Life With No Head (With Sam Harris)
Sam Harris returns to the podcast to talk about meditation and his new Waking Up meditation app. What are the goals of mindfulness practice - stress reduction and greater focus, or something much deeper? Can it cure David's existential dread? Tamler's fear of his daughter going away to college? Can sustained practice erode the illusion of self? Is that even something we'd want to do? What if it di... (@verybadwizards, 136 minutes, 2019-Jun-04)
460.podcast imageEV91 - The Void after God
Like the uncomfortable sensation in a limb you sat on too long, we’re back! So sorry for the hiatus, I promise it won't happen again. This week we're joined by Ryan Bell from the Life after God podcast. Ryan is a former pastor who was effectively excommunicated for his progressive views and now helps individuals as they try to make sense of a life after religion. We discuss the loss of belief in a... (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Jun-06)
461.podcast imageDrone homicide, jiggling brains and neurobionic revenge porn
The march of technology never stops, and sometimes institutions have trouble keeping up with the changes. This week we’re looking at possible future crimes committed via technology that’s already with us: brain-computer interfaces, which enable things to happen in the physical world by means of neural impulses – thoughts and imaginings, rather than movements. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jun-09)
462.podcast imageGlimpse: Machiavellian Politics (for Partially Examined Life #14)
Does politics have to be Machiavellian? Do you have to be ruthless to succeed? Given our treatment of Game of Thrones and Life Is a Dream, and the way in which end-justifying-the-means logic plays endlessly in our real-life political situation, it's time we looked back on our episode 14 on Machiavelli. Mark Linsenmayer reviewed that episode and recorded a little essay about practicing Machiavellia... (@PartiallyExLife, 9 minutes, 2019-Jun-02)
463.podcast imageThe Neuroscience of Conciousness | Raymond Tallis, Susana Martinez-Conde, Markus Gabriel
Neuroscientists believe that our minds and conciousness are no more than matter and mechanism. But if they are right, is all meaning, purpose and feeling illusory? Must we accept that we are just machines? Or do the secrets of experience lie beyond neuroscience's grasp, requiring an alternative account of who we are? In association with the New College of the Humanities. bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 47 minutes, 2019-May-20)
464.podcast imageBad Philosophy: Stefan Molyneux
Thought about doing a Stefan Molyneux book review but then I thought better of it. Check out why.....he's bad at philosophy(logic and reasoning). Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw M... (@philosophyguy2, 9 minutes, 2019-Jun-03)
465.podcast imageMary Kate McGowan, "Just Words: On Speech and Hidden Harm" (Oxford UP, 2019)
We’re all familiar with the ways in which speech can cause harm. For example, speech can incite wrongful acts. And I suppose we’re also familiar with contexts in which a person who occupies a position of authority can harm others simply by speaking – as when a boss announced and thereby institutes a discriminatory office policy. In such cases, the announcement is itself a harm in addition to the h... (@NewBooksPhil, 64 minutes, 2019-May-31)
466.podcast imageHAP 27 - Beyond the Reaction - The Continuing Relevance of Precolonial Traditions
As the twentieth century draws to a close, the critique of ethnophilosophy gives way to approaches that continue to privilege the study of precolonial traditions. (@HistPhilosophy, 27 minutes, 2019-Apr-28)
467.podcast image413: The Big Bang – Before and After
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/big-bang-before-and-after. The Big Bang theory is the prevailing theory about the “birth” of the universe. It posits a singularity, or super high density state from which the entire universe expanded and continues to expand. But what exactly is the Big Bang, and what’s the evidence that it took place? How do we account for the “Big Bang state”? Was... (@philtalkradio, 53 minutes, 2019-May-13)
468.podcast imageIs technology killing democracy?
What if social media and democratic politics serve radically different goals? Tech investor Raina Kumra joins us to discuss whether social media is undermining the conditions of healthy democratic society. (@Ariscottle_, 70 minutes, 2019-Jun-05)
469.podcast imageOn Strike
Jo Grady/ Martin O’Neill/ Waseem Yaqoob Listen here or on YouTube Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-May-14)
470.podcast imageMACHIAVELLI 2 Resistance Freedom
Freedom. Donald Trump. Radicalism. Quentin Skinner. Republicanism. Riots. Class conflict. Ideology. Social Justice. (@PolPhilPod, 106 minutes, 2019-Jun-03)
471.podcast image48 | Marq de Villiers on Hell and Damnation
If you’re bad, we are taught, you go to Hell. Who in the world came up with that idea? Some will answer God, but for the purpose of today’s podcast discussion we’ll put that possibility aside and look into the human origins and history of the idea of Hell. Marq de Villiers is a writer and journalist who has authored a series of non-fiction books, many on science and the environment. In Hell & Damn... (@seanmcarroll, 71 minutes, 2019-May-27)
472.podcast imageEpisode 61, David Pearce on Transhumanism (Part I - Transhumanism)
Co-founder of Humanity+, formerly known as the World Transhumanist Association, David Pearce is a leading figure of the transhumanist movement. David is perhaps best known for his 1995 manifesto, The Hedonistic Imperative, in which he argues that we can, and will, abolish suffering throughout the living world. Following The Hedonistic Imperative, David has published extensively on topics surroundi... (@ThePanpsycast, 57 minutes, 2019-Jun-02)
473.podcast imagePEL Audioplayers: "Life Is a Dream" by Pedro Calderón de la Barca
Your hosts are joined by real actors to do an unrehearsed read of Calderón's 1636 comedy La Vida Es Sueño, using Stanley Appelbaum's 2002 translation. Ep. 217 will cover the philosophical issues the play raises. Recorded in NYC on 4/7: Talene Monahon (Rosaura), David Epstein (Segismundo), Bill Youmans (Clotaldo), Erica Spyres (Estrella), Chris Martin (Basilio), Mark Linsenmayer (Clarín), Seth Pask... (@PartiallyExLife, 140 minutes, 2019-May-27)
474.podcast imageWhat Is Beauty? From Plato to Kim Kardashian | Bence Nanay, Justine Kolata, Sam Roddick
Once beauty was about goodness and truth, now we think it means little more than models, products and outdated art. Have practical concerns and the economy of desire made beauty trivial and expendable? Could we follow Goethe and Kant and cultivate our aesthetic judgment to enrich our lives? Or is the goal of living beautifully a conceit of the privileged elite? And finally, is there a difference i... (@IAI_TV, 42 minutes, 2019-May-14)
475.podcast imageUncivil Disobedience
In Australia, vegan and animal liberation activism has recently become intense and disruptive, invading farms, restaurants, and city centers. They’re doing everything from rescuing animals to blocking traffic, and occupying steakhouses. Some argue that these new activists are needlessly victimizing innocent farmers, business owners, and consumers. Others argue that the activists are only doing wha... (@HiPhiNation, 49 minutes, 2019-May-25)
476.podcast imageAnalytic philosophy: the leading brand
A quick scan of leading philosophy journals reveals that what passes for "philosophy" is selectively screened, with analytic philosophy clearly the dominant style. We look at the history of this phenomenon, some of the likely consequences, and how might it be addressed. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jun-02)
477.podcast imageEpisode 65 - Remco Heesen
On Episode 65, Nick chats with Dr. Remco Heesen, faculty member in philosophy at the University of Western Australia, about his research concerning what happens after scientific evidence is collected, such as the scientist’s choice of when to share her findings, and how peer review may affect what gets reported. (@SciPhiPod, 2019-May-28)
478.podcast image#59 - Torres on Existential Risk, Omnicidal Agents and Superintelligence
In this episode I talk to Phil Torres. Phil is an author and researcher who primarily focuses on existential risk. He is currently a visiting researcher at the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at Cambridge University. He has published widely on emerging technologies, terrorism, and existential risks, with articles appearing in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Futures, Erkenntnis, Met... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-May-09)
479.podcast imageHoP 323 - Through His Works You Shall Know Him - Palamas and Hesychasm
Gregory Palamas and the controversy over his teaching that we can go beyond human reason by grasping God through his activities or “energies”. (@HistPhilosophy, 19 minutes, 2019-Apr-21)
480.podcast imageMACHIAVELLI History and Ideology
Freedom. Radicalism. The Renaissance. Machiavellianism. Republicanism. Ideology. Interpretation. Class Conflict. (@PolPhilPod, 81 minutes, 2019-May-29)
481.podcast image480: What Is Religious Belief?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-religious-belief. Many people profess to believe in an all-powerful, all-knowing, benevolent God. Yet psychological data shows that people often think and reason about God in ways contrary to their professed religious beliefs. So, are these so-called religious beliefs genuinely held? Or are “believers” just playing an elaborate game of pretens... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-May-06)
482.podcast imageAre We in a Constitutional Crisis?
An unofficial sequel to the discussion on the Mueller Report, Dylan, Gabe, Ishan, and Zach reconvene to figure out what a “constitutional crisis” is. Like good philosophers, they distinguish a variety of types. Then they try to determine whether America is actually in one. Don’t miss the concluding segment. The participants play America’s fastest growing game show, “Constitutional Crisis or... (@thevimblog, 62 minutes, 2019-May-26)
483.podcast imageSchopenhauer
Christine Battersby/ Christopher Janaway/ Christopher Ryan Listen here or on YouTube Schopenhauer’s work prefigured important developments in philosophy, psychology, and political thought. On... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-May-07)
484.podcast imageNeeds of the Soul: Home
As we wrap up this year’s Ramadan series, we turn to the importance of having a place to be and a people to be among. How does 'love of country' square with our collective failure to address the way we are ravaging our 'common home'? (@Ariscottle_, 47 minutes, 2019-May-29)
485.podcast image0G59: Endgame and Moral Saints
As luck would have it, Mr. Smith, we're in the one and only timeline where you can make a difference. Snap your fingers and you can make the superhero movies go away forever, but only at the cost of never seeing the space babies ever again. Should you be expected to make that snap? This week we're talking Endgame and another famous concept by Susan Wolf, the issue of "moral saints". This topic rel... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-May-29)
486.podcast image40: Morality Scaled Up with Joshua Greene
We often discuss individual morality and ethics on the show–how people should or should not behave on an interpersonal level. But what about groups of people? How should they make sense of their competing value... The post 40: Morality Scaled Up with Joshua Greene appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 28 minutes, 2019-May-29)
487.podcast image#054 Humility Q&A: Self-Care, Self-Promotion, And The Myth of Being Self-Made
Welcome to the third and final episode on the topic of humility! In this episode you’ll hear the audience Q&A portion of the event with guests A.J. Jacobs and Dr. Serene J Khader. Topics discussed: The relationship between humility and artists, one way to change our approach to self-promotion for our projects, how can we make less harmful choices with our wallets, how we can re-frame the popular n... (@MissMMcCarthy, 22 minutes, 2019-May-28)
488.podcast imageRationally Speaking #234 - Dylan Matthews on "Global poverty has fallen, but what should we conclude from that?"
The global poverty rate has fallen significantly over the last few decades, but there's a heated debate over how to view that fact. Vox journalist Dylan Matthews explains the disagreement. (@Rspodcast, 78 minutes, 2019-May-28)
489.podcast image47 | Adam Rutherford on Humans, Animals, and Life in General
Most people in the modern world — and the vast majority of Mindscape listeners, I would imagine — agree that humans are part of the animal kingdom, and that all living animals evolved from a common ancestor. Nevertheless, there are ways in which we are unique; humans are the only animals that stress out over Game of Thrones (as far as I know). I talk with geneticist and science writer Adam Rutherf... (@seanmcarroll, 98 minutes, 2019-May-20)
490.podcast imageEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indulging i... (@ThePanpsycast, 37 minutes, 2019-May-26)
491.podcast imageEpisode 216: Game of Thrones' Fantasy Politics
Discussing the TV show (2011-2019) based on the books by George R.R. Martin. What's the role of a mass-consumed fantasy series in today's society? Is it our "fantasy" to have all these horrible things happen to us? Is this an edifying prompt to engage in public moral thinking, or a spectacular distraction of the kind that those Marxist theorists keep warning us about? We get into the function of f... (@PartiallyExLife, 85 minutes, 2019-May-20)
492.podcast imageTrump's Foreign Policy | George Galloway, Mark Leonard
Many think Donald Trump a buffoon and a threat to world peace. But with IS weakened, and signs of progress in North Korea, perhaps his supporters can point to some initial successes. Could a belligerent approach to foreign policy make for a safer world? Is the best way of pursuing peace to prepare for war? Or has Trump in fact made the world more precarious than ever? In association with the ... (@IAI_TV, 44 minutes, 2019-May-07)
493.podcast imageOut of the Vat #1 – Steven French
Steven French is a Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Leeds. In this episode, Steven discusses his current interest in phenomenological approaches to quantum mechanics, and... Philosophers’ work and philosophers’ lives, both inside and outside of philosophy. Brought to you by the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, the Centre for Philosophy of Natural a... (@LSEPhilosophy, 29 minutes, 2019-May-07)
494.podcast imageHAP 26 - Kai Kresse on the Anthropology of Philosophy
An interview with Kai Kresse who discusses his efforts to do "anthropology of philosophy" on the Swahili Coast. (@HistPhilosophy, 31 minutes, 2019-Apr-14)
495.podcast imageMind, matter and motherhood
When Nicola Redhouse had each of her two children, she experienced shattering post-natal anxiety that sent her deep into the mystery of the self, and the relationship between mind and body. A long standing participant in psychoanalysis, she found herself up against the practical limits of Freudian theory - but would science provide more useful insight? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-May-26)
496.podcast imageShorts - E19: Repeatability in Science
Everything is unique, yet almost everything is ignored. Herein may lie the crux of history as we fashion it for our purposes. Repeatability is a most productive bias. (@dawdlerspodcast, 33 minutes, 2019-May-26)
497.podcast imageGame of Thrones: Political Violence
Hello friends, probably my last Game of Thrones episode for a long time! Anyway, in this one, I do a short review of season 8, mainly because I think you need to know where I stand on it. But, the focus on the episode is how this final season concluded a major political theme of the show: political violence. Game of Thrones forces us to ask the political question, what are you willing to support i... (@philosophyguy2, 18 minutes, 2019-May-21)
498.podcast image479: Is Philanthropy Bad for Democracy?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philanthropy-bad-democracy. In a liberal democracy, individuals should have the freedom to give money to charities of their choice. But there’s a difference between charitable giving from ordinary individuals and philanthropic giving from extremely wealthy individuals. Whose interests are served when the wealthy give? Should the state continue to e... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2019-Apr-29)
499.podcast imagePlants
Karine Bonneval/ Paco Calvo/ Tom Greaves Listen here or on YouTube Philosophers have long assumed that plants are inferior to humans and animals: static, inert, and unreflective. But recent... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Apr-30)
500.podcast imageNeeds of the Soul: Hardship
Is there a danger in seeing hardship as something that simply needs to be overcome, and which can be overcome given the right technologies or policies, rather than something that is intrinsic to life? (@Ariscottle_, 41 minutes, 2019-May-22)
501.podcast imageEpisode #131 ... Gramsci - Cultural Hegemony
Today we discuss the work of Antonio Gramsci. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 25 minutes, 2019-May-22)
502.podcast image0G58: Runaround and Three Laws of Robotics
Here's my story, it's sad but true, about a bot that I once knew. It took my laws, and then ran around, all the science juice pools in town. This week we're beginning a journey through the robot short stories of Isaac Asimov, beginning with Runaround, the first story where Asimov specifically lays out the three laws of robotics. We discuss the many problems with these laws as well as why they're s... (@0gPhilosophy, 47 minutes, 2019-May-22)
503.podcast image#053 Losing My Religion With Auguste Comte and AJ Jacobs
In this episode you’ll learn what the French philosopher and eccentric, Auguste Comte can teach us about the relationship between faith, humanity, and humility. You’ll also hear what the bestselling author A.J. Jacobs has learned about gratitude and luck via his many personal quests for knowledge and self-improvement. This episode is part two in a three part series on HUMILITY. #thehappierhour Th... (@MissMMcCarthy, 38 minutes, 2019-May-21)
504.podcast imageHOW TO BE HAPPY With Peter Singer
Why are so many of us unhappy? Peter Singer, ‘The world’s most influential philosopher’ joins the podcast to discuss the link between doing good and being happy, money and happiness, working for a charity, right-wing self-help guru’s, and his advice for living a happy life. For more on effective giving: https://www.thelifeyoucansave.org (@PolPhilPod, 65 minutes, 2019-May-19)
505.podcast imageHoP 322 - Do the Math - Science in the Palaiologan Renaissance
Mathematics and the sciences in Byzantium, focusing on scholars of the Palaiologan period like Blemmydes and Metochites. (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
506.podcast image46 | Kate Darling on Our Connections with Robots
Most of us have no trouble telling the difference between a robot and a living, feeling organism. Nevertheless, our brains often treat robots as if they were alive. We give them names, imagine that they have emotions and inner mental states, get mad at them when they do the wrong thing or feel bad for them when they seem to be in distress. Kate Darling is a research at the MIT Media Lab who specia... (@seanmcarroll, 67 minutes, 2019-May-13)
507.podcast imageIs Reality Necessary? | Chiara Marletto, Gerard t'Hooft, Christopher Timpson
We think that lightning strikes, and waves crash, even if there is no one to see them. Yet according to quantum physics, the observer is critical to reality. Theoretical physicist Werner Heisenberg even argued that, in contemporary physics 'objective reality has evaporated'. Is a world independent of the observer an illusion? Or did quantum physics get it wrong? Nobel prize winning Gerard t'Hooft,... (@IAI_TV, 38 minutes, 2019-Apr-30)
508.podcast image#58 - Neely on Augmented Reality, Ethics and Property Rights
In this episode I talk to Erica Neely. Erica is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Ohio Northern University specializing in philosophy of technology and computer ethics. Her work focuses is on the ethical ramifications of emerging technologies. She has written a number of papers on 3D printing, the ethics of video games, robotics and augmented reality. We chat about the ethics of augmented re... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Apr-26)
509.podcast imageEpisode 215: Brave New World: PEL Live 10th Anniversary Show
On Aldous Huxley’s 1932 dystopian novel, recorded at Manhattan's Caveat on 4/6/19, with audience participation. If we harness the power of society to employ available technologies to really focus on making people happy, what would the result be? This is Huxley's thought experiment, but is it in all respects a dystopia, and is it a fair test of the ideal of social improvement or merely of a flawed ... (@PartiallyExLife, 98 minutes, 2019-May-13)
510.podcast imageEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part III - The Meaning)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indulging i... (@ThePanpsycast, 40 minutes, 2019-May-19)
511.podcast imageEpisode 164: Choosing to Believe
David and Tamler argue about William James' classic essay "The Will to Believe." What's more important - avoiding falsehood or discovering truth? When (if ever) is it rational to believe anything without enough evidence? What about beliefs that we can't be agnostic about? Are there hypotheses that we have to believe in order for them to come true? Does James successfully demonstrate that faith can... (@verybadwizards, 82 minutes, 2019-May-14)
512.podcast imageThe Hulk: Should People Be Punished for Crimes They Can’t Remember Committing?
Analyzing an article by Professor of Philosophy Helen BeeBee, "Should people be punished for crimes they can't remember committing?" We bring in the help of a murderer with dementia on death row, The Hulk, and an uncontrollable drunk. Tune in! An ask from you the audience...please share with your friends! I don't do an interview podcast so relying on organic growth means partially rely on yo... (@philosophyguy2, 14 minutes, 2019-May-15)
513.podcast imageFor Women Only (pt. 2)
In the 40 years since the events at Olivia Records, gender categorization seems to pop up sporadically in the mainstream press, leading to what sociologists Laurel Westbrook and Kristen Schilt call "gender panics," and then they disappear only to emerge again at some other time. An analysis of gender panics show that people fear some gender nonconformists but seem perfectly fine with others. It t... (@HiPhiNation, 48 minutes, 2019-May-11)
514.podcast imageThe blind spot
Can science potentially reveal everything, giving us a "God's eye view" of the world? Some hope that the answer is (or will one day be) Yes - other more cautious observers wonder if science can ever overcome its blind spot. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-May-19)
515.podcast imageShorts - E18: Depression
Life may be meaningless, but is it hopeless? This week the Dawdlers do a little Short on depression. Don't?...enjoy this? (@dawdlerspodcast, 22 minutes, 2019-May-19)
516.podcast image009 – Lab Coats
When did scientists start wearing white coats? Why do doctors wear them too? And are they strictly necessary in toothpaste commercials? Elena and Ian don their most fashionable lab jackets to look at the life and times of science's iconic wardrobe. If you liked this episode, subscribing/following means you'll get the next one automatically. We'd love it if you could leave us a review on iTunes too... (@wondercupboard, 49 minutes, 2019-May-19)
517.podcast image478: Authority and Resistance
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/authority-and-resistance. Authority can refer to people or institutions that have the political power to make decisions, give orders, and enforce rules. It can also refer to a certain kind of expertise or knowledge that we might defer to. Sometimes we respect authority, and sometimes we resist it or even revolt against it. But where exactly does au... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Apr-22)
518.podcast imageJames Doyle, "No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism" (Harvard UP, 2018)
This is the centennial year of the birth of G.E.M. Anscombe, one of the major philosophical figures of the 20th century within the analytic tradition. A close associate of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Anscombe contributed fundamental insights in philosophy of mind, action theory, and ethics. In his new book No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism (Harvard University Press, 2018), James Doyle c... (@NewBooksPhil, 65 minutes, 2019-May-10)
519.podcast imageWhy Isn't Something "Real" Until it is Online?
An epilogue to the episode titled, “Why Isn’t the Internet the ‘Real’ World?” Dylan and Zach consider a phenomena that might be in tension with Zach’s idea that we, in some vague and unarticulated way, take the internet to occupy a lower level of reality. It isn’t the “real world.” The episode is about the sentiment behind the phrase, “pics or it didn’t happen.” What should we make of the idea tha... (@thevimblog, 69 minutes, 2019-May-12)
520.podcast image18/3/2019: Stephen Mulhall on Heidegger’s Fountain: Ecstasis, Mimesis and Engrossment in the Origin of the Work of Art
Stephen Mulhall is Professor of Philosophy and a Fellow of New College, Oxford. His research interests include Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Nietzsche and Sartre; moral philosophy; the relationship between philosophy, theology and religion; and the relationship between philosophy and the arts (especially film and literature). His most recent publications include: ‘The Great Riddle: Wittgenstein and Non... (@Aristotweets, 61 minutes, 2019-Mar-31)
521.podcast imageHAP 25 - Wise Guys - Sage Philosophy
Henry Odera Oruka’s new method for exploring philosophy in Africa, based on interviews with wise individuals. (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2019-Mar-31)
522.podcast imageNeeds of the Soul: Conversation
What is 'good' conversation? What are its preconditions? What is its goal? And why is it so important to the moral life? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2019-May-15)
523.podcast imageUnderstanding Hume on Miracles (Audio Essay)
This audio essay is an Easter special. It focuses on David Hume's famous argument about miracles. First written over 250 years, Hume's essay 'Of Miracles' purports to provide an "everlasting check" against all kinds of "superstitious delusion". But is this true? Does Hume give us good reason to reject the testimonial proof provided on behalf of historical miracles? Maybe not, but he certainly prov... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Apr-20)
524.podcast image#052 Speaking Up With Audre Lourde and Serene J Khader
In this episode you’ll learn what the poet and feminist icon Audre Lorde can teach us about identity and the importance of speaking up for the oppressed. You’ll also hear why philosophy professor Dr. Serene J Khader believes we should rethink the way we empower women, and why humility is not one size fits all. This kicks off a three part series on HUMILITY. #thehappierhour Show notes: TheHappierHo... (@MissMMcCarthy, 47 minutes, 2019-May-14)
525.podcast imageEpisode 114: Sally Haslanger discusses ideology
What is the nature of a person's political outlook? (@ElucidationsPod, 41 minutes, 2019-May-14)
526.podcast image0G57: Orphan Black and Human Cloning
Well friends, I'm gonna level with you. We've been doing a little bit of mad sciencing on the side, and it appears some of the clones got loose and recorded an episode on Orphan Black and the Ethics of Cloning. It's a bit all over the place from what I'm told, but we thought it best to honor their plucky ingenuity and share the results with you, so that you can decide if the world is a better plac... (@0gPhilosophy, 46 minutes, 2019-May-15)
527.podcast imageAvengers Endgame: Film Analysis, questions, and outcome implications
A little bit less organized in this one friends. Just thought I would get out some thoughts! Anyway, in this episode, I do a quick analysis on Avengers: Endgame and raise some questions I hope the Marvel Universe chooses to get into in their coming films! We will see. Discord: https://discord.gg/tH5Fydn Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain F... (@philosophyguy2, 15 minutes, 2019-May-10)
528.podcast imageThe Lure of Evil | Christopher Hamilton, Patricia MacCormack, John Milbank
From Milton's Paradise Lost to bad boys and femmes fatales, we are seduced by the dark and dangerous. Why does the devil have all the best tunes? Have we sanitised the good and made it vacuous? Could we imagine a world where the good was exciting, dramatic and fun? Or are danger and denial somehow essential to being alive? Moral philosopher Christopher Hamilton, theologian and Zizek collaborator J... (@IAI_TV, 45 minutes, 2019-Apr-23)
529.podcast imagePOLITICS WITOUT GUARANTEES with Jacob T. Levy
In the second part of my conversation with professor Jacob T. Levy we look at the need people have for guarantees in their political and moral systems; guarantees that their will of the world will both be actualized and be morally correct. We ask what the world looks like in the absence of such certainty. (@PolPhilPod, 69 minutes, 2019-May-12)
530.podcast image45 | Leonard Susskind on Quantum Information, Quantum Gravity, and Holography
For decades now physicists have been struggling to reconcile two great ideas from a century ago: general relativity and quantum mechanics. We don’t yet know the final answer, but the journey has taken us to some amazing places. A leader in this quest has been Leonard Susskind, who has helped illuminate some of the most mind-blowing ideas in quantum gravity: the holographic principle, the string th... (@seanmcarroll, 74 minutes, 2019-May-06)
531.podcast imageRationally Speaking #233 - Clive Thompson on "The culture of coding, and how it’s changing the world"
Technology writer Clive Thompson discusses his latest book, "Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World." (@Rspodcast, 58 minutes, 2019-May-13)
532.podcast imageEpisode 214: More Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part Two)
Concluding Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1885). What's the wise way to live? We start in earnest into part three, treating the "spirit of gravity" where socially-imposed values cover over your uniqueness, omni-satisfaction vs. being choosy, "Old and New Tablets" where Nietzsche explores various ethical and meta-ethical issues (e.g. is self-overcoming a matter of one-time self-actua... (@PartiallyExLife, 81 minutes, 2019-May-06)
533.podcast imageEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part II - The Plot Continued)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indulging i... (@ThePanpsycast, 32 minutes, 2019-May-12)
534.podcast imageE32: Anatol Rapoport's Man-Made Conflicts - General Systems Theory
This week the Dawdler's take a step back from the previous weeks and dig down behind to examine an example of a general conceptual framework for thinking about systems, identity, and conflict - evolution, memes, and perspectivism; while they examine Anatol Rapoport's 1974 book Conflict in Man-Made Environment. (@dawdlerspodcast, 97 minutes, 2019-May-13)
535.podcast image477: Hacking the Brain – Beyond the Five Senses
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/hacking-brain. Humans evolved to have a variety of senses—smell, sight, touch, etc.—that provide information about the world around us. Our brains use this sensory information to construct a particular picture of reality. But what if it were technologically possible to hack our brains and create new senses for humans, such as echolocation or magnet... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Apr-15)
536.podcast imageIrrationality
In 1944, Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer published their famous claim that "Enlightenment reverts to mythology" - meaning that any rational order sooner or later collapses into irrationality. Seven decades later, it seems they were were right on the money. Is human society fated to be irrational? And why is the alt-right having all the crazy fun these days? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-May-12)
537.podcast imageEpisode 64 - Matt Brown
On Episode 64, Nick chats with Dr. Matt Brown, Associate Professor of Philosophy and History of Ideas, and Director of the Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology at University of Texas at Dallas, about the ways in which science is a value-laden enterprise, the impact of the value-ladenness of science on our conception of the role of science in policy, and the parallels between scie... (@SciPhiPod, 2019-May-07)
538.podcast imageReligion, War and Terrorism
In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Professor Tony Coady argues that religion does not have an inherent tendency towards violence, including particularly war and terrorism. There is a widespread belief amounting almost to a cultural assumption in many influential circles that assigns to religion and religious difference an inherent tendency to violence. In this talk, Professor Coady hig... (@ethicsinthenews, 44 minutes, 2019-May-01)
539.podcast imageEp85 - God Is a Question
In episode 84 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. William Irwin today about his most recent book, God Is a Question, Not an Answer published in December 2018 with Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. Dr. Irwin is Herve A. LeBlanc Distinguished Service Professor and Chair of Philosophy at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. He is also the author of ... (@PhilosophyBB, 60 minutes, 2019-Apr-24)
540.podcast imageUnderstanding Free Speech and the Privilege of having an Audience
The recent news story about Facebook banning people such as Alex Jones and Laura Loomer had my mind working about a topic I don't like talking about—free speech. As in it's talked about so often that it becomes tiring. So I decided to contradict myself in this one and do it anyway. In this one, I discuss free speech, John Stuart Mill "On Liberty" and understanding the distinction between free spee... (@philosophyguy2, 21 minutes, 2019-May-06)
541.podcast imageBergson and Time
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the French philosopher Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and his ideas about human experience of time passing and how that differs from a scientific measurement of time, set out in his thesis on 'Time and Free Will' in 1889. He became famous in France and abroad for decades, rivalled only by Einstein and, in the years after the Dreyfus Affair, was the first ever Jewish mem... (@BBCInOurTime, 51 minutes, 2019-May-09)
542.podcast imageJUSTICE IN A FALLEN WORLD With Jacob T. Levy
Can we know the nature of justice before confronting the conditions of injustice? I’m joined by Jacob T Levy to discuss his upcoming work Justice in Babylon, we cover Ideal theory, Rawls, the nature of politics and the nature of the human condition. (@PolPhilPod, 55 minutes, 2019-May-08)
543.podcast imageHoP 321 - Judith Herrin on Byzantium and Islam
Historian Judith Herrin joins us to talk about competition and mutual influence between Islam and Byzantium. (@HistPhilosophy, 33 minutes, 2019-Mar-24)
544.podcast imageEV - 090 The Void Report
Aaron gives us an update on his court case, we discuss the Muller Report, and then give our take on the people running for the Democratic Presidential bid.Open Invocation:Walt WhitmanMaking The Void Livable:Mortal Kombat 11  (@ETVPod, 64 minutes, 2019-May-06)
545.podcast imageMollie Gerver, "The Ethics and Practice of Refugee Repatriation" (U Edinburgh Press, 2018)
Moral and political theorists have paid a healthy amount of attention to states’ rights to determine who may reside within their territory. Accordingly, there’s a large literature on immigration, borders, asylum, and refugees. However, relatively little work has been done on questions concerning how refugees are treated once they have gained access to a new country; and from these questions emer... (@NewBooksPhil, 62 minutes, 2019-May-01)
546.podcast imageETV - 089 Better Know Frances Kamm
For this installment of Better Know a Philosopher, we're talking about Frances Kamm. Aaron has had to pleasure to work with her recently, so he has first hand knowledge on how awesome she is. Making the Void Livable:https://direkris.itch.io/you-are-jeff-bezos (@ETVPod, 66 minutes, 2019-May-05)
547.podcast imageNeeds of the Soul: Silence
During Ramadan, we’re giving concerted attention to what makes for a healthy moral life. In a time characterised by clamour and empty chatter, it’s never been more important — or more difficult — to reclaim the importance of silence. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-May-08)
548.podcast imageThe Cult of Mindfulness | Vishpani Blomfield, Linda Woodhead, Miguel Farias
From yoga retreats to mindfulness, meditation is fashionable and now even prescribed by the UK's National Health Service. Yet in some cases it can lead to depression and even psychosis. Is it a mistake to think that self-exploration and being at one with ourselves are necessarily good things? Would it be better to deal with our anxieties through action? Or is meditation the perfect antidote to mod... (@IAI_TV, 33 minutes, 2019-Apr-16)
549.podcast image#051 Design Q&A: Designing Our Dreams With Derrida and Kant
In this episode you’ll hear the audience Q&A from the live Happier Hour event with Debbie Millman (design expert and host of Design Matters), Dr. Kathleen Wallace (professor of Philosophy at Hofstra University), and host Monica McCarthy. You’ll learn how Immanuel Kant and Jacques Derrida can help us design our personal brand online and in interviews, and how we can better achieve our dreams by des... (@MissMMcCarthy, 18 minutes, 2019-May-07)
550.podcast image0G56: Humans and Everyday AI
Hello [primary user] and welcome to the show notes for your brand new copy of our episode about Humans, a British show about how awkward it will be when we're all surrounded by vastly superior, extremely polite robits. We hope you will find this show to be...suitable. If you find it sup bar, and can overcome the British urge to never voice that feeling, do let us know. And of course, if you want t... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2019-May-08)
551.podcast imageEpisode 163: Should I Stay or Should I Go? (Ursula K. Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas")
David and Tamler are pulled into Ursula K. Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas." Omelas is a truly happy city, except for one child who lives in abominable misery. Is that too high a moral cost? Why do some people walk away from the city? Why does no one help the child? Why does Le Guin make us create the city with her? Plus, we talk about our listener meetup in Vancouver, and a new edit... (@verybadwizards, 94 minutes, 2019-May-01)
552.podcast image44 | Antonio Damasio on Feelings, Thoughts, and the Evolution of Humanity
When we talk about the mind, we are constantly talking about consciousness and cognition. Antonio Damasio wants us to talk about our feelings. But it’s not in an effort to be more touchy-feely; Damasio, one of the world’s leading neuroscientists, believes that feelings generated by the body are a crucial part of how we achieve and maintain homeostasis, which in turn is a key driver in understandin... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Apr-29)
553.podcast imageEpisode 214: More Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part One)
On the remainder of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1885). How can we keep our spirits up and avoid nihilism? We consider Nietzsche's "solution" of eternal recurrence, why he uses a poetic, allegoric style, and more. Don't wait for part 2. Get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsor: Get $10 off a Skylight Frame in time for Mother's Day at skylightframe.com... (@PartiallyExLife, 51 minutes, 2019-Apr-29)
554.podcast image412: More Than Pun and Games
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/more-pun-and-games. Puns have been called both the highest and lowest form of humor. There is something about them that is at once painful and pleasurable, capable of causing either a cringe or a chuckle. But what exactly is it about word play that we find humorous? Is there something in particular about puns that makes them especially cringe-worth... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Apr-08)
555.podcast image#57 - Sorgner on Nietzschean Transhumanism
In this episode I talk Stefan Lorenz Sorgner. Stefan teaches philosophy at John Cabot University in Rome. He is director and co-founder of the Beyond Humanism Network, Fellow at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies (IEET), Research Fellow at the Ewha Institute for the Humanities at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, and Visting Fellow at the Ethics Centre of the Friedrich-Schiller-Univ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Apr-10)
556.podcast imageFor Women Only (pt. 1)
It is currently very difficult to get your gender legally changed in the U.K, That might change. In recent months, philosophers have been drafted into making complicated and contentious arguments about what it is to be a man, woman, or any other gender in the service of advancing or blocking the movement for trans-rights and recognition. In particular, it has exposed a conflict between trans-right... (@HiPhiNation, 51 minutes, 2019-Apr-27)
557.podcast imageEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part II - The Plot)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indulging i... (@ThePanpsycast, 49 minutes, 2019-May-05)
558.podcast imageBen Shapiro is on the Wrong Side of History - Prager U Response
So Ben Shapiro did one of his Prager U video based on his book. The video happens to cover more of the history side of things(which I missed in my review episode), so I thought it would be some fun new content to include. Plus, you receive his actual wording and voice to connect with my responses! As always, thanks for listening. Ben's Prager Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVD0xik-_FM&t... (@philosophyguy2, 25 minutes, 2019-May-01)
559.podcast imageE31: The Helm of the Mutineers - On Sociopolitical Revolutions
There’s a poem by Portia Nelson called “There’s a hole in my sidewalk”. In it, she keeps going down the street, falls in the hole in the sidewalk, and struggles to get out. The poem is about repeating patterns that ultimately hurt you. The punchline? Walk down another street. In this episode, we Dawds discuss sociopolitical revolutions and the effectiveness of protests and movements that hope to... (@dawdlerspodcast, 129 minutes, 2019-May-06)
560.podcast imageHAP 24 - Professionally Speaking - The Reaction Against Ethnophilosophy
Paulin Hountondji and other African philosophers criticize ethnophilosophy and advocate a universalist approach. (@HistPhilosophy, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-17)
561.podcast imageMugged by reality
Reality TV draws increasing concern from observers who fear that cast, producers and audiences alike could be participating in something morally reprehensible - and that serious consequences for society lie ahead. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-May-05)
562.podcast imageEpisode 63 - Hannah Rubin
On Episode 63, Nick chats with Dr. Hannah Rubin, Assistant Professor at Notre Dame University about her growing research on the evolution of cooperative and altruistic behavior, genetics in evolutionary game theory, experimental economics in philosophy, and her experience serving as Managing Editor for the journal, Philosophy of Science. (@SciPhiPod, 2019-Apr-29)
563.podcast imagePhilosophy and the Mueller Report
The Mueller report—along with Attorney General William’s Barr’s accompanying antics—have come. They have also largely gone from the news cycle. But that is a shame. There is a lot to digest and think about. Like good philosophers, Dylan, Zach, Ishan, and Gabe gather to discuss many of the issues that the massive Mueller Report poses. - What should we take from it? - What is up with Willia... (@thevimblog, 58 minutes, 2019-Apr-29)
564.podcast imageThe Problem with Materialism | John Ellis, Susan Blackmore, Hilary Lawson
The idea that the world is made of physical stuff alone has been central to scientific progress. But our theories do not account for experience or thought, and the particles of contemporary theoretical physics have no dimensions, so that material seemingly vanishes. Might materialism be a profound mistake? Should we see the world as being at least partly immaterial, or can stuff alone explain the ... (@IAI_TV, 50 minutes, 2019-Apr-09)
565.podcast imageWould Donald Trump’s impeachment be devastating to America’s democratic culture?
