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TrueSciPhi

Philosophy Podcasts (Ranked)

A list of episodes from the trailing year of selected podcast series with associated Twitter feeds.

Updated: 2018-Apr-23 14:00 UTC. Listed episodes: 514. Hide descriptions. Rank is based on episode age and recent retweets of podcast's indicated Twitter feed. Switch to chronological view. Feedback: @TrueSciPhi.

#  Episode details
1.thumbnailLarry Temkin on Obligations to the Needy
How can we best help other people? Peter Singer has argued that we should give aid. Despite a lifetime spent believing this, Larry Temkin has started to question whether the effects of aid are beneficial. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses some qualms about Peter Singer's arguments. (@philosophybites, 2018-Apr-02)
2.thumbnailHoP 300a - The Relevance of Ancient Philosophy Today
Rachel Barney, Christof Rapp, and Mark Kalderon join Peter to discuss the importance of ancient philosophy for today’s philosophers. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-22)
3.thumbnailBianca Bosker on Cork Dork
Some books can change the way you experience the world. Bianca Bosker's Cork Dork is one of these. It tells how she trained her senses of smell and taste to become a sommelier, starting from a position of almost complete ignorance about wine. But more than that it is a book about experiencing the world more fully. For more episodes of Thinking Books, go to www.thinkingbooks.co (@philosophybites, 2018-Mar-25)
4.thumbnailHAP 02 - It’s Only Human - Philosophy in Prehistoric Africa
Might philosophy be as old as humankind as we know it? We investigate the implications of findings concerning the origins of humankind in Africa. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-15)
5.thumbnailEpisode 36, The Daniel Dennett Interview (Part II - Philosophy of Mind)
Welcome to Episode 36 (Part II of II), where we'll be discussing philosophy of mind with Professor of philosophy, Daniel C. Dennett.In the words of A. C. Grayling, Professor "Daniel C. Dennett is perhaps the most distinguished philosopher in the world".In a 2013 study by Gottlieb Duttweiler Institut... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Apr-22)
6.thumbnailThe beauty imperative
What does it mean when beauty moves from aesthetic choice to ethical ideal? The age-old belief that true beauty lies within is ever harder to sustain today. It was once sidelined as a 'women’s issue' but beauty is now taking its place as a subject for serious philosophical scrutiny. (@RadioNational, 2018-Apr-22)
7.thumbnailEp62 - Is the Church Killing God?
In this 62nd episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview philosopher and Pentecostal Christian Dr. J. Aaron Simmons on his question: “Is the Church Killing God?” Aaron is associate professor of Philosophy at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. He works primarily in philosophy of religion and 19th and 20th Century Eur... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Apr-21)
8.thumbnailHoP 299 - Robert Pasnau on Substance in Scholasticism
Bob Pasnau joins Peter to discuss ideas about substance from Aquinas down to the time of Locke, Leibniz and Descartes. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-08)
9.thumbnailEpisode 36, The Daniel Dennett Interview (Part I - Philosophy of Religion)
Welcome to Episode 36 (Part I of II), where we'll be discussing philosophy of religion with Professor of philosophy, Daniel C. Dennett.In the words of A. C. Grayling, Professor "Daniel C. Dennett is perhaps the most distinguished philosopher in the world".In a 2013 study by Gottlieb Duttweiler Insti... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Apr-15)
10.thumbnailAfricana Philosophy Announcement
New paperbacks and a new series! (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-06)
11.thumbnail378: Heidegger
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/heidegger. Best known for his work Being and Time, Martin Heidegger has been hailed by many as the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century. He has also been criticized for being both nearly unreadable and a Nazi. Yet there is no disputing his seminal place in the history of Western thought. So what did Heidegger mean when he wrote about world... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Apr-23)
12.thumbnailMartin Luther King: political philosopher
We don’t routinely think of political figures as philosophers, but when but comes to Martin Luther King maybe we should. King was a deep thinker with a remarkably coherent vision of the moral life and a bracing take on some of the fundamental questions of political philosophy. (@RadioNational, 2018-Apr-15)
13.thumbnailHAP 01 - Something Old, Something New - Introducing Africana Philosophy
Chike Jeffers and Peter Adamson kick off the new series by explaining the scope and meaning of “Africana philosophy”. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-01)
14.thumbnailEpisode 38 - Alison Wylie
On Episode 38, Nick chats with Alison Wylie, Professor of Philosophy at the University of British Columbia and future President of the Philosophy of Science Association, about her formative experiences working as an advocationalist archaeologist throughout Saskatchewan, Canada, her turn toward exploring the philosophical issues being hotly debated in archaeology, when and how contex... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Apr-22)
15.thumbnailEpisode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Welcome to Episode 35, where we'll be discussing sexual ethics.Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.Sex is hugely important to us al... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Apr-08)
16.thumbnailEpisode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Welcome to Episode 35, where we'll be discussing sexual ethics.Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.Sex is hugely important to us al... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Apr-08)
17.thumbnailEpisode 188: Discussing "Lysistrata" and Politics with Lucy and Emily (Part One)
We are rejoined by actresses Lucy Lawless and Emily Perkins to discuss Aristophanes's bawdy play. Listen to us perform it first. Supplementary readings included Jeffery Henderson's introduction to his 1988 translation of the play; "Sexual Humor and Harmony in Lysistrata" by Jay M. Semel (1981); and "The 'Female Intruder' Reconsidered: Women in Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Ecclesiazusae" by Helene ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Apr-23)
18.thumbnailThinking Out Loud
Thinking Out Loud: The Sydney Lectures in Philosophy and Society aims to bring a leading international thinker to Western Sydney University annually to present a series of public lectures. This year Rosi Braidotti will present The Human in the Age of Technology and Climate Change. The idea of ‘human’ is undergoing rapid change. Some have termed this the age of the ‘post-human’, and it migh... (@RadioNational, 2018-Apr-09)
19.thumbnail455: Trolling, Bullying, and Flame Wars - Humility and Online Discourse
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/trolling-bullying-and-flame-wars. Open up any online comments section and you’ll find them: internet trolls, from the mildly inflammatory to the viciously bullying. It seems that the ease of posting online leads many to abandon any semblance of intellectual humility. So can we have intellectual humility on an anonymous forum with little oversight... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Apr-16)
20.thumbnailThe shadow of eugenics
Eugenics is a science that seems to belong back in the darkest days of the 20th century. But today, 'newgenics' has people worried, as reproductive technologies make it increasingly possible to filter out certain genetic disorders. How does this colour our notion of what constitutes a 'desirable' or 'undesirable' human subject? (@RadioNational, 2018-Apr-08)
21.thumbnailTocqueville: Democracy in America
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) and his examination of the American democratic system. He wrote De La Démocratie en Amérique in two parts, published in 1835 and 1840, when France was ruled by the July Monarchy of Louis-Philippe. Tocqueville was interested in how aspects of American democracy, in the age of President Andrew Jackson, could be applied to Europe as ... (@BBCInOurTime, 2018-Mar-22)
22.thumbnailHoP 298 - Renaissance Men - Ramon Llull and Petrarch
The Renaissance ideals of humanism and universal science flourish already in the medieval period, in the works of Petrarch and Ramon Llull. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-25)
23.thumbnailEp61 - The Future of Community College Education
In this sixty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, the second that aired in 2018, co-hosts Eric Thomas Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Cliff Harbour on “The Future of Community College Education,” the theme of his 2015 book, John Dewey and the Future of Community College Education. Dr. Harbour is Professor of Counseling and Higher Education at the Universi... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Apr-05)
24.thumbnailEpisode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part III - Homosexuality)
Welcome to Episode 35, where we'll be discussing sexual ethics.Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.Sex is hugely important to us al... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Apr-01)
25.thumbnailEpisode 137: Are Buddhists Afraid to Die? (with Shaun Nichols)
Why are we always attracted to people who mock us, resist our advances, and play hard to get? Maybe because it’s extra satisfying when you finally get them to… appear on your podcast. In our first live episode (recorded in San Antonio), the philosopher Shaun Nichols joins us to discuss his recent article “Death and the Self”. You might think that Buddhist conceptions of the self as illusor... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Apr-10)
26.thumbnail0G7: Altered Carbon and the Mind/Body Problem
This week we're spinning up our stacks for some endless psychological torture. That's right, it's episode one of Altered Carbon and the Mind/Body problem. Weekly reading: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/dualism/ Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/0G Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/0gPhilosophy Join our Facebook discussion group (make sure to answer the questions to joi... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-18)
27.thumbnailEpisode 37 - Quayshawn Spencer
On Episode 37, Nick chats with Quayshawn Spencer, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania, about growing up with the unspoken norms of social segregation in Nashville, Tennessee, the philosophical question that compelled a change in his career ambitions from biochemist to philosopher of biology, how he set out to write a book on the non-biological reality... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Apr-12)
28.thumbnailNEM#71: Aaron David Gleason Is a Wry Observer
Aaron was born into show business, staring young in L.A. in the early 00's with All Hours, then went solo, moved to New York, became an actor, and has now released his first album in seven years, Wry Observer. We discuss the title track from that album plus "Brooklyn at Dawn" (the intro music is from that too: "The Last to Die in Battle"). Then we look back to "Box Office Stud" by All Hours (2004)... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Apr-16)
29.thumbnail"Lysistrata" w/ Lucy Lawless, Emily Perkins, Erica Spyres, Bill Youmans & Aaron Gleason
The PEL Players return to perform a "cold read" of Aristophanes's play about using a sex strike to end war, first performed in 411 BCE. Jeffrey Henderson's translation makes this very accessible, and it's still really damn funny. Your hosts are joined by five real actors from TV, film, and Broadway. We will be following this up in ep. 188 with a full discussion of the play and the issues it raises... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Apr-16)
30.thumbnail#24 Take Five: Aliens, Ted Nugent, and Celeb Politicians
Dustyn and Whitney examine five topics from the internet, some of which are hot takes...hence Take Five. It's a bad name and they know it. Topics include: aliens, Ted Nugent, and celebrities-as-politicians. For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Apr-18)
31.thumbnail454: Monstrous Technologies?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/monstrous-technologies. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein raises powerful questions about the responsibilities of scientists to consider the impact of their inventions on the world. Are these questions as relevant now as they were 200 years ago? What insights, if any, should today’s technologists and disrupters glean from Shelley's story? What does i... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Apr-09)
32.thumbnailOh, the Humanities
We often hear that the academic Humanities and social sciences are in crisis—underfunded, out of touch with the job market, hamstrung by political correctness and moral relativism. So why study philosophy? And could a good dose of scientific method help to solve the problem—if indeed there is one? (@RadioNational, 2018-Apr-01)
33.thumbnailAugustine's Confessions
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss St Augustine of Hippo's account of his conversion to Christianity and his life up to that point. Written c397AD, it has many elements of autobiography with his scrutiny of his earlier life, his long relationship with a concubine, his theft of pears as a child, his work as an orator and his embrace of other philosophies and Manichaeism. Significantly for the developm... (@BBCInOurTime, 2018-Mar-15)
34.thumbnailPREVIEW-Episode 187: The Limits of Free Speech (Part Three)
Three substantial chunks of a follow-up conversation to our free speech episode. Mark and Wes discuss Jordan Peterson on speech, organizations' promoting certain speech (as opposed to restricting), insults vs. arguments, offense vs. harm, "incoherence" arguments like Fish's, fundamental principles in ethics, and more. Get the full discussion by becoming a PEL Citizen or Patreon supporter. (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Apr-14)
35.thumbnailIs Life Without Meaning?
Do you ever get the feeling that life is meaningless? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2018-Apr-17)
36.thumbnailHPI 62 - Kit Patrick on Philosophy and Indian History
The host of the History of India podcast joins us for the final episode on India. Coming next: Africana philosophy! (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-18)
37.thumbnailEpisode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part II - Extramarital Sex)
Welcome to Episode 35, where we'll be discussing sexual ethics.Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.Sex is hugely important to us al... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Mar-25)
38.thumbnailEpisode 187: The Limits of Free Speech (Part Two)
Continuing our free form discussion, trying to make sense of Stanley Fish's “There’s No Such Thing as Free Speech, and It’s a Good Thing, Too” (1994) and other potential rationales for prohibiting hate speech. How might the same sentence or idea be used in different speech acts, some of which might be legitimately censured but others not? Listen to part one first, or get the Citizen Editio... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Apr-09)
39.thumbnailRationally Speaking #206 - Kal Turnbull on "Change My View"
Julia and Kal Turnbull discuss the culture of the subreddit Change My View, what makes it such an oasis for reasonable discussion on the Internet, and what we've learned about what motivates people to change their minds or not. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Apr-15)
40.thumbnailThinking small
Understanding the human condition has been the province of many disciplines, but you wouldn’t necessarily expect microbiology to be among them. Think again! (@RadioNational, 2018-Mar-25)
41.thumbnail379: The Ethics of Whistleblowing with Edward Snowden
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/snowden. You might think we each have a moral duty to expose any serious misconduct, dishonesty, or illegal activity we discover in an organization, especially when such conduct directly threatens the public interest. However, increasingly we are seeing whistleblowers punished more harshly than the alleged wrongdoers, who often seem to get off scot-free.... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Apr-02)
42.thumbnailHoP 297 - The Prague Spring - Scholasticism Across Europe
New ideas and and new universities in Italy and greater Germany including Vienna and Prague, where Jan Hus carries on the radical ideas of Wyclif. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-11)
43.thumbnailSarah Fine on the Right to Exclude
Do states have a moral right to exclude people from their territory? It might seem obvious that states do have such a right, but Sarah Fine questions this in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes o... (@philosophybites, 2018-Feb-14)
44.thumbnailEpisode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part I - Premarital Sex)
Welcome to Episode 35, where we'll be discussing sexual ethics.Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.Sex is hugely important to us al... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Mar-18)
45.thumbnailEpisode 136: The Good Life (with Laurie Santos)
From Very Bad Wizards to Megyn Kelly Today back to Very Bad Wizards, Laurie Santos has traveled the typical trajectory of the celebrity academic. Laurie joins us to talk about her cult status after creating the most popular course in Yale University history: Psychology and the Good Life. Why are we so bad at predicting what will make us happy? What makes it so hard to do the things we know are goo... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Mar-27)
46.thumbnail0G6: Arrival and Sapir-Whorf
Incoming Alien Language Translation: (Event-Podcast-Source Material-Arrival Film) (Idea-Topic-Sapir/Whorf-Language-Experience) (After Dark-Free Will-Sexy Timelessness) End of Translation. (This would have been much easier if Thomas would have just let me teach y'all Heptapod B) Weekly reading: http://web.mit.edu/allanmc/www/whorf.scienceandlinguistics.pdf Supplemental readings: https://www.smith... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Apr-04)
47.thumbnailSun Tzu and The Art of War
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas attributed to Sun Tzu (544-496BC, according to tradition), a legendary figure from the beginning of the Iron Age in China, around the time of Confucius. He may have been the historical figure Sun Wu, a military adviser at the court of King Helu of Wu (who reigned between about 514 and 496 BC), one of the kings in power in the Warring States period of Chine... (@BBCInOurTime, 2018-Mar-01)
48.thumbnailPhilosophy for children: the why and the how
Children are natural philosophers—so why don’t we routinely teach them how to do philosophy? Some issues around that debate were aired at a recent public panel hosted by the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia. (@RadioNational, 2018-Mar-18)
49.thumbnail#23 A Tech Utopia?
Will technology, and our tech leaders, bring about utopia? Or are their promises just another marketing gimmick? Can we trust the richest of the rich to look out for the rest of us? For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Apr-04)
50.thumbnail453: Adorno and the Culture Industry
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/culture-industry. What's your favorite movie? Did you watch that season finale last night? No spoilers! Popular cultures pervades modern life. But what if pop culture was actually more pernicious than we ordinarily think? Could it be systematically deceiving us—eroding our ability to think for ourselves and fight for change? That's what the 20th ... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Mar-26)
51.thumbnailHPI 61 - What Happened Next - Indian Philosophy After Dignaga
A whirlwind tour of developments in Indian philosophy after Dignāga and a few words about the contemporary relevance of the tradition. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-04)
52.thumbnailEpisode 34, The Peter Singer Interview (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 34, where we'll be interviewing Peter Singer and discussing utilitarianism (Part II of II).Peter Singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. Professor Singer is currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human values ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Mar-11)
53.thumbnailEpisode 34, The Peter Singer Interview (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 34, where we'll be interviewing Peter Singer and discussing utilitarianism (Part II of II).Peter Singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. Professor Singer is currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human values ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Mar-11)
54.thumbnailEpisode 187: The Limits of Free Speech (Part One)
A free-form discussion drawing on Stanley Fish's “There’s No Such Thing as Free Speech, and It’s a Good Thing, Too” (1994), Joel Feinberg’s “Limits to the Free Expression of Opinion” (1975), and other sources. What are the legitimate limits on free speech? Feinberg delves into the harm and offense principles. Fish argues that every claim to free speech has ideological assumptions act... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-29)
55.thumbnailThe Self and Survival
In ordinary life, it is usually not hard to know who you are and who you used to be. For a small group of children around the world, their knowledge seems to conflict with what modern science believes is possible. On this episode, we tell stories of unusual childhood memories to examine the nature of the self, and what needs to survive in order for a person to survive. We delve into the strange ph... (@HiPhiNation, 2018-Mar-27)
56.thumbnailListener Qs #1
We wanted to say thank you for the overwhelming support, and to do that we've mixed in two things we think you will enjoy. Hearing us thank you each personally alternating with answering your in depth patron questions on episodes 1-5. For those we didn't get to yet, we will definitely do more of these so please keep posting your questions and help us find more patrons so we can do more bonus conte... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-28)
57.thumbnailEpisode 186: J.L. Austin on Doing Things with Words (Part Two)
Continuing on How to Do Things with Words (lectures from 1955), covering lectures 5-9. Austin tries and fails to come up with a way to grammatically distinguish performatives from other utterances, and so turns to his more complicated system of aspects of a single act: locutionary, illocutionary, perlocutionary. In doing so, he perlocutionarily blows our minds. Listen to part one first, or get the... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-26)
58.thumbnailRationally Speaking #205 - Michael Webb on "Are ideas getting harder to find?"
This episode features economist Michael Webb, who recently co-authored a paper titled "Are ideas getting harder to find?" It demonstrates that the number of researchers it takes to produce a technological innovation has gone up dramatically over time. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Apr-02)
59.thumbnailSteve Fuller on post-truth
For many of us, 'post-truth' means a culture where appeals to prejudice and emotion trump rational policy discussion. But for Steve Fuller, post-truth is just a by-product of the institutionalisation of knowledge—including scientific knowledge. (@RadioNational, 2018-Mar-11)
60.thumbnail#22 A Moral Document
"Budgets are moral documents," policymakers say. What does this mean? Should we evaluate our governmental, and personal, budgets ethically? Does the way we spend money reveal our true ethical commitments? For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Mar-28)
61.thumbnailEp60 - Existentialism and Romantic Love
In this sixtieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, the first that aired in 2018, we interview Dr. Skye Cleary on “Existentialism and Romantic Love,” the theme and title of her 2015 book. Dr. Cleary not only has her PhD in philosophy, but also a Master’s degree in Business Administration. She teaches at Columbia University, Barnard College, and The City College of ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Mar-10)
62.thumbnailHoP 296 - Morning Star of the Reformation - John Wyclif
John Wyclif refutes nominalism and inspires the Lollard movement, which anticipated Reformation thought with its critique of the church. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-25)
63.thumbnailEpisode 34, The Peter Singer Interview (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 34, where we'll be interviewing Peter Singer and discussing utilitarianism (Part I of II).Peter Singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. Professor Singer is currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human values a... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Mar-04)
64.thumbnailNEM#68: Billy James (Ant-Bee): Experimenting with Idols
Billy now does press for many of his idols, but began as a drummer in music school and started Ant-Bee in the late '80s, as a Zappa-esque improv live act and as a Beach Boys–psychedelic solo recording effort. He's released four albums, increasingly featuring his clients. We discuss two tracks from Electronic Church Muzik (2011): "Flutter-Bye, Butter-Flye" (feat. Michael Bruce) and "The Language ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-22)
65.thumbnailEpisode 135: Utilitarianism and Moral Identity
David and Tamler take a break from complaining about psychological studies that measure utilitarianism to complain about the moral theory itself. We talk about one of the most famous critiques of utilitarian theories from Bernard Williams. Does utilitarianism annihilate our integrity--our unity--as people? Would trying to maximize well-being fracture our identities, and swallow up our projects, mo... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Mar-13)
66.thumbnail0G5: Twilight Zone and the Chinese Room
Imagine a premise so implausible, it makes you question the very nature of personhood. Now imagine a thought experiment so implausible, it makes you question your own mind. The Twilight Zone ep1.7 The Lonely and the Chinese Room, they go together like Rob'ts and consciousness. Weekly reading: cogprints.org/7150/1/10.1.1.83.5248.pdf Weekly video: https://vimeo.com/141205172 Support us at Patreo... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-21)
67.thumbnailEpisode 186: J.L. Austin on Doing Things with Words (Part One)
On How to Do Things with Words (lectures from 1955). What's the relationship between language and the world? Austin says it's not all about descriptive true-or-false statements, but also includes "performatives" like "I promise…" and "I do" (spoken in a wedding) that are actions unto themselves. They can't be true or false, but they can be "unhappy" if social conventions aren't fulfilled (e.g., ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-19)
68.thumbnailExtended minds, predictive processes, and Andy Clark
Andy Clark is a big name in what’s known as embodied and extended cognition. The theory positions the mind beyond the brain. If accurate, his ideas will have radical practical consequences well beyond the philosophy of mind. (@RadioNational, 2018-Mar-04)
69.thumbnail452: How to Humbly Disagree
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/how-humbly-disagree. People like to argue, especially Philosophy Talk listeners! But no matter how hard we try to resolve disputes through rational discourse, sometimes we may still disagree about important issues. One response to this predicament is simply to agree to disagree. But should the mere fact of disagreement lower our confidence in our v... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Mar-12)
70.thumbnailHPI 60 - The Buddha and I - Indian Influence on Islamic and European Thought
The impact of ancient Indian thought upon the Muslim scholar al-Bīrūnī and upon European thinkers like Hume, Hegel, and Schopenhauer. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-18)
71.thumbnail#21 Wolverine Gets Old: "Logan," Aging, and Heroism
What's it like when someone with superpowers begins to age? What does it say about our own views on aging and mortality? We explore these questions, as well as the connection between heroism and the body. For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Mar-21)
72.thumbnailEpisode 33, Yujin Nagasawa and 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 33 on 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part II of II).Yujin Nagasawa is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham, as well as President of the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion. O... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Feb-25)
73.thumbnailEpisode 36 - Armin Shulz
On Episode 36, Nick chats with Armin Shulz, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Kansas and Visiting Fellow at the Center for Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, about leaving Germany at fifteen to study abroad in the United States Pacific Northwest, studying (and returning to teach) at the London School of Economics, how helping behavior is adap... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Mar-09)
74.thumbnailThe philosophy of parenting—part 4
An authentic life will risk heartbreak for the highs—sounds like parenting. Matt Beard presents his final foray into the bewildering modern world of children, parents and families. (@RadioNational, 2018-Feb-25)
75.thumbnailEpisode 185: Ethics in Homer's "Odyssey" Feat. Translator Emily Wilson (Part Two)
Continuing with Emily Wilson on her translation of the Greek epic poem. We discuss the "oikos" or estate, built on violence, and its connection to "xenia," or hospitality, which serves to forge military alliances. Also: status distinctions and the role of the gods in the text. Listen to part one first, or get the ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "Tiny Broken Boats" ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-12)
76.thumbnailHoP 295 - The Most Christian Doctor - Jean Gerson
Jean Gerson’s role in the political disputes of his day, the spread of lay devotion and affective mysticism, and the debate over the Romance of the Rose initiated by Christine de Pizan. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-11)
77.thumbnailRationally Speaking #204 - Simine Vazire on "Reforming psychology, and self-awareness"
Simine Vazire is a professor of psychology, the author of the blog, "Sometimes I'm Wrong," and a major advocate for improving the field of psychology. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Mar-19)
78.thumbnail#20 "The Push," Manipulation, and Murder
Netflix's new addition, "The Push" forces a difficult question: can you push an otherwise normal person to the point of killing someone? Dustyn and Whitney explore the philosophical questions around complying to authority, resisting the crowd, and how well we know ourselves. Fair warning: spoilers abound! For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Mar-14)
79.thumbnailEpisode #116 ... Structuralism and Mythology pt. 1
Today we begin talking about the initial projects of structuralism. (@iamstephenwest, 2018-Mar-18)
80.thumbnailEpisode #117 ... Structuralism and Mythology pt. 2
Today we continue to talk about the projects of Structuralism. (@iamstephenwest, 2018-Mar-18)
81.thumbnailEpisode 33, Yujin Nagasawa and 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 33 on 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part I of II).Yujin Nagasawa is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham, as well as President of the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion. Ob... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Feb-18)
82.thumbnailEpisode 35 - Steven French
On Episode 35, Nick chats with Steven French, Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Leeds, about his early interests in "geeky" hobbies, new music, and a motorcycle sport called "Speedway," his intense graduate school days under Heinz Post that ended at 4am in a pitch-black room debating Popper, taking his first permanent academic job at the University of Campinas... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Mar-05)
83.thumbnailAre we becoming too preoccupied with beauty?
Society expects us to conform to standards of beauty more than ever - says Heather Widdows. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2018-Mar-13)
84.thumbnailEric Schwitzgebel on Scepticism
How do I know I'm not dreaming? This sort of question has puzzled philosophers for thousands of years. Eric Schwitzgebel discusses scepticism and its history with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examin... (@philosophybites, 2018-Jan-11)
85.thumbnailEpisode 134: Digital Outrage
It's been 5 years since Molly Crockett has been guest on VBW. During that time she's completed a post-doc at University College, London and become a professor at Yale University. And we're...well, we're still doing the podcast. Today Molly joins us to talk about moral outrage in the age of social media. Has the outrage changed now that we express so much of it online? Does it contribute to polariz... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Feb-27)
86.thumbnailThe philosophy of parenting—part 3
Every parent knows the guilt that comes from being a ‘bad parent’—after you’ve lost your temper, given in to a tantrum and spoiled your precious little angel! It might affect how the child grows up, but how to work that out? (@RadioNational, 2018-Feb-18)
87.thumbnailHPI 59 - Looking East - Indian Influence on Greek Thought
Did Indian ideas play a role in shaping ancient Greek philosophy? (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-04)
88.thumbnail0G4: Star Trek: TNG and AI Personhood
Philosopher's log, showdate 02272018. We've encountered Season 2, Episode 9 of Star Trek: The Next Generation, and are currently studying it for clues to the nature of artificial personhood. Attempts to address the subject have failed, so we've turned to a thought experiment from 20th century earth; the Turing Test. Weekly reading: https://www.csee.umbc.edu/courses/471/papers/turing.pdfhttps://e... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Mar-07)
89.thumbnailNEM#67: RHEMA's Marc Jackson and Jeffrey Casey: Original Gangastas of Techno
RHEMA as a six-piece band produced an album called Voyage of the Rock Aliens that accompanied their appearance in the film of that name. The band then broke up, but songwriters Marc and Jeffrey continued to work together on various projects, and have finally now produced a proper album as RHEMA called Shine, drawing on their '80s roots but incorporating modern electronic music textures. We discuss... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-05)
90.thumbnailEpisode 185: Ethics in Homer's "Odyssey" Feat. Translator Emily Wilson (Part One)
On the classic Greek epic poem, written ca. 750 BC and translated by our guest Emily Wilson in 2018. Does this story of "heroes" have anything to teach us about ethics? Wilson wrote an 80-page introduction to her new translation laying out the issues, including "hospitality" as a political tool, the value for status and identity of one's home (including your family and slaves), and the tension bet... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Mar-05)
91.thumbnailEpisode 34 - Jackie Sullivan
On Episode 34, Nick chats with Jackie Sullivan, Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy, a member of the Rotman Institute of Philosophy, and an associate member of the Brain and Mind Institute at the University of Western Ontario, about how a challenging early home life pushed her to study existentialism and philosophy, finding a supportive environment in the History and... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Feb-28)
92.thumbnail451: Misogyny and Gender Inequality
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/misogyny. With the recent #MeToo viral campaign, along with the wave of prominent male figures toppled for being serial sexual harassers or worse, the topic of misogyny has come into sharp focus. But what exactly is misogyny? And how does it differ from sexism? What set of beliefs or attitudes makes someone a misogynist? And why does misogyny persi... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Feb-26)
93.thumbnailEpisode 033: Adrienne Martin on Hope
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Adrienne Martin about the nature of hope, why we should hope in humanity, differences and connections between hope, faith, and motivation, and much more. (@myishacherry, 2018-Mar-12)
94.thumbnailEp59 - Finding Peace
In this fifty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Annie Davis Weber yet again, this time on the subject of "Finding Peace" with Buddhism. This episode is different and special, as the very first wholly live episode, recorded while on the air live on WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM in Lexington, Kentucky. The episode aired and was recorded on December 18th, ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Feb-16)
95.thumbnail#19 Bigfoot (The Philosophy of)
Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Yeti. Skunk Ape. Is it rational to believe in our friend of the forest? We break down the evidence. For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Mar-07)
96.thumbnailEpisode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
Welcome to Episode 32 on Meta-Ethics (Part IV of IV) where we'll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in searc... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Feb-11)
97.thumbnailCicero
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas developed by Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43BC) to support and reinvigorate the Roman Republic when, as it transpired, it was in its final years, threatened by civil wars, the rule of Julius Caesar and the triumvirates that followed. As Consul he had suppressed a revolt by Catiline, putting the conspirators to death summarily as he believed the Republic was ... (@BBCInOurTime, 2018-Jan-25)
98.thumbnailCover Me Softly
When Lori Lieberman was 19 years old, she went to a concert of a singer she didn't know, and ended up writing a poem that would become one of the greatest cover songs of all time. This week we are going to look at the art of covering in popular music, and how that art marked the conversion from a classical model of musical aesthetics to a contemporary one. Popular music in the modern era is metaph... (@HiPhiNation, 2018-Feb-28)
99.thumbnailHoP 294 - Isabel Davis on Sexuality and Marriage in Chaucer
Peter is joined by Isabel Davis to discuss marriage, sex and chastity in Chaucer, focusing on the Wife of Bath’s speech. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Jan-28)
100.thumbnailThe philosophy of parenting—part 2
Brothers, sisters, parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, those weird second cousins you never talk to… how might we define family—and why it matters. (@RadioNational, 2018-Feb-11)
101.thumbnailThe Politics of Anti-intellectualism
In the second installment of the What Philosophy Owes Society series, Zach and Justin discuss a putative American epidemic, anti-intellectualism. But what is anti-intellectualism? Why is it brought up so often? Why is it as prevalent as it is? Could it be that it’s a hopelessly vague concept, deployed mainly to reinforce politico-epistemic (!) power dynamics, all with the effect of obscuring the... (@thevimblog, 2018-Mar-01)
102.thumbnail450: The Fifth (Mostly) Annual Dionysus Awards
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/5th-mostly-annual-dionysus-awards. Josh and Ken talk to philosophers, film critics, and listeners in presenting their fifth (mostly) annual Dionysus Awards for the most philosophically compelling movies of the past year. Categories include: • Most Searing Depiction of Humankind's Propensity to Dehumanize the Other • Most Philosophically ... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Feb-20)
103.thumbnail0G3: Futurama and Mereology
Good news, everyone! On this weeks episode we're diving into Futurama and into Fry himself. We're breaking down ep3.4 Parasites Lost and discussing the classic philosophical problem, the Ship of Theseus. After Dark, we rally sympathy for symbiote rights. #AllWormsMatter Weekly reading: https://io9.gizmodo.com/humans-with-amplified-intelligence-could-be-more-powerf-509309984 https://en.wikipedia.or... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-28)
104.thumbnailRationally Speaking #203 - Stephen Webb on “Where is Everybody? Solutions to the Fermi Paradox.