Has the weight of expectation on the findings of the Mueller Report foreclosed serious reflection on whether Trump should be impeached? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-May-01)
566.podcast image409: Radical Democracy
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/radical-democracy. Liberal democracy has its problems, including the fact that in trying to build consensus, it often ends up oppressing minorities or those who dissent. Radical democracy, on the other hand, tries to build consensus around difference, and challenge oppressive power relationships. But what are the risks of radical democracy? Is it r... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Apr-01)
567.podcast image#050 Moral By Design With Immanuel Kant and Kathleen Wallace
Is it possible to design a universal moral code? Is it ever acceptable to lie? Hear what the philosopher Immanuel Kant had to say about ethics and his influence in philosophy today. You’ll hear from Hofstra philosophy professor Kathleen A Wallace about Kant’s Categorical Imperative, and whether or not it can help life suck less. #thehappierhour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappie... (@MissMMcCarthy, 35 minutes, 2019-Apr-30)
568.podcast image0G55: Cube and Kafkaesque
"Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a pool cleaning robot, or whether I am now a pool cleaning robot, dreaming I am a man." -RoboZhuangzi This week we're discussing the Canadian Classic, Cube! This movie really exemplifies the concept of "kafkaesque", and we're joined by the amazing Cecil of Cognitive dissonance to unpack this tricky concept. We also dive into the idea of so... (@0gPhilosophy, 43 minutes, 2019-May-01)
569.podcast imageRationally Speaking #232 - Tyler Cowen on "Defending big business against its critics"
Economist Tyler Cowen discusses his latest book, "Big Business: A love-letter to an American anti-hero." Why has anti-capitalist sentiment increased recently, and to what extent is it justified? (@Rspodcast, 64 minutes, 2019-Apr-30)
570.podcast image43 | Matthew Luczy on the Pleasures of Wine
Some people never drink wine; for others, it’s an indispensable part of an enjoyable meal. Whatever your personal feelings might be, wine seems to exhibit a degree of complexity and nuance that can be intimidating to the non-expert. Where does that complexity come from, and how can we best approach wine? To answer these questions, we talk to Matthew Luczy, sommelier and wine director at Mélisse, o... (@seanmcarroll, 106 minutes, 2019-Apr-22)
571.podcast imageWHAT IS IDEOLOGY? With Matto Mildenberger And Jonathan Leader Maynard
What is an ideology? What do intellectuals studying it in opinion polls, contemporary debates, and historical texts understand it to mean? I’m joined by the authors of a recent survey of the study of ideology in different disciplines, Matto Mildenberger and Jonathan Leader Maynard, to help make sense of it all. (@PolPhilPod, 79 minutes, 2019-Apr-28)
572.podcast imageGlimpse: Nietzsche's Last Man (for Partially Examined Life #213)
Is technology making us complacent? Are we in danger of becoming Nietzsche's famed "last men" who are no longer capable of creativity and independent thought? Mark Linsenmayer from the Partially Examined Life philosophy podcast lays out Nietzsche's idea and argues that on the contrary, having our basic needs met by technology can free us up to pursue the creative endeavors that Nietzsche saw as th... (@PartiallyExLife, 8 minutes, 2019-Apr-22)
573.podcast imageEpisode 213: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part Two)
Continuing on Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, books 1 and 2 (1883). We talk through Nietzsche's symbolism (tightrope walkers and gravediggers and snakes, oh my!), the path toward the overman, his screed against the state, the Will to Power as the will to overcome oneself by reconciling oneself with the past, and more. Listen to part one first or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edit... (@PartiallyExLife, 75 minutes, 2019-Apr-22)
574.podcast imageHoP 320 - People of the South - Byzantium and Islam
Intellectual exchange between Christians and Muslims, and the later flowering of Syriac literature including the philosopher Bar Hebraeus. (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2019-Mar-10)
575.podcast imageEpisode #130 ... Dewey and Lippman on Democracy
Today we talk about a famous debate from the early 20th century. (@iamstephenwest, 22 minutes, 2019-Apr-30)
576.podcast image4/3/2019: Sophia Connell on Care and Parenting in Aristotelian Ethics
Sophia Connell is lecturer in ancient philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London. She did her MPhil and PhD at the University of Cambridge. She is a former Fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge and taught philosophy in Cambridge for many years, receiving the Pilkington Prize for teaching excellence in 2016. Her main research interests are ancient Greek philosophy and the history of analyti... (@Aristotweets, 49 minutes, 2019-Mar-08)
577.podcast imagePREVIEW-(sub)Text#6: Melanie Klein's "Notes on Some Schizoid Mechanisms"
Wes Alwan is joined by Dr. Glenn Mobray to discuss this classic 1946 psychoanalytic text. This is a preview of a 63-minute discussion. You can listen to the whole thing by becoming a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. Listen to more (sub)Text. (@PartiallyExLife, 10 minutes, 2019-Apr-21)
578.podcast imageEpisode 60, Albert Camus’ The Fall (Part I - Introduction)
Hello good sir! If you do not mind me saying, you look as if you’re in limbo. Lost? It might please you to know that most of the tourists, and the locals for that matter, don’t know where they’re heading in these parts. If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge? Your smile says it all. Nothing wrong with indulging i... (@ThePanpsycast, 36 minutes, 2019-Apr-28)
579.podcast imageDennis Prager(Prager U) Thinks You Can't Justify Not Murdering Without God
I tackle a new podcast episode format in this one, taking on some Prager U content! I guess Dennis Prager thinks you can't justify not murdering without God. In that case, I hope he continues believing in God for our safety. Anyway, I deconstruct his arguments for objective morality based on God. I also address his misunderstanding of the English language. Prager U video: https://www.youtube.co... (@philosophyguy2, 25 minutes, 2019-Apr-24)
580.podcast imageGuilty
Resentment, blame and guilt are generally placed on the negative side of the ledger of human emotions. Nobody particularly enjoys the way they feel. But they are morally important all the same, both in the public sphere and in the realm of interpersonal relationships. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Apr-28)
581.podcast imageE30: The Imbalance of the Century - Zizek v. Peterson
Who's interested in current events!? This week, the Dawdlers talk about the Slavoj Zizek/Jordan B. Peterson "debate": Happiness: Capitalism vs. Marxism. ...and there's not much else to say! So, declaw your lobsters and have a listen! (@dawdlerspodcast, 70 minutes, 2019-Apr-28)
582.podcast image#56 - Turner on Rules for Robots
In this episode I talk to Jacob Turner. Jacob is a barrister and author. We chat about his new book, Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), which discusses how to address legal responsibility, rights and ethics for AI.You can download here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the show on iTunes, Stitcher and a variety of other services (the RSS feed is he... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Mar-30)
583.podcast imageJill Stauffer, "Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard" (Columbia UP, 2015)
In Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard (Columbia University Press 2015, paperback 2018), Jill Stauffer argues that survivors of unjust treatment and dehumanization can experience further harm when individuals and institutions will not or cannot hear the survivors’ claims about what they suffered and what they are owed for having suffered. She calls this further harm “ethical lonel... (@NewBooksPhil, 62 minutes, 2019-Apr-19)
584.podcast imageWhy Isn't the Internet the "Real" World?
We often talk about a distinction between the online world and the “real” world? We say text or email conversations aren’t real conversations. We say we want to meet people IRL—’in real life’. What does this distinction mean? And is there such a distinction? In this episode, Dylan and Zach attempt to answer these questions. Zach puts forward two claims: 1. We don’t really know what we me... (@thevimblog, 74 minutes, 2019-Apr-22)
585.podcast imageShould We Live Forever? | Patricia MacCormack, Anders Sandberg, Janne Teller
From gene therapy and fad diets to cryonically frozen corpses, many still hope to find a way to live forever. Some scientists are starting to think death might be reversible. But Heidegger famously thought life's transience gave it meaning. Does our fear of death prevent us from living fully? Can we enhance experience by embracing its end? Or could science one day banish death's shadow?Philosopher... (@IAI_TV, 43 minutes, 2019-Apr-02)
586.podcast imageHAP 23 - Nkiru Nzegwu on Gender in African Tradition
An interview with Nkiru Nzegwu on matriarchy and gender fluidity in Africa. (@HistPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Mar-03)
587.podcast image411: The Mystery of Music
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/mystery-music-0. (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Mar-25)
588.podcast imageSocial media: promoter of democratic participation or purveyor of violence?
Can social media platforms be anything other than purveyors of violence in countries with deep and long-standing histories of ethnic-religious tensions? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Apr-24)
589.podcast image42 | Natalya Bailey on Navigating Earth Orbit and Beyond
The space age officially began in 1957 with the launch of the Sputnik 1 satellite. But recent years have seen the beginning of a boom in the number of objects orbiting Earth, as satellite tracking and communications have assumed enormous importance in the modern world. This raises obvious concerns for the control and eventual fate of these orbiting artifacts. Natalya Bailey is pioneering a novel a... (@seanmcarroll, 60 minutes, 2019-Apr-15)
590.podcast image#049 Designing Your Life With Debbie Millman and Jacques Derrida
In this episode you’ll hear how designing our lives can help us be happier. You’ll learn what the award winning design expert and podcast host Debbie Millman has to say about pursuing success and fame, and what the philosopher Jacques Derrida can teach us about meaning and giving voice to the voiceless. #thehappierhour Shownotes: thehappierhour.org Facebook: facebook.com/thehappierhour Instagram: ... (@MissMMcCarthy, 40 minutes, 2019-Apr-23)
591.podcast image0G54: The Fifth Element and Manacheanism
Well, it looks like we're taking another beloved classic and ruining it with our patented ruining sauce. I'm not sure if that makes us team good or team evil, or maybe it proves that those things make no sense, like this movie. Of course we save most of the darkness for after dark and focus on a debate over the nature of evil between Manachean dualism and St. Augustine's "absence of good" model of... (@0gPhilosophy, 44 minutes, 2019-Apr-24)
592.podcast image39: The Authentic Encounter with Beth Benedix
Beth Benedix is a professor of religious studies, world literature and community engagement and in her book Ghost Writer (A Story about Telling a Story), she explores the ethics of narrative. We covered some of the... The post 39: The Authentic Encounter with Beth Benedix appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 29 minutes, 2019-Apr-24)
593.podcast imageIDEOLOGY & BREXIT A conversation with Helen Thompson
IDEOLOGY & BREXIT A conversation with Helen Thompson by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod, 85 minutes, 2019-Apr-21)
594.podcast imageEpisode 213: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Part One)
On Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, books 1 and 2 (1883). What is wisdom? In this text whose style parodies the Bible, we get pithy advice and allegorical imagery to guide us away from self-defeating, life-denying attitudes and orient us towards creative self-overcoming (i.e. exertion of the Will to Power). The Last Man who no longer knows how to give birth to a dancing star is a rott... (@PartiallyExLife, 56 minutes, 2019-Apr-15)
595.podcast imageDisgust
Jo Applin/ Tina Chanter/ Sophie Russell Listen here or on YouTube Disgust is deceptively simple: physical repulsion to something revolting or potentially contagious. Behind this straightforward... Podcasts from the Forum for Philosophy. Science, politics and culture from a philosophical perspective. (@forumphilosophy, 2019-Mar-25)
596.podcast imageEpisode 162: Parents Just Don't Understand (with Paul Bloom)
As parents we like to think we have an impact on our children - their future, their happiness, the kinds of people they turn out to be. But are we deluded? Dave and Tamler are joined by empathy's kryponite, the great Paul Bloom, to talk about Judith Rich Harris's view that parents matter a lot less than you might think (while genes and peer groups matter a lot more than you might think) . Plus... (@verybadwizards, 87 minutes, 2019-Apr-16)
597.podcast imageDemons of Democracy
Preschool kids get their first taste of democratic participation when they vote on their class name, and democratic private schools try to display the value of democracy by making kids vote on everything, even the school budget. Does it work or do kids make terrible decisions? One diagnosis of our modern-day political problems is that too many stupid people are voting for stupid things. There a... (@HiPhiNation, 54 minutes, 2019-Apr-13)
598.podcast imageThe End of Humans | Interview with Patricia MacCormack
Patricia MacCormack is Professor of Continental Philosophy at Anglia Ruskin University, known for her work on Posthuman ethics. In this exclusive interview, Patricia explains why she thinks the world would be a better place without humans. In association with the New College of the Humanities. bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 12 minutes, 2019-Mar-29)
599.podcast imageEpisode 59, God and Suffering: Live in Liverpool
Believe it or not, humans have been debating questions concerning God for as long as couples have been discussing what they fancy for dinner. Does God exist? Is God all-power, all-knowing and all-loving? Shall we try that new Mexican restaurant on Bold Street? In this episode, we’re going to be discussing the existence of God in relation to the problem of evil, more specifically, on what has come ... (@ThePanpsycast, 50 minutes, 2019-Apr-21)
600.podcast image18/2/2019: Nicholas K. Jones on Propositions and Cognitive Relations
Nicholas K. Jones’ research interests lie at the intersection of metaphysics with the philosophy of logic and language, especially anything connected with objecthood. He is currently working on the metaphysics of higher-order quantification and applications of higher-order resources within metaphysics. He arrived at the University of Birmingham as a Birmingham Research Fellow in 2013, and has... (@Aristotweets, 62 minutes, 2019-Feb-24)
601.podcast imageGame of Thrones: Death and Morality
ohhh trying to feed off some of that Game of Thrones final season hype. I discuss the meaning of death and the use of death in Game of Thrones. Tune in! Embrace the Void: https://voidpod.com/podcasts Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKl... (@philosophyguy2, 17 minutes, 2019-Apr-16)
602.podcast imagePolitics and the sacred
According to Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, modern secular politics is theological from the ground up – which may come as a nasty surprise to the many people who believe, often for very good reasons, that religion and politics should be kept as far from each other as possible. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Apr-21)
603.podcast imageHoP 319 - Georgia on My Mind - Petritsi and the Proclus Revival
The Neoplatonist Proclus gets mixed reviews from Christians, as Nicholas of Methone refutes him but the Georgian philosopher Ioane Petritsi helps to revive his thought. (@HistPhilosophy, 19 minutes, 2019-Feb-24)
604.podcast imageThe Future of Pornography | Brooke Magnanti, Finn Mackay, Rowan Pelling, Peter Tatchell
Many believe that porn's dark fantasies risk corrupting relationships and society. Has this arisen because pornography is largely created by men? Could feminist pornography featuring authentic sex, diverse bodies and female perspectives offer a truly liberating alternative? Or is porn fundamentally incompatible with intimacy and a problem for all of us until its abolished? Feminist thinker Finn Ma... (@IAI_TV, 43 minutes, 2019-Mar-26)
605.podcast imageGlimpse: Sartre on Literature (for Partially Examined Life #212)
Should literature be political? Jean-Paul Sartre thought that all literature is political, because of what literature is. That's a very weird-sounding view. Mark Linsenmayer from the Partially Examined Life philosophy podcast tries to make it sound like something you should at least consider. This is but a Glimpse. To hear the full Partial Examination of this book, visit partiallyexaminedlife.co... (@PartiallyExLife, 8 minutes, 2019-Apr-11)
606.podcast imagePHILOSOPHY & HARRY POTTER A Conversation With Brenden Weber
I’m joined by Brenden Weber, host of the Philosophy Guy podcast. We chat about the current state of public philosophy from the podcasting community to the intellectual dark web. We then go into depth on his analysis of the moral philosophy of Harry Potter: Is death part of life - and accepting it a part of a moral life – or is it a problem to be solved? You can check out his podcast at: ... (@PolPhilPod, 65 minutes, 2019-Apr-17)
607.podcast image407: Philosophy of Sleep
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-sleep. "Blessed are the sleepy ones," writes Nietzsche, "for they shall soon drop off." Sleep is an extraordinarily, albeit profoundly odd, phenomenon, yet we seem to accept prolonged nightly blackouts without question. Still, sleep has played a major role in philosophical thought, with the likes of Aristotle, Locke, and Leibniz putting ... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
608.podcast imageThe Optimist's Guide to Schopenhauer's Pessimism (Audio Essay)
Schopenhauer was a profoundly pessimistic man. He argued that all life was suffering. Was he right or is there room for optimism? This audio essay tries to answer that question. It is based on an earlier written essay. You can listen below or download here.These audio essays are released as part of the Philosophical Disquisitions podcast. You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Pl... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Mar-20)
609.podcast image#048 Doubt Q&A: On Skepticism, Cynicism, and Optimism
In this episode you’ll hear how a 14th century Franciscan friar can teach us to make better choices, and what cynicism, skepticism, and optimism have in common with science, Socrates, and musical theater. This is the audience Q&A portion of the event on DOUBT featuring philosophy professor Nick Pappas and molecular biologist turned science advocate, Maryam Zaringhalam. #TheHappierHour Shownotes: t... (@MissMMcCarthy, 30 minutes, 2019-Apr-18)
610.podcast imageT. J. Kasperbauer, "Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes Towards Animals" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Non-human animals are companions, research subjects, creatures we fear, creatures we eat. Why do we put other animals in the various categories we do, and treat them in the various good and bad ways that we do? These are questions about human attitudes towards other animals, and the moral implications of those attitudes. In Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes Towards Animals (Oxford ... (@NewBooksPhil, 63 minutes, 2019-Apr-10)
611.podcast imageEp84 - Feminism and Peace: Jane Addams's Legacy
In episode 84 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Patricia Shields on “Feminism and Peace: Jane Addams's Legacy.” Dr. Shields is editor of editor of Jane Addams: Progressive Pioneer of Peace, Philosophy, Sociology, Social Work, and Public Administration, published in 2017. She is also Professor of Political Science at Texas State University in San Marcos, ... (@PhilosophyBB, 64 minutes, 2019-Mar-29)
612.podcast image41 | Steven Strogatz on Synchronization, Networks, and the Emergence of Complex Behavior
One of the most important insights in the history of science is the fact that complex behavior can arise from the undirected movements of small, simple systems. Despite the fact that we know this, we’re still working to truly understand it — to uncover the mechanisms by which, and conditions under which, complexity can emerge from simplicity. (Coincidentally, a new feature in Quanta on this preci... (@seanmcarroll, 75 minutes, 2019-Apr-08)
613.podcast imageFalse necessities: Is 'taste' enough to morally justify the mass slaughter of animals?
Is our culinary enjoyment enough to justify a complicity in cruelty which our fellow citizens find reprehensible? (@Ariscottle_, 48 minutes, 2019-Apr-17)
614.podcast imageEpisode 212: Sartre on Literature (Part Two)
Continuing on What is Literature? (1948). Sartre gives a phenomenology of reading and writing that makes reading into a creative act of completing the writer's work, and calls this cooperation ethical: the work is an appeal to the reader's freedom, and also the reader's responsibility to then know what the work reveals. Are you shirking, all you skimmers? Start with part one, or get the unbroken, ... (@PartiallyExLife, 62 minutes, 2019-Apr-08)
615.podcast imageThe Sex Myth | Interview with Brooke Magnanti
Brooke Magnanti is best known by her pen name Belle de Jour, from the blog behind Secret Diary of a Call Girl. In this exclusive interview, Brooke explains how we should free ourselves from the shackles surrounding sex from shame, to guilt and toxic femininity. In association with the New College of the Humanities. bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 8 minutes, 2019-Mar-22)
616.podcast imageRationally Speaking #231 - Helen Toner on "Misconceptions about China and artificial intelligence"
Helen Toner, the director of strategy at Georgetown's Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), shares her observations from the last few years of talking with AI scientists and policymakers in the US and China. (@Rspodcast, 59 minutes, 2019-Apr-16)
617.podcast image0G53: Zima Blue and Projects of Worth
Welcome to the beginning of our show's blue period. Until I decide otherwise we'll only be doing sci-fi that's blue themed. Waterworld. The Shape of Water. Mr. MeSeeks. Yellow Submarine. Don't worry, there will be some deeper meaning to it all that you'll probably fail to grasp but will pretend you understand at parties. Okay, enough meta, we're doing the Zima Blue episode from the Netflix series ... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Apr-17)
618.podcast imageHAP 22 - Women Have no Tribe - Gender in African Tradition
What archeology and ethnography tell us about the diverse and often ambiguous roles of men and women in traditional African societies. (@HistPhilosophy, 24 minutes, 2019-Feb-17)
619.podcast imageEpisode 58, ‘The Idealism and Pantheism of May Sinclair’ with Emily Thomas (Part II)
Emily Thomas is an Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Durham University; whose work focuses primarily on the history of metaphysics and the metaphysics of space and time. Thomas’ work in these areas has had a great impact, most notably, through her 2018 books Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics and Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. In this episode, we’ll be discussing Emily... (@ThePanpsycast, 41 minutes, 2019-Apr-14)
620.podcast imageEV - 087 35mm of Void
Our guest this week is Brenden Webber of the Philosophy Guy Podcast. We each list our top 3 voidy films and discuss their merits that make them void worthy.Opening Invocation:John CarpenterMaking The Void Livable:The high school that put on a theatrical production of Alien. (@ETVPod, 46 minutes, 2019-Apr-11)
621.podcast imageShorts - E17: Life is Meaningless
Do you laugh in the face of the abyss? Or do you sob uncontrollably? Either way, it doesn't matter you tiny speck of nothing! In this Short, the Dawdlers use Thomas Nagel's 1971 paper "The Absurd" as a guide for a discussion of the meaning of life (or something like that). Enjoy the discussion or cry yourself to sleep while listening. It doesn't matter. Nothing does!! -Ye olde Dawdlers (@dawdlerspodcast, 35 minutes, 2019-Apr-15)
622.podcast image#55 - Baum on the Long-Term Future of Human Civilisation
In this episode I talk to Seth Baum. Seth is an interdisciplinary researcher working across a wide range of fields in natural and social science, engineering, philosophy, and policy. His primary research focus is global catastrophic risk. He also works in astrobiology. He is the Co-Founder (with Tony Barrett) and Executive Director of the Global Catastrophic Risk Institute. He is also a Research A... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Mar-14)
623.podcast imageThe New Enlightenment | Julian Baggini, Amie Thomasson, Hilary Lawson
'Dare to know' was the radical rallying cry of the Enlightenment. But since then, philosophers from Nietzsche to Derrida have argued there are limits to knowledge so profound that truth is an impossible goal. Is the enlightenment dream over? Or can we forge a New Enlightenment that abandons ultimate truth but provides us with directions just as radical and exciting as the original? A Short History... (@IAI_TV, 37 minutes, 2019-Mar-19)
624.podcast image476: Immigration and Multiculturalism
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/immigration-and-multiculturalism. Whether for economic reasons or to flee violence and persecution, immigration rates continue to climb globally. At the same time, opposition to immigration and intolerance of multiculturalism is also growing. Should cultural or ethnic identity ever be a factor in immigration policy? Do immigrants have an obligation... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Mar-11)
625.podcast imageNutting it out
How are your critical thinking skills? Fine, you say. Everybody sees themselves as a competent critical thinker. But when you break critical thinking down to its component skills, it turns out to be more complicated and difficult than you might expect. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Apr-14)
626.podcast imageEpisode 62 - Denny Borsboom
On Episode 62, Nick chats with Dr. Denny Borsboom, Professor of Psychology and program leader of the Psychological Methods Group at the University of Amsterdam, about how he applies philosophy of science to to his research in psychological methods, conceptual issues in contemporary psychometrics, and his influential work on network approaches to psychopathology. (@SciPhiPod, 2019-Apr-08)
627.podcast image4/2/2019 – Amia Srinivasan on Genealogy
Amia Srinivasan is an Associate Professor of philosophy at Oxford and a tutorial fellow at St John’s College. Previously she was a permanent lecturer at University College London and a Prize Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. She works on topics in epistemology, metaphilosophy, political philosophy and feminism, and is currently writing a book on the genealogy of belief. Her essays and criticism... (@Aristotweets, 59 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
628.podcast imageBen Shapiro's "The Right Side of History": Analyzed
Sooo I read Ben Shapiro's new book, The Right Side of History, friends! Well, now let me provide my analysis of his philosophical arguments. Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqYKgKlEBRf4658pc8NeTw Merch: https://teespring.com/store... (@philosophyguy2, 26 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
629.podcast imageHoP 318 - Oliver Primavesi on Greek Manuscripts
Peter's Munich colleague Oliver Primavesi tells us how Greek manuscripts are used to establish the text of authors like Aristotle. (@HistPhilosophy, 36 minutes, 2019-Feb-10)
630.podcast imageTruth in a Post Truth World | Interview with Hilary Lawson
Hilary Lawson is a post realist philosopher, known for his theory of Closure. In this exclusive interview, Hilary explains how we should understand truth in a post truth world and why we need Enlightenment thinking now more than ever. In association with the New College of the Humanities bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 11 minutes, 2019-Mar-15)
631.podcast image40 | Adrienne Mayor on Gods and Robots in Ancient Mythology
The modern world is full of technology, and also with anxiety about technology. We worry about robot uprisings and artificial intelligence taking over, and we contemplate what it would mean for a computer to be conscious or truly human. It should probably come as no surprise that these ideas aren’t new to modern society — they go way back, at least to the stories and mythologies of ancient Greece.... (@seanmcarroll, 63 minutes, 2019-Apr-01)
632.podcast imageWhat are the limits of Australia’s obligations to its citizens?