The universe has been around for billions of years, so why haven't we seen any signs of alien civilizations? This episode features physicist Stephen Webb, who describes some of the potential solutions to the puzzle. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Mar-05)
105.thumbnailEpisode 184: Pascal on the Human Condition (Part Two)
Continuing on Pascal's Pensées. More on our human desire and how God is supposed to address that, plus Pascal's views on political philosophy, the relation between faith, reason, and custom... and finally the wager! Why not just be a skeptic? Is Pascal right that people suck? Listen to part 1 first or get the unbroken, ad-free, Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! End song: "44 Days" by Dutch... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-25)
106.thumbnail#18 Sweating the Small Stuff
Philosophers talk a lot about big ethical transgressions: murder, cheating, trolley problems, etc. What about the real-life choices you actually have to make every day? Dustyn and Whitney explore the small ethical transgressions people commit all the time. How bad is it to steal from the self check-out line? Can you lie to kids to make them behave? What about googling someone before a first date? ... (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Feb-28)
107.thumbnailEpisode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part III - Emotivism)
Welcome to Episode 32 on Meta-Ethics (Part III of IV) focusing on emotivism.Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Met... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Feb-04)
108.thumbnailEp58 - Posthumanism and the Media
In this fifty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview J. J. Sylvia of Fitchburg State University about “Post-Humanism and the Media.” J.J. is an assistant professor in Communications Media at Fitchburg State University. Since 2014, he's been a HASTAC Scholar and in 2015 he received North Carolina State University's Award for Excellence in Classroom Tea... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Feb-07)
109.thumbnailHPI 58 - Amber Carpenter on Animals in Indian Philosophy
An interview with Amber Carpenter about the status of nonhuman animals in ancient Indian philosophy and literature. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Jan-21)
110.thumbnailThe philosophy of parenting—part 1
Should you have kids? Don’t look for sage advice—part 1 of a 4-part series. (@RadioNational, 2018-Feb-04)
111.thumbnailWhat Does Philosophy Owe Society?
From Breaking Bad to Ken Burns, good things come in series. Accordingly, the Vim is here with not just one, but four articles and hence four episodes on "What Philosophy Owes Society". These episodes are Zach Biondi's j'accuse against the aloof philosophical establishment. In this first part, Zach is joined by Lila, Adam, and Justin to discuss the 'O' in 'WPOS'—that is, "owe". What is the duty o... (@thevimblog, 2018-Feb-22)
112.thumbnailEpisode 184: Pascal on Human Nature (Part One)
On Blaise Pascal's Pensées (1670). Is it rational to have religious faith? You're likely familiar with "Pascal's Wager," but our wretchedness is such that we can't simply choose to believe and won't be argued into it. Pascal thinks Christianity is the only religion to accurately describe the human condition. Don't wait for part 2! Get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-19)
113.thumbnail449: James Baldwin and Social Justice
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/james-baldwin. Sometimes, we struggle to tell the truth -- especially when it's the truth about ourselves. Why did James Baldwin, a prominent Civil Rights-era intellectual and novelist, believe that telling the truth about ourselves is not only difficult but can also be dangerous? How can truth deeply unsettle our assumptions about ourselves and ou... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Feb-12)
114.thumbnailEpisode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part II - Intuitionism)
Welcome to Episode 32 on Meta-Ethics (Part II of IV) focusing on intuitionism.Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. M... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Jan-28)
115.thumbnail#17 The Opioid Crisis and Harm Reduction with Leo Beletsky
Professor of Law and Health Sciences, Leo Beletsky joins Dustyn and Whitney to talk about the opioid crisis and the philosophy of harm reduction: a controversial strategy aimed at saving lives. For sources relevant to our discussion, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Feb-21)
116.thumbnailNEM#66: Arrica Rose's Dreamy Dramas
Arrica has released five albums and 3 EPs of floaty, poetic, California rock since 2006. We discuss "Whole Lotta Lows" and "X-Ray Eyes" from Low as the Moon (2017) and "When the Clouds Hang This Low" from Let Alone Sea (2011). We conclude by listening to "On and On" by Deer County from Low Country (2016). Intro music: "Sail Away" from Antebellum (2010). For more, visit arricarose.com. Hear more Na... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-17)
117.thumbnailHoP 293 - The Good Wife - Gender and Sexuality in the Middle Ages
Medieval attitudes towards homosexuality, sex and chastity, and the status of women. Authors discussed include Aquinas, Catherine of Siena, and Chaucer. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Jan-14)
118.thumbnailEpisode 133: Death and Dreams
David and Tamler talk about the nature of death. Is being dead a bad thing? If so, what makes it bad? How can anything be bad for a subject that no longer exists? We didn't have a problem with oblivion for the thirteen billion years before we were born, why fear it now? Plus, a discussion about the "it was all a dream" trope in TV and film. Why is it so infuriating in some works but not others? (@verybadwizards, 2018-Feb-06)
119.thumbnailPhilosophy of Taxes
In the long-awaited follow up to the Vim's previous episode on taxes, Justin and Zach go back to first principles and discuss the philosophy of taxation. This seemingly innocent topic spreads is tendrils from Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan and the justification of government itself to riveting economic ideas such as how decreasing marginal utility might justify progressive taxation. Listen and be enlig... (@thevimblog, 2018-Feb-16)
120.thumbnailThe value of thought experiments
Drop those test tubes, take off your lab coat, pull up a comfy chair and think your way to scientific truth. (@RadioNational, 2018-Jan-28)
121.thumbnailEp57 - Philosophy Outdoors
In this fifty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Anthony and Eric talk with Dr. Alejandro Strong, about “Philosophy Outdoors,” especially about the company he started, Apeiron Expeditions. Alex’s philosophical work specializes especially in environmental philosophy. He founded an “L3C” company, Apeiron Expeditions. According to the company Web site, “... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Jan-26)
122.thumbnailEpisode 183: Mill on Liberty (Part Two)
Continuing on John Stuart Mill's On Liberty. We discuss "partial truths," whether "truth will out," whether we can discard some "experiments in living" as established failures, how Mill compares to Nietzsche, education, "barbarians," and more. Listen to part 1 first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. End song: "Flavor" by Tori Amos with strings by John Philip Shenale, interviewed on Na... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-12)
123.thumbnail0G2: Rick and Morty and Possible Worlds
Source material: Rick and Morty season 1 episode 8 Rixty Minutes Ooooweeee, this week we’re breaking down some Rick and Morty and how the multiverse is really the ravings of a lunatic. Plus, after hours we convince all you versers to believe in god. Oh geez. Weekly Readings: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/possible-worlds/ (especially section 2.1) https://philosophy.stackexchange.com... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-14)
124.thumbnail0G1: Black Mirror and The Experience Machine
Source material: Black Mirror Season 4 Episode 1: USS Callister We break down one of the most popular episodes of Black Mirror and consider our first great thought experiment, Nozick’s experience machine. Then, after hours, Thomas breaks out the wet blankets for everyone. Weekly Readings: http://rintintin.colorado.edu/~vancecd/phil3160/Nozick1.pdf Support us at Patreon: https://www.patreon.... (@0gPhilosophy, 2018-Feb-14)
125.thumbnailEpisode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part I - Naturalism)
Welcome to Episode 32 on Meta-Ethics (Part I of IV) focusing on naturalism.Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Meta... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Jan-21)
126.thumbnailRationally Speaking #202 - Bryan Caplan on "The Case Against Education"
In this episode, economist Bryan Caplan argues that the main reason getting a college degree is valuable is because of signaling, and not because college teaches you useful knowledge or skills. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Feb-19)
127.thumbnail#16 Hitler's Art, "Literally," and the Next Generation
Multiple topics! Rapid fire! It's very exciting. Also, there's some odd interference on Dustyn's mic, but it's brief and intermittent. Sorry! For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Feb-14)
128.thumbnailPhilip Pettit on Robustly Demanding Goods
What is a robustly demanding good, and what has that got to do with friendship and love? Find out in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast in which Nigel Warburton interviews Princeton Professor Philip Pettit about this topic. (@philosophybites, 2017-Dec-10)
129.thumbnailHPI 57 - Learn by Doing - Tantra
Philosophy is put into practice in Kashmir Śaivite Tantra and Buddhist Tantra. (@HistPhilosophy, 2018-Jan-07)
130.thumbnailAre there benefits to Psychedelic Drugs?
An intellectual trip with Ole Martin Moen. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2018-Feb-13)
131.thumbnailFuelling free will
Alfred Mele has four years and four million dollars trying to get to the bottom of free will. He learnt that it was like petrol. (@RadioNational, 2018-Jan-21)
132.thumbnailEp56 - Inclusion and Philosophy
In this fifty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Anthony and Eric talk with Grace Cebrero, a rising star in philosophy, a graduate of Mount Saint Mary’s University, and an alumna of the Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institute. We talk with Grace about “Inclusion and Philosophy.” Grace has worked as a research intern for a professor at MSMU and has bee... (@PhilosophyBB, 2018-Jan-19)
133.thumbnail448: Frantz Fanon and the Violence of Colonialism
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/frantz-fanon. Frantz Fanon is a thinker who has inspired radical liberation movements in places ranging from Palestine to South Africa to the United States. Most famous for his work "The Wretched of the Earth," Fanon is often understood as a proponent of revolutionary violence. But is this a fair characterization of Fanon, or is it an oversimplific... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Jan-29)
134.thumbnailEpisode 31, Ludwig Wittgenstein with Prof. Richard Gaskin (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 31 on Ludwig Wittgenstein (Part II of II) with Prof. Richard Gaskin.Ludwig Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher whose work focused on the philosophy of mathematics, logic, the philosophy of mind, and most notably, the philosophy of language.Wittgenstein’s influence o... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Jan-14)
135.thumbnailEpisode 183: Mill on Liberty (Part One)
Discussing John Stewart Mill's On Liberty (1859). If we disapprove of certain behaviors, when is it okay to prohibit them legally? What about just shaming people? Mill's "harm principle" says that we should permit anything (legally and socially) unless it harms other people. But what constitutes "harm"? And how can we discourage someone from, e.g., just being drunk all the time? Mark, Wes, and Dyl... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-04)
136.thumbnailTEASER-Episode 182: Reflections on PEL 2017 (Part Two)
The PEL guys get personal and political and tell you in brief about things like Planet of the Apes, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, and Vine Deloria Jr. in the second half of our year-in-review discussion. Here you get a taste. You can only hear the meat with the full, ad-free episode, posted for PEL Citizens (see partiallyexaminedlife.com/support!) or at patreon.com/partiallyexaminedlife. (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Feb-04)
137.thumbnail#15 The Self-Improvement Machine with Chris Partridge
Why are there so many books, apps, and systems devoted to self-optimization? Are they helping us improvement where it matters? If we're getting better, why does it feel so bad? Chris Partridge joins Dustyn and Whitney to discuss the motivations and pains behind endless self-improvement. For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Feb-07)
138.thumbnailHoP 292 - Say it With Poetry - Chaucer and Langland
Philosophical themes in Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” and “Troilus and Criseyde,” as well as Langland’s “Piers Plowman.” (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Dec-31)
139.thumbnailEpisode 33 - Zoe Drayson
On Episode 33, Nick chats with Zoe Drayson, Assistant Professor in Philosophy at the University of California, Davis, about leaving high school at seventeen to work full-time as a horoscope writer at a teenage magazine, returning to study under Tim Williamson at the University of Edinburgh, spending several years in academic publishing at Routledge on the philosophy list, going from... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Jan-27)
140.thumbnailEpisode 132: Emotional Willpower (with David DeSteno)
What's the best way to build self-control, patience, productivity, and delayed marshmallow eating? For decades psychologists and economists have told us to develop traits like willpower and grit. But psychologist David DeSteno describes a better, easier, and more effective path--the emotions. We talk to David about his new (not-self-help) book "Emotional Success," which argues that the emotions of... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Jan-23)
141.thumbnailCarlo Rovelli and his quantum problem
Carlo Rovelli on the desperate need for some conceptual engineering to dig quantum thinking out of a deep black hole. (@RadioNational, 2018-Jan-14)
142.thumbnailEpisode 31, Ludwig Wittgenstein with Prof. Richard Gaskin (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 31 on Ludwig Wittgenstein (Part I of II) with Prof. Richard Gaskin.Ludwig Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher whose work focused on the philosophy of mathematics, logic, the philosophy of mind, and most notably, the philosophy of language.Wittgenstein’s influence on... (@ThePanpsycast, 2018-Jan-07)
143.thumbnail447: Fractured Identities
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/fractured-identities. Despite tremendous strides made towards civil and political rights in the United States, discrimination and exclusion based on race, class, gender, and sexuality are still pervasive. As a result, individuals seen as "the other" often experience a painful inner fracturing W.E.B. Du Bois called "double consciousness." So, how do... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Jan-22)
144.thumbnailEpisode 182: Reflections on PEL 2017 (Part One)
To what extent has our podcast changed in reaction to current politics? Mark, Seth, Wes, and Dylan reflect back on our year, discuss how we select texts, and give some thumbnail sketches of potential topics. Also, does authorial intent matter, and how to talk philosophically about works that aren't philosophical texts. Attention: Only the first 45 min of this discussion will be posted on the blog ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-29)
145.thumbnail#14 Black Mirror: "White Christmas" and Cruelty
Dustyn and Whitney use the Black Mirror episode, "White Christmas," to ask the questions: what's so creepy about pick up artistry? Can an AI be a person? Can you enslave yourself? Would it be ethical to "block" someone in real life like we do on social media? Check out our sources at NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Jan-31)
146.thumbnailRationally Speaking #201 - Ben Buchanan on "The Cybersecurity Dilemma"
In this episode, Ben Buchanan (postdoctoral fellow at Harvard studying cybersecurity and statecraft) explores how the escalation dilemma plays out in the realm of cybersecurity. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Feb-05)
147.thumbnailEpisode 032: Kyle Whyte on Indigenous Resilience and Environmental Change
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Kyle Whyte about climate injustice, settler colonialism, anthropogenic environmental change, Indigenous resilience, and much more. (@myishacherry, 2018-Feb-05)
148.thumbnailHPI 56 - Who’s Pulling Your Strings? - Buddhaghosa
Buddhaghosa, a major figure in the history of Buddhism in Sri Lanka, argues against the need for a self to control and coordinate mental activities. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Dec-24)
149.thumbnailNEM#65: Jherek Bischoff Risks Every String
Jherek started off as bassist in the late '90s for the Seattle art rock bands The Dead Science and Parenthetical Girls, and has released about five solo albums (and other things) since 2006, the last two being full-on orchestral works. We discuss the title track from Cistern (2016), "The Nest" featuring Mirah from Composed (2012), and "Blackstar," featuring Anna Calvi, from a David Bowie tribute w... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-27)
150.thumbnailStones rolling and the joy of ordinary objects
The structure of the universe is written in stone—maybe. Dana Goswick talks metaphysics. (@RadioNational, 2018-Jan-07)
151.thumbnailEpisode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche - with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 30 (Part II of II) on Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Dr Gregory Sadler.Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these agai... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Dec-31)
152.thumbnailFreedom and Hostile Design
Some acts of expression are awesome, while others suck, and one philosopher has a new theory about the difference. Using this theory as a guide, we look at some of the suckiest things that ever sucked in urban design, and the street artists and compassionate vandals who are trying to fight them. We use these stories to investigate how public spaces are becoming less free and more coercive. Guest v... (@HiPhiNation, 2018-Jan-23)
153.thumbnail371: The Art of Non-Violence
More at philosophytalk.org/shows/art-non-violence We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violen... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Jan-15)
154.thumbnailEpisode 181: Hannah Arendt on the Banality of Evil (Part Two)
Continuing on Eichmann in Jerusalem, on how ordinary people can do--or acquiesce to--horrific things. How do people rationalize this? What can we apply from this to ourselves? Also, how was genocide a new type of crime, and what's the best rationale for punishing it? We talk justice, revenge, and ways that we too might be morally mass-confused. Listen to part one first or get the unbroken, ad-free... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-22)
155.thumbnailHoP 291 - Alle Maner of Thyng Shall be Welle - English Mysticism
Julian of Norwich’s Shewings and the Cloud of Unknowing lay out challenging paths to knowledge of, and union with, God. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Dec-17)
156.thumbnail#13 Black Mirror: "Nosedive" and Yelp for People
Dustyn and Whitney talk about the Black Mirror episode "Nosedive" and get into what makes Yelp-for-People so horrifying. Whitney recommends the book Halsey Street by Naima Coster and the album If All I Was Was Black by Mavis Staples. Dustyn recommends the film A Ghost Story. Find links to these recommendations and our sources at NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Jan-24)
157.thumbnailEpisode #115 ... Structuralism and Context
Today we talk about the origins of Structuralism. (@iamstephenwest, 2018-Jan-28)
158.thumbnailAwesome ethics and the art of mushroom blading
Forget the meaning of life; an ethical definition of awesome is far more important. (@RadioNational, 2017-Dec-31)
159.thumbnailEpisode 131: I Have No Genitals and I Must Scream
David and Tamler break down two episodes (with full spoilers) from the new season of Charlie Brooker's bleaker-than-bleak Netflix series Black Mirror. First up, "The USS Callister," a Star Trek parody that becomes a meditation on fandom, humiliation, and cowardly revenge. Next we talk about "Black Museum" - could it be the final episode of Black Mirror? Should it be? After four seasons of indicti... (@verybadwizards, 2018-Jan-09)
160.thumbnailEpisode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche - with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 30 (Part I of II) on Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Dr Gregory Sadler.Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these again... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Dec-24)
161.thumbnail446: Philosophy of Retirement
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-retirement. Many of us look forward to retirement, that time in life when we stop working for a living. But what exactly is retirement and why do we retire? Does retirement always mean an end to work, or can it sometimes just mean a shift to a different kind of work? Ought we retire for purely selfish reasons, such as to give ourselves m... (@philtalkradio, 2018-Jan-08)
162.thumbnailKatalin Farkas on Knowing a Person
Philosophers talk about 'knowing how' and 'knowing what'. But what is involved in knowing a person? Katalin Farkas discusses this question with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This episode was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. (@philosophybites, 2017-Nov-06)
163.thumbnailEpisode 181: Hannah Arendt on the Banality of Evil (Part One)
On Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963). Are we still morally culpable if our entire society is corrupt? Arendt definitely thinks so, but has a number of criticisms of the handling of the 1961 trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann. The Israelis were committed to the view that Eichmann was a monster, when the reality, says Arendt, is more frightening. Don't wait for pa... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-15)
164.thumbnailHPI 55 - Doors of Perception - Dignaga on Consciousness
Dignāga argues that all perception is accompanied by self-awareness. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Dec-10)
165.thumbnailNEM#64: Mike Huberty (Sunspot): Rock from the Other Side
Mike fronts a hard-working Madison power trio in the glam rock vein that's put out 7 albums and 7 EPs since 2000. He also runs (and records a new song every week for) a podcast about the occult. We discuss "Sulfur" from The Wilderness of Almost Was and Never Were (2017), "Saturday Night Gospel" from Dangerous Times (2014), and "Prozac Girl" from Loser of the Year (2003). We conclude by listening t... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-14)
166.thumbnail#12 The City: History vs Development
Whitney and Dustyn explore the tension between historical preservation and development. Then they focus on the classic question: would you accept a duel on the moon? For our sources, visit NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Jan-17)
167.thumbnailRationally Speaking #200 - Timothy Lee on "How much should tech companies moderate speech?"
This episode features tech and policy journalist Timothy Lee, discussing a question that's increasingly in the spotlight: How much should tech companies be actively moderating their users' speech? (@Rspodcast, 2018-Jan-22)
168.thumbnailEnid Blyton—the moral of the story
She might not be in vogue these days, but for one Cambridge philosopher Enid Blyton is serious moral business. (@RadioNational, 2017-Dec-24)
169.thumbnailRobot Love
Can robots fall in love? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2018-Jan-16)
170.thumbnailEpisode 29, Stephen Law and 'The Evil-God Challenge' (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 29 (Part II), where we'll be interviewing Dr Stephen Law and discussing his 'Evil-God Challenge'.Dr Stephen Law is a Reader in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, and editor of the Royal Institute of Philosophy journal THINK. Amongst many other books, Stephen Law... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Dec-17)
171.thumbnailEpisode 32 - Tim Maudlin
On Episode 32, Nick chats with Tim Maudlin, Professor of Philosophy at New York University, about being advised by his Yale undergraduate professor, "not even if you were Immanuel Kant would I suggest you go to graduate school in philosophy," how he "accidentally" wrote several books including Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity, Truth and Paradox, The Metaphysic Within Physics, and... (@SciPhiPod, 2018-Jan-04)
172.thumbnailEp55 - Evaluating Public Philosophy
In this fifty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Anthony and Eric talk about “Evaluating Public Philosophy,” in an episode based upon their recently co-authored paper, titled “Lessons Learned Baking Bread.” In this episode and in our paper, Anthony and Eric propose four criteria by which public philosophy can be evaluated: substance, accessibility, inviting... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Dec-21)
173.thumbnailHoP 290 - Martin Pickavé on Emotions in Medieval Philosophy
Martin Pickavé returns to the podcast to talk about theories of the emotions in Aquinas, Scotus and Wodeham. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Dec-03)
174.thumbnailEpisode 180: More James's Psychology: Self and Will (Part Two)
Concluding on William James's Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892). We briefly cover emotions and spend the bulk of our time on will. James’s introspective method allows us to distinguish reflex or coerced actions from voluntary, free-seeming ones, and gives us the vocabulary to attribute moral virtue to those who have enough willpower to keep those inconvenient truths in mind (if you eat this,... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-08)
175.thumbnail#11 Blue Ruin: The Ethics of Vengeance with Chris Partridge
Comedy writer Chris Partridge (@narc_twain) joins Dustyn and Whitney to explore the ethical questions at the heart of the film, Blue Ruin: must we avenge the ones we love? Does pursuing vengeance make your a life a blue ruin? Is violence outside of self-defense ever justified? To see more from Chris, check out cpartridge.com or follow him on Twitter: @narc_twain For our sources, visit NoNarrowTh... (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Jan-10)
176.thumbnailRobot dogs dream of consciousness
A convincing artificially intelligent dog might sniff, bark, and roll around—but before we build a successful K-9, we might need to re-evaluate intention and volition as properties of the human mind. And to fathom those we probably need to better understand our dreams. We present two thinkers coming at the consciousness question in their own unique way. (@RadioNational, 2017-Dec-17)
177.thumbnailEpisode 130: Dehumanization and Disintegration (with Paul Bloom)
In this Very Special Boxing Day edition of the podcast, Tamler and David welcome back honorary Third Wizard Paul Bloom to discuss his latest article in the New Yorker about dehumanization and cruelty. Is it really the case that we dehumanize in order to harm others? Or does most violence actually require us to view others as fundamentally human, agentic, and capable of true suffering? But first, w... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Dec-26)
178.thumbnailEpisode 29, Stephen Law and 'The Evil-God Challenge' (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 29 (Part I), where we'll be interviewing Dr Stephen Law and discussing his 'Evil-God Challenge'.Dr Stephen Law is a Reader in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, and editor of the Royal Institute of Philosophy journal THINK. Amongst many other books, Stephen Law ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Dec-10)
179.thumbnail445: The Examined Year - 2017
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/examined-year-2017. What ideas and events took shape over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Join Ken and Josh as they celebrate the examined year with a philosophical look back at the year that was 2017, featuring a roundtable discussion with host emeritus John Perry, as well as... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Dec-27)
180.thumbnailEp53 - Kneeling and Civil Protest
In this fifty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Arnold Farr about “Kneeling and Civil Protest,” concerning the conflicts that have arisen in the last few months about football star Colin Kaepernick and many others who followed his example. Arnold is a professor of philosophy at The University of Kentucky. He authored Critical Theory and Democr... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Dec-14)
181.thumbnailHPI 54 - Graham Priest on Logic and Buddhism
Graham Priest joins Peter to discuss non-classical logic and its connections with Buddhist patterns of reasoning. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Nov-26)
182.thumbnail363: What's Next? Death and the Afterlife
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/whats-next-death-and-afterlife. The question of what happens to us after we die remains as mysterious now as it always was. Some think that death amounts to total annihilation of the self; others adhere to certain religious traditions, which teach that the immaterial soul (and, in some traditions, the resurrected body) can ultimately survive death.... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Dec-25)
183.thumbnailEpisode 180: More James's Psychology: Self and Will (Part One)
On Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), chapters on "The Self," "Will," and "Emotions." Continuing from ep. 179, we talk about the "Me" (the part of me that I know) vs. the "I" (the part of me that knows), including personal identity. James thinks that emotions are just our experience of our own physiology. Finally, we tackle will, veering into ethics, free will, and more. Don't wait for part 2!... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-01)
184.thumbnailNEM#63: Revisiting Bradley Skaught, Jeff Heiskell, Steve Petrinko: 2017 Year-end Extravaganza
To celebrate year #2, previous guests return: Bradley (see #32) talks "Duet" from Take Out the Poison, Jeff (see #5) presents "Still Life with Broken Heart" from Emotional Terrorism, and Steve (see #6) discusses "Wind of Change" from A Tribute to the Bee Gees '66 to '78. Finally, hear Tyler Hislop (see #24) about his "Wounds and Nihilism (Feat. Mark Lint)." Opening music: "Dawning on Me" by Mark ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2018-Jan-01)
185.thumbnail#10 Philosophy for Children with Jana Mohr Lone
Jana Mohr Lone, director and founder of University of Washington's Center for Philosophy for Children and president of the Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO) joins Dustyn and Whitney to discuss philosophy for children: what does philosophical education for children look like? How does it change students? What would a world be like where everyone was a little more philosophical? ... (@NoNarrowThing, 2018-Jan-03)
186.thumbnailParental guidance recommended
The nature of Family could be more than a Christmas puzzle. (@RadioNational, 2017-Dec-10)
187.thumbnailEp52 - Against the Common Core
In this fifty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Nicholas Tampio, author of Common Core: National Education Standards and the Threat to Democracy. Nicholas is Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University. In addition to his forthcoming book, he has also authored a book titled Kantian Courage, and another titled Deleuze's Politic... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Dec-09)
188.thumbnailRationally Speaking #199 - Jessica Flanigan on "Why people should have the right to self-medicate"
This episode features Jessica Flanigan, professor of normative and applied ethics, making the case that patients should have the right to take pharmaceutical drugs without needing to get a prescription from a doctor. (@Rspodcast, 2018-Jan-08)
189.thumbnailEpisode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part IV)
Welcome to Episode 28 (Part IV) on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometime... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Dec-03)
190.thumbnailHoP 289 - A Wing and a Prayer - Angels in Medieval Philosophy
Be surprised by how many philosophical problems arise in connection with angels (how many can dance on the head of a pin is not one of them). (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Nov-19)
191.thumbnailEpisode 179: William James's Psychology (Part Two)
Continuing on Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), completing "The Stream of Thought" and covering the chapter on "Habit." James thinks that psychologists focus too much on those parts of consciousness that get picked out by substantive words. He describes habit as part of a general natural pattern that things that happen once tend to create pathways for themselves in surrounding material to all... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-25)
192.thumbnailEnvy has its reasons
Since the Ancient Greeks the philosophy of emotion has held that envy is irrational. As such it’s a non-starter in the conversation about economic redistribution: you can’t destroy someone’s advantage simply because you feel aggrieved that they have more than you. Case closed? Not so fast—envy might be considered one of the seven deadly sins but perhaps that’s not reason enough against a... (@RadioNational, 2017-Dec-03)
193.thumbnail#9 The Good Art of Bad People (Guest: Lane Eagles)
In light of the prominence of sexual assault allegations against artists, art historian Lane Eagles joins Dustyn and Whitney as they navigate the difficult question: how does our relationship to art change when we know its creator did bad things? Are we allowed to enjoy the works? Are we allowed to purchase them? Visit NoNarrowThing.com for our sources. (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Dec-27)
194.thumbnailEpisode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part III)
Welcome to Episode 28 (Part III) on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometim... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Nov-26)
195.thumbnailEpisode 129: Dystopias
David and Tamler assert their autonomy as individuals by discussing their favorite dystopian works of art. Rebelling against a repressive regime, they refuse to sacrifice their privacy, uniqueness, and reproductive freedom. Through sheer force of will - the human spirit - they triumph over the pressures to ... wait what? You want me to take that pill? Okay, can't hurt. Aaahhhhh. So happy... So co... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Dec-12)
196.thumbnailHPI 53 - Follow the Evidence - Dignaga’s Logic
Dignāga’s trairūpya theory, which sets out the three conditions required for making reliable inferences. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Nov-12)
197.thumbnailNEM#62: Anthony Phillips: Private Pieces, Soundtrack Parts, and Prog Rock
Anthony was the original guitarist and a key songwriter in Genesis from '67–'70, released some prog rock albums in the '70s, then shifted largely to a mix of acoustic guitar pieces and synth soundscapes, often for soundtracks. We discuss "Nocturne" from Seventh Heaven (2012, with Andrew Skeet), "From the Jaws of Death - Touching the Face of God" from Wildlife (recorded 1999) and "Magdalen" from ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-21)
198.thumbnailEp51 - What Philosophers Owe Society
In this fifty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview UCLA philosophy graduate student and co-founder of the Vim Blog Zach Biondi about "What Philosophers Owe Society," the subject of a set of essays that he wrote for the Vim. Zach caught our attention with three essays that he wrote for the Vim Blog, which were released in part in the effort to define wha... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Nov-29)
199.thumbnail444: Can Speech Kill?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/can-speech-kill. Free speech is one of the core tenets of our democracy. We’re inclined to think that more speech is always better. Although the Supreme Court has outlined some minor restrictions to our right to free speech, the most courts are willing to admit is that speech can lead to violence—it cannot itself do violence. But is it possible... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Dec-11)
200.thumbnailDrowned at Sea
In the process of preparing to testify in a divorce case, Brian had to study one of the strangest books he had ever come across, where religion, mathematics, and the apocalypse intersect. This week, we look at how a religious cult of number worshipers on the Italian coast gave rise to modern science, mathematics, philosophy, and music. In the interim 2500 years, as we have increased our knowledge ... (@HiPhiNation, 2017-Dec-19)
201.thumbnailEpisode 179: William James's Introspective Psychology (Part One)
On The Principles of Psychology (1890) chapters 1 & 7, and Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892), the chapters on "The Stream of Thought," "Habit," and some of "The Self." Can we talk about the mind in a way that is both scientific and also does justice to our everyday experiences? James thought his method, which involved both introspection and physiology, yielded more accurate descriptions of the... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-18)
202.thumbnailA tale of two universes
Philosophy and modern physics: a case of the irrelevant versus the impractical? (@RadioNational, 2017-Nov-26)
203.thumbnailEpisode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 28 (Part II) on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometime... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Nov-19)
204.thumbnailHoP 288 - Men in Black - The German Dominicans
Dietrich of Freiberg, Berthold of Moosburg, John Tauler and Henry Suso explore Neoplatonism and mysticism. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Nov-05)
205.thumbnail#8 Taylor Swift: Awkward, Strategic, or Villainous?