Do modern nation-states have persistent obligations to their citizens, even when those citizens engage in behaviour that seems to deny their membership to that political community? (@Ariscottle_, 41 minutes, 2019-Apr-10)
633.podcast imageEpisode 212: Sartre on Literature (Part One)
On Jean-Paul Sartre's What is Literature (1948), ch. 1 and 2. What's the purpose of literature? Why write prose as opposed to poetry? Sartre argues that while poetry is about the words themselves, prose is about the ideas, so it's necessarily political. A written work is essentially an ethical appeal for a reader to apply his or her own faculties and experiences to complete the work through the ac... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Apr-01)
634.podcast imageMichael Hannon, "What is the Point of Knowledge? A Function-First Epistemology" (Oxford UP, 2019)
Epistemologists working traditional modes have sought to discover the necessary and sufficient conditions under which one has knowledge. This has led to several tricky philosophical problems. Perhaps most notorious of these are the problems concerning skepticism. It seems that any analysis of knowledge admits of cases where the analysis is satisfied and yet knowledge has not been secured. This... (@NewBooksPhil, 62 minutes, 2019-Apr-01)
635.podcast imagePREVIEW-(sub)Text#5: Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya"
Wes Alwan is joined by Monica McCarthy of the Happier Hour podcast to discuss Anton Chekhov's 1898 play about family dysfunction and potentially wasting your life. This is a preview of a 54-minute discussion. You can listen to the whole thing by becoming a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter. Visit partiallyexaminedlife.com/support to learn how. (@PartiallyExLife, 8 minutes, 2019-Apr-01)
636.podcast imageName of God (2019)
A few days after the New Zealand Mosque massacre, Dr. Thaya Ashman heard about a woman who was too afraid to come out in public in her hijab for fear of being targeted. So Dr. Ashman had an idea to invite every person in New Zealand to wear a headscarf in public. The result was quite different from what happened in America three years ago, when a woman who tried to make a similar gesture of good w... (@HiPhiNation, 54 minutes, 2019-Mar-30)
637.podcast imageFuturism, Fascism, & Other Audience Questions.
I take questions from Facebook and twitter on Ancient Stoic Philosophers, J S Mill, randomization in democracy, ethical consumerism, futuristic concerns about body modification and if fascism is left wing or right wing. (@PolPhilPod, 51 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
638.podcast image0G52: Infinity Wars and Overpopulation
Lemme just get my witty banter beard on: Hey kids, do you like violence? Want to see Murtle the turtle stick needles in Dr. Strange's eyelids? Sorry, not current enough pop culture reference? How bout this? What's big, purple, has a jewelry fetish, and makes some really sound points about overpopulation? That's right! A Kardashian Oompa loompa. Too many references mashed together? Okay, how bou... (@0gPhilosophy, 42 minutes, 2019-Apr-10)
639.podcast imageEpisode 161: Reach-Around Knowledge and Bottom Performers (The Dunning-Kruger Effect)
The less we know, the more we know it. David and Tamler talk about the notorious Dunning-Kruger effect, which makes us overconfident in beliefs on topics we're ignorant about and under-confident when we're experts. Plus, we break down an evolutionary psychology article on why poor men and hungry men prefer women with big breasts. Trust us, it's a really bad study. We're sure about it. (@verybadwizards, 85 minutes, 2019-Apr-02)
640.podcast imageEV - 086 Buckle Up, We're Talking Politics
This week we're joined by Toby Buckle of the Political Philosophy Podcast. We discuss the role of language in political debate. Special thanks to Toby for supplying us with his backup audio and special thanks to Brian Ziegenhagen for editing the show.Opening Invocation:Jake the Fake JakePolitical Philosophy Podcast: https://www.politicalphilosophypodcast.com/ (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Apr-05)
641.podcast imageEpisode 113: Tom Pashby discusses quantum mechanics
In this episode, Tom Pashby explains how quantum physics is different from theories that came before, and runs through some of the ways that philosophers and physicists have tried to make intuitive sense of this challenging framework. (@ElucidationsPod, 36 minutes, 2019-Apr-08)
642.podcast imageThe Moral Problem of Accelerating Change (Audio Essay)
(Subscribe here)This is an experiment. For a number of years, people have been asking me to provide audio versions of the essays that I post on the blog. I've been reluctant to do this up until now, but I have recently become a fan of the audio format and I appreciate its conveniences. Also, I watched an interview with Michael Lewis (the best-selling non-fiction author in the world) just this week... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Mar-07)
643.podcast image406: Altered States
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/altered-states. Aldous Huxley explains his conception of the brain as a "reducing valve" of consciousness in his provocative book, The Doors of Perception. His famous experiment with the psychedelic substance mescaline was an attempt to open this valve and expand his capacity for knowledge. However, many drugs and psychedelics today are seen as sim... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Mar-04)
644.podcast imageDemocracy
How can we save democracy? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2019-Mar-19)
645.podcast imageWhy is There Something Rather than Nothing? | Amie Thomasson, George Ellis, Rupert Sheldrake
The fundamental problem of philosophy, argued Heidegger, is 'why is there something rather than nothing?' Now, some scientists claim nothing doesn't exist and that even deepest space is full of virtual particles. Have we misunderstood the very idea of nothing? Is this little more than a logical mistake, or might understanding nothing just be the key to explaining the universe? Templeton prize winn... (@IAI_TV, 32 minutes, 2019-Mar-12)
646.podcast imageEpisode 58, ‘The Idealism and Pantheism of May Sinclair’ with Emily Thomas (Part I)
Emily Thomas is an Assistant Professor in Philosophy at Durham University; whose work focuses primarily on the history of metaphysics and the metaphysics of space and time. Thomas’ work in these areas has had a great impact, most notably, through her 2018 books Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics and Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. In this episode, we’ll be discussing Emily... (@ThePanpsycast, 46 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
647.podcast imageThe Ethics of Stress, Resilience, and Moral Injury Among Police and Military Personnel
Professor Seumas Miller sets out how the use of lethal and coercive forces may erode moral character and cause moral injury. According to leading psychiatrist Jonathan Shay whose patients are US war veterans, “Moral injury is an essential part of any combat trauma that leads to lifelong psychological injury. Veterans can usually recover from horror, fear and grief so long as ”what’s right” has als... (@ethicsinthenews, 56 minutes, 2019-Mar-26)
648.podcast imageHAP 21 - The Doctor Will See You Now - Divination, Witchcraft, and Knowledge
Special forms of knowledge and the explanation of misfortunes in African tradition. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Feb-03)
649.podcast imageJordan Peele's 'Us': Philosophy, Symbolism, and Self-Examination
Jordan Peele has done it again in this one. The creator of Get Out has made a great film full of deeper meanings and thoughtful symbolism. I take a look at his recent film 'Us' that has been all the rage. How does the film force us to examine not only ourselves but society itself? Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: http... (@philosophyguy2, 14 minutes, 2019-Apr-02)
650.podcast imageArtificial intelligence, real emotions
Artificial intelligence is pretty impressive these days. An AI robot can interact with humans in ways that give a strong impression of empathy, intellectual engagement and independent thought. A robot can smile, frown and respond to emotional cues offered by human faces and voices. But can it experience real emotions of its own? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
651.podcast imageShorts - E16: The Good Life
One way or many ways or any ways... Is there a recipe to live The Good Life? (@dawdlerspodcast, 18 minutes, 2019-Apr-07)
652.podcast imageThe Secrets of Consciousness | Interview with Rupert Sheldrake
Rupert Sheldrake is a renowned author and biologist, known for his research into parapsychology. In this exclusive interview, Rupert shares with us the secrets of consciousness, putting forward a panpsychist view of what it is to be conscious and debunking why materialism has failed. In association with the New College of the Humanities. bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 9 minutes, 2019-Mar-08)
653.podcast image21/1/2019 – Keith Allen asks Whether We Should Believe Philosophical Claims on Testimony
Keith Allen is Senior Lecturer at the University of York. He has been at York since 2007, and before that was Jacobsen Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy (2005-7). His areas of research include colour, perception, and the history of philosophy, particularly early modern philosophy and phenomenology. He is the author of A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour (Oxford University Press, 2016) an... (@Aristotweets, 43 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
654.podcast imageLIBERTARIANISM 4 The Nature Of Change
In the finale I continue the story of liberalism vs libertarianism into the middle of the twentieth century. We explore the Keynes vs Hayek debate, the formulation of the modern welfare state and the 1945 general election. The finale also covers the different battlegrounds of ideological competition and ends by arguing for a particular understanding of what political change is and how it is poss... (@PolPhilPod, 126 minutes, 2019-Apr-02)
655.podcast image39 | Malcolm MacIver on Sensing, Consciousness, and Imagination
Consciousness has many aspects, from experience to wakefulness to self-awareness. One aspect is imagination: our minds can conjure up multiple hypothetical futures to help us decide which choices we should make. Where did that ability come from? Today’s guest, Malcolm MacIver, pinpoints an important transition in the evolution of consciousness to when fish first climbed on to land, and could sudde... (@seanmcarroll, 80 minutes, 2019-Mar-25)
656.podcast imageHoP 317 - Made by Hand - Byzantine Manuscripts
Without handwritten copies produced by Byzantine scribes, we would know almost nothing about ancient philosophy. How and why were they made? (@HistPhilosophy, 24 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
657.podcast imageEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part Three)
Moving finally on to Jean-Paul Sartre's "Black Orpheus" (1948), where he introduces a book of black poetry by praising its revolutionary spirit as embodied in "negritude." Is this a legitimate consciousness-raising exercise or a weird fetishization of blackness? Listen to parts one and two first, or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition, which will also get you access to (sub)Text#5 on Checkho... (@PartiallyExLife, 69 minutes, 2019-Mar-25)
658.podcast imageEp83 - Philosophy and Environmental Policy
In episode 83 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Andrew Light on “Philosophy and Environmental Policy.” Dr. Light is University Professor of Philosophy, Public Policy, and Atmospheric Sciences and Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy at George Mason University. He is also Distinguished Senior Fellow at the World Resources Institute i... (@PhilosophyBB, 76 minutes, 2019-Mar-12)
659.podcast image408: The Philanthropy Trap
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philanthropy-trap. Many of us generally admire people who donate large sums of money to charity. Yet people donate for all sorts of reasons – some selfless, some not so much. Should we consider philanthropy as mere ego expression for the wealthy, or is it genuinely altruistic behavior? If philanthropists are so concerned with having an impact on so... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
660.podcast imageEpisode #54 - Sebo on the Moral Problem of Other Minds
In this episode I talk to Jeff Sebo. Jeff is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Affiliated Professor of Bioethics, Medical Ethics, and Philosophy, and Director of the Animal Studies M.A. Program at New York University.  Jeff’s research focuses on bioethics, animal ethics, and environmental ethics. He has two co-authored books Chimpanzee Rights and Food, Animals, and the ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Feb-28)
661.podcast imageIs literary fiction necessary for the moral life?
What does a society lose when it neglects the moral discipline of reading literary fiction? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Apr-03)
662.podcast imageLeadership in the Age of Trump | Jess Phillips, Jon Barnes, Tania Branigan
There are many who see Trump and Putin as a threat to world peace. But are they in power because we believe that strong leaders are good for us? Is it a mistake to imagine that leaders can solve all of our problems? Can we imagine a politics where we voted for policies rather than personalities? Or do we need leaders, however flawed they might be? Outspoken Labour MP Jess Phillips, Guardian journa... (@IAI_TV, 43 minutes, 2019-Mar-05)
663.podcast imageRationally Speaking #230 - Kelsey Piper on “Big picture journalism: covering the topics that matter in the long run”
This episode features journalist Kelsey Piper, blogger and journalist for "Future Perfect," a new site focused on topics that impact the long-term future of the world. (@Rspodcast, 53 minutes, 2019-Apr-02)
664.podcast image0G51: The Ricklantis Mixup and Artistic Improvement
After a trilogy like this, what is left to be said? All the references have been made. All the Chidi'ing about better and worse art. And lets all be honest, after pouring our hearts into these episodes, we all know the buzz will be 95% about what we're doing next week, so go ahead and scroll on down. You've earned it. Tradition and the Individual talent: https://www.bartleby.com/200/sw4.html Supp... (@0gPhilosophy, 46 minutes, 2019-Apr-03)
665.podcast imageEpisode 57, ‘Pantheism: Personhood, Consciousness and God’ with Sam Coleman (Part II)
Specialising in philosophy of mind, Sam Coleman is a reader in philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire. Coleman’s main work centres around questions concerning consciousness, predominantly, on what has come to be known as ‘the hard problem of consciousness’. To paraphrase Colin McGinn, the problem can be summarised as follows: how does soggy grey matter give rise to vivid technicolour experi... (@ThePanpsycast, 36 minutes, 2019-Mar-31)
666.podcast imageBad Philosophy: God's Not Dead
Ohhh I cover some horrendous argumentation in this one. Does God's Not Dead prove the existence of God? No. The God's Not Dead film pretends to argue for the existence of God honestly...I explain why that is definitely not the case. Let's talk some philosophy, tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/t... (@philosophyguy2, 25 minutes, 2019-Mar-26)
667.podcast imageHAP 20 - I Am Because We Are - Communalism in African Ethics and Politics
Emphasis on the value of community as a major theme in African philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Jan-20)
668.podcast imageEpisode 61 - David Papineau
On Episode 61, Nick chats with Dr. David Papineau, Professor of Philosophy of Science at King's College London and the City University of New York Graduate Center, about stories from his early days studying the logic of statistical inference under Ian Hacking, his work on philosophical naturalism, teleosemantics, and consciousness, and how he came to write his most recent book, “Knowing the Score:... (@SciPhiPod, 91 minutes, 2019-Mar-25)
669.podcast imageThe ecology of torture
Who is responsible for acts of torture? Individual perpetrators, certainly. But focusing on the guilt of individuals can lead us to miss the significance of context - social, political, cultural, the "ecology" of complex circumstances within which practices of torture occur. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-31)
670.podcast imageThe Digital Revolution | Interview with Jon Barnes
Jon Barnes is a guest lecturer at the world's top business schools, innovator and author. In this exclusive interview, Jon shares with us how technology is already being used to shape the way we vote, organise and think about politics. From Democracy Squared to Tech Monopolies, Jon's work has focused on the relationship between technology and democracy and here he shares why he thinks we should be... (@IAI_TV, 11 minutes, 2019-Mar-01)
671.podcast imageShorts - E15: Health
What's a healthy podcast release schedule? We sure don't know but are trying to figure it out! (@dawdlerspodcast, 21 minutes, 2019-Mar-31)
672.podcast image475: The 2019 Dionysus Awards
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/2019-dionysus-awards. What movies of the past year challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Josh and Ken talk to philosophers, film critics, and listeners as they present their sixth (mostly) annual Dionysus Awards for the most thoughtful films of the past year, including: • Least Superficial Superhero Movie • B... (@philtalkradio, 7 minutes, 2019-Feb-18)
673.podcast imageDiscussion of Massive Online Peer Review and Open Access Publishing
In the information age, knowledge is power. Hence, facilitating the access to knowledge to wider publics empowers citizens and makes societies more democratic. How can publishers and authors contribute to this process? This podcast addresses this issue. We interview Professor Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, whose book, The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance (forthcoming with MIT Pr... (@NewBooksPhil, 32 minutes, 2019-Mar-19)
674.podcast image38 | Alan Lightman on Transcendence, Science, and a Naturalist’s Sense of Meaning
Let’s say, for sake of argument, that you don’t believe in God or the supernatural. Is there still a place for talking about transcendence, the sacred, and meaning in life? Some of the above, but not all? Today’s guest, Alan Lightman, brings a unique perspective to these questions, as someone who has worked within both the sciences and the humanities at the highest level. In his most recent book, ... (@seanmcarroll, 77 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
675.podcast imageThinking Across the World | Julian Baggini
How have ideas across the world shaped the places from which they emerged? Author and philosopher Julian Baggini explores global thinking and its varied influence on our cultures, our ideals and how we see ourselves. In association with the New College of the Humanities. bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 33 minutes, 2019-Feb-26)
676.podcast imageEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part Two)
Continuing on Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate (1946). Is there an "authentic" way to respond to persecution? As part of his critique of anti-semitism, Sartre criticized the responses of some Jews to this situation, e.g. denying that the persecution exists, pretending to not be Jewish, or in any way accepting the terms of anti-semitism and setting up o... (@PartiallyExLife, 48 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
677.podcast imageHoP 316 - Just Measures - Law, Money, and War in Byzantium
Legal and economic thought in Byzantium: the sources of the law’s authority, the relation of church and civil law, just price, and just war. (@HistPhilosophy, 22 minutes, 2019-Jan-13)
678.podcast imageThe Forever War
This year will mark the 18th anniversary of the war in Afghanistan, the forever war characterized by regime change, a surge, drawdowns, and then re-engagement across three Presidential administrations. We take a retrospective of the entire war, from the forgotten events of the lead-up to its total financial and moral costs to date. Journalist Douglas Wissing and Professor Neta Crawford of the Cost... (@HiPhiNation, 50 minutes, 2019-Mar-16)
679.podcast imageEp87 - Going to College in the Sixties
In this 87th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. John Thelin, University Research Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation at the University of Kentucky and author of Going to College in the Sixties. John is an historian and author of many books, including his widely read and studied A History of American Higher Education. He was honor... (@PhilosophyBB, 64 minutes, 2019-Mar-04)
680.podcast imageEpisode 160: Everything is Meaningless: The Book of Ecclesiastes
David and Tamler dive into the book of Ecclesiastes, an absurdist classic that is somehow also a book of the Bible. Is everything meaningless, vain, and a chasing after the wind? Are humans just the same as animals? Are wise people no better off than fools? Will God judge us after we die, rewarding the good people and punishing the shit-heels? What if there is no afterlife and this is all we get? ... (@verybadwizards, 94 minutes, 2019-Mar-19)
681.podcast imageWe Are Not Good
Hmmm, I give off a little bit of my opinion in this one. Just went down the rabbit hole. I'm posting because I want all your thoughts. How good are we? When I hear this question, I want my gut reaction to be yes, of course, we are good! But the thinking side of me starts to take over, ‘but is this the case?’ Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and G... (@philosophyguy2, 13 minutes, 2019-Mar-21)
682.podcast imageWhy does antisemitism cut across the political spectrum?
Why is it that most other forms of racist contempt can find a place in the diseased branches of antisemitism? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Mar-27)
683.podcast image#047 Weird Science With Karl Popper and Maryam Zaringhalam
In this episode you’ll learn the difference between science and pseudoscience and how the philosopher Karl Popper radically changed how we view both. You’ll also hear from molecular biologist turned science advocate, Maryam Zaringhalam, about why diversity is imperative for progress, and how all of us can (and should) ward off science skeptics in order for all of us to be happier. #thehappierhour ... (@MissMMcCarthy, 35 minutes, 2019-Mar-26)
684.podcast imageBREXIT, IRELAND, AND THE CONSTITUTION - A Conversation With Cathy Barry
What does Brexit mean for peace in Ireland, Parliamentary democracy, and the British constitution? How should we think about the motivations and actions of all involved? Is there any way forward from here? Cathy Barry joins the podcast to help me make sense of it all. Cathy is editor of the Irish philosophy blog www.irishphilosophy.com You can follow her on twitter @cathyby and @irishphiloso... (@PolPhilPod, 115 minutes, 2019-Mar-24)
685.podcast imageEpisode #53 - Christin on How Algorithms Actually Impact Workers
In this episode I talk to Angèle Christin. Angèle is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, where she is also affiliated with the Sociology Department and Program in Science, Technology, and Society. Her research focuses on how algorithms and analytics transform professional values, expertise, and work practices. She is currently working on a book on the ... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Feb-18)
686.podcast image0G50: The Ricklantis Mixup and Aesthetic Objectivity
Now that the exposition zone is done, this seems like a time for a drink and a wild, twisty podcast with elitist overtones. A podcast about art, about objectivity, references, poetry! Podcasts are for philosophizing, and now is the time for Aesthetics! ::cue the creepy Morty music:: Tradition and the Individual talent: https://www.bartleby.com/200/sw4.html Support us at Patreon: https://www.patre... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Mar-27)
687.podcast imageListener Qs 8
We survived another nominal gauntlet! Thanks again to everyone who contributes to the collective in any form. We'll merge into Roko's Basilisk in no time. Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): https://www.facebook.com/groups/985828008244018/ Email us... (@0gPhilosophy, 48 minutes, 2019-Mar-27)
688.podcast image38: A Story about Telling a Story (about Telling a Story) with Beth Benedix
Humans are captivated by stories. Stories draw people in–they take raw facts and infuse them with meaning and significance. But is it acceptable to take the facts of someone’s life and turn them into an entertaining... The post 38: A Story about Telling a Story (about Telling a Story) with Beth Benedix appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 29 minutes, 2019-Mar-27)
689.podcast imageEpisode 57, ‘Pantheism: Personhood, Consciousness and God’ with Sam Coleman (Part I)
Specialising in philosophy of mind, Sam Coleman is a reader in philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire. Coleman’s main work centres around questions concerning consciousness, predominantly, on what has come to be known as ‘the hard problem of consciousness’. To paraphrase Colin McGinn, the problem can be summarised as follows: how does soggy grey matter give rise to vivid technicolour experi... (@ThePanpsycast, 43 minutes, 2019-Mar-24)
690.podcast imageBonus episode: Behind the scenes at our music and philosophy festival HowTheLightGetsIn!
In this special bonus episode, we go behind the scenes of HowTheLightGetsIn, the world’s largest music and philosophy festival, to find out the philosophy behind the festival and hear from the producers about what speakers, ideas, music and comedy will be abuzz at HowTheLightGetsIn Hay 2019 from 24-27th May. Tickets here: https://howthelightgetsin.org/hay/ Or check our social media: ... (@IAI_TV, 9 minutes, 2019-Feb-22)
691.podcast imageHAP 19 - Behind the Mask - African Philosophy of the Person
Traditional African ideas about personhood, which challenge assumptions about the relation between mind and body, self and other. (@HistPhilosophy, 18 minutes, 2019-Jan-06)
692.podcast image474: What Do We Owe Future Generations?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-do-we-owe-future-generations. We talk about owing future generations a better world. We might also think that we should do things for future generations even if our actions might not benefit present-day people. But is it possible to have obligations to people who are not yet born? Can people who do not exist be said to have rights that we shou... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
693.podcast imageExamining Yourself: Is the Self an Illusion?
Hello everyone! A big announcement in this one friends. Plus, some audio to let you know what the heck I'm talking about. Yeet, Youtube channel!!!! Please subscribe, give a thumbs up, and watch the video to help support! Link: https://youtu.be/2PLAu5lj2iw (@philosophyguy2, 10 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
694.podcast imageEpisode 60 - James "Jack" Justus
On Episode 60, Nick chats with Dr. James “Jack” Justus, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Floria State University, about how his early interest in the outdoors led to his work in the philosophy of conservation ecology, his heroic attempt to integrate decision theory and environmental ethics, and his upcoming book on the philosophy of ecology. (@SciPhiPod, 89 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
695.podcast imageTechne-logy
The ancient Greek root of our word "technology" is techne, which means "craftsmanship" or "art". In a world where technology today is thought of in mechanistic terms - consumer items that simply appear in our lives and perform certain functions - is it time we rediscovered the techne behind its development? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-24)
696.podcast imageShorts - E14: Fairness
This week the Dawdlers talk about Fairness. Medieval fairs, County fairs...everything... (@dawdlerspodcast, 23 minutes, 2019-Mar-24)
697.podcast imageWhat Is Justice? | Sarah Langford
Sarah Langford is a barrister. Her job is to stand in court representing the mad and the bad, the vulnerable, the heartbroken and the hopeful. She must become their voice: weave their story around the black and white of the law and tell it to the courtroom. These stories may not make headlines but they will change the lives of ordinary people in extraordinary ways. They are stories which, but... (@IAI_TV, 25 minutes, 2019-Feb-19)
698.podcast imageHoP 315 - Wiser Than Men - Gender in Byzantium
The role of women in Byzantine society and the complex attitudes surrounding eunuchs: did they make up a “third gender”? (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2018-Dec-30)
699.podcast image37 | Edward Watts on the End of the Roman Republic and Lessons for Democracy
When many of us think “Ancient Rome,” we think of the Empire and the Caesars. But the Empire was preceded by the Roman Republic, which flourished for a full five centuries. Why, after such a long and prosperous run, would an essentially democratic form of government change — with a good deal of approval from its citizens — into an autocracy? That’s the question I discuss with today’s guest, histor... (@seanmcarroll, 91 minutes, 2019-Mar-11)
700.podcast imageEV - 085 This Rand Is My Rand
Aaron just couldn't get enough Ayn Rand from episode 83 that we decided to revisit one of her main philosophical principles: Egoism. We attempt to steel bot the idea and then tear it down to pieces.Opening Invocation:Ricklantis MixupMaking The Void Livable:Rock Climbing (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Mar-17)
701.podcast imageEpisode 211: Sartre on Racism and Authenticity (Part One)
On Jean-Paul Sartre's Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate (1946) and "Black Orpheus" (1948). How can we best understand the psychology of racism? Sartre condemns anti-Semitism as denying the facts of the human condition: the responsibility for fixing problems and not blaming them on a demonized other. But he also criticizes "the democrat" for a humanism that pretends we're ... (@PartiallyExLife, 59 minutes, 2019-Mar-11)
702.podcast imageElizabeth Schechter, "Self-Consciousness and Split Brains: The Mind's I" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Human brains have two hemispheres whose major connection is the corpus callosum, which enables information to be shared between the hemispheres. Split-brain subjects are people whose corpus callosum has been surgically cut to alleviate epilepsy. This and other similar operations or conditions yield an odd phenomenon in which the patient appears to be two agents: for example, in controlled experime... (@NewBooksPhil, 66 minutes, 2019-Mar-11)
703.podcast imageConstellary Tales #6: Philip K. Dick's "Minority Report" (PEL Crossover Special)
PEL's Mark Linsenmayer joins hosts Ken Gerber and Brian Hirt to weigh in on the philosophical implications of precognitive crime fighting in Philip K. Dick's "The Minority Report." Brian quizzes Mark and Ken on PKD movie trivia. Get more Constellary Tales podcasts, and read original sf in the magazine at constellary.com. Listen to PEL #175 on Blade Runner. (@PartiallyExLife, 59 minutes, 2019-Mar-11)
704.podcast imageWhat does the Christchurch shooting demand of us?
Why has it taken the sound of bullets fired and the sight of blood spilled to get some to see Muslims as fully human, as capable of placing demands on our attention or claims for our respect? (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Mar-20)
705.podcast imageInto The Void - A Conversation With ETV's Aaron R (2)
Without free will or agency is morality possible? What could we ever really say we know about morality, is such knowledge possible and how would we go about knowing it? I go deep in my second part with Aaron from the Embrace The Void podcast. https://voidpod.com https://www.patreon.com/PoliticalPhilosophyPodcast (@PolPhilPod, 52 minutes, 2019-Mar-17)
706.podcast image#046 Doubt With Socrates and Nick Pappas
In this episode you’ll hear the philosophical history of “doubt” and learn why a healthy dose of skepticism can help us face our fears in work and life today. Philosophy professor Nick Pappas and host Monica McCarthy chat about Socrates’ contributions to the topic of doubt and how we can apply his lessons in order to live more well-examined lives. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Facebook: @TheH... (@MissMMcCarthy, 39 minutes, 2019-Mar-19)
707.podcast imageHAP 18 - One to Rule Them All - God in African Philosophy
Is traditional African religion in some sense monotheist, despite the worship of many divinities? (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2018-Dec-23)
708.podcast imageRationally Speaking #229 - John Nerst on "Erisology, the study of disagreement"
This episode features John Nerst, data scientist and blogger at everythingstudies.com, discussing a potential new field called "erisology," the study of disagreement. (@Rspodcast, 65 minutes, 2019-Mar-19)
709.podcast image410: Identity Politics
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/identity-politics-0. The notion of identity has become so hugely important in contemporary political discourse that no conversation on social issues would be complete without it. Identity politics typically focuses on how to empower individuals from marginalized groups so that they can achieve greater equality and representation. But why should any... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2019-Feb-04)
710.podcast imageSpider-Man: The Growing Pains of Life
I talk some Spider-Man in this one friends! More so focussing on the new one, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Anyway, how does this film connect with the audience? It connects with everyone, that's the point. But what does this connection do for our lives? What does it force us to examine? Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full A... (@philosophyguy2, 12 minutes, 2019-Mar-13)
711.podcast image0G49: The Ricklantis Mixup and Aesthetics, Part 1
Aw Jeez, we're grabbing all sorts of third rails on this one. We're doing a multi-parter on an episode of Rick and morty, some might say THE episode of Rick and Morty, and we're talking aesthetics, AND we're going to try to figure out why T.S. Eliot thinks art can't improve and what he means by that and is he right or is he proven wrong by Ricklantis being possibly the best episode of television e... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Mar-20)
712.podcast imageListener Qs 7
No snark or satire or pop culture references here, just a big earnest thank you for supporting us and making all this possible. We've had so much fun and we've just barely scratched the surface. So yeah, thanks! Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to join): ht... (@0gPhilosophy, 46 minutes, 2019-Mar-20)
713.podcast imageIs there a Moral Problem with the Gig Economy?