What makes Taylor Swift so interesting? Is she, actually, interesting? How does she relate to Guy Fieri, America, and...ourselves? Dustyn and Whitney try to figure out the elusive, enigmatic T. Swift. Dustyn and Whitney recommend the TV show Terriers, the book Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees by Lawrence Weschler, and the movie Blue Ruin in the final segment. Note: Dustyn and Wh... (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Dec-20)
206.thumbnail443: Midlife and Meaning
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/midlife-and-meaning. At some point or another, the midlife crisis comes for us all. But what is it really about? Is it a sense of our mortality, the fear of not achieving what we hoped to, or the sinking feeling that we’ve been spending our whole adult lives chasing our tails? And what is the solution: a new car, a new life goal, or the choice to... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Dec-04)
207.thumbnailEpisode #114 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 7 - The Great Refusal
Today we talk about Herbert Marcuse's concepts of The Great Refusal and The New Sensibility. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Dec-23)
208.thumbnailNEM#61: Richard X. Heyman Is Incognito (Yet a Cornerstone)
Richard garnered early fame as drummer for -60s New Jersey garage band The Doughboys and has put out 11 albums, largely as a one-man band, since 1988. We discuss the title tracks from Incognito (2017) and Cornerstone (1998) and “Agnostic’s Prayer” from Tiers and Other Stories (2011). End song: "And Then" from Incognito. Intro: "Falling Away" from Hey Man! (1990). Learn more at richardxheyman... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-11)
209.thumbnailAutonomy, self, and substances
Substance abuse lets you say ‘it wasn’t me’. Then who was it? (@RadioNational, 2017-Nov-19)
210.thumbnailEpisode 031: Serene Khader on Cross-Border Feminist Solidarity
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Serene Khader about transnational feminism, solidarity, neoliberalism and women in the global south, writng advice, and so much more. (@myishacherry, 2017-Dec-21)
211.thumbnailEpisode 31 - Robyn Bluhm
On Episode 31, Nick chats with Robyn Bluhm, Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy and Lymann Briggs College at Michigan State University, about her transition from doing a Bachelors in Translation, to studying behavioral neuroscience, to gradate work in the philosophy of science, spending three years doing functional neuroimaging in psychiatry, becoming a leading exper... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Dec-04)
212.thumbnailEpisode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 28 (Part I) on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometimes... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Nov-12)
213.thumbnailHPI 52 - Under Construction - Dignaga on Perception and Language
The great Buddhist thinker Dignāga argues that general concepts and language are mere constructions superimposed on perception. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Oct-29)
214.thumbnailEp50 - Transitional Justice
In this fiftieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Colleen Murphy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign about her recent book on "Transitional Justice." Colleen's recent book is titled The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice. This project is an extension of her work from a prior book, A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation. Co... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Nov-18)
215.thumbnailEpisode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: Twilight of the Idols (Part Two)
Continuing on Nietzsche's 1888 book. Is there any ground from which we could judge life as a whole to be good or bad? Is N. more about saying "yes" to life or saying "no" to all the numerous things that piss him off? We also talk Becoming, whether producing great art is more important than being nice to everyone, and whether Nietzsche is ultimately someone we'd want to hang around. End song: "Obli... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-10)
216.thumbnailEpisode 128: Fragmented Values and Sex Panics (with Christina Hoff Sommers)
David and Tamler keep their Nagel streak alive, discussing the essay "The Fragmention of Value" from his collection "Mortal Questions." How should we address our fragmented moral landscape, with multiple sources of value that can't be reduced or systematically ordered? Does this make all of our moral decisions arbitrary? Plus, we talk about Louis CK and in a Thanksgiving tradition special guest Ch... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Nov-28)
217.thumbnail#7 Guy Fieri and Authenticity
Is Guy Fieri authentic? Is authenticity admirable, even if someone is authentically unappealing? What does Guy Fieri’s character and celebrity say about America? In the final segment, Dustyn and Whitney talk about crime and punishment (not the book). Check out our sources on NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Dec-13)
218.thumbnailEvolution and Cooperation
Why do some animals behave in altruistic ways? With Jonathan Birch. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Dec-12)
219.thumbnailHoP 287 - Down to the Ground - Meister Eckhart
The scholastic and mystic Meister Eckhart sets out his daring speculations about God and humankind in both Latin and German. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Oct-22)
220.thumbnailGetting stuck: The midlife mess
Your midlife crisis: it’s more than you think. (@RadioNational, 2017-Nov-12)
221.thumbnailEpisode 27, Conscience (Part IV)
Welcome to Episode 27 (Part IV/IV) on the conscience.Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscien... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Nov-05)
222.thumbnailEpisode 178: Nietzsche as Social Critic: "Twilight of the Idols" (Part One)
On Friedrich Nieztsche's 1888 book summarizing his thought and critiquing the founding myths of his society. He defends "spiritualized" instinct and frenzied creativity, but also Napoleon and war. We try to figure out what kind of social critic he'd be today. Would we actually like him? Sponsors: Get up to $50 off a DNA kit at 23andme.com/pel. Visit MUBI.com/PEL for 30 days of free curated movies,... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Dec-04)
223.thumbnail#6 Gossip II - Mean Girls and the Culture of Censure
What’s the philosophical significance of Mean Girls? How can gossip change a culture? What is a “culture of censure?” Dustyn asks Whitney what sci-fi/fantasy world would be the best to live in. See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Dec-06)
224.thumbnailEp54 - BC11 - Super Cute PBB Promo
This fifty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our eleventh "breadcrumb” so far, this time featuring only a humorous radio spot that we recorded for the station, WRFL, to play throughout the week to promote the show. We had a lot of fun making this little promo, which features Weber's 3-year-old son Sam. If you'd enjoy a chuckle, give this, our shortest breadcr... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Nov-08)
225.thumbnailRoger Scruton on Human Nature
Are human beings fundamentally different from the rest of the animal world? Can what we essentially are be captured in a biological or evolutionary description? Roger Scruton discusses the nature of human nature with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. (@philosophybites, 2017-Aug-29)
226.thumbnailRationally Speaking #198 - Timur Kuran on “Private Truths and Public Lies"
In this episode, economist Timur Kuran explains the ubiquitous phenomenon of "preference falsification" -- in which people claim to support something publicly even though they don't support it privately -- and describes its harmful effects on society. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Dec-11)
227.thumbnailGraduate Students Talking about the GOP Tax Bill
In this emergency (!) episode, three graduate students and two impartial panelists discuss the new corporate-tax cutting, graduate student-hating GOP tax plan. Trump is lying at his rallies and the GOP is back-stabbing their base. Or are they? We discuss the economics, the politics, and the back-room dealings involved in this deal. www.thevimblog.com ▽ www.facebook.com/thevimblog www... (@thevimblog, 2017-Dec-03)
228.thumbnail368: Diseases of the Mind - Philosophy of Psychiatry
More https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/diseases-mind-philosophy-psychiatry. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual is the primary reference catalog for mental health illnesses. But whereas a medical textbook will show you the picture of a broken bone or a tumor, leaf through the DSM and you will find just one thing: lists of symptoms. Who creates these lists, and based on what criteria? Do ... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Nov-20)
229.thumbnailHPI 51 - Change of Mind - Vasubandhu and Yogacara Buddhism
Vasubandhu’s path to Yogācāra Buddhism, a form of idealism which holds that nothing can be mind-independent. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Oct-15)
230.thumbnailEpisode 27, Conscience (Part III - Sigmund Freud)
Welcome to Episode 27 (Part III/IV) on the conscience.Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscie... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Oct-29)
231.thumbnailThe Reformation: What's not to like?
Is it just a coincidence that the five-hundredth anniversary of the Reformation falls on the same year that Britain is trying to 'Brexit'? (@RadioNational, 2017-Nov-05)
232.thumbnailThe Ethics Bowl
High school students from around the country converge on the University of North Carolina for a weekend of moral dilemmas. We follow twenty-four of the nation's top ethics teams competing in the 2017 National High School Ethics Bowl, and take a whirlwind tour of moral philosophy in the process. Guest voices include Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Geoff Sayre-McCord, Jeff Sebo, and students from high sch... (@HiPhiNation, 2017-Nov-28)
233.thumbnailEpisode 030: Winston Thompson on Educational Justice
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Winston Thompson about justice and education, potential and formation, charter schools, decolonizing the curriculm, and more. (@myishacherry, 2017-Dec-08)
234.thumbnailNEM#60: Alejandro Escovedo's Hard Road
Alejandro started as a punk guitarist for the The Nuns, moved to Austin in the '80s and became a songwriter with True Believers. He has since put out 14+ solo albums of story-driven, lyrically intense, stylistically varied Texas rock. We discuss "Beauty and the Buzz" from Burn Something Beautiful (2016), "Sally Was a Cop" from Big Station (2012), and "Pissed Off 2AM" from With These Hands (1996).... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-27)
235.thumbnailEpisode 177: Guest Russ Roberts on Adam Smith and Emergent Order (Part Two)
Continuing with the Econtalk host on the moral aspects of economics, focused by Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations and Theory of Moral Sentiments. Should we sacrifice ourselves to the machine of the economy? How does Smith's idea of virtue and talk of the "impartial spectator" line up with economic growth? Listen to part 1 first or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! Lea... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-27)
236.thumbnailEp49 - Public Philosophy and Polarization
In this forty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Matt Yglesias on the subject of "Public Philosophy and Polarization." Before starting his career as a pundit, writer, and philosophical blogger, Matt majored in Philosophy in his undergraduate studies. Matt is a Senior Correspondent and a co-founder of Vox.com, which he started with Ezra Klein and Meliss... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Nov-03)
237.thumbnailEpisode 127: Moral Luck
David and Tamler dip back into the Thomas Nagel well, and discuss the problem of "moral luck." Why do we blame drunk drivers who hit someone more than drunk drivers who make it home OK? Why do we judge people for things that are beyond their control (when we have strong intuitions that uncontrollable acts don't deserve blame)? Does moral luck ultimately swallow all of our behavior? Can we truly e... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Nov-14)
238.thumbnail#5 Gossip I - The Ethics of Gossip
Is gossip good after all? What does gossip get for us and what's the moral cost? Whitney takes a stand against Twitter’s new character limit. See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-29)
239.thumbnailHoP 286 - On the Money - Medieval Economic Theory
Changing ideas about money, just price, and usury, up to the time of Buridan, Oresme, and Gregory of Rimini. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Oct-08)
240.thumbnail369: Democracy in Crisis
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/democracy-crisis. Democratic systems of government are supposed to reflect the interests of ordinary citizens, and not some shadowy political elite. But more and more, we see the influence of big money and special interest groups in so-called democratic politics, while income inequality and voter suppression grow. With millions convinced that polit... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Nov-13)
241.thumbnailEp48 - BC10 - How to Read Philosophy? The Answer Might Surprise You
This forty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our tenth “breadcrumb” episode so far, this time with Dr. Nancy McHugh, who was our featured guest in Episode 47. For this breadcrumb, Nancy said that she had a funny tidbit about how to read philosophy, and that the answer to the question might surprise us. We had to hear it! In addition to being chair of the Ph... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Oct-29)
242.thumbnailEpisode 27, Conscience (Part II - Saint Thomas Aquinas)
Welcome to Episode 27 (Part II/IV) on the conscience.Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscien... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Oct-22)
243.thumbnailAnimals and the philosophy of friendship
Some of our best friends are animals. So where does that leave some humans we know? (@RadioNational, 2017-Oct-29)
244.thumbnailEpisode #113 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 6 - Art As A Tool For Liberation
Today we talk about the revolutionary potential of Art through the eyes of Herbert Marcuse. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Dec-02)
245.thumbnailNEM#59: Annie Haslam's Renaissance: Sing Now, Figure it Out Later
Annie fronted British symphonic rock band Renaissance for nine albums starting in 1971 but only in the late 80s became a lyricist. She's now released eight studio albums and two new Renaissance albums. We discuss "Blessing in Disguise," the title track from her 1994 album; "Grandine il Vento", the title track from Renaissance's 2013 album, and “Precious One” from Annie's The Dawn of Ananda (20... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-20)
246.thumbnailEpisode 177: Guest Russ Roberts on Adam Smith and Libertarian Economics (Part One)
The host of Econtalk provides his take on our ep. 174 on The Wealth of Nations, and explores with us the idea of emergent economic order. Is the economy more like a machine or a garden or what? Don't wait for part two! Get the full, ad-free, unbroken Citizen Edition now! Please support PEL! Visit lovepop.com/pel for 3D pop-up cards; simplecontacts.com/pel, promo code PEL; MUBI.com/PEL for curated ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-20)
247.thumbnailEp47 - Philosophy and Social Change
In this forty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Nancy McHugh on the topic of "Philosophy and Social Change." After the "Know Thyself!" segment, we talk about her recent book, The Limits of Knowledge, inspired by her experiences in Vietnam witnessing continuing victims of Agent Orange. Then, in the next segment, we ask her about her experience te... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Oct-26)
248.thumbnailHow to Read (about) Hannah Arendt
Who is Hannah Arendt and why should we care? In this episode, Zach and Kevin introduce her work and discuss why there was a season of Arendt popularity in the "media elite." How would Arendt feel about being the subject of partisan think pieces? Should we read her work—the Origins of Totalitarianism or Eichmann in Jerusalem—to get a better handle on the age of Trump? Or are we doomed to misint... (@thevimblog, 2017-Nov-22)
249.thumbnailHPI 50 - Marie-Hélène Gorisse on Jain Epistemology
We’re joined by Marie-Hélène Gorisse for a look at the Jain theory of knowledge. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Oct-01)
250.thumbnailKant's Categorical Imperative