Is 'gig work' exploitative and injust? In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Daniel Halliday examines the common concerns from an ethical perspective. Recent advances in communication economy have created new ways for consumers to access service labour. Those who own the platforms associated with these services typically do not employ their workers, but treat them as freelance or 'gig' wor... (@ethicsinthenews, 41 minutes, 2019-Mar-04)
714.podcast imageEpisode 56, ‘Utopia for Realists’ with Rutger Bregman (Part II)
Rutger Bregman is a historian and author, best known for his bestselling book, Utopia for Realists: and how we can get there. Arguing for new utopian ideas such as a fifteen-hour work week and universal basic income, Utopia for Realists has been translated into over 30 different languages, making headlines and sparking movements across the world. Despite the fact we’ve never had it better, says Br... (@ThePanpsycast, 35 minutes, 2019-Mar-17)
715.podcast imageHoP 314 - Katerina Ierodiakonou on Byzantine Commentaries
A chat about commentaries on Aristotle from Byzantium with guest Katerina Ierodiakonou. (@HistPhilosophy, 31 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
716.podcast imageDo we Need Romance to be Happy? | Bella DePaulo, Anders Sandberg, Heidi Rice
From medieval legends to Hollywood endings to the horoscope, we are led to believe that lifelong love means happiness. But a recent survey of 814 separate studies showed single people to be happier, more fulfilled and less stressed. Is it time to stop seeing romantic love as all-important? Could living by and for ourselves be radically liberating? Or is it the search for love that makes us human? ... (@IAI_TV, 34 minutes, 2019-Feb-12)
717.podcast imageE29: Hustling Past the Graveyard - Ideation in the New Gilded Age
“If you want new ideas, read old books.” -Ivan Pavlov This was the sentiment Ryan witnessed at an evolution conference a few years back. On the one hand, it is a condemnation of the state of originality in science. And, on the other, it is a commendation of its resourcefulness. But why the need for such resourcefulness? What’s the problem? In this episode the Dawdlers talk about the state of i... (@dawdlerspodcast, 111 minutes, 2019-Mar-18)
718.podcast image26/11/2018 – Stephen Neale on Means Means Means
Stephen Neale is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics, and Kornblith Chair in the Philosophy of Science and Value at the City University of New York. He is a British philosopher and specialist in the philosophy of language who has written extensively about meaning, information, interpretation, and communication, and more generally about issues at the intersection of philosophy and... (@Aristotweets, 59 minutes, 2018-Dec-08)
719.podcast imageAre we enlightened?
Most of us think of the European Enlightenment as a historical period during which society cast off the shackles of mythic thinking. Today, mythic thinking is alive and well in the era of neo-liberal capitalism - at least that's according to the analysis of critical theory, a mode of philosophy deeply rooted in the dynamics of history. Critical theory comes to us via Max Horkheimer and Theodor Ado... (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-17)
720.podcast imageHAP 17 - Event Horizon - African Philosophy of Time
John Mbiti’s influential and controversial claim that traditional Africans experience time as having “a long past, a present, and virtually no future.” (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2018-Dec-09)
721.podcast image36 | David Albert on Quantum Measurement and the Problems with Many-Worlds
Quantum mechanics is our best theory of how reality works at a fundamental level, yet physicists still can’t agree on what the theory actually says. At the heart of the puzzle is the “measurement problem”: what actually happens when we observe a quantum system, and why do we apparently need separate rules when it happens? David Albert is one of the leading figures in the foundations of quantum mec... (@seanmcarroll, 103 minutes, 2019-Mar-04)
722.podcast imageAuthenticity
Melvyn Bragg and guests dicuss what it means to be oneself, a question explored by philosophers from Aristotle to the present day, including St Augustine, Kierkegaard, Heidegger and Sartre. In Hamlet, Polonius said 'To thine own self be true', but what is the self, and what does it mean to be true to it, and why should you be true? To Polonius, if you are true to yourself, ‘thou canst not be fal... (@BBCInOurTime, 51 minutes, 2019-Mar-14)
723.podcast imageEpisode #128 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 4 - Flows
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 23 minutes, 2019-Mar-16)
724.podcast imageEpisode #129 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 5 - Difference
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 22 minutes, 2019-Mar-16)
725.podcast imageGina Rippon on the Myth of the Gendered Brain
Do men and women have different brains? Jordan Peterson and the Google memo guy are pretty sure they do. Different chromosomes, different hormones = different brains. Right? Professor Gina Rippon disagrees. Biology, she argues, is not destiny and evidence of differences has been drastically overstated. For her efforts she has been called a ‘science denier’ & her ideas dismissed as politically corr... (@NSthepodcast, 67 minutes, 2019-Mar-15)
726.podcast imageEpisode 210: Frantz Fanon's Black Existentialism (Part Two)
Continuing on Black Skin White Masks (1952), starting with the influential ch. 4 "The Fact of Blackness." Are the successive coping strategies to racism (including "anti-racist racism" and embrace of negritude) that Fanon describes necessary steps in a dialectic which should be encouraged, or would it be best to learn from his "mistakes" and jump right to the humanistic end-point? With guest Lawre... (@PartiallyExLife, 64 minutes, 2019-Mar-04)
727.podcast image473: Envy – Vice or Virtue?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/envy-vice-or-virtue. Bertrand Russell said that envy was one of the most potent causes of unhappiness, and it's well known as one of the seven deadly sins. But is envy always a bad thing? Is it simply a petty emotion we should try to avoid, or could envy help us understand ourselves more? Is envy rooted in unhealthy comparison with others, or does ... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jan-28)
728.podcast imageNo Offense
What if you could sue someone for calling you a racial slur? In the 90s, one country that always looked very similar to America decided to allow it, rolling back the rights to free speech in the interest of protecting victims of hate speech. Is the result a slippery slope to government tyranny, or a more harmonious society? The moral right to hate speech does not run as deep in the U.S. as most pe... (@HiPhiNation, 48 minutes, 2019-Mar-02)
729.podcast imageHoP 313 - Queen of the Sciences - Anna Komnene and her Circle
Princess Anna Komnene makes good use of her political retirement by gathering a circle of scholars to write commentaries on Aristotle. (@HistPhilosophy, 21 minutes, 2018-Dec-02)
730.podcast image12/11/2018 – Rae Langton on Empathy and First Personal Imagining
Rae Langton is Knightbridge Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Newnham College. Born and raised in India, she studied Philosophy at Sydney and Princeton, and has taught philosophy in Australia, Scotland, the USA, and England. She held professorships at Edinburgh 1999-2004 and at MIT 2004-2013. She works in moral and political philosophy, speech act theory, phil... (@Aristotweets, 50 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
731.podcast imageEpisode 159: You Have the Right to Go to Prison
Poor and black defendants have more legal rights than ever, but that didn't stop mass incarceration. Why is that? We talk about a paper by Paul Butler called "Poor People Lose: Gideon and the Critique of Rights." Plus, we answer the question that’s on everyone’s mind: how to live as an anti-natalist. And Tamler is appalled to discover David's anti-natalist leanings. (@verybadwizards, 76 minutes, 2019-Mar-05)
732.podcast imageEV - 084 Free Will Wheaton
Here to have out age old battle of free will with Aaron is none other than Darron (@NecessaryBeing). They get into the weeds discussing free will, determinism, and if it's possible for there to be a spectrum.Opening Invocation:Deacon of Doubt @DeaconDoubt (@ETVPod, 48 minutes, 2019-Mar-09)
733.podcast imageHAP 16 - Samuel Imbo on Okot p'Bitek and Oral Traditions
A conversation with Sam Imbo on approaching oral traditions as philosophy and the Ugandan thinker and poet Okot p'Bitek. (@HistPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2018-Nov-25)
734.podcast imageEpisode #52 - Devlin on Sex Robots and Moral Panics
 In this episode I talk to Kate Devlin. Kate is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Digital Humanities at King's College London. Kate's research is in the fields of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), investigating how people interact with and react to technology in order to understand how emerging and future technologies will affect us and the society in whi... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Jan-30)
735.podcast imageHoP 312 - Past Masters - Byzantine Historiography
The larger meaning of history in the chronicles written by Michael Psellos, Michael Attaleiates, Anna Komnene, and Niketas Choniates. (@HistPhilosophy, 20 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
736.podcast imageWould it be wrong to 'rape' a sex robot?
Does ethics have anything to say to the prospect that some of the sexual fantasies enacted on sex robots will, undoubtedly, include 'rape'? (@Ariscottle_, 40 minutes, 2019-Mar-13)
737.podcast imageMORAL LUCK A Conversation With ETV's Aaron Rabinowitz
MORAL LUCK A Conversation With ETV's Aaron Rabinowitz by Toby Buckle (@PolPhilPod, 58 minutes, 2019-Mar-10)
738.podcast imageTruth, Science and the Universe | Peter Atkins, Sophia Roosth, Tim Lewens
Where once we made sense of the world using the idea of God, most of us now believe in a more scientific story, of an unfolding universe and evolution. Yet scientists increasingly see their theories as useful models rather than ultimate accounts. Is science then just another human description limited by language, culture and circumstance? Or are we right to assume that science can uncover eternal ... (@IAI_TV, 37 minutes, 2019-Feb-05)
739.podcast imageGuy Axtell, "Problems of Religious Luck: Assessing the Limits of Reasonable Religious Disagreement" (Lexington, 2019)
Our lives are shot through with contingency – where, when, and into what circumstances we are born is largely a matter of chance. And yet those features play determining roles in our lives. The languages we speak, the customs we practice, as well as our tastes and ambitions, all seem to depend largely on luck. In many cases, this is also true of our religious convictions. Hence a puzzle: it is com... (@NewBooksPhil, 62 minutes, 2019-Mar-01)
740.podcast image0G48: Groundhog Day and Buddhist Virtue Theory
Rise and shine, philosonaughts, and don't forget your space suit, cause it's voidy outside! We're stretching the concept of sci-fi to the brink by doing Groundhog Day and discussing how it's the perfect parable for the Buddhist version of virtue theory that Aaron finds so very tempting. Rise and shine, spacebrains, and don't forget your space vats, cause it's voidy outside! We're pushing the conce... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Mar-13)
741.podcast imageStoic Lessons for a Toxic Political Climate
Woooo, I try to get all Stoic in this one friend. I found some interesting quotes that made me think of our terrible current state of political discourse. Listen in for some Stoic lessons to consider before your next political debate with your neighbor. Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy ... (@philosophyguy2, 16 minutes, 2019-Mar-05)
742.podcast imageEpisode 56, ‘Utopia for Realists’ with Rutger Bregman (Part I)
Rutger Bregman is a historian and author, best known for his bestselling book, Utopia for Realists: and how we can get there. Arguing for new utopian ideas such as a fifteen-hour work week and universal basic income, Utopia for Realists has been translated into over 30 different languages, making headlines and sparking movements across the world. Despite the fact we’ve never had it better, says Br... (@ThePanpsycast, 51 minutes, 2019-Mar-10)
743.podcast image405: Affirmative Action – Too Little or Too Much?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/affirmative-action-too-little-or-too-much. Addressing our nation’s history of racial injustice can be a truly backbreaking endeavor. Race-based affirmative action is usually thought of as one such effort, and colleges and universities often use it in their admissions process. However, affirmative action does seem to lower standards for certain unde... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jan-21)
744.podcast image35 | Jessica Yellin on The Changing Ways We Get Our News
Everything we think about the world outside our immediate senses is shaped by information brought to us by other sources. In the case of what’s currently happening to the human race, we call that information “the news.” There is no such thing as “unfiltered” news — no matter how we get it, someone is deciding what information to convey and how to convey it. And the way that is happening is current... (@seanmcarroll, 69 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
745.podcast imageFree speech crisis on campus?
With freedom of speech at Australian universities currently under governmental review, we explore the notion of free speech on campus. Should what gets said at universities - and who gets to say it - be regulated? And is the supposed "free speech crisis" just a front for the culture wars? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-10)
746.podcast imageEp82 - BC16 - On Addams and Dewey
In this 82nd episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 16th “breadcrumb” episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Marilyn Fischer back on the show to talk about the relationship between Jane Addams and John Dewey. As a reminder, Marilyn is a Professor Emerita at the University of Dayton where she specializes in political philosophy and American Pragmatism. She focuses especially o... (@PhilosophyBB, 17 minutes, 2019-Feb-09)
747.podcast imageNick Riggle (University of San Diego): “Aesthetic Judgments as Invitations”
Nick Riggle (University of San Diego) “Aesthetic Judgments as Invitations” 1 March, 16:00-18:00, Room 246, Senate House. (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Mar-07)
748.podcast imageNick Stang (University of Toronto): “Self-Knowledge and Desire in Douglas Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows”
Nick Stang (University of Toronto) “Self-Knowledge and Desire in Douglas Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows” 15 February, 16:00-21:00, Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square. (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Mar-07)
749.podcast imageJonathan Gilmore (City University of New York): “Material, Medium and Sculptural Imagining”
Jonathan Gilmore (City University of New York) “Material, Medium and Sculptural Imagining” 27 February, 16:00-18:00, Room 246, Senate House. (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Mar-07)
750.podcast imageE28: The Pleistocene - Part II
Back with Part II of The Pleistocene, Ryan blathers on as H-dog harnesses a mega-punnage. This is the exciting part so are you not excited!? Anyway, enjoy the data dump. Yer welcome. “The” Dawdler’s 00:04:27 – Housekeeping (Sammy Harris-style) 00:17:06 – The Epistemological State of Human Prehistory 00:30:14 – Hominine Lineages 00:36:21 – Stone Toolmaking 00:47:03 –... (@dawdlerspodcast, 123 minutes, 2019-Mar-10)
751.podcast imageEpisode 210: Frantz Fanon's Black Existentialism (Part One)
On Black Skin White Masks (1952). How does growing up in a racist society mess people up? Fanon's "clinical study" includes phenomenology, poetry, and a lot of existentialism, which means that the "let's embrace negritude in the face of bigotry" solution isn't ultimately available to him: We're all radically free, with no race-specific essence, whether positive or negative. With guest Lawrence War... (@PartiallyExLife, 53 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
752.podcast imageEV - 083 Void Shrugged
For our next installment of Better Know a Philosopher, we tackle Ayn Rand. We look at her life and work including Atlas Shrugged.Opening Invocation:Charles Bukowski (The Last Night of the Earth Poems)Making the Void Livable:Young people, like the ones who talking with Dianne Feinstein  (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Mar-03)
753.podcast imageEpisode 112: Myisha Cherry discusses the skill of conversation
In this episode, Myisha Cherry argues that having a productive conversation with someone often involves explicitly laying out each person's background experiences and expectations. (@ElucidationsPod, 44 minutes, 2019-Mar-07)
754.podcast image#045 Failure With Jean-Paul Sartre and Olivia Goldhill
Kicking off Season 3 of The Happier Hour, is guest Olivia Goldhill, a journalist who specializes in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience as we explore the topic of FAILURE. You’ll learn what Jean-Paul Sartre and the Existentialists can teach us about failure, and why so much of the current self-help advice gets failure wrong. #TheHappierHour Show notes: TheHappierHour.org Facebook: @TheHappier... (@MissMMcCarthy, 36 minutes, 2019-Mar-07)
755.podcast imageThe Morality of the Tribe | David Miller, Natalie Cargill, Peter Tatchell
We think everyone should be treated equally. Yet we also think we are right to care most about our family, our friends and our lovers, and 82% of charitable donations in the UK are given to the causes closest to home. Should we just accept that our ethics are in practice tribal? Or is a universal concern for humanity the bedrock of a civilised culture? Barrister and founder of Effective Giving UK ... (@IAI_TV, 40 minutes, 2019-Jan-29)
756.podcast imagePodchaser Interview of Mark Linsenmayer: Partially Examined Life and Nakedly Examined Music
Morgan DeLisle, writer for the PodChaser "Behind the Streams Blog," interviewed Mark for a feature of our podcasts. Learn about the origins of PEL and NEM, how we make the shows, and what's coming up. Listen to all of the PEL network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com, or subscribe to them individually on Apple Podcasts or via your preferred player. (@PartiallyExLife, 39 minutes, 2019-Feb-23)
757.podcast image404: One Child Too Many
More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/one-child-too-many. The United Nations predicts human population growth will surpass 9 billion around 2050. We know the consequences of overpopulation have the potential to be catastrophic in terms of our continued existence on the planet, with negative environmental effects already visible. Limiting the number of children we have seems like one obvious wa... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
758.podcast imageEpisode 59 - Branden Fitelson
On Episode 59, Nick chats with Dr. Branden Fitelson, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Northeastern University, about his early days working in mathematics and physics as a research scientist at Argonne National Laboratory and a NASA contractor, his highly-social approach to doing and learning philosophy, his work on probability in scientific inference, the story of the Formal Epistemology ... (@SciPhiPod, 55 minutes, 2019-Feb-28)
759.podcast imageDo we have an obligation to pity the guilty?
Does the moral life demand of us a fuller range of emotions beyond anger and contempt? (@Ariscottle_, 51 minutes, 2019-Mar-06)
760.podcast imageRationally Speaking #228 - William Gunn and Alex Holcombe on "Is Elsevier helping or hurting scientific progress?"
William Gunn, director of scholarly communications for Elsevier, and Alex Holcombe, cognitive scientist and open science advocate, discuss the University of California's decision to end their contract with Elsevier, the world's largest scientific publisher. (@Rspodcast, 59 minutes, 2019-Mar-05)
761.podcast imageEV - 082 Heretic Life in Utah with Uncle Mark
Joining us for this episode is Mark from the How To Heretic Podcast. We talk about Mark's experience as a gay man growing up in Utah, the Mormon church, Pride, and many other topics. (@ETVPod, 65 minutes, 2019-Feb-28)
762.podcast image0G47: Annihilation and Deep Ecology, Part 2
::Maynard James Keenan does weird synthesizer stuff in a way that totally works:: Strap in friends, it's time to get weird! We're taking that tasty body horror from part one and we're cranking up the David Lynch. Lean into the confusion and embrace the ambiguity, as a PZ Meyers alien clone walks us through the theory of Deep Ecology, a view that seeks to replace our individual centric models with ... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Mar-06)
763.podcast imageJESUS, SEX, AND THE FAMILY A conversation with Dale Martin (2)
What was the sexuality of the historical Jesus? Did he have romantic partners? What did Jesus and Paul teach about teach about the desirability or permissibility of sex, what where their views on the family, and how should all of that impact how we live today? (@PolPhilPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Mar-02)
764.podcast imageEpisode #51 - Moen on the Unabomber's Ethics
In this episode I talk to Ole Martin Moen. Ole Martin is a Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Oslo. He works on how to think straight about thorny issues in applied ethics. He is the Principal Investigator of “What should not be bought and sold?”, a $1 million research project funded by the Research Council of Norway. In the past, he has written articles about the ethics of prostit... (@JohnDanaher, 2019-Jan-15)
765.podcast imageEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pred... (@ThePanpsycast, 36 minutes, 2019-Mar-03)
766.podcast imageEthan Mills, "Three Pillars of Skepticism in Classical India: Nagarjuna, Jayarasi, and Sri Harsa" (Lexington Books, 2018)
Skepticism has a long history in the Western tradition, from Pyrrhonian Skepticism in the Hellenistic period to more contemporary forms of skepticism most often used as foils to theories of knowledge. The existence of skepticism in Indian Philosophy, however, has long been neglected in favor of dogmatic positions. In Three Pillars of Skepticism in Classical India: Nagarjuna, Jayarasi, and Sri Hars... (@NewBooksPhil, 67 minutes, 2019-Feb-20)
767.podcast image403: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/why-something. The old metaphysical question – why anything exists at all – has perplexed and intrigued humankind for ages. It has long been a question reserved for philosophers, but now some physicists claim to have answered it. Yet these attempts have raised questions of their own: is this even a meaningful question in the first place? Can it be ... (@philtalkradio, 52 minutes, 2019-Jan-07)
768.podcast image34 | Paul Bloom on Empathy, Rationality, Morality, and Cruelty
Within every person’s mind there is on ongoing battle between reason and emotion. It’s not always a battle, of course; very often the two can work together. But at other times, our emotions push us toward actions that our reason would counsel against. Paul Bloom is a well-known psychologist and author who wrote the provocatively-titled book Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion, and is... (@seanmcarroll, 71 minutes, 2019-Feb-18)
769.podcast imageFires of Progress | Steven Pinker, Tariq Ali, Elif Sarican
Most think that social progress should be driven by ideas and persuasion not force. Yet from the French and Russian Revolutions to the Suffragettes, violent action has been instrumental to generating change. Is violence ever justified as a political strategy? Or should we always venerate Gandhi over Guevara? Enlightenment Now author Steven Pinker, filmmaker and author of The Clash of Fundamentalis... (@IAI_TV, 36 minutes, 2019-Jan-22)
770.podcast imageRisky Business
How many innocent people should we be allowed to arrest and jail in order to prevent a single dangerous person from being free? The Supreme Court has refused to answer this question, but algorithms have, and many courts across the country are going with the algorithm. At different stages of the criminal justice system, computerized risk-assessment algorithms are slowly replacing bail hearings ... (@HiPhiNation, 49 minutes, 2019-Feb-16)
771.podcast imageEpisode 209: Francis Fukuyama on Identity Politics (Part Two: Discussion)
Continuing on Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). Fukuyama recommends a "creedal national identity" as a solution for tribalism; does this work? Is this "demand for recognition" that he describes foundational for the act of making an ethical claim? For self-consciousness itself? How does ideology prejudice the sort of theorizing that Fukuyama engages in? Listen ... (@PartiallyExLife, 86 minutes, 2019-Feb-18)
772.podcast imageExistentialism and crisis
Existentialism entered the popular consciousness after World War 2, and for many it still has a mid-century ring to it. But how does it look look today, especially in an age where the unfolding environmental crisis calls for something more than radical humanism? (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Mar-03)
773.podcast imageE27: The Pleistocene - Part I
Finally!! Ryan gets to talk about the Pleistocene—the epoch in which a new ice age began and we sapiens evolved…into incredible narcissists the likes of which the world has never seen. Two things: In this episode 1) Ryan nerds out while Harland lends intermittent support and 2) this is the first part of a two part series some (specifically Ryan, for fear of being alone in his appreciation of thi... (@dawdlerspodcast, 100 minutes, 2019-Mar-03)
774.podcast imageThe Salvation Agenda: The Politics of Medical Humanitarianism During Zimbabwe's Cholera Outbreak 2008/09
In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Simukai Chigudu examines the humanitarian politics of responding to the most catastrophic cholera outbreak in African history. The paper demonstrates how humanitarian relief operations are riven by competing claims to leadership, authority and legitimacy but often converge on the ineluctable logic of saving lives - 'the salvation agenda'. Nevertheless, ... (@ethicsinthenews, 51 minutes, 2019-Feb-12)
775.podcast imageEpisode 158: False Dichotomies and Oral Reciprocity
David and Tamler talk about the invasion of dual process theories in psychology. Why do we love theories that divide complex phenomena into just two categories? Is there any evidence to back up these theories? Are we distorting our understanding of the mind and morality? And what we can do to get out of this mess? Plus, Liam Neeson, moral pet peeves, and oral ethics. (@verybadwizards, 96 minutes, 2019-Feb-19)
776.podcast imageBonus Episode: The Struggle for Social Justice | Angela Eagle
Britain is one of the wealthiest nations in the world, so why do so many feel short-changed? Labour MP and former minister Angela Eagle sees an urgent need to protect social cohesion and makes a case for radical economic reform. In association with the New College of the Humanities: www.nchlondon.ac.uk (@IAI_TV, 15 minutes, 2019-Jan-17)
777.podcast image472: The Examined Year – 2018
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/examined-year-2018. A new year offers an opportunity to reflect on the significant events of the previous year. So what happened over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Join the Philosophers as they celebrate the examined year with a philosophical look back at the year that was 2018. ... (@philtalkradio, 15 minutes, 2018-Dec-31)
778.podcast imageGENDER IN THE NEW TESAMENT A Conversation With Dale Martin
Dale Martin returns to the podcast! We cover Paul’s ideas about resurrection, the gender of the resurrected dead, the gender spectrum in the ancient world, the modern invention of the male/ female dichotomy, and postmodernism. (@PolPhilPod, 65 minutes, 2019-Feb-24)
779.podcast imageFalse necessities: Is it time to leave two-party politics behind?
Should we place a premium on the political virtue of compromise instead of the zero-sum game of the two-party contest? (@Ariscottle_, 38 minutes, 2019-Feb-27)
780.podcast imageBig Bang Creation Myths | Sean Carroll, Roger Penrose, Laura Mersini-Houghton
The big bang theory won out over the Steady State alternative 50 years ago because we discovered the universe was expanding. But now we know that the universe is in fact accelerating away from us. Might the whole big bang theory be mistaken? Is the theory of the universe's origin just another creation myth, or is it still the best account we've got? Eminent mathematician Roger Penrose, CalTech phy... (@IAI_TV, 39 minutes, 2019-Jan-15)
781.podcast imageEp81 - BC15 - Listener Vmail: Addams on Immigrants from Europe versus Africa
In this 81st episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 15th “breadcrumb” episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Marilyn Fischer back on the show to talk about a great voicemail message that we received from Dr. Vance Ricks of Gilford College, who had called in about Marilyn's first chat with us, in episode 67. As a reminder, Marilyn is a Professor Emerita at the University of Da... (@PhilosophyBB, 25 minutes, 2019-Jan-25)
782.podcast image0G46: Annihilation and Catastrophic Destruction, Part 1
::Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young casually play in the background:: Oh, hey, didn't see you there. Welcome to part one of Annihilation. There's a supernatural doins a transpiring, but cause this is the south we're going to meander our way into it like an albino croc at feeding time. We're joined by special guest PZ Meyers for this journey into the heart or weirdness. He'll be playing the role of ... (@0gPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2019-Feb-27)
783.podcast image37: Pushing Back on Epistemic Pushback with Alison Bailey
If a professor told you about pushback from their students, you might assume that their students are complaining about having too much homework, or that the assigned reading is boring. The philosopher Alison Bailey says that... The post 37: Pushing Back on Epistemic Pushback with Alison Bailey appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 27 minutes, 2019-Feb-27)
784.podcast imageEpisode 55, Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis (Part III - The Meaning)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pred... (@ThePanpsycast, 46 minutes, 2019-Feb-24)
785.podcast image33 | James Ladyman on Reality, Metaphysics, and Complexity
Reality is a tricky thing. Is love real? What about the number 5? This is clearly a job for a philosopher, and James Ladyman is one of the world’s acknowledged experts. He and his collaborators have been championing a view known as “structural realism,” in which real things are those that reflect true, useful patterns in the underlying reality. We talk about that, but also about a couple of other ... (@seanmcarroll, 67 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
786.podcast image399: The Ancient Cosmos – When the Earth Stood Still
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ancient-cosmos. Even in ancient Greek society, philosopher-scientists engaged in heated debate about the origin, composition, and structure of our universe. Tracking our understanding of cosmology from then until now shows monumental shifts in thinking. So what did the Ancients think was the fundamental nature of the cosmos, and what kind of eviden... (@philtalkradio, 51 minutes, 2018-Dec-24)
787.podcast imageEpisode 209: Guest Francis Fukuyama on Identity Politics (Part One)
Talking to the author about Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment (2018). What motivates people? Frank points to thymos, the demand for recognition, as at the root of both the "end of history" (i.e., democracy as demand for equal recognition) and our current tribalist stalemates, involving desires to be seen—in virtue of group membership—as superior. Thymos may in fact be... (@PartiallyExLife, 63 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
788.podcast imageJonathan Birch, "The Philosophy of Social Evolution" (Oxford UP, 2017)
It seems to go against evolutionary theory for an individual to give up its own chances at reproducing in order to increase the fitness of others. Yet social behavior is found throughout nature, from bacteria and social insects to wolves, whales, and of course humans. What makes self-sacrifice to any degree even possible, given that self-interested behavior is the default? In The Philosophy of Soc... (@NewBooksPhil, 63 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
789.podcast imageShorts - E13: The Future
If you've got a 401k you might think you have comfort that awaits you in 20-30 years. You might consider yourself able to live without working, seeing yourself eating simple meals and meeting friends on easy adventures without a thought toward responsibility. Or maybe you have a dentist appointment tomorrow and you hate the dentist because they always make you feel bad about yourself. Or may... (@dawdlerspodcast, 22 minutes, 2019-Feb-25)
790.podcast imageOn the way
John Kaag is a philosopher who travelled to the Swiss Alps with the aim of putting into practice some of Nietzsche's recommendations for "becoming who you are". In his memoir Hiking With Nietzsche, what he finds is that following in the footsteps of the great German thinker requires big shoes. (@RadioNational, 31 minutes, 2019-Feb-24)
791.podcast imageInnocence and Punishment | Ritula Shah, Emma Sulkowicz, David Aaronovitch, Sarah Langford
'Innocent until proven guilty' is a core principle of democracy. Yet from the BBC's coverage of the Cliff Richard raid to the social media storms around MeToo, it seems we are increasingly happy to destroy reputations and careers before the proof is in. Can trial by media be more effective than the legal system? Is the individual less important than the common good? Or is the presumption of innoce... (@IAI_TV, 41 minutes, 2019-Jan-08)
792.podcast image471: Foreign Aid – or Injury?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/foreign-aid-or-injury. Many of us might think that developed nations should lead the effort to end global poverty. But decades of foreign aid—from governments and non-governmental organizations—has failed to produce sustainable growth in the developing world. How can we empower local actors to become self-sufficient rather than dependent on foreign... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
793.podcast imageThe Matrix: The Value of Reality
The original Matrix film has become a cultural phenomenon, one that seems only to gain further relevance with age. A film originally released in 1999 was ahead of its time for the questions it raised. The question I want you to consider today: is it so crazy to plug into the Matrix? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.... (@philosophyguy2, 15 minutes, 2019-Feb-14)
794.podcast imageEpisode #50 - Loi on Facebook, Justice and Data as the New Oil
In this episode I talk to Michele Loi. Michele is a political philosopher turned bioethicist turned digital ethicist. He is currently (2017-2020) working on two interdisciplinary projects, one of which is about the ethical implications of big data at the University of Zurich. In the past, he developed an ethical framework of governance for the Swiss MIDATA cooperative (2016). He is interested in b... (@JohnDanaher, 2018-Dec-24)
795.podcast imageEpisode #46 - Minerva on the Ethics of Cryonics
 In this episode I talk to Francesca Minerva. Francesca is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ghent. Her research focuses on applied philosophy, specifically lookism, conscientious objection, abortion, academic freedom, and cryonics. She has published many articles on these topics in some of the leading academic journals in ethics and philosophy, including the Journal of Medical Ethic... (@JohnDanaher, 2018-Dec-23)
796.podcast imageEV - 081 23andVoid
Today, Aaron and GW discuss relevant topics like the terribleness of Black Face, and why you shouldn't blindly trust 23andMe. We look at not only the privacy issues, but the philosophical issues with a DNA database.Open Invocation:The Ones Who Walk Away From OmelasHero of the Week???:Philosophers in Space / Embrace The Void Facebook group  (@ETVPod, 59 minutes, 2019-Feb-15)
797.podcast imageEpisode 044: Laura Pérez on Seeing Corruption
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Laura Pérez about visual experiences and social institutions, how is corruption inherent in our visual experiences, corruption and authenticity, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 45 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
798.podcast imageEpisode 039: Kris Sealey on Bad Faith
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kris Sealey about decolonialism, the role of the stereotype, Bad Faith's subversive potential, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 41 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
799.podcast imageEpisode 037: Michele Moody-Adams on Monuments & Memorials
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Michele Moody-Adams about monuments and memorials, their similarities and differences, arguments for their destruction, the democratic possibilities of both, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 40 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
800.podcast imageEpisode 036: Colleen Murphy on Reconciliation
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Colleen Murphy about reconciliation, its connection with forgiveness, its role in transitional justice, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 38 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
801.podcast imageEpisode 038: Carrie Jenkins on Love & Happiness
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Carrie Jenkins about the nature of love and happiness, can you have one without the other, what is love-crafting in private and public, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 34 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
802.podcast imageEpisode 043: Serena Parekh on Refugees
Myisha Cherry chats with Serena Parekh about refugees and statelessness, the harms of statelessness, our ethical obligations, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 39 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
803.podcast imageEpisode 040: Erin Tarver on Sports and Identity
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Erin Tarver about sports fandom, hero worship vs mascotting, the logics of white supremacy and misogyny in sports, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 48 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
804.podcast imageEpisode 041: Yolonda Wilson on Health Justice
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Yolonda Wilson about health disparities, factors that contribute to it, race, class, and medical treatment, health justice, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 45 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
805.podcast imageEpisode 042: Kathryn Norlock on Complaining & Shaming
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kathryn Norlock about complaining, its prohibitions, what it does, how to do it well, its connection to shaming, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 36 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
806.podcast imageEpisode 035: Kate Manne on HIMpathy
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kate Manne about over-sympathy for men, its connection to misogyny, why women are prone to it, some strategies to resist it, and so much more. (@UnMutePodcast, 48 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
807.podcast imageLIBERTARIANISM 3 War And The Elite
The first world war and economic crisis explode into the world in the 3rd part of our series on the ideologies of libertarianism and progressive liberalism. How do ideologies deal with huge system shocks like these? What is the role of elites in ideological creation and consumption? (@PolPhilPod, 88 minutes, 2019-Feb-17)
808.podcast image402: Extreme Altruism
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/extreme-altruism. We can all agree that helping others is great, a deed worth doing. But devoting too much to helping others – too much time, too many resources – may get you labelled an oddity, a freak. How much can morality demand of us? Is it good to live as moral a life as possible, or do we lose something – devotion to one’s family, for exampl... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2018-Dec-10)
809.podcast imageWhat are the dangers of declaring political 'emergencies'?