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how, in the Enlightenment, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) sought to define the difference between right and wrong by applying reason, looking at the intention behind actions rather than at consequences. He was inspired to find moral laws by natural philosophers such as Newton and Leibniz, who had used reason rather than emotion to analyse the world around them and had id... (@BBCInOurTime, 2017-Sep-21)
251.thumbnailEpisode 30 - Elisabeth Lloyd
On Episode 30, Nick chats with Elisabeth Lloyd, the Arnold and Maxine Tanis Chair of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University, about developing resilience from growing up in adverse circumstances, returning to college after spending a year in a hippie commune to write her own major on Science and Political Theory, getting through a difficult and discouraging environme... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Nov-11)
252.thumbnail#4 Ghosts II - Poltergeists and Cannibals
What counts as good evidence for ghosts? Is it a matter of faith? How do we approach the uncertain? Dustyn and Whitney discuss the Case of the Speluncean Explorers. See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com. (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-22)
253.thumbnailEpisode 27, Conscience (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 27 (Part I/IV) on the conscience.Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscienc... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Oct-15)
254.thumbnail442: Philosophy of Trash
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-trash. "One man's trash is another man's treasure," or so the saying goes. But what makes something trash to begin with? The word can be used to describe disposable objects, pieces of culture, or even people. Underlying each of these uses, however, are feelings of indifference, disdain, or disgust. How do the things that we call trash re... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Nov-06)
255.thumbnailBots, bankers and big brother
Would you trust a killer robot more than a banker? This philosopher does, and has his reasons. (@RadioNational, 2017-Oct-22)
256.thumbnailEp46 - Philosophy at Home
In this forty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Amy Leask of Red T Media and Enable Education on the subject of "Philosophy at Home: Re-envisioning Philosophy’s Reach Beyond the Academy." Red T Media is a publisher and Web and mobile application provider for parents who want to introduce their kids to Philosophy. Among Red T Media’s most successfu... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Oct-21)
257.thumbnailTim Harford on Messy
Sometimes disorder can be a source of efficiency and creativity. Tim Harford explores some cases where lack of planning and order has been a boon in this interview with Nigel Warburton, based on Tim's recent book Messy. (@philosophybites, 2017-Jul-30)
258.thumbnailEpisode 176: Situationism in Psych: Milgram & Stanford Prison Experiments (Part Two)
Continuing with Dave Pizarro on articles by Stanley Milgram, Philip Zimbardo, and John Doris about situationism, which entails that people's level of morality will vary by situation, as opposed to virtue ethics, which posits that how people will act in a novel situation will be determined by the quality of their character. Listen to part 1 first or get the ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support P... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-13)
259.thumbnailHoP 285 - Dominik Perler on Medieval Skepticism
The medievals were too firm in their beliefs to entertain skeptical worries, right? Don’t be so sure, as Peter learns from Dominik Perler. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Sep-24)
260.thumbnailEp45 - Experimentation in Art and Law
In this forty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Brian Butler of the University of North Carolina Asheville. We talk with Brian about two applications of the idea known as "democratic experimentalism" that have been at the heart of his work. One application concerns Constitutional law. The other involves the history of Black Mountain College, an ex... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Oct-17)
261.thumbnailEpisode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part IV)
Welcome to Episode 26 (Part IV/IV) on Karl Marx's Political Philosophy. Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologi... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Oct-08)
262.thumbnail#1 Democracy I - The Paradox of Voting
Welcome to No Narrow Thing! Dustyn and Whitney ask if there is a duty to vote. The two discuss if humans are even capable of voting responsibly, and if voting for a candidate who does something wrong makes you complicit in their actions. We also learn a Random Fact from History! See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com. (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-15)
263.thumbnail#3 Ghosts I - Ghosts are Fun
Do ghosts exist? Should a person believe in them? Whitney makes the case for ghosts; Dustyn is skeptical. The two go down the Rabbit Hole of Amazon’s HQ2. See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com. (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-15)
264.thumbnail#2 Democracy II - Compromised Politics
Is political compromise different from other kinds of compromise? When values and ethics are involved, is any compromise morally permissible? Is centrism pragmatic or lacking in principles? See the sources for our discussion at NoNarrowThing.com. (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-15)
265.thumbnailAnil Seth on the Real Problem of Consciousness
The Hard Problem of consciousness is the difficulty of reconciling experience with materialism. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, in conversation with Nigel Warburton, Anil Seth, a neuroscientist, explains his alternative approach to consciousness,which he labels the 'Real Problem. Anil is a Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow. (@philosophybites, 2017-Jul-19)
266.thumbnailFacts and trust in a post-truth world
We’re told it’s a post-truth world—so what’s left of the philosophy of knowledge? (@RadioNational, 2017-Oct-15)
267.thumbnail441: Race Matters
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/race-matters. Started in the wake of George Zimmerman's 2013 acquittal in the death of Trayvon Martin, the #BlackLivesMatter movement has become a powerful campaign demanding redress for the mistreatment of African-Americans by law enforcement in the United States. But it has also inspired deep antipathy from those who claim it overemphasizes racia... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Oct-30)
268.thumbnailHPI 49 - Well Qualified - the Jains on Truth
Does the Jain theory of seven predications (saptabhaṇgī) land them in self-contradiction, or help them to avoid it? (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Sep-17)
269.thumbnailTEASER-Episode 175: Blade Runner (Part Two)
Do you want the WHOLE discussion on the new Blade Runner 2049, the original 1982 film, and the idea packed Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1967) by Philip K. Dick? If you do, show your love to the podcast by signing up to be a supporter at the $1-or-higher level at patreon.com/partiallyexaminedlife, or better yet become a PEL Citizen and get every podcast we've ever recorded plus bonus discu... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-06)
270.thumbnailEpisode 176: Situationism in Psych: Milgram & Stanford Prison Experiments (Very Bad Wizards Crossover) (Part One)
On Stanley Milgram's "Behavioral Study of Obedience" (1963), Philip Zimbardo’s "Interpersonal Dynamics in a Simulated Prison" (1973), and John Doris’s "Persons, Situations, and Virtue Ethics" (1998). Do difficult situations make good people act badly? Are there really "good" and "bad" people, or are we all about the same, but put in different situations? With guest David Pizarro from the Very ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Nov-06)
271.thumbnailEpisode 126: The Absurd
Is life meaningless? Are humans just glorified dung beetles, pushing around our piles of poop with no greater purpose? What would it take for life to actually be meaningful? In this episode, Tamler and David discuss Thomas Nagel’s essay on the sense of meaninglessness and absurdity that can so easily creep into human existence (with a special emphasis on the work of Camus and the philosophy of R... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Oct-24)
272.thumbnailEpisode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part III)
Welcome to Episode 26 (Part III/IV) on Karl Marx's Political Philosophy. Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociolog... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Oct-01)
273.thumbnailMatthew Syed on Black Box Thinking
How can we learn from failure? In this episode of the Thinking Books podcast, Matthew Syed, author of Black Box Thinking discusses the importance of feedback from the world in a wide range of contexts. (@philosophybites, 2017-Jul-05)
274.thumbnailPersonal identity: a primer
Who am I? Glad you asked; now for two millennia of thinking. (@RadioNational, 2017-Oct-08)
275.thumbnailEpisode 29 - Eric Winsberg
On Episode 29, Nick chats with Eric Winsberg, Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida, about the "unbelievably permissive" schooling he had growing up in Montreal in the 70's, transitioning from Physics to History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Chicago, exploring the quirky, non-traditional menu of philosophy of science at Indiana University, the r... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Oct-26)
276.thumbnailEp44 - On Philosophy, Leadership, & SOPHIA
In this forty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Dr. Anthony Cashio decides that "turn-about is fair play." He had been the guest in the very first episode of the show, and in this episode, he turns the tables and grills co-host Dr. Eric Thomas Weber as the guest for the day. The show focuses on Weber's 2013 book, Democracy and Leadership, and then relates Weber's... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Oct-06)
277.thumbnailThe Vim Watches Fox News - Hannity on Collusion
In this very special explosive episode of The Vimcast, Zach and Justin sit down to watch and analyze a Sean Hannity monologue. Whatever you thought about Mueller's first round of indictments, prepare to have your mind changed. Or not. What is Hannity's style? Does he present arguments, or is it all on-screen graphics, rapid-fire non-sequiturs and facial expressions? How convincing is t... (@thevimblog, 2017-Nov-05)
278.thumbnailMichael Puett on Ritual in Chinese Philosophy
Why does apparently trivial ritual play such an important part in some ancient Chinese philosophy? Michael Puett, co-author of The Path, explains in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to... (@philosophybites, 2017-Jun-26)
279.thumbnail#0 Trailer
No Narrow Thing is the podcast that gets philosophical about everything. It drops on November 15th! Visit NoNarrowThing.com for more information! (@NoNarrowThing, 2017-Nov-06)
280.thumbnailRationally Speaking #197 - Doug Hubbard on “Why people think some things can’t be quantified (and why they’re wrong)”
In this episode Julia talks with Doug Hubbard, author of How to Measure Anything, about why people so often believe things are impossible to quantify like "innovation" or "quality of life." (@Rspodcast, 2017-Nov-13)
281.thumbnailThe Bottom of the Curve
At the beginning of their adult lives, millennials are trying to find out what it means to be happy in their 20s, not knowing that they have no where to go but down. Meanwhile, three highly successful people find themselves at the bottom of life's happiness curve, and try to find their way back up. The show today is about a demographic inevitability, the midlife crisis, and how we seek happiness i... (@HiPhiNation, 2017-Oct-31)
282.thumbnailEpisode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 26 (Part II/IV) on Karl Marx's Political Philosophy. Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologi... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Sep-24)
283.thumbnailEpisode 175: Blade Runner: Androids and Humanity (Part One)
On Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1967) and the films Blade Runner 2049 (2017) and Blade Runner (1982). What makes us human? Dick's story about androids emphasized their lack of empathy, while the movie adaptations portrayed the "replicants" as plenty capable of emotion, but unjustly treated as servants or targets. Attention: This second half of this special bonus episode i... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-30)
284.thumbnailAnother concept of race
Race is the hot button term of our era. But perhaps the time has come to update it with a more accurate concept. (@RadioNational, 2017-Oct-01)
285.thumbnail440: The Internet of Things
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/internet-things. Smart TVs, refrigerators, cars, and houses—the internet of things refers to the networking of all the devices in our lives, as they gather data and interact with one another, apparently to make our lives easier. How will this augmented connectivity affect the way we live? If government agencies or hackers can potentially access t... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Oct-16)
286.thumbnailEp43 - The Stories of Our Day 1: Game of Thrones
This forty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special new show format, more of a round-table discussion than usual, and with a new theme: The Stories of Our Day. In this first "Stories of Our Day" episode, we're talking about The Game of Thrones! For this discussion, we knew that we wanted to bring Dr. Shane Courtland back on the show, given his specialty in Th... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-29)
287.thumbnailAaron Meskin on the Definition of Art
What is Art? That's not an easy question to answer. Some philosophers even think it can't be answered. Aaron Meskin discusses this question on this episode of Aesthetics Bites. Aesthetics Bites is a podcast series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British ... (@philosophybites, 2017-May-30)
288.thumbnailEpisode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 26 (Part I/IV) on Karl Marx's Political Philosophy. Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologis... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Sep-17)
289.thumbnailEpisode #112 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 5 - Civilization
Today we continue our discussion of Marcuse's work Eros and Civilization. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Nov-06)
290.thumbnailEpisode 125: Can You Feel It?
What do we mean when we say someone is angry? Can we identify anger (or any other emotion) via facial expressions, physiological changes, or neural markers? Is anger simply a feeling, something that happens to us, or does it involve a judgment? How much control do we have over our emotions, and can we be responsible for them? We talk about the work of Lisa Feldman Barrett and Bob Solomon. Plus, Ta... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Oct-10)
291.thumbnailVirtue, vice, sex, and robots
The robots have given rise to a distinctly modern dilemma: is there such a thing as an immoral fantasy? (@RadioNational, 2017-Sep-24)
292.thumbnailEp42 - BC9 - Overcoming Redneck State Stigma
This forty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a second “breadcrumb” episode with Dr. Larry A. Hickman, who was our featured guest in Episode 40. In that episode, Larry spoke about democracy and education in the United States today. While he was with us, we asked him to comment on a question that we received from a listener earlier this year. Larry, Anthony, ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-23)
293.thumbnailNEM#57: Richard Amp's Exploratory Atmospheres
Richard F. Walker has released 20+ albums, usually with his London space-rock band Amp. We discuss "Just Get It (Why Don’t You)" and "Les Ombres Sur la Lune" from Q Factors (A Mixtape) (2017) and "Tomorrow" from Stenorette (1988), and listen to "Levil Devil" from US (2005). Opening music is from Transmissions (part 1) (2005), and closing music is from "Mort Irritées" from AMP Studio's Uncertain... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-22)
294.thumbnailEpisode 174: Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations" (Part Two)
Continuing on the foundational text of economics. We talk "invisible hand," "greed is good," tariffs, unproductive labor, city vs. country, and the education racket. Listen to part 1 first or get the ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "With My Looks and Your Brains" by The Mr. T Experience. Hear about the singer/songwriter on Nakedly Examined Music #56. Try blinkist.com/pel for... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-22)
295.thumbnailEp41 - BC8 - The Meaning of Life? Answered.