Does the invocation of a political 'emergency' have corrosive effects on the moral health of a political community? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2019-Feb-20)
810.podcast imageEpisode 58 - Deborah Mayo
On Episode 58, Nick chats with Deborah Mayo, Professor Emerita in the Department of Philosophy at Virginia Tech, about how she learned to apply statistics to key problems in the philosophy of science, how to think about replication and other pressing statistical issues in the social and biological sciences, and her new book, Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Stati... (@SciPhiPod, 80 minutes, 2019-Feb-12)
811.podcast imageReality in the Digital World | Laurence Scott
Our worlds were once human and solid, but now our lives are increasingly virtual. What place has reality in this fantasy world? ‘Picnic Comma Lightning’ author Laurence Scott explores the challenges of finding meaning amidst the digital noise. In association with the New College of the Humanities: bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 28 minutes, 2019-Jan-02)
812.podcast image0G45: Star Trek Next Gen 4-22 and Cultural Relativism vs Ethical Pluralism
It's tempting to sweep into these show notes like a certain loudmouthed Betazoid and start spreading pate related puns, but it just doesn't feel right. This is a beautiful hour of television and y'all all deserve to go watch it unspoilered. Really the very best that Star Trek has to offer. Cultural Relativism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_relativism Ethical Pluralism: www.ethik.uzh.ch... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2019-Feb-20)
813.podcast image32 | Naomi Oreskes on Climate Change and the Distortion of Scientific Facts
Our climate is in the midst of dramatic changes, driven largely by human activity, with potentially enormous consequences for humanity and other species. That’s why science tells us, anyway. But there is an influential contingent, especially in the United States, who deny that reality, and work hard to prevent policy action that might ameliorate it. Where did this resistance come from, and what ma... (@seanmcarroll, 70 minutes, 2019-Feb-04)
814.podcast imageShorts - E12: Scarcity
How much do you really want something? Is it worth the price? Who decides you want it anyway? In this Dawdlers Short, we explore our thoughts on scarcity. And to commemorate this topic, it will only be available for 100,000 days so get it while it lasts!! (@dawdlerspodcast, 19 minutes, 2019-Feb-20)
815.podcast image(Bonus) The Battle over CSOCs
On this bonus episode, I go into some of the history between the LAPD police commission and the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, and feature some of the tape from the Central station CSOC protest that didn't make it into the episode, including some creepy stuff that happened toward the end of the protest. I then talk to Sarah Brayne about the possibility of using surveillance technology to monitor the ... (@HiPhiNation, 18 minutes, 2019-Feb-02)
816.podcast imageRationally Speaking #227 - Sarah Haider on "Dissent and free speech"
This episode features Sarah Haider, the president of Ex-Muslims of North America. Julia and Sarah discuss why it's important to talk about the challenges of leaving Islam, and why that makes people uncomfortable or angry. (@Rspodcast, 58 minutes, 2019-Feb-18)
817.podcast image470: Foucault and Power
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/foucault-and-power. Michel Foucault was a 20th century philosopher known for his work concerning power and knowledge. Foucault is often cited for his theory of knowledge and power, which are inextricably linked. But what exactly is Foucault's philosophy of power? Is it a universal theory intended to be applied in any context, or was Foucault simply... (@philtalkradio, 12 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
818.podcast imageEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part II - The Plot)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around travelling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of pred... (@ThePanpsycast, 49 minutes, 2019-Feb-17)
819.podcast imageEpisode 208: Epicurus on Seeking Pleasure (Part Two)
More on the ethics-related fragments of Epicurus and accounts by Martha Nussbaum and Tim O'Keefe. What would a purely therapeutic philosophy consist of? Does philosophy as pursuit of pleasure mean that you eschew political action or other substantial goals? Mark, Wes, and Dylan try to figure out which of our desires are vain and whether society is compatible with human happiness. Listen to part on... (@PartiallyExLife, 58 minutes, 2019-Feb-04)
820.podcast image469: The Creative Life
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/creative-life. Parents and students alike often think that a college major defines possible career options. Yet what distinguishes today's work world from bygone times is that it's quite common for adults to have a variety of different careers in a single lifetime. So what can students do now to ensure happiness and fulfillment in all possible futu... (@philtalkradio, 10 minutes, 2018-Nov-26)
821.podcast imageThe Precrime Unit
Predictive policing technology is spreading across the country, and Los Angeles is the epicenter. A small group of LA activists are in a lopsided campaign against billions of dollars in city, federal, and Silicon Valley money using algorithms to predict where and when the next crime is going to occur, and even who the perpetrators are going to be. Barry embeds with the Stop LAPD Spying coalition f... (@HiPhiNation, 48 minutes, 2019-Jan-31)
822.podcast imageEpisode 157: Notes From Underground (Pt. 2)
David and Tamler continue their discussion of Dostoevsky's funny, sad, philosophical novella Notes From Underground. We focus on part 2 this time - three stories from the Underground Man's past - and explore what the stories tell us about his existentialist rants in part 1. Is he consumed with guilt over his treatment of Liza? Is he ashamed of his social awkwardness, low status, and self-destructi... (@verybadwizards, 81 minutes, 2019-Feb-05)
823.podcast image400: The Science of Happiness
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/science-happiness. Positive psychology is an emerging science that investigates the qualities, attitudes, and practices that enable people to thrive and be happy. So what does this research reveal about human happiness? Are some of us just born with happier dispositions than others? How (if at all) do health, wealth, family relations, and community... (@philtalkradio, 13 minutes, 2018-Nov-19)
824.podcast image468: Does Reputation Matter?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/does-reputation-matter. We think about about our own reputation all the time, and we constantly reference the reputations of the people we meet and interact with. But why do we care so much about reputation? Is it rational for us to rely on reputation so heavily in our day-to-day lives? Are judgments about reputation just a handy social screening m... (@philtalkradio, 11 minutes, 2018-Nov-12)
825.podcast imageWalter Benjamin: multimedia prototype?
As an intellectual oddball in the early 20th century, Walter Benjamin appears to have been a precursor of the cross-disciplinary hybrid thinkers we celebrate today. Was he the first multimedia journalist? (@RadioNational, 31 minutes, 2019-Feb-17)
826.podcast imageE26: Hofstadter's Scrumptious Edibles - Analogy as the Core of Cognition
Does A = A or not!? Or is it just approximate? Or none of it… We Dawdlers take a dip into the book Surfaces and Essences by Douglas Hofstadter and Emmanuel Sander on the significance of analogy-making in thinking. 00:04:40 – The book itself 00:14:30 – The man himself // Form and content 00:18:06 – The form of the content // The main thesis 00:25:15 – Analogy and category // Category, con... (@dawdlerspodcast, 120 minutes, 2019-Feb-17)
827.podcast imageHenry S. Richardson, "Articulating the Moral Community: Toward a Constructive Ethical Pragmatism" (Oxford UP, 2018)
Even those among us who think that morality is rooted in timeless normative truths will acknowledge that the overall moral fabric that binds us to one another is subject to various kinds of renovation and expansion. To take a simplistic example, the advent of the Internet has occasioned a host of new moral concepts attuned to the new ways in which people are able to treat each other -- think of ... (@NewBooksPhil, 72 minutes, 2019-Feb-01)
828.podcast imageEpisode #49 - Maas on AI and the Future of International Law
In this episode I talk to Matthijs Maas. Matthijs is a doctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen's 'AI and Legal Disruption' research unit, and a research affiliate with the Governance of AI Program at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute. His research focuses on safe and beneficial global governance strategies for emerging, transformative AI systems. This involves, in part, ... (@JohnDanaher, 2018-Dec-03)
829.podcast imageLouise Hanson (Durham University): “Robust Moral Realism and Robust Aesthetic Realism”
The London Aesthetics Forum is an initiative of the Institute of Philosophy. (http://philosophy.sas.ac.uk ) Louise Hanson (Durham University): “Robust Moral Realism and Robust Aesthetic Realism” Please do not cite or reproduce this material without written permission of the author We (@aestheticsforum, 2019-Feb-12)
830.podcast imageEV - 080 How To Not Be Like Spock With Massimo Pigliucci Part 2
And now the continuation of our interview with Massimo.Opening Invocation: Evan Matthews and Ben OldhamHero of the Week: Why we shouldn't use the word Hero. (@ETVPod, 58 minutes, 2019-Feb-07)
831.podcast image31 | Brian Greene on the Multiverse, Inflation, and the String Theory Landscape
String theory was originally proposed as a relatively modest attempt to explain some features of strongly-interacting particles, but before too long developed into an ambitious attempt to unite all the forces of nature into a single theory. The great thing about physics is that your theories don’t always go where you want them to, and string theory has had some twists and turns along the way. One ... (@seanmcarroll, 72 minutes, 2019-Jan-28)
832.podcast imageA Simplified History of Western Philosophy
This episode is an oversimplified, hopefully, more fun version of the history of Western philosophy. Have I missed things? Yes, many. But this episode is a bite-sized version of the history. Tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https... (@philosophyguy2, 15 minutes, 2019-Feb-04)
833.podcast imageWhat should politicians do with 'expert advice'?
What is the nature and what are the limits of political decision-making? Just how important — how final — is ministerial responsibility? (@Ariscottle_, 40 minutes, 2019-Feb-13)
834.podcast imageLIBERTARIANISM 2 Evolution And Equilibrium
In the second part of my series on the history of libertarianism I look at how the competition between libertarianism and progressive liberalism escalated to competition over scientific metaphors. The origin, and ideological weaponization of, the phrase “survival of the fittest”, and the introduction to the ideological fight of Newtonian mechanics. (@PolPhilPod, 73 minutes, 2019-Feb-09)
835.podcast imageThe Promise of Psychedelics | David Nutt, Amanda Feilding, Stephen Reid
Besides being illegal, LSD has not had good press, associated with bad trips and psychological breakdown. But with a new craze for microdosing acid amongst Silicon Valley whizz kids and management gurus, and respected scientists claiming antidepressant benefits, might we have been too quick to ban psychedelics? Could they be a means to deepen experience and enhance our lives? Or is this all danger... (@IAI_TV, 37 minutes, 2018-Dec-18)
836.podcast image008 – Valentine's Special: Mamie & Kenneth
Mamie and Kenneth Clark's work in psychology was instrumental in the fight to ban racial segregation in US schools. For Valentine's Day, Elena and Ian tell the story of one of their favourite scientific couples. If you liked this episode, subscribing/following means you'll get the next one automatically. We'd love it if you could leave us a review on iTunes too. And if you want to get in touch wit... (@wondercupboard, 28 minutes, 2019-Feb-14)
837.podcast imageJules Montague on Dementia, Memory and Identity
This episode features a neurologist with some striking tales to tell about who we become when our brains start to break. What happens when memories are gradually destroyed by Alzheimer's, when our personality is drastically transformed by dementia, or when a sudden surge of creativity is unleashed by Parkinson’s medication? Dr Jules Montague’s new book Lost and Found integrates moving stories of h... (@NSthepodcast, 56 minutes, 2019-Feb-12)
838.podcast imageEpisode 208: Epicurus on Seeking Pleasure (Part One)
On the extant fragments of Epicurus (341–270 BCE) dealing with ethics, including his "Letter to Menoceus," “The Principal Doctrines,” and “The Vatican Collection of Epicurean Sayings.” Plus Tim O’Keefe’s Epicureanism (2010) and Martha Nussabum’s The Therapy of Desire (1994). How are we supposed to act once we understand nature as atoms bouncing and swerving around in the void, temporarily producin... (@PartiallyExLife, 50 minutes, 2019-Jan-28)
839.podcast imageOG44: Bandersnatch and the Ethics of Mental Illness Representation, Part 2
Like Netflix, we're going to soak this thing for all its worth. How many hours of your life can we steal making you click through episodes trying to find easter eggs?! Really though, for all the innovations in this episode, it feel painfully underdeveloped in the arguably unethical way it makes use of tropes that are harmful to people with mental illness, and it felt like that deserved a main segm... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Feb-13)
840.podcast imageShorts - E11: Authority
Are you talkin' to me? This week the Dawdlers contemplate asymmetrical power dynamics regarding behavioral modification; from parent/child to peace officer/citizen, how do we feel about and deal with exertions of Authority? (@dawdlerspodcast, 24 minutes, 2019-Feb-13)
841.podcast imageEpisode 55, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (Part I - The Life of Kafka)
Published in 1915, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis is a gruelling and ironic depiction of the pressures imposed by family and profession in the Twentieth Century. The novella centres around traveling salesman Gregor Samsa who, one morning, finds himself transformed into an insect. What follows, depending on the interpretation, is a reflection of how modern life provides a misunderstanding of predi... (@ThePanpsycast, 37 minutes, 2019-Feb-10)
842.podcast imageEp80 - BC14 - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Sports Fandom
In this 80th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread and our 14th "breadcrumb" episode, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio invite Dr. Erin Tarver back on the show to talk with us about a great listener voicemail that we received from Julia from New Hampshire. We call this breadcrumb episode "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Sports Fandom." Erin was our guest in episode 31 of the show, titled "Sport... (@PhilosophyBB, 29 minutes, 2019-Jan-01)
843.podcast imageBonus: What does it mean to age well?
What are the ethics and obligations of ageing? (@Ariscottle_, 55 minutes, 2019-Feb-11)
844.podcast imageDoes Universal Morality Exist? | Stanley Fish, Myriam Francois, Phillip Collins
Is there a universal morality, and if not, are moral beliefs actually the cause of some of the greatest human suffering? To debate this issue, we have on our panel literary theorist Stanley Fish, writer, broadcaster and SOAS researcher Myriam Francois, and journalist and former speech-writer to Tony Blair Phillip Collins. In association with the New College of the Humanities: bit.ly/2FdPgLD (@IAI_TV, 31 minutes, 2018-Dec-11)
845.podcast imageEpisode 57 - Julia Bursten
On Episode 57, Nick chats with Julia Bursten, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Kentucky, about how her interactions with philosophers, physicists, and chemists led her toward a research career in the philosophy of nanoscience, doing socially-engaged philosophy of science with a regional focus, and her involvement as co-chair in the Philosophy of Science Asso... (@SciPhiPod, 93 minutes, 2019-Feb-01)
846.podcast imageAristotle's Biology
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable achievement of Aristotle (384-322BC) in the realm of biological investigation, for which he has been called the originator of the scientific study of life. Known mainly as a philosopher and the tutor for Alexander the Great, who reportedly sent him animal specimens from his conquests, Aristotle examined a wide range of life forms while by the Sea of M... (@BBCInOurTime, 50 minutes, 2019-Feb-07)
847.podcast imageAgeing
Getting older: comedy or tragedy? Martha Nussbaum and Saul Levmore—co-authors of Aging Thoughtfully: Conversations About Retirement, Romance, Wrinkles and Regret—talk about older bodies, intergenerational resentment, and a certain Shakespearean geriatric. (@RadioNational, 53 minutes, 2019-Feb-10)
848.podcast imageEV - 079 How To Be Like Spock with Massimo Pigliucci Part 1
In this installment we bring on a very special guest Massimo Pigliucci to discuss Stoicism. He has a PhD in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Connecticut and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Tennessee. Opening Invocation:Seneca, On Earthquakes (@ETVPod, 57 minutes, 2019-Feb-02)
849.podcast imageShorts - E10: End ofs
How 'bout another Short!? This time the Dawdlers go off about "End ofs". You know, the "End of the World" type ideas. Consider us ambivalent. Enjoy for the world will soon be over! (@dawdlerspodcast, 24 minutes, 2019-Feb-10)
850.podcast imageHow We Came To MeToo | Linda Woodhead
Sexual abuse accusations have reached an unprecedented high. How have we come here, and why is this happening now? Leading British sociologist Linda Woodhead investigates. (@IAI_TV, 20 minutes, 2018-Dec-04)
851.podcast image30 | Derek Leben on Ethics for Robots and Artificial Intelligences
It’s hardly news that computers are exerting ever more influence over our lives. And we’re beginning to see the first glimmers of some kind of artificial intelligence: computer programs have become much better than humans at well-defined jobs like playing chess and Go, and are increasingly called upon for messier tasks, like driving cars. Once we leave the highly constrained sphere of artificial g... (@seanmcarroll, 89 minutes, 2019-Jan-21)
852.podcast imageMinds, Madness And Medicine | Lucy Johnstone, David Nutt, David Healy
Deaths from heart disease have fallen by almost two thirds since the 1960s, yet outcomes for those with mental illness have not improved for decades. Is this because we have the wrong categories and the wrong diagnoses? Might neuroscience enable more precise descriptions and more effective treatment? Or is it a mistake to think that biological accounts of mental illness will ever provide the answe... (@IAI_TV, 32 minutes, 2018-Nov-27)
853.podcast imageEpisode 207: Herder on Art Appreciation (Part Two)
Continuing on Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), then moving to “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect? A Divine Colloquy” (1785), and and some of Critical Forests: Fourth Grove (written 1769). With guest rock god John "Jughead" Pierso... (@PartiallyExLife, 86 minutes, 2019-Jan-21)
854.podcast imageESCAPING THE POLITICAL A Conversation With Rupert Read (2)
In the second part of my conversation with Rupert Read we cover private language, essential contestability and political ideologies. We also discuss if it is possible to escape political ideologies or the use of power: Can we carve out true friendships separate from the forms of oppression that surround us? (@PolPhilPod, 54 minutes, 2019-Feb-02)
855.podcast imageWho We Are | Diane Abbott, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Kemi Badenoch, Richard Reeves
Ten years ago, the US elected its first black president. Yet race-related hate crime has increased 216% in the last year. Are we wrong to suppose that racial prejudice will be overcome by equal opportunity? Should we dream of a world where race is not a basis for social identity? Or are social groupings inevitable and equality the only possible solution? (@IAI_TV, 34 minutes, 2018-Nov-20)
856.podcast imageEpisode #127 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 3 - Anti-Oedipus
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Gilles Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 30 minutes, 2019-Feb-07)
857.podcast imageWhat do we owe those in need?
What is the nature, and what are the limits, of our responsibility for others? When can we say we've discharged our obligation? (@Ariscottle_, 45 minutes, 2019-Feb-06)
858.podcast imageThe Evolution of Suicide | Nicholas Humphreys
Suicide is a terrible but commonplace event amongst all societies within the human race. But at what point in our evolution did suicide come into being, and for what purpose? Can suicide be explained, and if so, can we provide an answer to those who become so desperate? Neuropsychologist and author of A History of the Mind Nicholas Humphrey answers these questions. (@IAI_TV, 25 minutes, 2018-Nov-13)
859.podcast imageRationally Speaking #226 - Rob Wiblin on "An updated view of the best ways to help humanity"
If you want to do as much good as possible with your career, what problems should you work on, and what jobs should you consider? This episode features Rob Wiblin, director of research for effective altruist organization 80,000 Hours. (@Rspodcast, 53 minutes, 2019-Feb-05)
860.podcast image0G43: Bandersnatch and Quantum Immortality
Welp, for better or worse, you're in the timeline where the will of the collective has pulled the pod suddenly back to Black Mirror. Everyone spent some portion of their holiday deep in some Bandersnatch, and we're here to stack meta analysis on meta analysis till the whole thing becomes a satirical singularity, which I'm now calling a Satirelarity (that's terrible, don't ever use that). If you fe... (@0gPhilosophy, 44 minutes, 2019-Feb-06)
861.podcast imageEpisode 156: Notes From Underground (Pt. 1)
We’re sick men. We’re spiteful men. We’re unpleasant men. We think our livers are diseased (especially Tamler’s). So we talk about Dostoevsky’s wild, complex, stream of consciousness masterpiece Notes From Underground. For this episode we focus on part 1 of the novella, and the philosophy behind it. Is the underground man an existentialist hero affirming his freedom in the face of a deterministic ... (@verybadwizards, 104 minutes, 2019-Jan-22)
862.podcast imageEpisode 54, Why Buddhism is True with Robert Wright (Part II)
Currently Visiting Professor of Science and Religion at Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, Robert Wright’s work in journalism, psychology and philosophy has been deeply influential. Robert is the author of many best-selling books including ‘The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology’, ‘Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny’, ‘The Evolutio... (@ThePanpsycast, 48 minutes, 2019-Feb-03)
863.podcast imageShorts - E9: Stupidity
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. ~Albert Einstein The only way to comprehend what mathematicians mean by Infinity is to contemplate the extent of human stupidity. ~Voltaire Present audience excepted-- surely --but Carlo Cippola, George Carlin, and Jonathan Swift aren't the only ones who think that there's a bit too much Stupidit... (@dawdlerspodcast, 31 minutes, 2019-Feb-06)
864.podcast imageEpisode 56 - Kevin Zollman
On Episode 56, Nick chats with Kevin Zollman, Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University, how his early interests in the mathematics of poker informed his approach to doing philosophy of science, understanding social behavior through game theory and mathematical modeling, and his co-authored book, "The Game Theorist’s Guide to Parenting.” (@SciPhiPod, 70 minutes, 2019-Jan-25)
865.podcast imageETV - 078 Better Know Judith Jarvis Thomson
Time for another installment of our Better Know a Philosopher serise. We dive into Judith Jarvis Thomson, author of the famous Trolly Problem thought experiment and has an interesting thought experiment on abortion.Opening Invocation:Absurdist ExistentialismHero of the Week:Teachers  (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
866.podcast imageEp78 - Demons and Other Unusual Mental States
In this 78th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Tadd Ruetenik, Professor of Philosophy at Saint Ambrose University, on "Demons and Other Unusual Mental States." Tadd is the author of The Demons of William James: Religious Pragmatism Explores Unusual Mental States, out this year with Palgrave MacMillan. Tadd is the winner of the 2018 Ila and John Morr... (@PhilosophyBB, 60 minutes, 2018-Dec-13)
867.podcast image29 | Raychelle Burks on the Chemistry of Murder
Sometimes science is asking esoteric questions about the fundamental nature of reality. Other times, it just wants to solve a murder. Today’s guest, Raychelle Burks, is an analytical chemist at St. Edward’s University in Texas. Before becoming a full-time academic, she worked in a crime lab using chemistry to help police track suspects, and now she does research on building new detectors for use i... (@seanmcarroll, 75 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
868.podcast imageDevotion, democracy and Duterte
Is religious language incompatible with democratic politics, as philosopher Richard Rorty believed? Not in the Philippines, where religion and democracy are working together as close allies—with troubling implications for justice and human rights. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Feb-03)
869.podcast imageMaria Kronfeldner, "What's Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist, and Interactive Account of a Contested Concept" (MIT Press, 2018)
Much of the debate about the roles of nature vs. nurture in the development of individual people has settled into accepting that it's a bit of both, although what each contributes to a given trait or feature, how much, and they interact are still matters of dispute. In What's Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist, and Interactive Account of a Contested Concept(MIT Press, 2018), Mari... (@NewBooksPhil, 71 minutes, 2019-Jan-15)
870.podcast imageHaunting the Margins - E2: Terence McKenna
We all dull and enhance our senses in various ways. Some of us, few of us can explore the extremes of sensory manipulation. Even fewer can understand what it means. The Dawdlers return to the theme of Haunting the Margins. This time they take a trip with Terence McKenna, the late hallucinagenic experimentalist of the 20th Century. Uncle Terence had loads of ideas and a remarkably lucid penchant ... (@dawdlerspodcast, 132 minutes, 2019-Feb-03)
871.podcast imageBad Philosophy: The Big Bang Theory
In today's episode, I examine the bad philosophy presented in the hit tv show, The Big Bang Theory. Does the Big Bang Theory misrepresent nerd culture? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ Amazon Banner link: https://amzn.to/2C6nnCT Email: [email protected] (@philosophyguy2, 16 minutes, 2019-Jan-22)
872.podcast imageEpisode 207: Herder on Art Appreciation (Part One)
On Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect? A Divine Colloquy” (1785), and some of Critical Forests: Fourth Grove (written 1769). With guest rock god John "Jughead" Pierson. What is aesthetic taste, an... (@PartiallyExLife, 56 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
873.podcast imagePREVIEW-Ep 206 Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part Three)
Mark and Wes go into more textual detail re. Lucretius’s take on atomism and the metaphysical and epistemological problems it entails. Start with Part one. This is a preview; become a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter to get the full, 50 minute conversation. (@PartiallyExLife, 14 minutes, 2019-Jan-13)
874.podcast imageWITTGENSTEIN, LANGUAGE, AND POWER A Conversation With Ruper Read
Dr. Rupert Read returns to the podcast to provide an introduction to Wittgenstein’s philosophy of language. We cover Wittgenstein’s life, his approach to philosophy, his value to us, and the metaphors of family resemblances, word games, and money. https://www.patreon.com/PoliticalPhilosophyPodcast (@PolPhilPod, 50 minutes, 2019-Jan-26)
875.podcast imageIllegal drug use — does ethics have anything to say?
How best to respond to the prevalence, use and associated dangers of illicit drugs presents particular challenges to political decision-making and ethical judgment alike. (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2019-Jan-30)
876.podcast imageKevin Mitchell on How The Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are
My guest in this episode is a neurogeneticist who is unafraid to tackle some of the most politically charged questions in science. Dr Kevin Mitchell is an associate professor at the Institute of Neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin. His recent book INNATE sets out to show ‘How The Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are’, and in it he offers his take on the latest research into the biological un... (@NSthepodcast, 60 minutes, 2019-Jan-29)
877.podcast imageEpisode 54, Why Buddhism is True with Robert Wright (Part I)
Currently Visiting Professor of Science and Religion at Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York, Robert Wright’s work in journalism, psychology and philosophy has been deeply influential. Robert is the author of many best-selling books including ‘The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology’, ‘Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny’, ‘The Evolutio... (@ThePanpsycast, 49 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
878.podcast image0G42: Today I am Paul and AI Elder Care
::alters chassis into show notes mode:: Hello. In keeping with my programming, I've done my best to anticipate all your needs as a podcast consumer. My empathy net tells me you'll desire a link to our subject: Today I am Paul: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/shoemaker_08_15/ and to maximize your comfort here is an audio version: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/audio_08_15/ I've also located a pa... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2019-Jan-30)
879.podcast imageLookism
Francesca Minerva says discrimination based on looks is a serious problem. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2018-Dec-02)
880.podcast image36: Facing the Synthetic Age with Christopher Preston
We’re in an age known as the Anthropocene, an era in which humans have been the dominant force on earth. We’ve impacted the climate, we’ve shaped the land and in recent years, we’ve made changes... The post 36: Facing the Synthetic Age with Christopher Preston appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 28 minutes, 2019-Jan-30)
881.podcast imageShorts - E8: Artificial Intelligence
Are there inherent limits to the behavioral capacities of artifacts? How would that differ from human bodies? Are not both arrangements of universe, of "stuff"? Why would one substrate permit abilities inaccessible to others? In this week's Short the Dawdlers muse about Artificial Intelligence: what are its limits, if any-- and should we fear? (@dawdlerspodcast, 25 minutes, 2019-Jan-30)
882.podcast imageEpisode 111: Greg Kobele discusses mathematical linguistics
In this episode, Greg Kobele discusses how abstract mathematics can be useful for arriving at a unified theory of what patterns a person has mastery over when they can speak a language. (@ElucidationsPod, 41 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
883.podcast imageEp77 - Justifications for Intellectual Property & Copyright Law
In this 77th episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview law professor Brian Frye on "Justifications for Intellectual Property and Copyright Law." Brian is the host of The Bindle on WRFL 88.1 FM and is the Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky's College of Law. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Berkeley and then went on to ea... (@PhilosophyBB, 70 minutes, 2018-Nov-13)
884.podcast image28 | Roger Penrose on Spacetime, Consciousness, and the Universe
Sir Roger Penrose has had a remarkable life. He has contributed an enormous amount to our understanding of general relativity, perhaps more than anyone since Einstein himself -- Penrose diagrams, singularity theorems, the Penrose process, cosmic censorship, and the list goes on. He has made important contributions to mathematics, including such fun ideas as the Penrose triangle and aperiodic tilin... (@seanmcarroll, 95 minutes, 2019-Jan-07)
885.podcast image007 – What Are Numbers?
What are they though? And where do they come from? Did someone invent them? Elena and Ian attempt to answer countless such questions in an episode critics are already rating Pi out of Planck. If you liked this episode, subscribing/following means you'll get the next one automatically. We'd love it if you could leave us a review on iTunes too. And if you want to get in touch with us, you can do tha... (@wondercupboard, 48 minutes, 2019-Jan-29)
886.podcast imageEpisode 206: Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part Two)
More on Lucretius’s poem about Epicurean science: On the Nature of Things from the first century BCE. We talk more about how macroscopic phenomena are supposed to come out of the interaction of atoms, including mind and its processes of knowledge and illusion, including the illusion of love. One conclusion: life after death is not possible. Can the properties of the atoms themselves be explained? ... (@PartiallyExLife, 74 minutes, 2019-Jan-07)
887.podcast imageNEM#89: Dusty Wright's Metaphysical Americana
After starting in the '80s with the Trolls and the Bastards of Execution, Dusty has released six albums as a solo artist since 1997. We discuss a new, unreleased song "Pardon My Love," then "Man in the Mirror" from Gliding Toward Oblivion (2018) and "High Flyin' Bird" by GIANTfingers from around 2003. We conclude by listening to "(Art at) the Speed of Life" by the Dusty Diamonds from 1994. Intro/o... (@PartiallyExLife, 69 minutes, 2019-Jan-06)
888.podcast imageDisability and dignity
Philosophers have been slow to address disability - which is odd, because disability raises a host of fascinating and challenging issues around justice, rights and fairness. (@RadioNational, 28 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
889.podcast imageEV - 077 Losing My Religion
This week we're joined by Marie D'Elephant from Everyone's Agnostic Podcast. Marie talks about leaving her religion and how that impacted her to this day. We also discuss a myriad of topics relating to religion, death, and polyamory.Opening Invocation: The World Has Turned And Left Me Here by WeezerHero of the Week: Marie's cat (and our pets in general) (@ETVPod, 66 minutes, 2019-Jan-17)
890.podcast imageE25: A Fetish of Fallacies - Are All Fallacies Created Equal?
“Live” but “not live”, that’s what The Dawdler’s Philosophy Podcast is. “Live” in that it is generally unscripted where we tend to not know exactly what the other host will say. And “not live” in that you can’t listen to it as it is unfolding for the first time. We’re fine with this; obviously, or we would change it. But it does require some preparation in order to pull it off in as constructive a... (@dawdlerspodcast, 82 minutes, 2019-Jan-27)
891.podcast imageEpisode 55 - Helen Longino
On Episode 55, Nick chats with Helen Longino, the Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University, about her early upbringing and bohemian mindset, learning how to bridge methods in analytic philosophy with history and contextual factors, her activity in anti-war and women's liberation movements in the late 1960s and 1970s, early feminist scholarship, the resistance she and ot... (@SciPhiPod, 68 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
892.podcast imageAre We Prejudiced Against Machines?
This episode is a bit unusual. It is a talk that Zach gave to some students at University of Cincinnati on Oct. 18, 2018. However, since we’ve been wanting to do a technology episode for a while, we thought we’d release it. In the talk Zach explains the concept of ‘substratism’, prejudice on the basis of material substrate, which Zach also calls the “coming oppression.” So the question is: A... (@thevimblog, 55 minutes, 2019-Jan-14)
893.podcast imageEpisode 155: Alfred Hitchcock's Money Shot
David and Tamler dive deep into Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 hallucinatory classic, Vertigo. Why does this movie seem to gain stature among critics and academics every year? Is this a really a exploration of Hitchcock's own obsessions and sexual repression? Is it a story about filmmaking and celebrity? Or is it just a twisty noir thriller about a man who has no job and can't kiss to save his life? Plus... (@verybadwizards, 99 minutes, 2019-Jan-08)
894.podcast imageLIBERTARIANISM An Ideological History (1)
By audience selection, I cover the intellectual and ideological history of libertarianism. What were its origins and what was is reacting against? I also attempt to place these developments in their historical context and discuss how they affected the world, our current institutions, and even how we think now. (@PolPhilPod, 59 minutes, 2019-Jan-19)
895.podcast imageShould prisons be abolished?
Have prisons outlived their political and moral usefulness? Can we find a moral equivalent to incarceration? (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Jan-23)
896.podcast imageEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast, 54 minutes, 2019-Jan-20)
897.podcast imageRationally Speaking #225 - Neerav Kingsland on "The case for charter schools"
This episode features Neerav Kingsland, who helped rebuild New Orleans' public school system after Hurricane Katrina, converting it into the country's first nearly-100% charter school system. (@Rspodcast, 48 minutes, 2019-Jan-21)
898.podcast imageEpisode 206: Lucretius's Epicurean Physics (Part One)
On Lucretius’s poem about Epicurean science: On the Nature of Things a.k.a. De Rerum Natura from the 1st century BC. How does the world work? Lucretius presents a system that is surprisingly modern, and raises philosophical issues that are still on point today: What are the basic building blocks of the universe? How could these give rise to minds? What ethical views does a mechanistic world-view i... (@PartiallyExLife, 58 minutes, 2018-Dec-31)
899.podcast imagePREVIEW-Ep 205 Durkheim et al on Suicide (Part Three)
Mark and Wes discuss Durkheim's Suicide (1897), getting into more of the details of his account and exploring comparative modes of explanation: Are there really "sociological facts" distinct from mere generalizations about psychological facts? Get the full discussion as a PEL Citizen or $5 Patreon supporter! (@PartiallyExLife, 20 minutes, 2018-Dec-31)
900.podcast image0G41: A Christmas Carol and Moral Motivation
What's this? Is it possible? Could Brian have managed to edit the surprise episode all in one night?! It's a space Santa miracle! You there, young listener! Tell me, are everyone's favorite childhood movies still sitting in the window at the butchers? Run and purchase them all, and buy some new intro quotes for yourself! I've been such a fool. Basic and broad are good things. I love them now, espe... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Jan-23)
901.podcast imageShorts - E7: Anything is Possible
No, this isn't a New Age affirmation. It isn't a derisive denouncement of low likelihood. It's the Dawdlers giving their takes on modal logic! Herein are considered types of possibility, and how responsible epistemology might interface with metaphysical musings. Who has the arguments to back up absolute impossibility claims? If not us, then, well, as far as we know: Anything is Possible! (@dawdlerspodcast, 26 minutes, 2019-Jan-23)
902.podcast imageEV - 076 A Quiet Box
A Quiet Place vs Birdbox. Aaron and GW evaluate each of these very void'y movies in terms of their believability, how they approached essentially the same story differently, and go over parts that may be problematic in some ways.Opening Invocation:Shardik thanks to Eric Brewer and Shannon Slayton Hero of the Week:Nancy Pelosi (@ETVPod, 66 minutes, 2019-Jan-12)
903.podcast imageEpisode 8 - Rebecca Goldstein on Philosophy, the Axial Age, and more
On this episode Zack talks talks to philosopher & novelist Rebecca Goldstein about her recent books, philosophy, and much more.  (@zackabaker, 47 minutes, 2019-Jan-22)
904.podcast imageEpisode 54 - Cailin O'Connor
On Episode 54, Nick chats with Cailin O’Connor, Associate Professor in the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science at the University of California, Irvine, about transitioning from studying Film and Environmental Studies at Harvard and a career in the arts to studying philosophy of science, the relevance of game theory to biology, the sciences, and to resolving old philosophical problems, an... (@SciPhiPod, 63 minutes, 2019-Jan-07)
905.podcast imageAfrican philosophy and the West
How do you articulate African philosophy in a Western academic environment? And what gets lost in the project of “translating” the former into the categories of the latter? (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2019-Jan-20)
906.podcast imageHoliday Message 2018
There won't be any regular episodes of Mindscape this week or next, as we take a holiday break. Regular service will resume on Monday January 7, 2019. In the meantime, here is a special Holiday Message. Most likely it will be of interest to very few people -- there's no real substantive content, just me talking about the State of the Podcast and some other things I've been doing. Thanks to everyon... (@seanmcarroll, 45 minutes, 2018-Dec-24)
907.podcast imageE24: In Lieu of Arguments - The Gettier Problem
In art, genius is forgiven if it isn't consistent. Hell, it's probably revered more if it's inconsistent. It's fluid. Not so in philosophy. Consistency is king. Without it one becomes lost and strays from the path. In this episode the Dawdlers (well, Harland, mostly) try their best to explain why a cherished method and paper are inconsistent and are representative of bad philosophy. It's a famou... (@dawdlerspodcast, 102 minutes, 2019-Jan-20)
908.podcast imageTHE FOUNDATIONS OF LIBERALISM A Conversation With Shadi Hamid (2)
In the second part of our conversation, Shadi Hamid and I get into a conversation about the contradictions of liberal universality. Should we want Islamists to become liberals for instance? Shadi argues for a liberalism that can appeal to the most possible people and I argue that, given we can never escape contestable premises, a liberalism based on progress best makes sense of these contradicti... (@PolPhilPod, 51 minutes, 2019-Jan-12)
909.podcast imageHow important is truth in democratic politics?
In a democracy, the denial of shared facts also denies the possibility of a shared world in which we can deliberate together. (@Ariscottle_, 46 minutes, 2019-Jan-16)
910.podcast imageEpisode 205: Suicide with Dr. Drew (Durkheim et al) (Part Two)
More on philosophical and psychological interpretations of and judgments about suicide with guest Drew Pinsky. Is suicide an epidemic or a choice? Could it be both? Socrates didn't fear death and inspired Stoics and others to see suicide in some circumstances as brave. Or is it always cowardly? Does meaninglessness motivate suicide? Listen to part one first or get the Citizen Edition, which will a... (@PartiallyExLife, 55 minutes, 2018-Dec-22)
911.podcast imageEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part III - Beyond Good and Evil)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast, 44 minutes, 2019-Jan-13)
912.podcast image0G40: Total Recall and Locke's Theory of Personal Identity, Part 2
Was 0G39 a little too short for you? Did you feel ultimately unfilled after listening to it? Well, good news! Here at Podcall, we can implant a part two that will feel so real and lifelike and enriching, it will make you forget your drab existence before hearing it. And that's not all! Pay extra and we'll throw in some paranoid delusions. Already feeling them? That's how you know it's working. Won... (@0gPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2019-Jan-16)
913.podcast imageEV - 075 Void Punishment
We ring in the new year with Jon from the Wayward Willis Podcast as we discuss a range of topics surrounding religion. We focus quite a bit on Jon's experience growing up in a very Christian household, and then later raising a child in a secular household.Hero of the Week:People Losing Their Heros  (@ETVPod, 60 minutes, 2019-Jan-04)
914.podcast image27 | Janna Levin on Black Holes, Chaos, and the Narrative of Science
It's a big universe out there, full of an astonishing variety of questions and puzzles. Today's guest, Janna Levin, is a physicist who has delved into some of the trippiest aspects of cosmology and gravitation: the topology of the universe, extra dimensions of space, and the appearance of chaos in orbits around black holes. At the same time, she has been a pioneer in talking about science in inter... (@seanmcarroll, 69 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
915.podcast imageShorts - E6: What Came First: Thinking or Language?
Ever try and prank someone but it back fires and they just go about their business as if they were not even remotely aware of what just didn’t happen? Yeah, that’s this episode. (@dawdlerspodcast, 22 minutes, 2019-Jan-16)
916.podcast imageEpisode 205: Suicide with Dr. Drew (Durkheim et al) (Part One)
We are rejoined by Drew Pinsky to discuss philosophical and psychological readings by Seneca, Arthur Schopenhauer, Sigmund Freud, Emile Durkheim, Albert Camus, plus two 2017 survey papers on predictors of suicide. Is suicide ever morally permissible? If it's a symptom of mental illness rather than a chosen behavior, is it even appropriate to morally evaluate it? Check the PEL Store for our Wall Ca... (@PartiallyExLife, 48 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
917.podcast imageBlack Mirror Bandersnatch: The Illusion of Choice
In today's episode, I do a philosophy quick take on the new Netflix addition of Black Mirror: Bandersnatch. I examine its commentary on the idea of free will and the illusion of choice. Are our lives predetermined just like films, tv shows, and video games? Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and review! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophy... (@philosophyguy2, 13 minutes, 2018-Dec-29)
918.podcast imageBackyard ethics: defending the NIMBY
Suppose a new hospital or drug rehabilitation centre needs to be built. If you’re a NIMBY, then you’ll be fine with the project—as long as it doesn’t negatively affect your property value. NIMBYism is often touted as the scourge of suburbia, but maybe there’s more to it than meets the eye. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2019-Jan-13)
919.podcast imageSamuel Schindler, "Theoretical Virtues in Science: Discovering Reality Through Theory" (Cambridge UP, 2018)
A fundamental problem in science, and in philosophy of science, is that of theory choice. Scientists propose theories to explain data, but when two scientific theories can both explain the same data, what criteria do scientists use to choose between them? And given that even very popular scientific theories can turn out to be wrong, how are the criteria for theory choice related to truth? Do scien... (@NewBooksPhil, 62 minutes, 2018-Dec-14)
920.podcast imageWHAT ISLAMISTS BELIEVE A conversation with Shadi Hamid
Shadi Hamid discusses the different types of Islamism and their beliefs about government, democracy, and Islamic law. We also cover perceptions of Islam and its relationship with liberalism. (@PolPhilPod, 56 minutes, 2019-Jan-05)
921.podcast imageE23: The Moonlight Walks - Aesthetics in Science
Yeats repeats “a terrible beauty is born” in his poem “Easter, 1916”. The poem expresses the emotional limbo of Yeats as he grapples with the post World War I Irish rebellion in response to the broken promise of Irish liberation. Out of acts of violence, comes the hope of freedom. Or is it the hope of freedom that fuels acts of violence? Whence progress? Do we make progress with ideas, and if ... (@dawdlerspodcast, 100 minutes, 2019-Jan-13)
922.podcast image26 | Ge Wang on Artful Design, Computers, and Music
Everywhere around us are things that serve functions. We live in houses, sit on chairs, drive in cars. But these things don't only serve functions, they also come in particular forms, which may be emotionally or aesthetically pleasing as well as functional. The study of how form and function come together in things is what we call "Design." Today's guest, Ge Wang, is a computer scientist and elect... (@seanmcarroll, 71 minutes, 2018-Dec-10)
923.podcast imageEpisode 154: Metaphysical Vertigo (Borges's "Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius")
In the famous words of the idealist philosopher George Berkeley, “To exist is to be perceived.” Our ideas and perceptions are the fundamental objects in the universe; there is no real world beyond them. Hume wrote (I think) that Berkeley’s arguments don’t admit of the slightest refutation, and they don’t inspire the slightest conviction. On Earth, that may be true. On Tlön, it’s false – the people... (@verybadwizards, 117 minutes, 2018-Dec-18)
924.podcast imageEpisode 204: The Bhagavad Gita's Hindu Theology (Part Two)
More on this classic text by (perhaps) Vyasa, with guest Shaan Amin. Should we acquire good karma or behave "beyond good and evil"? How can everything be Krishna while Krishna is also the an element of virtue we're supposed to pursue? How does this compare with Stoicism? Plus, behold Krishna unveiled and be freaked out! Listen to part one first or get the full, unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. P... (@PartiallyExLife, 61 minutes, 2018-Dec-10)
925.podcast imageHarry Potter: Love and Death
What is choices role in Harry Potter? What does it mean to accept or deny death? What role does our understanding of death play in our understanding of love? Why does this matter? What is the contrast between Voldemort and Harry in relation to death? What does the Harry Potter series ultimately say about love and death? All of this discussed, tune in! Some info mentioned: Aristotle, Greek Mytho... (@philosophyguy2, 20 minutes, 2018-Dec-24)
926.podcast imageIs Humility a Virtue, Unfashionable or Not?
It is one quality that undergirds all others; it constitutes their ground, their condition of possibility. But is humility the virtue of all virtues? (@Ariscottle_, 41 minutes, 2019-Jan-09)
927.podcast imageEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part II - Thus Spoke Zarathustra)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast, 62 minutes, 2019-Jan-06)
928.podcast imageRationally Speaking #224 - Rick Nevin on "The long-term effects of lead on crime"
This episode features Rick Nevin, an economist who is known for his research suggesting that lead is one of the main causes of crime. (@Rspodcast, 60 minutes, 2019-Jan-07)
929.podcast image25 | David Chalmers on Consciousness, the Hard Problem, and Living in a Simulation
The "Easy Problems" of consciousness have to do with how the brain takes in information, thinks about it, and turns it into action. The "Hard Problem," on the other hand, is the task of explaining our individual, subjective, first-person experiences of the world. What is it like to be me, rather than someone else? Everyone agrees that the Easy Problems are hard; some people think the Hard Problem ... (@seanmcarroll, 82 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
930.podcast imageEV - 074 Cabin In The Void
Aaron and GW review the cult classic Cabin In The Woods. The satire and tentacles make it a prime Voidy movie.Opening Invocation: Mary Elizabeth Frye (last couplet lovingly added by Aaron)Hero of the Week: Greta Thunberg (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2018-Dec-27)
931.podcast image0G39: Total Recall and Locke's Theory of Personal Identity, Part 1
Imagine if you could clean up any part of your memories, would you? Are there any days in the past few years, perhaps, that you might wish to remember differently? Would you worry that changing the memory would result in a different you? Would you worry it was wrong to trade a real memory for a fake one? Good, now hop in, cause we're going to mars! That's right, it's Total Recall time, and we've g... (@0gPhilosophy, 34 minutes, 2019-Jan-09)
932.podcast imageShorts - E5: Reproducing
Ya like how last week we did death? This week we do birth. It also sucks! Can a Dawdler catch a break? What's that? Is that what we are basically known for? Look, don't be a hater. We mean, hustler... (@dawdlerspodcast, 35 minutes, 2019-Jan-09)
933.podcast imageEpisode 204: The Bhagavad Gita's Hindu Theology (Part One)
On the classic Hindu text (ca. the 3rd century B.C.E.), part of the Indian Epic poem Mahabharata, attributed to Vyasa, using Keya Maitra's 2018 translation/commentary. What is it to live wisely? What grounds duty? Listen as the supreme God Krishna convinces archer hero Arjuna that it's OK for him to kill his relatives because, you know, reincarnation and determinism and caste-related duties. Lots ... (@PartiallyExLife, 59 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
934.podcast imageCarrie Figdor, "Pieces of Mind: The Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates" (Oxford UP, 2018)
We’re all familiar with cases where one attributes certain psychological states or capacities to creatures and systems that are not human persons. For example, your cat might prefer a certain variety of cat food, and maybe your houseplants enjoy a certain corner of the room they’re in. In many cases, these attributions pass by without much notice. However, in certain regimented scientific conte... (@NewBooksPhil, 73 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
935.podcast image24 | Kip Thorne on Gravitational Waves, Time Travel, and Interstellar
I remember vividly hosting a colloquium speaker, about fifteen years ago, who talked about the LIGO gravitational-wave observatory, which had just started taking data. Comparing where they were to where they needed to get to in terms of sensitivity, the mumblings in the audience after the talk were clear: “They’ll never make it.” Of course we now know that they did, and the 2016 announcement of t... (@seanmcarroll, 80 minutes, 2018-Nov-26)
936.podcast imageCHARACTER A Conversation With Christian Miller
Christian Miller joins the podcast to discuss his book The Character Gap. What does it mean to have good character? What are, if any, the meta ethical foundations of this? Why should we develop character, and what are the factors that determines if people exhibit positive character traits in any given situation? (@PolPhilPod, 67 minutes, 2018-Dec-29)
937.podcast image23 | Lisa Aziz-Zadeh on Embodied Cognition, Mirror Neurons, and Empathy
Brains are important things; they're where thinking happens. Or are they? The theory of "embodied cognition" posits that it's better to think of thinking as something that takes place in the body as a whole, not just in the cells of the brain. In some sense this is trivially true; our brains interact with the rest of our bodies, taking in signals and giving back instructions. But it seems bold to ... (@seanmcarroll, 67 minutes, 2018-Nov-19)
938.podcast imageDignity and enhancement
Human dignity is one of those ideas that seem to have been around for as long as humans themselves, and few people would take issue with it. But like most ideas, human dignity has a philosophical pedigree, and there are in fact those who say we should abandon the notion—or at least modify its invocation. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2019-Jan-06)
939.podcast imageEpisode 203: Kristeva vs. Lovecraft on Horror and Abjection (Part Two)
Concluding on Julia Kristeva's Powers of Horror (1980) and focusing on H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" (1928). Does Lovecraft's presentation of nameless terror capture (or improve upon) what Kristeva means by "abjection"? End song: "The Other" by Mark Lint feat. Lucy Lawless. Read about it and support the project. Listen to part one first, or go back to ep. 202 first. Become a PEL Citizen t... (@PartiallyExLife, 70 minutes, 2018-Nov-26)
940.podcast image22 | Joe Walston on Conservation, Urbanization, and the Way We Live on Earth
There's no question that human activity is causing enormous changes on our planet's environment, from deforestation to mass extinction to climate change. But perhaps there is a tiny cause for optimism -- or at least, the prospect of a new equilibrium, if we can manage to ameliorate our most destructive impulses. Wildlife conservationist Joe Walston argues that -- seemingly paradoxically, but not r... (@seanmcarroll, 88 minutes, 2018-Nov-12)
941.podcast imageE22: A Farewell to Armchairs - Philosophy Without Intuitions
Imagine a beginner's luck without a point of reference, without any obvious design and you'll have a better picture of intuition and the role it plays in ego and illusion. So there is no luck. There is no accident. Some thinkers are just so in touch with the universe they need not appeal to another authority because they ARE the authority. In this episode we Dawdlers try to critique how intuit... (@dawdlerspodcast, 113 minutes, 2019-Jan-06)
942.podcast imageEpisode 53 - Stathis Psillos
On Episode 53, Nick chats with Stathis Psillos, Professor of Philosophy of Science and Metaphysics in the Department of Philosophy & History of Science in the University of Athens, about writing his first thesis on Aristotle and quantum mechanics, developing and defending “selective realism,” creating a dictionary of philosophy of science, “Philosophy of Science A-Z,” what it’s like to do phil... (@SciPhiPod, 57 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
943.podcast imageThe Hypocrisy of Sam Harris
The trilogy is complete! In this episode, Zach makes his case that Sam Harris’ attitude on racism is hypocritical. Zach thinks that Harris’ critique of religious moderates should lead him, by the same logic, to critique people with moderate attitudes on racism (like Harris himself). Big if true, surely. The episode is based on Zach’s article called “Wake Up, Sam Harris.” It can be found here... (@thevimblog, 69 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
944.podcast imageEpisode 203: Kristeva vs. Lovecraft on Horror and Abjection (Part One)
More on Julia Kristeva's Powers of Horror (1980) plus H.P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu" (1928). What is the object of fear? Mark, Seth, and Dylan get clearer on Kristeva's view of the establishment and loss of the integrity of the self, what the "object" of abjection is, and what this all might have to do with feminism. Most of the Lovecraft goodness is in part 2, so don't wait! Get the unbro... (@PartiallyExLife, 55 minutes, 2018-Nov-19)
945.podcast imagePREVIEW-Ep 202 Follow-Up: Close Reading of Kristeva's "Approaching Abjection"
Mark takes a very close look at pages 1–4 of the first chapter of On Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (1980) as a supplement to episode 202. Get the full, 55-minute experience as a PEL Citizen, or get it by supporting us on Patreon for a mere $1! (@PartiallyExLife, 17 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
946.podcast imageShannon Spaulding, “How We Understand Others: Philosophy and Social Cognition” (Routledge, 2018))
Social cognition includes the ways we explain, predict, interpret, and influence other people. The dominant philosophical theories of social cognition–the theory-theory and the simulation theory–have provided focused accounts of mindreading, the more specific practice of ascribing beliefs, desires, and intentions to others in order to predict and explain their behavior. In How We Understand Others... (@NewBooksPhil, 67 minutes, 2018-Nov-15)
947.podcast imageEpisode 202: Julia Kristeva on Disgust, Fear and the Self (Part Two)
Continuing on Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection, ch. 1 and 2. We try to get clearer on Kristeva's talk of "object," the relationship between language and abjection, how Kristeva is advancing on Freud, how to be a mom that allows a kid to separate in a healthy way, and how abjection plays into religion and writing. Listen to part one first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition, and do... (@PartiallyExLife, 79 minutes, 2018-Nov-12)
948.podcast imageEpisode 153: Progress in Psychology: A Reply to BootyBootyFartFart
David dies for science’s sins and addresses the failed replication of one of his studies (conducted with three former VBW guests) by the Many Labs Project. But first, the guys try to gauge their intuitions about the phenomenal experience of their molecule-for-molecule mirror reflection duplicate in a universe with a non-orientable topology. Could this spell doom for e-categoricalism? Plus, the an... (@verybadwizards, 107 minutes, 2018-Dec-04)
949.podcast imageEV - 073 Abundant Peter Coffin's Part 2
Continuing with Peter Coffin.Opening Invocation:The Resistible Rise of Auturo UiHero of the Week:Nadia Murad  (@ETVPod, 65 minutes, 2018-Dec-20)
950.podcast imageUnfashionable Virtues: Steadfastness
In the ancient world, steadfastness is bound up with personal integrity and interpersonal loyalty. Today, can it provide the basis for dynamic political friendship? (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2019-Jan-02)
951.podcast imageEpisode 53, Friedrich Nietzsche (Part I - The Life of Nietzsche)
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), a man who suffered greatly from bodily ills, considered himself somewhat of a physician. Yet, his remedies were not aimed towards physical conditions of the body, but rather the personal and societal ills of his time. Nietzsche, often poetically and rhetorically, dissected what he perceived to be the root of the suffering or apathy many of his contemporaries were f... (@ThePanpsycast, 65 minutes, 2018-Dec-30)
952.podcast imageInception: Contradictions with a Purpose
In this episode, we analyze the philosophy of Inception. We look at an obvious contradiction that is present throughout the film. But what is its purpose? This question inevitably brings up, is the entire film in the mind of Cobb? If true, does this destroy the meaning of the film? What is the meaning of the film? All of this discussed, tune in! Thanks for listening, please subscribe, rate, and... (@philosophyguy2, 24 minutes, 2018-Dec-11)
953.podcast image0G38: Terminator 2 and Roko's Basilisk, Part 2
WARNING: THIS PODCAST CONTAINS A THOUGHT EXPERIMENT THAT MAY CAUSE FUTURE VERSIONS OF YOU TO BE TORTURED BY A ROBOT GOD. ^Technically not a joke. Okay, if you're still reading, you're a brave soul indeed. This week we're wrapping up Terminator 2 with a discussion of one of the wildest thought experiments of the modern age, Roko's Basilisk, an idea so terrifying it was banned from the Lesswrong web... (@0gPhilosophy, 39 minutes, 2019-Jan-02)
954.podcast image#044 Reflecting On The Year That Was
Celebrating the one year anniversary of the Happier Hour by looking back at 2018 through the lens of each guest and philosophy featured on the show. From Resolutions to Love to Rebellion to Money to Creativity to Discovery to Revelry to Legacy, in this episode you'll hear the best of philosophy to help life suck less. Happy New Year! #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappierHour T... (@MissMMcCarthy, 34 minutes, 2018-Dec-29)
955.podcast imageShorts - E4: Mortality
Tick, tick, tick, tick... Happy New Year! Tick, tick, tick... The clock doesn't stop ticking when the ball drops. Another trip around the sun and we're all another year older. They haven't fixed aging yet. Death still seems a likely part of our future. What's your take on that? (@dawdlerspodcast, 23 minutes, 2019-Jan-02)
956.podcast imageEpisode 152: Ruthlessness, Public and Private
Tamler and David continue their Nagel-gazing by discussing another essay from Mortal Questions: "Ruthlessness in Public Life." Why do we treat the immorality of politicians, military leaders, and others in power differently than the immorality of individuals? Why does it seem less aversive to shake the hand of someone responsible for the death of thousands of civilians through military action than... (@verybadwizards, 81 minutes, 2018-Nov-20)
957.podcast imageEV - 072 Abundant Peter Coffin's Part 1
This is part one of a two part episode with Peter Coffin. A YouTube Documentarian, Author, and self-proclaimed Marxist. We first dive into capitalist systems, the open source movement, humans as labor, the state vs. the government, pokemon as a commentary on society, and so much more.Opening Invocation:Gestalt Buddhism (@ETVPod, 59 minutes, 2018-Dec-13)
958.podcast imageThe beauty imperative
What does it mean when beauty moves from aesthetic choice to ethical ideal? The age-old belief that true beauty lies within is ever harder to sustain today. It was once sidelined as a 'women’s issue' but beauty is now taking its place as a subject for serious philosophical scrutiny. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-30)
959.podcast imageEpisode 52 - Federica Russo
On Episode 52, Nick chats with Federica Russo, Assistant Professor in Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam, about the relationship between probability and causality, the role of philosophy of science in science, how the Russo-Williamson Thesis sparked a lively debate on causation in medicine, and the role technology plays on knowledge itself.FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT (@SciPhiPod, 65 minutes, 2018-Dec-06)
960.podcast imageE21: Ever Since the Universe Invented Imagination - What Do You Believe but Can't Prove?
We are as much our biases as we are our perception to others. Fallibility. It works in mysterious ways. This week the Dawdlers present a discussion from an earlier time than the present moment. It's a conversation they've been meaning to have but not really sure when to have it. But they did...eventually. The topic? An Edge.org annual question: 2005's What do you believe is true even though yo... (@dawdlerspodcast, 127 minutes, 2018-Dec-30)
961.podcast imageRick & Morty: The Psychology of Rick
In this episode, I consider the Psychology of Rick. Is Rick destined to be miserable because of his intelligence? Can being smart make you miserable? I consider some research in psychology to help answer these questions. Is this question a matter of nature or nurture? What does being intelligent have to do with being creative? Is any of this an excuse for Rick's bad behavior? All of this discus... (@philosophyguy2, 22 minutes, 2018-Dec-02)
962.podcast imageEpisode 52, Existentialism and Romantic Love with Skye Cleary (Part II)
Dr Skye Cleary is a philosopher and author, best known for her work in the field of existentialism. As well as teaching at Columbia, Barnard College and the City College of New York, Skye is also the associate director of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University. Skye’s contribution to the world of public philosophy has been extensive, writing for a wealth of publications... (@ThePanpsycast, 44 minutes, 2018-Dec-23)
963.podcast imageSam Harris vs. Jordan Peterson. What's the difference?