This forty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special "breadcrumb" episode with Dr. Larry A. Hickman, who was our featured guest in Episode 40. In that episode, Larry raised a question for listeners for which he said he has an answer: "What's the meaning of life?" It's the age-old question, the stereotypical philosophical question, yet Larry believes that ther... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-22)
296.thumbnailEpisode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part III)
Hello and welcome to Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part III).In the words of David Chalmers, “The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Sep-10)
297.thumbnailEp40 - Democracy and Education Today
This fortieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. Larry A. Hickman, former Director of the Center for Dewey Studies at Southern Illinois University, talking with co-hosts Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio about John Dewey's rich ideas about democracy and education, as well as what we can say about the state of each today. Dr. Hickman is a prolifi... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-17)
298.thumbnailTell me one thing that's absolutely true
Truth: a simple word that’s spawned a cosmos of theories, and caused a world of trouble. (@RadioNational, 2017-Sep-17)
299.thumbnailRationally Speaking #196 - Eric Schwitzgebel on "Weird ideas and opaque minds"
Philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel returns to the show to explore several related questions: His taxonomy of the three different styles of thinker -- "Truth," "Dare," and "Wonder" -- and whether one of them is better than the others. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Oct-30)
300.thumbnailEpisode 174: Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations" (Part One)
On the foundational, 1776 text of modern economics. How does the division of labor and our instinct to exchange lead to the growth of wealth? Is the economy sufficiently machine-like to enable us to manipulate its output, or at least to tell us how not to screw it up? Continues on part 2, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! Visit mubi.com/pel for 30 days of free, cura... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-16)
301.thumbnailHoP 284 - Seeing is Believing - Nicholas of Autrecourt’s Skeptical Challenge
The debate between Nicholas of Autrecourt and John Buridan on whether it is possible to achieve certain knowledge. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Aug-13)
302.thumbnailEpisode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part II)
Hello and welcome to Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part II).In the words of David Chalmers, “The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there i... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Sep-03)
303.thumbnailTranscendence and the moderns
People claim to find modern transcendence in sport, at raves, or on Amazonian hallucinogens. But is it the real thing? (@RadioNational, 2017-Sep-10)
304.thumbnailEpisode 124: Dr. Strawson or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Episodic Life
Do you think of your life as a story? Does your life have a narrative structure or form? Do you identify with your past selves and your future selves? If not, can you live a good life, a moral life, an authentic life? Can you feel guilt, regret, and resentment? Plus, speaking of stories, we talk about a new study suggesting that books with anthropomorphic animals can't teach moral lessons to kids.... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Sep-26)
305.thumbnailEpisode 28 - Bas Van Fraassen
On Episode 28, Nick chats with Bas van Fraassen, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at San Francisco State University and the McCosh Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Princeton University, about growing up working in a library in a small town in the Netherlands, early influences in philosophy of science, how he developed his major works, including 'The Scientific Image' and 'La... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Oct-02)
306.thumbnailHPI 48 - Taking Perspective - the Jain Theory of Standpoints
The Jain theory of standpoints or non-onesidedness (anekāntavāda) makes truth a matter of perspective. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Aug-06)
307.thumbnailEp39 - BC7 - Stoicism Today
This thirty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special "breadcrumb" episode with Dr. Gregory Sadler, who was featured in Episode 38. Greg is the editor of Stoicism Today, a publication put out by Modern Stoicism. If you haven't had a chance to hear Episode 38 with Greg, we call him the YouTube Philosopher, as he has over 40,000 YouTube subscribers. His videos h... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-07)
308.thumbnailEpisode 173: Relating to American Indian Philosophy (Part Two)
We go further into "Philosophy of Native Science" by Gregory Cajete and "What Coyote and Thales Can Teach Us: An Outline of American Indian Epistemology" by Brian Yazzie Burkhart, plus process philosophy, propositional vs. procedural knowledge, and what we owe to nature. With guest Jim Marunich. Listen to part 1 first or get the ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: “Circle’s ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-09)
309.thumbnailEp38 - The YouTube Philosopher
This thirty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. Greg Sadler, The YouTube Philosopher, talking with co-hosts Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio about the great work he has done as a public philosopher. In addition to having built a remarkable following on YouTube, Dr. Sadler is also the President, CEO, and Chief Lord of ReasonIO, a company w... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Sep-06)
310.thumbnailEpisode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part I)
Hello and welcome to Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate: 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part I).In the words of David Chalmers, “The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there is... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Aug-27)
311.thumbnailNEM#56: "Dr. Frank" Portman Writes His Inner Teenager
Frank has led punk band The Mr. T Experience in the Bay Area since 1985, and has also released three successful music-related books for teens since 2006. We discuss "Down With the Universe" from King Dork Approximately (2016), "Big, Strange, Beautiful Hammer" from Yesterday Rules (2004), and "More Than Toast" from Our Bodies Our Selves (1993). We conclude by listening to "Even Hitler Had a Girlfri... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-08)
312.thumbnail439: A World Without Work
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/world-without-work. Work: a lot lot of people do it, and a lot of people don’t seem to like it very much. But as computers and artificial intelligence get increasingly sophisticated, more and more of our workers will lose their jobs to technology. Should we view this inevitability with hope or with despair? Without the order and purpose that mean... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Sep-25)
313.thumbnailHoP 283 - Jack Zupko on John Buridan
Peter speaks to Jack Zupko about John Buridan’s secular and parsimonious approach to philosophy. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jul-30)
314.thumbnailEpisode #111 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 4 - Eros
Today we talk about Freud's views on civilization and the first half of Marcuse's response to them. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Oct-20)
315.thumbnailTranscendence and the ancients
If there's one subject you could write 800 pages on it would be Transcendence. But is it philosophy? (@RadioNational, 2017-Sep-03)
316.thumbnailOn Guns
In this episode of ‘The Vim Reads the News’, in light of the Las Vegas mass shooting, Justin, Justin, and Zach discuss a topical article from 2016, “The Argument Gun Rights Supporters Can’t Respond To” by Nathan J. Robinson at Current Affairs. How are guns different from the death app, OK Reaper? In addition, J, J & Z touch some general issues like, Why do philosophers not talk about thi... (@thevimblog, 2017-Oct-09)
317.thumbnailEpisode 24, The A. C. Grayling Interview (Part II)
Hello and welcome to Episode 24 (Part II/II) The A. C. Grayling Interview.Philosopher and master of the New College of the Humanities professor A. C. Grayling is considered by many to be amongst the greatest and most influential philosophers of our time. Professor Grayling has published around 40 bo... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Aug-20)
318.thumbnailEp37 - Philosophy in High School
In this thirty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio interview Nick Caltagiarone, who’s been teaching history for 16 years at the West Chicago Community High School, and has taught philosophy there as well for 13 of those years. We spoke with Nick about “Philosophy in High School,” asking why and how to teach philosophy in high sc... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Aug-30)
319.thumbnailEpisode 173: Relating to American Indian Philosophy (Part One)
What is wisdom? We discuss articles by Brian Burkhart, Gregory Cajete, and Anne Waters, plus Black Elk Speaks by John Neihardt (1932) and some traditional stories. With guest Jim Marunich; we read his master's thesis, "Process Metaphysics in the Far West: American Indian Ontologies." Don't wait for part 2! Get your unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Visit barkbox.com/PEL fo... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Oct-02)
320.thumbnailHPI 47 - Jan Westerhoff on Nagarjuna
A discussion with Jan Westerhoff, an expert on the great Buddhist thinker Nāgārjuna. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jul-23)
321.thumbnailIndirect Discrimination
Can discrimination be subtle and indirect, as in Aesop's fable of the fox and the stork? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Oct-09)
322.thumbnailRationally Speaking #195 - Zach Weinersmith on "Emerging technologies that'll improve and/or ruin everything"
This episode features Zach Weinersmith, creator of the philosophical webcomic Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, and the co-author (with his wife Kelly Weinersmith) of the new book Soonish: 10 Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everythings. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Oct-15)
323.thumbnailThree things you should know about time
Confused about time? Let’s give presentism, eternalism, and the growing block a brisk work out. (@RadioNational, 2017-Aug-27)
324.thumbnailPlato's Republic
Is it always better to be just than unjust? That is the central question of Plato's Republic, discussed here by Melvyn Bragg and guests. Writing in c380BC, Plato applied this question both to the individual and the city-state, considering earlier and current forms of government in Athens and potential forms, in which the ideal city might be ruled by philosophers. The Republic is arguably Plato's b... (@BBCInOurTime, 2017-Jun-29)
325.thumbnailEp36 – Quality Philosophy for Everyone
This thirty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Cole Nasrallah, talking with co-hosts Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio about the paper that she gave at the Future of Philosophical Practice seminar at the University of North Carolina Asheville in July of 2017. Cole’s paper was on “The Elements of High Value Philosophy and Audience Accessibi... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Aug-25)
326.thumbnailEpisode 123: What Chilling Effect? (Intelligence Pt. 2)
It’s Part 2 of the Patreon listener selected episode! David and Tamler continue their discussion on intelligence from our last episode by tackling the radioactive topic of group differences and IQ. Are there reliable differences in IQ across races? Given that IQ is strongly heritable, and that racial categories are based (in part) on biological differences, does it follow that group differences ... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Sep-12)
327.thumbnailHoP 282 - Portrait of the Artist - John Buridan
The hipster’s choice for favorite scholastic, John Buridan, sets out a nominalist theory of knowledge and language, and explains the workings of free will. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jul-16)
328.thumbnailEpisode 24, The A. C. Grayling Interview (Part I)
Hello and welcome to Episode 24 (Part I/II) The A. C. Grayling Interview.Philosopher and master of the New College of the Humanities professor A. C. Grayling is considered by many to be amongst the greatest and most influential philosophers of our time. Professor Grayling has published around 40 boo... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Aug-13)
329.thumbnailThe Vim Reads the News- Blame Facebook for Everything!
The Vim reads the news, philosophically! This is our second episode dedicated to an article not found on thevimblog.com. Adam, Dylan, and Zach jump into the world of social media and Russian PSYOPS. They discuss Erin Griffith’s piece, “FACEBOOK CAN ABSOLUTELY CONTROL ITS ALGORITHM.” The go-to social media site is in the news for turning over to the government ads purchased by Russians that w... (@thevimblog, 2017-Oct-01)
330.thumbnail438: Post-Truth Politics
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/post-truth-politics. You've probably heard about the dangerous effects of fake news, and the spread of sensational and targeted falsities. But what about "legitimate" news, one might still ask? Well, do you want the "liberal truth" or the "conservative truth"? Just stick to the facts? What if my "facts" differ from yours? Listen to science? Those s... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Sep-11)
331.thumbnailEpisode 172: Mind, Self, and Affect with Guest Dr. Drew (Part Two)
Continuing with Drew Pinsky on “Attachment and Reflective Function: Their Role in Self-organization” by Peter Fonagy and two articles by Allan Schore. Fonagy claims we gain the ability to emotionally self-regulate as a result of achieving secure attachment with a caregiver as infants. Schore claims that if this fails, we can end up fundamentally disengaged. So what are the philosophical implic... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-25)
332.thumbnailRemembering wars, lest we forget
The rituals of remembrance can be powerful and moving, but what moral lesson lies beneath? (@RadioNational, 2017-Aug-20)
333.thumbnailHPI 46 - No Four Ways About It - Nagarjuna’s Tetralemma
Nāgārjuna’s four-fold argument scheme, the tetralemma (catuṣkoṭi). (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jul-09)
334.thumbnailEp34 - Saving American Culture in a Yurt
This thirty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Drs. Randall Auxier and John Shook, talking with co-hosts Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio about the institute that they and Dr. Larry Hickman (not present in this interview) co-founded, the American Institute for Philosophical and Cultural Thought. Dr. Auxier is the author of Metaphysical Grafi... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Aug-18)
335.thumbnailEpisode 23, John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy (Part II)
Hello and welcome to Episode 23 (Part II/II) on John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy. The following is a quotation from Colin Heydt: Writing of John Stuart Mill a few days after Mill’s death, Henry Sidgwic... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Aug-06)
336.thumbnailEpisode 27 - Serife Tekin
On Episode 27, Nick chats with Serife Tekin, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Daemen College in Buffalo, New York, about her childhood and adolescent years spent on the Aegean coast in Denizli, Turkey, her transition at Middle East Technical University from studying economics and mathematics to philosophy, her work in the philosophy of psychiatry that incorporates first-person a... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Sep-13)
337.thumbnailHoP 281 - Monica Green on Medieval Medicine
An interview with Monica Green reveals parallels between medicine and philosophy in the middle ages. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jul-02)
338.thumbnailNEM Ep 55: Don Preston, Mother of Keyboard Invention
Don has composed and played jazz since the 50s, was a Frank Zappa sideman through his classic 60s albums and beyond, and has since released 20+ albums, scored 20 films, and has performed with artists including John Lennon, Lou Rawls, and Nat King Cole. He has also been called "the father of modern synthesis" for his work in electronic music. We discuss "Winds of Change" (3rd movement, 2001), "Palm... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-20)
339.thumbnailOn being vulnerable
It’s a promise as old as Buddha: make the right choices and you can put an end to your suffering. But is it the wrong end of the stick? (@RadioNational, 2017-Aug-13)
340.thumbnailA Guide to Nazi Analogies in Trump's America
In this episode of the Vimcast, Zach, Justin and esteemed newcomer Clare critique the most famous critique of Nazi analogies, Godwin’s Law. Should we make Nazi analogies? If so, when should we make Nazi analogies? In the last segment they take a step back, looking at analogies generally and setting Scott Adams firmly in their non-violent crosshairs. Read the article this episode is b... (@thevimblog, 2017-Sep-23)
341.thumbnailEpisode 23, John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy (Part I)
Hello and welcome to Episode 23 (Part I/II) on John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy. The following is a quotation from Colin Heydt: Writing of John Stuart Mill a few days after Mill’s death, Henry Sidgwick... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jul-30)
342.thumbnailHPI 45 - Motion Denied - Nagarjuna on Change
Nāgārjuna applies his emptiness theory to motion, change, and cognition. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jun-25)
343.thumbnailEpisode 172: Mind, Self, and Affect with Guest Dr. Drew (Part One)
Radio legend Dr. Drew Pinsky talks with us about “Attachment and Reflective Function: Their Role in Self-Organization” by Peter Fonagy and two articles by Allan Schore. The focus is "theory of mind"; how do we develop the ability to impute thoughts and intentions to others? What in our upbringing can interfere with this development? We relate this back to previous episodes (Hegel, Buber, etc.)... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-18)
344.thumbnailEp33 - Cakes, Capes, and Culture Wars
This thirty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. John Corvino of Wayne State University, talking with co-hosts Eric Weber and Anthony Cashio about religious liberty and discrimination, the topics of his most recent book, as well as the HERO award he received for 25 years of advocacy on LGBTQ+ issues. John was celebrated in 2017, receivi... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Aug-10)
345.thumbnailEpisode 029: Wendy Salkin on Informal Representation
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Wendy Salkin about informal representation, its powers, duties, and problems, Du Bois & Coates on the issue, and more. (@myishacherry, 2017-Oct-03)
346.thumbnailEpisode 26 - Tony Chemero
On Episode 26, Nick chats with Tony Chemero, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology at the University of Cincinnati and author of the book, 'Radical Embodied Cognitive Science,' about taking trips to the East Village as a kid to see punk rock shows, early interactions with Dan Dennett and Newton scholar George Smith, hanging out with computer scientists and psychologists during grad... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Sep-06)
347.thumbnailRationally Speaking #194 - Robert Wright on "Why Buddhism is True"
This episode features bestselling author Robert Wright making the case for why Buddhism was right about human nature: its diagnosis that our suffering is mainly due to a failure to see reality clearly. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Oct-02)
348.thumbnailEpisode 122: Nothing but a "G" Thing (Intelligence Pt. 1)
David and Tamler do their best to talk frankly about intelligence and IQ research. (It's our Patreon listener-selected topic! We probably would never have chosen this one on our own...). Is intelligence a meaningful, definable concept? Can we reliably test for it? How much of the variability in IQ across individuals is due to heritable factors? Are people with higher IQ happier, wealthier, or heal... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Aug-29)
349.thumbnailHoP 280 - Get to the Point - Fourteenth Century Physics
Ockham, Buridan, Oresme and Francis of Marchia explore infinity, continuity, atomism, and the impetus involved in motion. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jun-18)
350.thumbnailCauses, effects, and hidden powers
If there’s anything you can bank on it’s cause and effect; Stephen Mumford on an indispensable first principle. (@RadioNational, 2017-Aug-06)
351.thumbnailEpisode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 22 (Part II/II) on John Locke's Political Philosophy. Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17th century. Locke’s main political work, Two Treatise of... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jul-23)
352.thumbnailEp32 - The Public Philosopher and the Gadfly: Return of the Curry!