Zach and Dylan are back with part 2 of their series on the “Intellectual Dark Web,” a group of thinkers/political figures held together by god-knows-what. Scroll back for part 1! In this episode, Dylan makes his case that Jordan Peterson and Sam Harris (the IDW’s biggest names) are fundamentally different types of thinkers. That is a strong claim because it means that they shouldn’t be members of ... (@thevimblog, 72 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
964.podcast imageUnfashionable Virtues: Forbearance
Should forbearance still be considered a virtue? Or is forbearance ultimately an undesirable response to a hideously unjust world? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2018-Dec-26)
965.podcast image#043 Legacy Q&A: On Sacrifice, Success, and Selfies
In this episode you’ll hear from all three guests (Scott Barry Kaufman, Barry Lam, and Mary Pilon) in the series on LEGACY as they answer questions from the audience on topics including: success, American culture, religion and spirituality, and the psychological concept of The Dark Triad. #TheHappierHour Website: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappierHour Twitter.com/MissMMcCarthy Instagram.co... (@MissMMcCarthy, 26 minutes, 2018-Dec-23)
966.podcast imagePhilosophy of The Big Lebowski
In this episode, I analyze the cult classic, The Big Lebowski. Is the film providing commentary on postmodernism? Or is it a more Stoic take on life? What is the philosophy of The Dude? Should we be more like The Dude? All of this discussed, tune in! Please subscribe, rate and review to help out the show! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Tw... (@philosophyguy2, 20 minutes, 2018-Nov-27)
967.podcast imageSacred and Profane Love Episode 13: Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life
  Download Episode 13: Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life   In episode 13 of Sacred & Profane Love, “Jane Austen on the Virtues of Social Life, I speak with professor Karen Stohr of Georgetown University about how Austen brings into relief the social dimensions of virtue in her novels. We discuss the … Continue reading Sacred and Profane Love Episode 13: Jane Auste... (@jennfrey, 2018-Dec-02)
968.podcast imageTHE BIRTH OF ETHICS A Conversation With Philip Pettit (2)
In the second part of our conversation Philip Pettit gives his answer to the challenge of the first; creating a reconstructive account of morality that explains its nature, the origins of desirability and responsibility, and why we should be moral. As mentioned in the intro I’ve decided not to accept offers for paid advertisements for the podcast and will be attempting to fund it solely thr... (@PolPhilPod, 63 minutes, 2018-Dec-15)
969.podcast imageEpisode 51 - Hasok Chang
On Episode 51, Nick chats with Hasok Chang, the Hans Rausing Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, about deciding to leave Seoul, South Korea at the age of sixteen to study physics in the U.S., running up against physicists at Caltech who discouraged philosophical thinking, finding encouragement and a home in HPS within the Stanford School of Philosophy of ... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Nov-28)
970.podcast imageEV - 071 Better Know Epicurus
Let's get to know Epicurus who is definitely not Epictetus. This is the first time we've taking a close up look at one of the old Greek philosophers.Opening Invocation:South Wales Wassiling folk customHero of the Week:Luo Xixi  (@ETVPod, 62 minutes, 2018-Dec-06)
971.podcast image0G37: Terminator 2 and the Bootstrap Paradox, Part 1
Download me if you want to live! J/K nothing can save you from the impending robopocalypse, but at least you can hear us talk about how the causal narrative makes no sense and John Connor is even better than Jesus because he appears to spring fully formed into the universe at some point. Maybe you can chat about it with the murderbot on the way to the human camps. That would actually be great, we'... (@0gPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2018-Dec-26)
972.podcast image35: Finite Responsibility and Infinite Hope with Joel Reynolds
Caring for other people can be difficult. Whether it’s your own children, your parent, or a friend, care work is emotionally complicated and can be physically messy and uncomfortable. Today’s guest, the philosopher Joel Reynolds,... The post 35: Finite Responsibility and Infinite Hope with Joel Reynolds appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-26)
973.podcast imageShorts - E3: Time Travel
The Dawdlers offer some takes on the concept, possibility, and consequences of time travel. Not the kind we're all doing every day [real time "forward"], but that kind from the movies where you can go at high speeds in both directions on the entropic autobahn. Does the idea even make sense? What might happen if we succeeded? What's your take? (@dawdlerspodcast, 26 minutes, 2018-Dec-26)
974.podcast imageBoJack Horseman on Loneliness, Depression, and Self
Today's episode I analyze the Netflix show BoJack Horseman and the philosophy of it. Focussing on the show's commentary of loneliness, depression, and the self through the lens of the main character, BoJack Horseman. Tune in! Please subscribe, rate and review to help out the show! Support the Podcast and Gain Full Access: https://www.patreon.com/thephilosophyguy Twitter: @brendenweber_ A... (@philosophyguy2, 25 minutes, 2018-Nov-14)
975.podcast imageEpisode 50 - Justin Garson
On Episode 50, Nick chats with Justin Garson, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College-CUNY, about chairing a session with Daniel Dennett on memetics at the 2018 Philosophy of Science Association meeting, his work on biological functions in psychiatry and how symptoms of mental disorders like anxiety and schizophrenia might be useful to us, taking part in a summer meeting that brought s... (@SciPhiPod, 63 minutes, 2018-Nov-17)
976.podcast image#042 Achievement With Friedrich Nietzsche and Mary Pilon
In this episode you’ll learn what the controversial German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche can teach us about taking charge of our own legacies. You’ll also hear from author and investigative reporter Mary Pilon about Olympic athletes, our culture’s obsession with winners, and why we should welcome the long road to success. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org Twitter: @MissMMcCarthy IG: @MissMMcCar... (@MissMMcCarthy, 30 minutes, 2018-Dec-19)
977.podcast imageIntroduction to the "Intellectual Dark Web"
In this first of three episodes on the so-called “Intellectual Dark Web,” Dylan and Zach start with the basics. - What is this group? - What unites them? - What makes them intellectual? - What makes them dark? We focus mainly on Sam Harris and Jordan Peterson. In the coming episodes, we get more specific. Part 2 is about Dylan’s article: https://thevimblog.com/2018/08/19/sa... (@thevimblog, 47 minutes, 2018-Nov-19)
978.podcast imageEV - 070 Skepticism with Michael Marshall
We're joined by the esteemed Michael Marsh Marshall of the Be Reasonable podcast. Aaron and Marsh dive into many areas including: the Socratic method, placebo affect, skepticism, and cannibalism.Opening Invocation: The Holocaust (@ETVPod, 60 minutes, 2018-Nov-30)
979.podcast imageTelling the story
Philosophy is usually thought of as the province of ideas and abstract thought. But this week’s guest is taking philosophy in a slightly different direction, yet makes perfect sense. US academic Barry Lam is the creator and host of Hi-Phi Nation, a podcast that bringing together philosophy and storytelling—the results are rather wonderful. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-23)
980.podcast imageEpisode 52, Existentialism and Romantic Love with Skye Cleary (Part I)
Dr Skye Cleary is a philosopher and author, best known for her work in the field of existentialism. As well as teaching at Columbia, Barnard College and the City College of New York, Skye is also the associate director of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University. Skye’s contribution to the world of public philosophy has been extensive, writing for a wealth of publications... (@ThePanpsycast, 59 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
981.podcast imageEpisode #126 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 2 - Immanence
Today we continue our discussion on the work of Deleuze. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 23 minutes, 2018-Dec-22)
982.podcast imageE20: The Great Silliness - Consciousness Does Not Exist
Harland and Ryan were born on the same day 3 years apart. December 22. To celebrate they're doing an episode on consciousness and how you, yes you, dont have it!! Happy birthday to us, eh? Eh... They don't know philosopher Keith Frankish's birthday, but he doesn't think you have consciousness either even if he doesnt say it explicitly. C'mon Keith!! It's the Dawdlers' birthday!! Jerk. Here's d... (@dawdlerspodcast, 108 minutes, 2018-Dec-23)
983.podcast imageRECONSTRUCTING MORALITY A Conversation With Philip Pettit
Philip Pettit returns to the podcast to discuss his latest work The Birth of Ethics. We set of the challenge of resolving the seeming paradox of ethical truth in a naturalistic universe: In a world explained by science with 'nothing spooky' going on, how, and why, would morality emerge? (@PolPhilPod, 56 minutes, 2018-Dec-08)
984.podcast imageCan we still enjoy the labours of morally ‘tainted’ artists?
Can we still learn from, use, enjoy or legitimately benefit from the work of people who have committed egregious moral wrongs or who themselves hold morally repugnant beliefs? (@Ariscottle_, 42 minutes, 2018-Dec-19)
985.podcast imageRationally Speaking #223 - Chris Fraser on "The Mohists, ancient China's philosopher warriors"
Not enough people know about the Mohists, a strikingly modern group of Chinese philosophers active in 479-221 BCE. This episode features Chris Fraser, expert on Mohism and professor of philosophy at the University of Hong Kong. (@Rspodcast, 44 minutes, 2018-Dec-17)
986.podcast image#041 Storytelling With David Hume and Barry Lam
When is fiction more important that fact? In this episode with Vassar philosophy professor and host of the Hi-Phi Nation podcast, Barry Lam, you’ll learn what the 18th century Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume can teach us about the importance of emotions and storytelling in a polarized world. #TheHappier Hour Website: TheHappierHour.org Facebook.com/TheHappierHour Twitter.com/MissMMcC... (@MissMMcCarthy, 29 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
987.podcast imageAaron Meskin (Leeds): “The Social Construction of an Aesthetic Kind: “Foodie” and Foodies”
The London Aesthetics Forum is an initiative of the Institute of Philosophy. (http://philosophy.sas.ac.uk ) Aaron Meskin (Leeds): “The Social Construction of an Aesthetic Kind: “Foodie” and Foodies” Please do not cite or reproduce this material without written permission of the (@aestheticsforum, 2018-Dec-11)
988.podcast imageEV - 069 The World Is Doomed and GW Is In The Void
With GW not being around, Bethany Furtrell joins Aaron to talk about the election results. They also talk about Aaron's woes of Monster Island and how the finical crisis is about to start its reunion tour.Opening Invocation: Kobe BryantHero of the Week: Eileen and Todd (@ETVPod, 61 minutes, 2018-Nov-21)
989.podcast imageEpisode 110: Chike Jeffers discusses the social and political philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois
What is the best way forward for a group of people fairly recently freed from slavery? Booker T. Washington emphasized economic enfranchisement, whereas W.E.B. Du Bois thought it was necessary to achieve political enfranchisement alongside economic enfranchisement. Join us as our guest discusses how threads from this 100-year-old debate persist in today's discussions about racial justice in Americ... (@ElucidationsPod, 37 minutes, 2018-Dec-15)
990.podcast imageEV - 068 TERF's and Trans Athleticism
Today we are lucky to have Dr. Rachel McKinnon to talk about the term TERF (Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminist) and Trans Athletes. Rachel, herself, is a philosopher who's very qualified to speak about TERF, and is a world class cyclist who knows an immense amount about Biology as it relates to non-cis athletes.Trans Athletes LectureQueerMealsOpening Invocation:Angel  (@ETVPod, 63 minutes, 2018-Nov-19)
991.podcast imageRaymond Tallis on the Uniqueness of Human Consciousness
My guest in this episode could be described as a medical doctor who thinks we transcend our biology, or as a neuroscientist who thinks there is much more to us than our brains. Raymond Tallis spent many years as an NHS consultant and Professor of Geriatric Medicine, specialising in the neuroscience of strokes and epilepsy. He is also a prolific thinker, having published more than 20 substantial wo... (@NSthepodcast, 56 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
992.podcast image0G36: The Matrix and Skepticism, Part 2
What if I were to tell you that everything you know is wrong? What if I told you that the story you know is a system of control made up by people who want to keep you from the one real truth: The Matrix lacks a clear message on the problem of skepticism. On its own, it's kind of a confused mess of messaging. We dive into this issue, starting with a discussion of Plato's allegory of the cave and mo... (@0gPhilosophy, 40 minutes, 2018-Dec-19)
993.podcast imageShorts - E2: Determinism
In this episode, the Dawdlers take on determinism. Are killers gonna kill? Haters gonna hate? Chefs gonna cook? Eh...Anyway, Harland plays therapist and Ryan plays games because they're fun. And this is just the way it is because it has to be, as all things must be in the Determiverse. (@dawdlerspodcast, 23 minutes, 2018-Dec-19)
994.podcast image#040 Practice With William James and Scott Barry Kaufman
What does it mean to leave a legacy and how can we practice being better people starting today? In this episode you’ll learn how the American philosopher and leader of the Pragmatism Movement, William James, can teach us about habits, and what psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman has discovered in his research on self-actualization. #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy, 34 minutes, 2018-Dec-12)
995.podcast imageFREE WILL, RACE & IQ, AND OTHER LISTENER QUESTIONS
I Answer listener questions on a range of topics then give extended answers defending my views on free will (and how they relate to my views on religion and social justice and explaining my I think the arguments that race and IQ are linked are both flawed and dangerous. (@PolPhilPod, 70 minutes, 2018-Dec-01)
996.podcast imageEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast, 51 minutes, 2018-Dec-09)
997.podcast imageSteve Fuller on post-truth
For many of us, 'post-truth' means a culture where appeals to prejudice and emotion trump rational policy discussion. But for Steve Fuller, post-truth is just a by-product of the institutionalisation of knowledge—including scientific knowledge. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
998.podcast image#039 Revelry Q&A: On Beauty, Bacchae, and Becoming
In this episode you’ll hear what all three guests on the topic of REVELRY have to say in the audience Q&A. From beauty to movies to dancing to immigration and Latinx culture, revelry has a role to play. You’ll also learn what the ancient Greek tragedy The Bacchae can teach us today. Woa, that rhymes! #TheHappierHour TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy, 26 minutes, 2018-Dec-09)
999.podcast imageLucy Johnstone Against Psychiatric Diagnosis
In this episode I meet a controversial clinical psychologist who thinks that mainstream mental health services are bad for us. Dr Lucy Johnstone has worked for many years on the frontline of adult mental health services - helping those who may have been diagnosed with conditions like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or clinical depression. It's a staggering fact that roughly a quarter of British ad... (@NSthepodcast, 67 minutes, 2018-Dec-11)
1000.podcast imageE19: The Muck Raker's Son-in-Law - R.A. Fisher's Science and Statistics
People love to talk about the pitfalls of statistics and how we can "lie" with it. Those people don’t do statistics. In science, statistics is often quite difficult. It's there to help us with very complicated problems, not to hurt others with simple craven power leveragings. The Dawdlers discuss the positive side of this dichotomy through a paper by the mid-to-late 20th Century statistician Geo... (@dawdlerspodcast, 103 minutes, 2018-Dec-16)
1001.podcast imageWas 2018 the year of living undemocratically?
Is there reason to remain hopeful in democracy as a form of peaceful, pluralistic, ethically defensible way of life? (@Ariscottle_, 49 minutes, 2018-Dec-12)
1002.podcast imageRACE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY A Conversation With Glenn Loury
What role should race play in how we think of ourselves as Americans? I discuss the race debate with Professor Glenn Loury. We cover the role of culture, the wealth gap, high levels of inner city-violence, the case for reparations, and police killings. (@PolPhilPod, 75 minutes, 2018-Nov-24)
1003.podcast imagePhilip Goff on why consciousness may be fundamental to reality
Panpsychism can seem like a bonkers theory of consciousness, but according to Philip Goff and a growing chorus of leading thinkers - from philosophers to neuroscientists - it might just be right… In this episode we discuss why Philip rates panpsychism as 'the worst solution to the problem of consciousness - apart from all the others.' We explore his dramatic claim that Bertrand Russell and Arthur ... (@NSthepodcast, 56 minutes, 2018-Dec-10)
1004.podcast imageKNOWLEDGE AND PSEUDO KNOWLEDGE A Conversatin With Brain Earp (2)
In the second part of my conversation with Brian Earp we discuss replicability, pre-registration, pseudoscience, science in popular culture, and the limits of scientific knowledge. We also apply this epistemically cautious empiricism to the difficult cases of implicit bias, affirmative action, and workplace diversity quotas. Website: https://www.politicalphilosophypodcast.com Suppo... (@PolPhilPod, 58 minutes, 2018-Nov-17)
1005.podcast image#038 Sexy Time with Michel Foucault and Jezebel Express
Are we too repressed? In this episode you’ll learn what the philosopher historian Michel Foucault had to say about oppression, resistance, and power, and what NYC burlesque dancer and instructor Jezebel Express can teach us about taking ownership of our own bodies. #TheHappierHour Website: TheHappierHour.org (@MissMMcCarthy, 23 minutes, 2018-Dec-05)
1006.podcast imageOG35: The Matrix and Skepticism, Part 1
Do you hear that? That's the sound of conceptual inevitability. We all know this was coming, so grab your bondage gear and chug some red pills, cause Kansas is going bye bye! We're doing The Matrix and Skepticism. There's so much skepticism packed into this classic, we're gonna spread it out and let it breathe some. For part one, we cover the Cartesian style external world skepticism and the sim... (@0gPhilosophy, 37 minutes, 2018-Dec-12)
1007.podcast imageEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part III - The Second Sex)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast, 58 minutes, 2018-Dec-02)
1008.podcast imageShorts - E1: Does Everyone Have a Right to Their Opinions?
Hello World. It’s us Dawds, trying out yet another new thing. We thought we’d discuss a kinda off-the-cuff, shootin’-from-the-hip type format in addition to the usual 2+ hours we do. It’s more of a relaxed stroll with intermittent skipping as opposed to the marathons we’ve been doing so far. This time the Dawdlers wanna get each other’s take on whether or not everyone has a “right” to their own ... (@dawdlerspodcast, 31 minutes, 2018-Dec-12)
1009.podcast image006 – Mesmerism
Elena and Ian find out how one man and his impressive finger sparked the genesis of hypnosis and psychotherapy. Some waterfowl were harmed in the making of this episode. (@wondercupboard, 69 minutes, 2018-Dec-12)
1010.podcast imageRationally Speaking #222 - Spencer Greenberg and Seth Cottrell on "Ask a Mathematician, Ask a Physicist"
This episode features the hosts of "Ask a Mathematician, Ask a Physicist," a blog that grew out of a Burning Man booth in which a Spencer Greenberg and Seth Cottrell answer people's questions about life, the universe, and everything. (@Rspodcast, 58 minutes, 2018-Dec-03)
1011.podcast imageReparation
When individuals and communities today still suffer the consequences of past wrongs — slavery, dispossession, invasion, the theft of land and resources — what exactly is owed to them, and who should pay? (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-09)
1012.podcast imageIs moral philosophy being killed by hypothetical cases?
Why have hypothetical scenarios come to dominate moral reflection over the last century? Is it time for moral philosophy to abandon its preoccupation with hypothetical cases? (@Ariscottle_, 44 minutes, 2018-Dec-05)
1013.podcast imageEpisode #125 ... Gilles Deleuze pt. 1 - What is Philosophy?
Today we begin our discussion on Gilles Deleuze with a special thanks to Felix Guatarri. Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :) (@iamstephenwest, 23 minutes, 2018-Dec-08)
1014.podcast imageHope
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the philosophy of hope. To the ancient Greeks, hope was closer to self-deception, one of the evils left in Pandora's box or jar, in Hesiod's story. In Christian tradition, hope became one of the theological virtues, the desire for divine union and the expectation of receiving it, an action of the will rather than the intellect. To Kant, 'what may I hope' was one o... (@BBCInOurTime, 53 minutes, 2018-Nov-22)
1015.podcast image#037 Fiestas & Solitude With Octavio Paz and Daniel Campos
Are fiestas an answer to combating loneliness? In this episode you’ll learn what the poet and diplomat Octavio Paz can teach us about belonging and why philosophy professor Daniel Campos believes partaking in revelry is especially important for immigrant communities. #thehappierhour Show notes: thehappierhour.org (@MissMMcCarthy, 27 minutes, 2018-Nov-29)
1016.podcast imageE18: Wittgenstein's Inner Parliament - Exploring "On Certainty"
There are these people in workplaces who have a talent for completing assigned tasks well. Their results are basically always excellent and up to the specifications and requirements for getting the job "done right". Worker bees, we call them. And they are essential for the consistent and routine operation of a workplace. Without them the riffraff hand in a suboptimal and incomplete product. What... (@dawdlerspodcast, 139 minutes, 2018-Dec-09)
1017.podcast imageEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part II - The Ethics of Ambiguity)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast, 63 minutes, 2018-Nov-25)
1018.podcast image#036 Nostalgia With Svetlana Boym and Not Your Average Cotton
Can nostalgia help us be happier? In this episode you’ll learn the difference between good and bad nostalgia according to Russian philosopher Svetlana Boym, and how a toy cotton candy machine became a side hustle for the founders of Not Your Average Cotton. #thehappierhour Website: thehappierhour.org (@MissMMcCarthy, 28 minutes, 2018-Nov-26)
1019.podcast imageEpisode 51, Simone de Beauvoir (Part I - The Life of Simone de Beauvoir)
Simone de Beauvoir was a pioneer for the second-wave feminist movement and one of the most famous philosophers to have lived. Strikingly, Beauvoir did not label herself as a philosopher, since she never attempted to provide an original treatise which aimed to fully encapsulate the truth of the world or the human condition. Instead, she considered herself as a writer, commentator and novelist. Beau... (@ThePanpsycast, 62 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
1020.podcast image0G34: The Good Place and Moral Luck
Well, the cats out of the bag now. Everyone knows this is really The Bad Show. You'd think all the bickering between Thomas and I would have given it away sooner, but it's a relief to have it out in the open. Kidding! Everything is great! We're doing season two of The Good Place, a show we both think is great, and we're talking about Moral Luck, something you will all soon think is great! I strong... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2018-Dec-05)
1021.podcast imageListener Qs 6
Listener Q's 6, or 5 pt.2 depending on how you keep count. We get through every question and patron name there is! Plus, it's looking like we're gonna have a fun special guest next week back on the Patron feed. Stay tuned! Principia Discordia: https://principiadiscordia.com/ Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook... (@0gPhilosophy, 44 minutes, 2018-Dec-05)
1022.podcast image#035 DISCOVERY Q&A: On Cruises, Knowledge, Books, and Brains
In this Q&A episode with all three guests on the topic of DISCOVERY you’ll learn: Does taking a cruise count as traveling? What does consciousness have to do with social media? What knowledge is needed to discuss philosophy? What is luck? Which books have had the biggest impact? #thehappierhour Website: thehappierhour.org Facebook: Facebook.com/thehappierhour (@MissMMcCarthy, 22 minutes, 2018-Nov-21)
1023.podcast imageFrancis Fukuyama and the problem of identity politics
Does the resurgence of notions of “identity” represent a problem to be solved, or does it present an invitation to rediscover a deeper understanding of solidarity? (@Ariscottle_, 39 minutes, 2018-Nov-28)
1024.podcast imageThe vice of fear
Is fear such a bad thing? Nobody likes to experience it, but fear can be a spur to virtuous action, and overcoming fear is the essence of courage. But not everyone takes such a benign view. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Dec-02)
1025.podcast imageRationally Speaking #221 - Rob Reich on "Is philanthropy bad for democracy?"
This episode features political scientist Rob Reich, author of "Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy, and How it Can Do Better". Rob and Julia debate his criticisms of philanthropy. (@Rspodcast, 47 minutes, 2018-Nov-14)
1026.podcast imageE17: The Final Induction - The Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses
> > Ryan has kids. Kids have diseases and general poor hygiene. Thus, Ryan has diseases and sometimes poor hygiene. But he loves ‘em, those little rascals. In this episode, the Dawdlers explore this kind of parental affection, but for ideas. How much affection should we give to our brain children? The discussion centers around a little old paper that holds the key! And the key is as Harland sa... (@dawdlerspodcast, 135 minutes, 2018-Dec-02)
1027.podcast imageWhat can fans do when sport becomes ethically intolerable?
Do fans have particular moral responsibilities when it comes to their consumption of, and participation in, professional sport? (@Ariscottle_, 43 minutes, 2018-Nov-21)
1028.podcast imageListener Qs 5
Hey y'all! No jokes on this one, just a sincere thank you to our listeners and especially our patrons for keeping us in orbit. We had so much fun doing these, and as you'll here there's more fun on the way! Principia Discordia: https://principiadiscordia.com/ Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion grou... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2018-Nov-28)
1029.podcast image0G33: Aliens and The Second Sex
Hop to, marines! We've got feminist critiques to drop on some unsuspecting sex monsters. We're breaking down the blockbuster hit Aliens, and putting it through the ringer in ways that make me deeply uncomfortable, given I was raised on this movie. Luckily we have Thomas on hand to remind us how terrible it is. Here are some links on The Second Sex: The Second Sex: https://plato.stanford.edu/entrie... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2018-Nov-28)
1030.podcast image34: Roles and Responsibilities with Robin Zheng
We’re facing some pretty big problems these days. And whether they’re things like climate change, racism or poverty, these problems are all bigger than we are as individuals. So big, in fact, it can be... The post 34: Roles and Responsibilities with Robin Zheng appeared first on Examining Ethics. (@DePauwPrindle, 26 minutes, 2018-Nov-28)
1031.podcast imageAmerica after the mid-terms: Just how divided can a democracy become, and survive?
When the conditions of political friendship seem no longer to exist, what democratic resources remain that might begin healing this civic wound? (@Ariscottle_, 43 minutes, 2018-Nov-14)
1032.podcast imagePlato, Buddhism and storytelling
At a glance, Platonic philosophy and Buddhism might seem to have little in common. But their ideas on moral development and "turning the soul" towards reality have fascinating congruences. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Nov-25)
1033.podcast imageHaunting the Margins - E1: Robert Anton Wilson
"If you don't mind haunting the margins, I think there is more freedom there. It's like being a politician in opposition; that's where you can be most sincere. But, of course, you sometimes look at people taking lead parts and think they've got all the gravy." -Colin Firth Unremitting travelers rarely play it safe. How could they? They are in motion. Momentum is both a liberator and a killer. Bu... (@dawdlerspodcast, 126 minutes, 2018-Nov-25)
1034.podcast image0G32: Alien and The Corporation as Sociopath
This week we're breaking out the big guns, except not really because one of the greatest horror movies of all time ain't got no guns. Just some ineffective flamethrowers misused by some schluby rockhoppers. Best in class on all fronts, Alien! We're mixing it up with the 2003 cultural touchstone The Corporation. A book/movie about how corporate persons are functionally sociopaths. We attempt some p... (@0gPhilosophy, 41 minutes, 2018-Nov-21)
1035.podcast imageAre we getting anywhere?
Is philosophy more about questions than answers? Not necessarily. It all depends on how you conceive of philosophy in the first place, particularly with regard to its institutional setting. (@RadioNational, 25 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
1036.podcast image0G31: Snow Crash and Universal Language, Part 2
Ai Oh EH ME PA TI Congrats, you're all our language slaves now. We learned the secret words of the Ur language developed by the ancient masters to code the behavior of their followers and now our cult is going to really kick in to high gear. Hope you enjoy this part two, featuring both a new set of intro quotes and our returning special guest Noah Lugeons of Puzzle in a Thunderstorm fame. Universa... (@0gPhilosophy, 38 minutes, 2018-Nov-14)
1037.podcast imageE16: Episodic Synchrony - Diversity in Consumer-Resource Systems
“I suppose most scientists—most authors—have one piece of work of which they would say: It doesn’t matter if you never read anything else of mine, please at least read *this*.” Richard Dawkins wrote that in a note to a 1989 paperback edition of his book "The Extended Phenotype". Ryan appeals to this sentiment when it comes to the idea he outlines in this episode. Poor Harland has to sit and list... (@dawdlerspodcast, 160 minutes, 2018-Nov-18)
1038.podcast imageEp 7 - Joe Edelman on Designing Human Systems, Goals vs Values, and more
On this episode of Re:thinking Zack talks to philosopher, designer, and scientist Joe Edelman about human nature, community, and the relationship between goals and values. (@zackabaker, 47 minutes, 2018-Nov-14)

Questions in Podcast Episode Descriptions

(ordered as in episode list above; click/tap question to jump to episode entry)

Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics?
Could biological sex itself then be an illusion, constructed from human categories?
... Or is this a futile attempt to deny the reality of two biological sexes?
But would it be like life on earth?
... Or is the wish to find other life forms a science fiction fantasy that serves Hollywood well but has little to do with reality?
What does it say about what leads one to violent acts?
Ever wonder what 'gender non-binary' means?
As postcolonial subjects, how should these migrants be received and understood?
Should we use genetic testing to choose which children to bring into the world, and if so, how should we choose?
... Is it acceptable to choose a deaf child?
... Should we choose our children on the basis of non-disease traits such as intelligence or fitness, if we can?
Might we do better to give up the notion that mental distress implies illness?
But do we know enough about our experience of consciousness to suggest that consciousness cannot arise from nothing more than the physical interactions of bits of matter?
Is there a careful way to approach problems that will ensure that you'll always be right?
... What if you just never assert anything you can't be sure of?
But is this justified?
... And why the fascination in the West?
Could you truly enjoy such a podcast knowing that those who challenge the podcast are summarily executed?
... What if we call their objections a disease that must be cut out at the root?
... Better or worse?
What does Mill’s life teach us about meaningful lives?
While future AI might be excellent at appearing conscious, could AI ever actually become conscious?
How has this shaped the discipline of philosophy?
Are stand-up comedians the Modern Day Philosophers?
... Are those exceptional comics philosophizing?
... Does telling the whole, tragic truth rule out being funny?
Does science have the tools to give us a theory of consciousness or is that project doomed from the outset?
... Why do reductionist or functionalist explanations seem so unsatisfying?
But what about the future?
So what does feminism demand of men?
... Meagan Tyler joins Scott and Waleed to discuss whether men can be "feminists"?
What price would you be willing to pay for that podcast?
... Could you truly enjoy such a podcast knowing that it relied on the constant pain of one poor co-host at the hands of the other cohost?
What makes humans special?
... Is it language?
... Culture?
... Throwing?
... Semiotics?
... Impossible burgers?
But what about space, or the space-time continuum?
... What exactly is space-time?
... Are space and time fundamental features of the world?
... How do Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity change our understanding of space-time?
Are we supposed to identify with, or idolize, or merely like these people?
... What makes the formula work, did it sustain itself over its 10-year run, was it successfully replicated, and what parts haven't aged well?
Is it an essential trait of being human to reach out into the unknown?
If conspiracism is the consequence of particular conceptions of truth, knowledge, agency, power in democratic politics, is it a problem that can be solved?
To be or not to be, that’s the question, isn’t it?
But must that be the case?
How well does humanism's account of itself hold up in philosophical terms?
How can you process it all?
What gives?
Is character destiny, or can fluky decisions or tiny shifts in weather patterns fundamentally change who we are?
... Does the existence or non-existence of alternate universes have any bearing on freedom and responsibility?
Is the current distribution of ecumenic resources in the US morally defensible?
... How should a mature moral or political theory think about this?
Are they exploring where our ideas came from or trying to change things?
... nurture or essentially political solicitations for us to reconceptualize in healthier ways?
What obligations does the United States have to the Kurds, and indeed, to the region as a whole?
How?
"Such, Such Are the Joys" from Why Anything?
... Why This?
But are we justified in assuming these tidy explanations are most likely to be true?
Why do zebras have stripes?
Why do we disagree about political facts not just opinions?
Ecofeminism takes this seriously - but does it also perpetuate negative stereotypes about women's supposedly "natural" connection to the earth and to nurturing?
Huh?
Is this the real life?
... Is this just fantasy?
Is CRISPR the key to improving health and defeating ageing?
Do you have to believe to be entertained?
... What's the connection to humor, religion, and anti-government venom?
How, then, can we account for the appearance of complex systems such as organisms and biospheres?
language, ideology, booking guests, volunteering, and am I an anti-white racist?
What is spirituality?
... What is religiousness?
... And what is their purpose?
How do political scientists detect authoritarian personalities?
... Why have authoritarians sorted themselves into the Republican party?
But how do we know if what we believe to be true is really knowledge?
... Can our beliefs be both justified and true, yet still not count as genuine knowledge?
Do you ever get tired of talking explicitly about consciousness?
Will a genetically enhanced human in 2060 will be rendered “obsolete” by technological advances that come along in 2070?
... What happens when we blur the distinction between person and product?
Let's not fight over it, k?
Is morality objective or subjective?
Should we seek to eradicate offence?
How is this kind of knowledge possible?
But is reviving a show really ever a good idea?
What if you could interact with alternate versions of yourself - versions that made different choices, had different jobs, or different partners?
... Would you get jealous of your other selves if they were more successful?
What is ‘Positivism’ and why was it so important so Adorno to label Popper as one?
... Popper’s response, and what can we learn from this failure to communicate?
Is the damage that Trump is inflicting on US political culture and the office of the executive so egregious that legislative sanction is more important than electoral advantage?
But what defines what it means to be queer?
... Is it as much a political identity as it is a sexual or gender identity?
Do we need to explain to you what breathing is?
... Or is it?
Is an insistence on 'the facts' the dogmatic prejudice of believers in their particular truth?
Is this a brilliant film or a fundamentally misguided idea badly in need of an editor?
Is this a fair assessment?
Are there reasons to act in a particular way, to willingly make some sacrifice, do something which may be good, and which we may even be committed to, when our actions (or lack of action) are likely to be of no consequence?
... Is size detrimental to democratic community?
The question is, do we keep the train as is, do we try to change it, or do we blow it to bits?
What does marriage mean?
... What political implications does it have?
... If marriage as an institution is unjust, is there something wrong with participating in it?
Are these climate deniers simply impervious to scientific evidence?
Is reality then a creative construct that helps us to live but doesn't reflect the world?
... Are physical objects a useful hallucination?
Can the ancients show us how to recover these essential aspects of social harmony?
Why are tickets so pricey?
... Do tribute bands fulfill our needs?
... Should audiences ideally be on drugs?
In today's episode, I address Capturing Christianity's (Cameron Bertuzzi) video about, who created God?
... I contemplate the question, who created the universe?
... And maybe a better question, does the universe even need a cause?
Is Chappelle trolling his audience?
... Has he lost touch with the powerless people he used to champion?
... Or have critics missed his larger point, and failed to approach the new special as an art form?
Dare we imagine that we can bring our self-inflicted climate catastrophe under control, through a combination of technological advances and political willpower?
Is the Australian media’s coverage of China having the effect of both alienating Chinese Australians and promoting a kind of countervailing pro-China nationalism?
Should we justify liberalism from appeals to political precepts or normative understandings of human nature?
What should you be reading this summer—and how should you be reading it?
... But are we getting too quick to dismiss complicated fiction—the kind that doesn’t have straightforward heroes and happy endings?
Is the theory of natural selection a Victorian relic, about to be replaced by a new science of cultural evolution?
So how has contemporary philosophy come to owe such a huge debt to the father of psychoanalysis?
How did psychology come to define itself as a separate area of inquiry, and how did it come to be a science?
How do circumstances oppress and dehumanize us?
How do we enforce rights under uncertainty?
... Does America's long history of human rights violations prevent it from acting as a force for good today?
If liberal democracies are now ailing, maybe even failing, what might a recovery of a politics of virtue look like?
What you get when you reward the best?
Should we then simply encourage and argue for acts we support and do without morality altogether?
Are cartoons an inherently juvenile art form?
... A guilty pleasure when viewed by adults?
The Wrong of Rudeness asks a key question for our times how do we interact with each other, especially in politically contentious situations?
Does K's critique actually apply to our present age?
Where would pop music, television, and fine art be without the dilemmas at the intersection of love and sex?
And does not play, both as sex, drugs and rock and roll, and as creative and physical endeavour provide us with the most memorable events in life?
How did we get here?
... What are the implications for political philosophy, and for politics in general?
Do we need "realism" in such stories?
... When does a premise like this get too old to keep recycling?
What does this book have to say about the theodicy, the problem of evil?
... Why does Job (and his children) have to suffer so much just so God can prove a point to Satan?
... Are the speeches of Job's friends meant to be convincing?
... Does Job capitulate in the end?
What's wrong with our society?
Should the lifestyle choices we make affect our right to treatment?
Would you choose an algorithm rather than a human to mark your exam papers?
... Would you welcome a translation app that replaced foreign language learning?
... Would you trust a marriage prediction app to choose your life partner?
Should we recognise ours as the only universe and give up on others as fantasy science?
If you’re caring for a person with dementia, what do you do if they demand to see their spouse, who in fact died long ago?
What is the relationship between the form of writing and what can be thought?
... How is a writer’s thinking shaped by form?
... How is a reader’s?
... Does this matter for philosophy?
What did people do before such forms of memory even existed?
When is a machine deserving of moral consideration?
... When does it have rights?
Might the problem be not with our theory of language, but with the very idea of reality?
In an era of university funding cuts, economic rationalism and the creeping perception that human progress comes to us principally via science and technology, who needs the Humanities?
Is social psychology just a kid dressing up in grown-up science clothes?
... Are the methods in social psychology--hypothesis-driven experiments and model-building--appropriate for the state of the field?
Should a doctor say NO on conscience?
Is 'goodness’ still a term that we should be using?
... Is there a difference between the 'good' and the 'virtuous' character?
... What is the relationship between action and intention, between the inner and outer life?
Is love for all an illusion?
... Might we be better to see love as a dangerous force that by its nature excludes others and gives rise to conflict?
Contemplating whether or not the iconic film, Gladiator is Stoic?
What's the appeal?
... Why do women in particular gravitate to it?
What would it be like to be halfway between person and machine?
Have you ever avoided stepping on a crack, just in case you might break your mother’s back?
... Why do we so often engage in this kind of magical thinking?
Contemplating whether or not the iconic film, Gladiator is Stoic?
The introduction of the Libra would undoubtedly increase Facebook’s power and would certainly disrupt our existing financial systems. But if it diminishes Facebook’s untrammelled sway over news distribution, political communication and the ‘information economy’, is this a price we should be willing to pay?
But is there any research to back that up?
Is dismissing the self a mistake driven by the desire to uphold a purely material universe?
How did appeals to racism, sexism, and religion shape American party politics and conservative ideology?
Mark, Erica, and Brian consider the HBO mini-series, plus "based on a true story" and why do we enjoy witnessing suffering?
What kind of a story is this?
... A Marxist or religious allegory?
... A work of weird fiction?
... A family drama?
... A dark comedy?
... Why does a story about a man who turns into a giant insect get under our skins so much?
What is the link between responsibility and effort?
Should we give up on our conviction that physical stuff is the bedrock of the world, or is such talk ivory tower nonsense?
Is media trying to brainwash us into being ALL THE SAME?
... Are the excesses of the mob scaring us into conformity?
Are we fascinated by evil, violent characters because they make life more exciting?
... Or because they express our real nature?
What counts as binge watching?
... Why do we do it?
... Is it bad for us?
Is gender irrelevant to Buddhist teaching?
... And for women who have been denied agency or a sense of identity, how reasonable is the doctrine of non-self?
Is corporate power of form of government?
... How does it affect our lives and freedom?
What's the ethos of this stoner masterpiece?
... Is it a nihilstic movie?
... A deconstruction of masculinity?
... A cannabis infused Daoist parable?
... And is it fair to compare these two classics from the 90s?
... Fair?
What is the mind?
... Is this a satisfying account of the mind?
Are addicts responsible for harming their health?
Is rationality just the prejudiced claim of those who are sure they are right?
... Were we mistaken to think that reason drives progress?
Was the extradition bill the 'last straw' around which a torrent of popular discontent in Hong Kong has gathered?
How does perception result in thoughts about items in the world (such as dogs or flowers) and in conscious states of many kinds (such as experiences of seeing red)?
... How does perception provide evidence for our beliefs (such as the belief that there is a red rose in front of you)?
So where better to start than with a conversation with a lovely friendly philosopher, discussing his fascination with soul-searching French philosophy?
What is pop culture?
... Does it make sense to distinguish it from high culture, or can something be both?
Was this philosophy connected to his African origins?
What should we make of conservative complaints that their free speech is being trampled on by protestors?
... Is deplatforming a harm?
... Do social media companies have an obligation to respect a freedom of speech?
Are great ideas independent of time, place and tradition?
... Do African conceptions of the self or Chinese Mohist logic offer equally valid insights?
Why don't colleges pay their faculty to educate the public through regular, broadcasted conversations like ours?
Can caring be shared through podwaves?
Should they risk joining the ranks of the indebted in order to get a college degree?
What does it mean to be a good person?
... To act ethically and morally in the world?
What constitutes a "philosophical" conversation?
What would give us sufficient reason to believe that a non-human was conscious?
Given our modern scientific view of the world, how is freedom of the will possible?
How do video games help us become more human?
Should patient autonomy always be respected?
Where did ethics come from?
Is time not a river at all, but instead a static dimension?
... Are we deluded by experience into imagining the present is real?
freedom of expression; freedom of religion; freedom from discrimination on the basis of religion or sexuality?
... Or has Folau simply exposed the limits of political project of liberal tolerance?
As the schisms between our beliefs grow larger, what happens when our moral and political ideals put us deeply at odds with your fellow citizens?
What is the origin of this human impulse, and what makes for a great game?
What happens when we take philosophy into the field?
Is that true?
Can oppression help produce masterpieces or do the free always write the greatest poetry?
Is Trump a liar?
... Or is it more accurate to call him a 'bullshitter'?
Is anyone really 'right' about political values, or does essentail​ contestability imply a strong relitavism​?
But what if, more often than not, violence is intended to be morally righteous?
The rest?
Was Gemistos Plethon, the last great thinker of the Byzantine tradition, a secret pagan or just a Christian with an unusual enthusiasm for Platonism?
Should obese people be held responsible for being overweight?
Can we explain human experience using the terms of brain physiology?
But what if we had an easily searchable video record of all our experiences and interactions?
... How would that affect our relationships?
... What would it reveal about our characters and our sense of who we are?
... Is there a kind of truth that can’t be determined by perfect objectivity?
Is something radically wrong?
... Are the theories that led to the hypotheses of Dark Energy and Dark Matter mistaken?
... Might we need to rethink our account of the universe entirely?
Is this just a way of describing counterfactual situations?
Megan Le Masurier joins us to discuss whether "slow journalism" could help us remember what matters?
Where did that come from?
So why should we accept that states have the right to exclude or restrict entry to refugees and immigrants?
But is history on anyone's side?
... And as for morality, don't all politicians think they're in the right?
... Should the left then give up its claim to the moral high ground and argue for policies on pragmatic grounds alone?
... Or would this be to undermine its very core and meaning?
Is the president above the law?
But is it enough for the free press to provide scrutiny and surveillance?
What is beauty?
... What is art?
... What is good taste?
Part two of my rousing conversation with Dr. Keith Frankish, where we try to answer the ageless question "Where is my mind?
What are the goals of mindfulness practice - stress reduction and greater focus, or something much deeper?
... Can it cure David's existential dread?
... Tamler's fear of his daughter going away to college?
... Can sustained practice erode the illusion of self?
... Is that even something we'd want to do?
Does politics have to be Machiavellian?
... Do you have to be ruthless to succeed?
But if they are right, is all meaning, purpose and feeling illusory?
... Must we accept that we are just machines?
... Or do the secrets of experience lie beyond neuroscience's grasp, requiring an alternative account of who we are?
But what exactly is the Big Bang, and what’s the evidence that it took place?
... How do we account for the “Big Bang state”?
What if social media and democratic politics serve radically different goals?
Who in the world came up with that idea?
Have practical concerns and the economy of desire made beauty trivial and expendable?
... Could we follow Goethe and Kant and cultivate our aesthetic judgment to enrich our lives?
... Or is the goal of living beautifully a conceit of the privileged elite?
So, are these so-called religious beliefs genuinely held?
How does 'love of country' square with our collective failure to address the way we are ravaging our 'common home'?
Should you be expected to make that snap?
But what about groups of people?
Lost?
... If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge?
What's the role of a mass-consumed fantasy series in today's society?
... Is it our "fantasy" to have all these horrible things happen to us?
... Is this an edifying prompt to engage in public moral thinking, or a spectacular distraction of the kind that those Marxist theorists keep warning us about?
Could a belligerent approach to foreign policy make for a safer world?
... Is the best way of pursuing peace to prepare for war?
... Or has Trump in fact made the world more precarious than ever?
A long standing participant in psychoanalysis, she found herself up against the practical limits of Freudian theory - but would science provide more useful insight?
Whose interests are served when the wealthy give?
Is there a danger in seeing hardship as something that simply needs to be overcome, and which can be overcome given the right technologies or policies, rather than something that is intrinsic to life?
Why are so many of us unhappy?
Is a world independent of the observer an illusion?
... Or did quantum physics get it wrong?
If we harness the power of society to employ available technologies to really focus on making people happy, what would the result be?
Lost?
... If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge?
What's more important - avoiding falsehood or discovering truth?
... When (if ever) is it rational to believe anything without enough evidence?
... What about beliefs that we can't be agnostic about?
... Are there hypotheses that we have to believe in order for them to come true?
Can science potentially reveal everything, giving us a "God's eye view" of the world?
Life may be meaningless, but is it hopeless?
... Don't?...enjoy this?
When did scientists start wearing white coats?
... Why do doctors wear them too?
... And are they strictly necessary in toothpaste commercials?
What is 'good' conversation?
... What are its preconditions?
... What is its goal?
... And why is it so important to the moral life?
But is this true?
... Does Hume give us good reason to reject the testimonial proof provided on behalf of historical miracles?
What is the nature of a person's political outlook?
Why does the devil have all the best tunes?
... Have we sanitised the good and made it vacuous?
... Could we imagine a world where the good was exciting, dramatic and fun?
... Or are danger and denial somehow essential to being alive?
What's the wise way to live?
Lost?
... If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge?
Is human society fated to be irrational?
... And why is the alt-right having all the crazy fun these days?
Can we know the nature of justice before confronting the conditions of injustice?
Is it a mistake to think that self-exploration and being at one with ourselves are necessarily good things?
... Would it be better to deal with our anxieties through action?
Is that too high a moral cost?
... Why do some people walk away from the city?
... Why does no one help the child?
... Why does Le Guin make us create the city with her?
How can we keep our spirits up and avoid nihilism?
But what exactly is it about word play that we find humorous?
Lost?
... If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge?
The punchline?
- What should we take from it?
Might materialism be a profound mistake?
Has the weight of expectation on the findings of the Mueller Report foreclosed serious reflection on whether Trump should be impeached?
But what are the risks of radical democracy?
Is it possible to design a universal moral code?
... Is it ever acceptable to lie?
Why has anti-capitalist sentiment increased recently, and to what extent is it justified?
Where does that complexity come from, and how can we best approach wine?
What is an ideology?
... What do intellectuals studying it in opinion polls, contemporary debates, and historical texts understand it to mean?
Is technology making us complacent?
... Are we in danger of becoming Nietzsche's famed "last men" who are no longer capable of creativity and independent thought?
Lost?
... If I could be so bold as to make an assessment, I would take you for the sophisticated type but with a little bit of an edge?
Who's interested in current events!?
We often talk about a distinction between the online world and the “real” world?
... What does this distinction mean?
... And is there such a distinction?
Does our fear of death prevent us from living fully?
... Can we enhance experience by embracing its end?
Can social media platforms be anything other than purveyors of violence in countries with deep and long-standing histories of ethnic-religious tensions?
What is wisdom?
But are we deluded?
Does it work or do kids make terrible decisions?
Does God exist?
... Is God all-power, all-knowing and all-loving?
... Shall we try that new Mexican restaurant on Bold Street?
Has this arisen because pornography is largely created by men?
... Could feminist pornography featuring authentic sex, diverse bodies and female perspectives offer a truly liberating alternative?
... Or is porn fundamentally incompatible with intimacy and a problem for all of us until its abolished?
Should literature be political?
Is death part of life - and accepting it a part of a moral life – or is it a problem to be solved?
Was he right or is there room for optimism?
Why do we put other animals in the various categories we do, and treat them in the various good and bad ways that we do?
Is our culinary enjoyment enough to justify a complicity in cruelty which our fellow citizens find reprehensible?
Continuing on What is Literature?
... Are you shirking, all you skimmers?
Do you laugh in the face of the abyss?
... Or do you sob uncontrollably?
Is the enlightenment dream over?
... Or can we forge a New Enlightenment that abandons ultimate truth but provides us with directions just as radical and exciting as the original?
Should cultural or ethnic identity ever be a factor in immigration policy?
How are your critical thinking skills?
Do modern nation-states have persistent obligations to their citizens, even when those citizens engage in behaviour that seems to deny their membership to that political community?
What's the purpose of literature?
... Why write prose as opposed to poetry?
Hey kids, do you like violence?
... Want to see Murtle the turtle stick needles in Dr. Strange's eyelids?
... Sorry, not current enough pop culture reference?
... How bout this?
... What's big, purple, has a jewelry fetish, and makes some really sound points about overpopulation?
... Too many references mashed together?
How can we save democracy?
Have we misunderstood the very idea of nothing?
... Is this little more than a logical mistake, or might understanding nothing just be the key to explaining the universe?
How does the film force us to examine not only ourselves but society itself?
But can it experience real emotions of its own?
Where did that ability come from?
How and why were they made?
Is this a legitimate consciousness-raising exercise or a weird fetishization of blackness?
Should we consider philanthropy as mere ego expression for the wealthy, or is it genuinely altruistic behavior?
What does a society lose when it neglects the moral discipline of reading literary fiction?
But are they in power because we believe that strong leaders are good for us?
... Is it a mistake to imagine that leaders can solve all of our problems?
... Can we imagine a politics where we voted for policies rather than personalities?
... Or do we need leaders, however flawed they might be?
After a trilogy like this, what is left to be said?
Does God's Not Dead prove the existence of God?
Who is responsible for acts of torture?
What's a healthy podcast release schedule?
What movies of the past year challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways?
How can publishers and authors contribute to this process?
Is there still a place for talking about transcendence, the sacred, and meaning in life?
... Some of the above, but not all?
How have ideas across the world shaped the places from which they emerged?
Is there an "authentic" way to respond to persecution?
Is everything meaningless, vain, and a chasing after the wind?
... Are humans just the same as animals?
... Are wise people no better off than fools?
... Will God judge us after we die, rewarding the good people and punishing the shit-heels?
... What if there is no afterlife and this is all we get?
How good are we?
Why is it that most other forms of racist contempt can find a place in the diseased branches of antisemitism?
What does Brexit mean for peace in Ireland, Parliamentary democracy, and the British constitution?
... How should we think about the motivations and actions of all involved?
... Is there any way forward from here?
But is it possible to have obligations to people who are not yet born?
In a world where technology today is thought of in mechanistic terms - consumer items that simply appear in our lives and perform certain functions - is it time we rediscovered the techne behind its development?
did they make up a “third gender”?
Why, after such a long and prosperous run, would an essentially democratic form of government change — with a good deal of approval from its citizens — into an autocracy?
How can we best understand the psychology of racism?
Why has it taken the sound of bullets fired and the sight of blood spilled to get some to see Muslims as fully human, as capable of placing demands on our attention or claims for our respect?
Without free will or agency is morality possible?
... What could we ever really say we know about morality, is such knowledge possible and how would we go about knowing it?
Is traditional African religion in some sense monotheist, despite the worship of many divinities?
Anyway, how does this film connect with the audience?
... But what does this connection do for our lives?
... What does it force us to examine?
Is 'gig work' exploitative and injust?
Is it time to stop seeing romantic love as all-important?
... Could living by and for ourselves be radically liberating?
... Or is it the search for love that makes us human?
But why the need for such resourcefulness?
... What’s the problem?
what actually happens when we observe a quantum system, and why do we apparently need separate rules when it happens?
In Hamlet, Polonius said 'To thine own self be true', but what is the self, and what does it mean to be true to it, and why should you be true?
Do men and women have different brains?
... Right?
Are the successive coping strategies to racism (including "anti-racist racism" and embrace of negritude) that Fanon describes necessary steps in a dialectic which should be encouraged, or would it be best to learn from his "mistakes" and jump right to the humanistic end-point?
But is envy always a bad thing?
... Is it simply a petty emotion we should try to avoid, or could envy help us understand ourselves more?
What if you could sue someone for calling you a racial slur?
... Is the result a slippery slope to government tyranny, or a more harmonious society?
Why is that?
Does ethics have anything to say to the prospect that some of the sexual fantasies enacted on sex robots will, undoubtedly, include 'rape'?
Is science then just another human description limited by language, culture and circumstance?
Should what gets said at universities - and who gets to say it - be regulated?
... And is the supposed "free speech crisis" just a front for the culture wars?
This is the exciting part so are you not excited!?
How does growing up in a racist society mess people up?
Should we just accept that our ethics are in practice tribal?
... Or is a universal concern for humanity the bedrock of a civilised culture?
Does the moral life demand of us a fuller range of emotions beyond anger and contempt?
What was the sexuality of the historical Jesus?
... Did he have romantic partners?
... What did Jesus and Paul teach about teach about the desirability or permissibility of sex, what where their views on the family, and how should all of that impact how we live today?
is this even a meaningful question in the first place?
Is violence ever justified as a political strategy?
... Or should we always venerate Gandhi over Guevara?
How many innocent people should we be allowed to arrest and jail in order to prevent a single dangerous person from being free?
Fukuyama recommends a "creedal national identity" as a solution for tribalism; does this work?
... Is this "demand for recognition" that he describes foundational for the act of making an ethical claim?
... For self-consciousness itself?
... How does ideology prejudice the sort of theorizing that Fukuyama engages in?
But how does it look look today, especially in an age where the unfolding environmental crisis calls for something more than radical humanism?
Why do we love theories that divide complex phenomena into just two categories?
... Is there any evidence to back up these theories?
... Are we distorting our understanding of the mind and morality?
... And what we can do to get out of this mess?
Britain is one of the wealthiest nations in the world, so why do so many feel short-changed?
So what happened over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways?
Should we place a premium on the political virtue of compromise instead of the zero-sum game of the two-party contest?
Might the whole big bang theory be mistaken?
... Is the theory of the universe's origin just another creation myth, or is it still the best account we've got?
Is love real?
... What about the number 5?
What motivates people?
What makes self-sacrifice to any degree even possible, given that self-interested behavior is the default?
Can trial by media be more effective than the legal system?
... Is the individual less important than the common good?
is it so crazy to plug into the Matrix?
How do ideologies deal with huge system shocks like these?
... What is the role of elites in ideological creation and consumption?
How much can morality demand of us?
Does the invocation of a political 'emergency' have corrosive effects on the moral health of a political community?
What place has reality in this fantasy world?
How much do you really want something?
... Is it worth the price?
... Who decides you want it anyway?
But what exactly is Foucault's philosophy of power?
What would a purely therapeutic philosophy consist of?
... Does philosophy as pursuit of pleasure mean that you eschew political action or other substantial goals?
Is he consumed with guilt over his treatment of Liza?
So what does this research reveal about human happiness?
... Are some of us just born with happier dispositions than others?
But why do we care so much about reputation?
... Is it rational for us to rely on reputation so heavily in our day-to-day lives?
Was he the first multimedia journalist?
Does A = A or not!?
... Or is it just approximate?
Have I missed things?
What is the nature and what are the limits of political decision-making?
... Just how important — how final — is ministerial responsibility?
But with a new craze for microdosing acid amongst Silicon Valley whizz kids and management gurus, and respected scientists claiming antidepressant benefits, might we have been too quick to ban psychedelics?
... Could they be a means to deepen experience and enhance our lives?
What happens when memories are gradually destroyed by Alzheimer's, when our personality is drastically transformed by dementia, or when a sudden surge of creativity is unleashed by Parkinson’s medication?
Are you talkin' to me?
... This week the Dawdlers contemplate asymmetrical power dynamics regarding behavioral modification; from parent/child to peace officer/citizen, how do we feel about and deal with exertions of Authority?
What are the ethics and obligations of ageing?
Is there a universal morality, and if not, are moral beliefs actually the cause of some of the greatest human suffering?
comedy or tragedy?
How 'bout another Short!?
How have we come here, and why is this happening now?
Is this because we have the wrong categories and the wrong diagnoses?
... Might neuroscience enable more precise descriptions and more effective treatment?
Continuing on Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), then moving to “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect?
Can we carve out true friendships separate from the forms of oppression that surround us?
Are we wrong to suppose that racial prejudice will be overcome by equal opportunity?
... Should we dream of a world where race is not a basis for social identity?
... Or are social groupings inevitable and equality the only possible solution?
What is the nature, and what are the limits, of our responsibility for others?
... When can we say we've discharged our obligation?
But at what point in our evolution did suicide come into being, and for what purpose?
... Can suicide be explained, and if so, can we provide an answer to those who become so desperate?
If you want to do as much good as possible with your career, what problems should you work on, and what jobs should you consider?
Is religious language incompatible with democratic politics, as philosopher Richard Rorty believed?
In What's Left of Human Nature?
Does the Big Bang Theory misrepresent nerd culture?
On Johann Gottfried von Herder's “The Causes of Sunken Taste among the Different Peoples in Whom It Once Blossomed” (1775), “On the Influence of the Belles Lettres on the Higher Sciences” (1781), “Does Painting or Music Have a Greater Effect?
Are there inherent limits to the behavioral capacities of artifacts?
... How would that differ from human bodies?
... Are not both arrangements of universe, of "stuff"?
... Why would one substrate permit abilities inaccessible to others?
What are they though?
... And where do they come from?
... Did someone invent them?
Can the properties of the atoms themselves be explained?
Why does this movie seem to gain stature among critics and academics every year?
... Is this a really a exploration of Hitchcock's own obsessions and sexual repression?
... Is it a story about filmmaking and celebrity?
... Or is it just a twisty noir thriller about a man who has no job and can't kiss to save his life?
What were its origins and what was is reacting against?
Have prisons outlived their political and moral usefulness?
... Can we find a moral equivalent to incarceration?
How does the world work?
... What are the basic building blocks of the universe?
... How could these give rise to minds?
Are there really "sociological facts" distinct from mere generalizations about psychological facts?
What's this?
... Is it possible?
... Tell me, are everyone's favorite childhood movies still sitting in the window at the butchers?
Who has the arguments to back up absolute impossibility claims?
How do you articulate African philosophy in a Western academic environment?
... And what gets lost in the project of “translating” the former into the categories of the latter?
Should we want Islamists to become liberals for instance?
Is suicide an epidemic or a choice?
... Could it be both?
... Or is it always cowardly?
... Does meaninglessness motivate suicide?
Was 0G39 a little too short for you?
... Did you feel ultimately unfilled after listening to it?
... Already feeling them?
Ever try and prank someone but it back fires and they just go about their business as if they were not even remotely aware of what just didn’t happen?
Is suicide ever morally permissible?
... If it's a symptom of mental illness rather than a chosen behavior, is it even appropriate to morally evaluate it?
Are our lives predetermined just like films, tv shows, and video games?
Scientists propose theories to explain data, but when two scientific theories can both explain the same data, what criteria do scientists use to choose between them?
... And given that even very popular scientific theories can turn out to be wrong, how are the criteria for theory choice related to truth?
Or is it the hope of freedom that fuels acts of violence?
... Whence progress?
Should we acquire good karma or behave "beyond good and evil"?
... How can everything be Krishna while Krishna is also the an element of virtue we're supposed to pursue?
... How does this compare with Stoicism?
What is choices role in Harry Potter?
... What does it mean to accept or deny death?
... What role does our understanding of death play in our understanding of love?
... Why does this matter?
... What is the contrast between Voldemort and Harry in relation to death?
... What does the Harry Potter series ultimately say about love and death?
But is humility the virtue of all virtues?
What is it like to be me, rather than someone else?
Imagine if you could clean up any part of your memories, would you?
... Are there any days in the past few years, perhaps, that you might wish to remember differently?
... Would you worry that changing the memory would result in a different you?
... Would you worry it was wrong to trade a real memory for a fake one?
Ya like how last week we did death?
... Can a Dawdler catch a break?
... What's that?
... Is that what we are basically known for?
What is it to live wisely?
... What grounds duty?
What does it mean to have good character?
... What are, if any, the meta ethical foundations of this?
... Why should we develop character, and what are the factors that determines if people exhibit positive character traits in any given situation?
Or are they?
Does Lovecraft's presentation of nameless terror capture (or improve upon) what Kristeva means by "abjection"?
What is the object of fear?
Could this spell doom for e-categoricalism?
Today, can it provide the basis for dynamic political friendship?
But what is its purpose?
... This question inevitably brings up, is the entire film in the mind of Cobb?
... If true, does this destroy the meaning of the film?
... What is the meaning of the film?
Why do we treat the immorality of politicians, military leaders, and others in power differently than the immorality of individuals?
What does it mean when beauty moves from aesthetic choice to ethical ideal?
The topic?
Is Rick destined to be miserable because of his intelligence?
... Can being smart make you miserable?
... Is this question a matter of nature or nurture?
... What does being intelligent have to do with being creative?
... Is any of this an excuse for Rick's bad behavior?
Should forbearance still be considered a virtue?
... Or is forbearance ultimately an undesirable response to a hideously unjust world?
Is the film providing commentary on postmodernism?
... Or is it a more Stoic take on life?
... What is the philosophy of The Dude?
... Should we be more like The Dude?
Does the idea even make sense?
... What might happen if we succeeded?
... What's your take?
- What is this group?
... - What unites them?
... - What makes them intellectual?
... - What makes them dark?
Happy birthday to us, eh?
In a world explained by science with 'nothing spooky' going on, how, and why, would morality emerge?
Can we still learn from, use, enjoy or legitimately benefit from the work of people who have committed egregious moral wrongs or who themselves hold morally repugnant beliefs?
When is fiction more important that fact?
What is the best way forward for a group of people fairly recently freed from slavery?
What if I were to tell you that everything you know is wrong?
Are killers gonna kill?
... Haters gonna hate?
... Chefs gonna cook?
What does it mean to leave a legacy and how can we practice being better people starting today?
Is there reason to remain hopeful in democracy as a form of peaceful, pluralistic, ethically defensible way of life?
What role should race play in how we think of ourselves as Americans?
Are we too repressed?
Do you hear that?
When individuals and communities today still suffer the consequences of past wrongs — slavery, dispossession, invasion, the theft of land and resources — what exactly is owed to them, and who should pay?
Why have hypothetical scenarios come to dominate moral reflection over the last century?
... Is it time for moral philosophy to abandon its preoccupation with hypothetical cases?
Are fiestas an answer to combating loneliness?
Can nostalgia help us be happier?
Does taking a cruise count as traveling?
... What does consciousness have to do with social media?
... What knowledge is needed to discuss philosophy?
... What is luck?
... Which books have had the biggest impact?
Does the resurgence of notions of “identity” represent a problem to be solved, or does it present an invitation to rediscover a deeper understanding of solidarity?
Is fear such a bad thing?
How much affection should we give to our brain children?
Do fans have particular moral responsibilities when it comes to their consumption of, and participation in, professional sport?
When the conditions of political friendship seem no longer to exist, what democratic resources remain that might begin healing this civic wound?
How could they?
Is philosophy more about questions than answers?