This thirty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features a follow-up interview with Dr. Tommy J Curry of Texas A&M University (who featured in Ep9 before this one), on the controversy and death threats that he endured when a piece was published mischaracterizing his work in The American Conservative. Dr. Curry is the author of The Man-Not: Race, Class, Genre, an... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Aug-05)
353.thumbnailHPI 44 - It All Depends - Nagarjuna on Emptiness
Nāgārjuna founds the Madhyāmaka (“middle way”) Buddhist tradition by “relinquishing all views” and arguing that everything is “empty.” (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jun-11)
354.thumbnail437: Polyamory
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/polyamory. In most if not all modern Western societies, monogamy is the dominant form of romantic relationship. In polyamorous or "open" relationships, however, each person is free to love multiple partners at once. Just as our friendships are non-exclusive, advocates of polyamory believe our romantic relationship should be too. So why do so many p... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Aug-28)
355.thumbnailEpisode 171: Buddhism vs. Evolution with Guest Robert Wright (Part Two)
Continuing on Why Buddhism Is True. We discuss the "no self" doctrine as articulated in Buddha's Second Discourse and the modularity-of-mind theory that Bob claims supports it. What are the ethical implications, and do we really need meditation to achieve its alleged ethical benefits? Continued from part 1, or get the ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "Alphalpha Bhang" by Anto... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-11)
356.thumbnailHoP 279 - Quadrivial Pursuits - the Oxford Calculators
Bradwardine and other thinkers based at Oxford make breakthroughs in physics by applying mathematics to motion. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Jun-04)
357.thumbnailEp31 - Sports Fan I Am
In this thirty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Erin Tarver, author of The I in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity. Dr. Tarver is assistant professor of philosophy at Emory University's Oxford College in Georgia. She is the author of numerous essays and the co-editor of Feminist... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-31)
358.thumbnailEpisode 25 - Adina Roskies
On Episode 25, Nick talks with Adina Roskies, the Helman Family Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Cognitive Science Program at Dartmouth College, about her life-changing undergraduate experience (filled with pedagogical nightmares) at Yale, graduate study and postdoctoral work in neuroscience and cognitive science, returning to complete a PhD in philosophy at MI... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Aug-30)
359.thumbnailEpisode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 22 (Part I/II) on John Locke's Political Philosophy.  Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and po... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jul-16)
360.thumbnailWine: a matter of taste?
What a good quaffing can reveal about being objective about the subjective; raise a glass to the philosophy of wine. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jul-30)
361.thumbnailHPI 43 - We Beg to Differ - the Buddhists and Jains
An introduction to philosophical developments in Buddhism and Jainism up to the time of Dignāga in the sixth century AD. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-May-28)
362.thumbnailThe Vim Reads the News- Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “The First White President”
The Vim reads the news! This is the first of our episodes dedicated to articles not found on thevimblog.com. Today we discuss Ta-Nehisi Coates’ piece, “The First White President.” We unpack his argument and discuss a few other related issues. For instance, is Trump the natural conclusion of regular GOP politics or is he an aberration? And what about the practical, day to day stuff? If Trump ... (@thevimblog, 2017-Sep-13)
363.thumbnailHoP 278 - Sara Uckelman on Obligations
Sara Uckelman soundly defeats Peter in the medieval logical game of “obligations.” (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-May-21)
364.thumbnailNEM Ep 54: Kaki King's Guitar Progression
www.nakedlyexaminedmusic.com (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-07)
365.thumbnailEp30 - Private Government
In this thirtieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Elizabeth Anderson about her new book, Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don't Talk About It). She recently published a piece on the book on Vox.com. Dr. Anderson is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and the John Dewey Disting... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-25)
366.thumbnailHPI 42 - In Good Taste - The Aesthetics of Rasa
Bharata’s Nāṭya-Śāstra and later works from Kashmir explore the idea of rasa, an emotional response to drama, music, and poetry. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-May-14)
367.thumbnailEpisode 21, Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 21 (Part II of II) on Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy.Few political thinkers can be considered as influential as Thomas Hobbes. Published in 1651, Hobbes’s most famous work, the Leviathan (or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil), argues ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jul-09)
368.thumbnailEp35 - BC 6 - 10,000 Downloads Celebration and Giveaway!
This thirty-fifth episode, a short breadcrumb, is being released early to announce the fact that Philosophy Bakes Bread has reached the exciting early milestone of 10,000 episode downloads! We also wanted to put this out early, given that we're setting a deadline to enter our celebration give-away: October 1st, 2017! For the text of this episode, put out early given the deadline, see the transcri... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-24)
369.thumbnailHoP 277 - Trivial Pursuits - Fourteenth Century Logic
The scholastics discuss the ambiguity of terms, the nature of logical inference, and logical paradoxes, and play the game of “obligations.” (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-May-07)
370.thumbnailHPI 41 - Monima Chadha on Indian Philosophy of Mind
Monima Chadha takes Peter through Buddhist-Hindu debates over mind and self. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Apr-30)
371.thumbnailThe Politics of Wishful Thinking
In this episode, the normalcy bias becomes a normal topic. There are novelties, however. It's the first time we mention crackpots and prophets of doom. Wishful thinking on the Left is also picked apart and we puzzle over the case of the missing tweets. Zach execrates the concepts of optimism and pessimism (just in case anyone doubted he was the scold of the group). Be there or be square. Listen or... (@thevimblog, 2017-Sep-09)
372.thumbnailHoP 276 - Back to the Future - Foreknowledge and Predestination
Scotus, Ockham, and Bradwardine ask how we can be free if God knows and chooses the things we will do in the future. (@HistPhilosophy, 2017-Apr-23)
373.thumbnailFree speech, campus protests, and the right to silence
University students calling for deplatforming are making a curious claim about free speech. But what is it exactly? (@RadioNational, 2017-Jul-23)
374.thumbnailEp29 - What's the Public Got to Do with It?
In this twenty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Drs. Amanda Fulford and Naomi Hodgson, on the topics of "What is the public?" and understanding philosophy as education - sung in a Tina Turner voice: "What's the Public Got to Do with It, Got to Do with It?" Dr. Fulford is Reader in the Philosophy of E... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-22)
375.thumbnailEpisode 171: Buddhism vs. Evolution with Guest Robert Wright (Part One)
Bob joins the PEL four to discuss his new book Why Buddhism Is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment. Bob applies his expertise in evolutionary psychology to corroborate Buddhism's claims that we are deluded: about our desires, emotions, the unity of our selves, and the "essences" we project on things and people. And he thinks meditation can instill in the diligent the a... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-04)
376.thumbnailEpisode 121: The Beauty of Illusion - David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive"
Guest Yoel Inbar joins David and Tamler to break down David Lynch’s dreamy masterpiece Mulholland Drive. (FULL SPOILERS – watch before you listen!) What’s real and what’s illusion? What happens when our illusions unravel? How do expectations affect our experience? How can artists use our expectations to manipulate our emotions? Come for the questions, stay for the answers – or at least ... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Aug-15)
377.thumbnailEpisode 21, Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 21 (Part I of II) on Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy.Few political thinkers can be considered as influential as Thomas Hobbes. Published in 1651, Hobbes’s most famous work, the Leviathan (or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil), argues t... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jul-02)
378.thumbnailEp28 - Philosophy in Nature
In this twenty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Andrea Christelle, co-founder of the Sedona Philosophy Experience, on the topic of "philosophy in nature." According to their Web site, the Sedona Philosophy Experience "was conceived by four university professors who had the crazy idea to bring th... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-18)
379.thumbnailMale Circumcision
Should we ban male circumcision? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Sep-11)
380.thumbnailNEM#53: David Brookings Is Obsessed
David has recorded seven albums since 2000. Usually one wants to avoid the term "Beatlesque," but David is a Beatles freak who once recorded his performances all 209 Beatles songs over 209 days. We discuss "Time to Go" from David Brookings and the Average Lookings (2016), "Dead Battery" from Chorus Verses the Bridge (2005), and the title track from Obsessed (2007). We conclude by listening to "If ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Sep-01)
381.thumbnailEp27 - Leadership and Civic Engagement
In this twenty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Drs. Danielle Lake, Judy Whipps, and Mike Ricco, all of Grand Valley State University. Danielle was featured in episode 12 ("That's a Wicked Problem You've Got There") of the show and was kind enough to join us again. She and Judy both teach philosoph... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-17)
382.thumbnailRationally Speaking #193 - Eric Jonas on "Could a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor?"
This episode features neuroscientist and computer scientist Eric Jonas, discussing his provocative paper titled "Could a Neuroscientist Understand a Microprocessor?" in which he applied state-of-the-art neuroscience tools to a computer chip. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Sep-18)
383.thumbnail436: Could the Laws of Physics Ever Change?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/could-laws-physics-change. From airplanes flying overhead to the cellular activity inside us, all events that take place in the world obey the laws of physics. Physicists seem to be getting closer and closer to understanding the physical laws that govern our universe. But what if our physical laws changed? Could that even be possible? How might cha... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Aug-14)
384.thumbnailRemembering Zygmunt Bauman and Hubert Dreyfus
Bauman and Dreyfus: remembering two greats who engaged deeply with powerful forces of our time. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jul-16)
385.thumbnailEpisode 20, Plato's Political Philosophy (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 20 (Part II of II) on Plato's Political Philosophy.This episode benchmarks the beginning of our mini-series on political philosophy. Plato provides a strong critique of democracy through his formulation of a utopian city-state. By attempting to find justice in the city, Plato prom... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jun-25)
386.thumbnailEp26 - BC5 - Thanks & an Outtake
This twenty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special "breadcrumb" episode with Dr. Annie Davis Weber, who was featured in Episode 25. We have some thanks to give for listener feedback and we had a big laugh after recording an episode, about a line that ended up in the episode with Annie. Thanks for feedback from Thomas O'Connor for his tweet, as well as one ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-12)
387.thumbnailWhy We Cannot See Disaster Coming
In this episode, three Vimmers strive to match Keith Olbermann's fever pitch of doom. They sound the alarm of the normalcy bias, a bias holding both Trump yea and naysayers in its thrall. Yes, both the Left and the Right stand accused of ignoring warning signs and 'normalizing' definitely abnormal and potentially dangerous situations. Zach highlights our tendency to rationalize our non-/pre-/irrat... (@thevimblog, 2017-Sep-02)
388.thumbnailEpisode 170 Second Opinions: Leftists on "Society of the Spectacle"
Mark and Seth ask Doug Lain (Zero Squared), Brett O'Shea (Revolutionary Left Radio), and C. Derick Varn (Symptomatic Redness) what they think of Debord and PEL's treatment of the book on Ep #170. End song: "Open Your Eyes (Wake Up)" from Tyler Hislop, interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #24. Go to blueapron.com/PEL for three free meals with free shipping. Get 20% off your first pair of underwear... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-28)
389.thumbnailEnid Blyton—the moral of the story
She might not be in vogue these days, but for one Cambridge philosopher Enid Blyton is serious moral business. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jul-09)
390.thumbnailEpisode 20, Plato's Political Philosophy (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 20 (Part I of II) on Plato's Political Philosophy.This episode benchmarks the beginning of our mini-series on political philosophy. Plato provides a strong critique of democracy through his formulation of a utopian city-state. By attempting to find justice in the city, Plato promp... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jun-18)
391.thumbnailEp25 - Assessing Assessment
In this twenty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Annie Davis Weber of the University of Kentucky on "Assessing Assessment: The Philosophy Behind Measuring Student Success in Higher Education." Dr. Annie Davis Weber is Assistant Provost for Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness at the ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-05)
392.thumbnailEp24 - BC4 - Teaching Kids about Pessimism
This twenty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is another "breadcrumb" with Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. In this breadcrumb, we talk about how to talk to our kids about the little engine that couldn't, or quixotic pessimism, the focus of our full-length episode 22. Episode 22 of the show was titled "The Little Engine that Cou... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jul-05)
393.thumbnailEpisode 19, Mind, Body and Consciousness (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 19 (Part II of II) on Mind, Body and Consciousness.For Episode 19, I'm joined by Gregory Miller and Dr Thom Atkinson from the University of Liverpool. As well as introducing the questions and problems surrounding consciousness and mind; we'll be discussing substance dualism, ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jun-11)
394.thumbnailAn answer for Carlo Rovelli and his quantum question
Carlo Rovelli is a physicist in need of a philosopher, and we’ve found one who's happy to help. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jul-02)
395.thumbnailEp23 - BC3 - Who Bakes Bread Anymore?
This twenty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a "breadcrumb." A Breadcrumb is a short, 8-20 minute episode that was cut off from a longer show, that's a collage of little clips, or that is a response to listener feedback. Today's breadcrumb episode features Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Va... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-30)
396.thumbnailNEM#52: Kim Rancourt's Authentic NYC Rock n' Roll
Kim is a poet, archivist, and New York City tour guide. We discuss his album plum plumfeaturing “The Dream Band”: his producer friend Don Fleming, Joe Bouchard (Blue Öyster Cult), Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth) and NEM guest Gary Lucas. We discuss “Circle’s Gotta Go” and “Arizona Burning,” and conclude with “Claudine.” We also discuss “I Comb My Hair with My Hand” by Jad Fair a... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-21)
397.thumbnailEpisode 170: Guy Debord's "Society of the Spectacle" (Part Two)
More on the 1967 Situtationist book. Do we buy Debord's critique? Is any merely partial critique (i.e. no revolution) just more spectacle? Is technology inherently dehumanizing? Don't these passivity/anti-technology arguments even apply to books? Could Debord's model of authenticity catch on in society as a whole? Start with part 1, or get the Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "Millio... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-21)
398.thumbnailEp22 - The Little Engine that Couldn't
In this twenty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) on the topic of "The Little Engine that Couldn't." Dr. Alessandri is an assistant professor of philosophy at UTRGV. She has published in The New York Times, Times Higher Educat... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-29)
399.thumbnailEpisode 19, Mind, Body and Consciousness (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 19 (Part I of II) on Mind, Body and Consciousness.For Episode 19, I'm joined by Gregory Miller and Dr Thom Atkinson from the University of Liverpool. As well as introducing the questions and problems surrounding consciousness and mind; we'll be discussing substance dualism, m... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Jun-05)
400.thumbnailEpisode #110 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 3 - The Culture Industry
Today we talk about an important chapter from The Dialectic of Enlightenment entitled The Culture Industry. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Sep-07)
401.thumbnailEp21 - BC2 - What to Do About Wicked Problems? Voicemail and Response Breadcrumb
This twenty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a "breadcrumb." A Breadcrumb is a short, 8-20 minute episode that was cut off from a longer show, that's a collage of little clips, or, as in this case, that is a response to listener feedback. Today's breadcrumb episode is a bigger version of what in the past we called a "Y... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-24)
402.thumbnailEpisode 18, Albert Camus (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 18 (Part II of II) on Albert Camus. Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea th... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-May-28)
403.thumbnailThe military, moral injury, and Nancy Sherman
This year’s Alan Saunders Memorial Lecturer—Nancy Sherman—has something to say about the military. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jun-25)
404.thumbnailEpisode 120: Clap Your Hand for Robert Wright
Special guest Robert Wright joins the podcast to discuss his latest book "Why Buddhism is True." What is the Buddhist conception of not-self? When we become aware that the boundaries between us and the world are fluid, what is the “we” that arrives at this insight? Can daily meditation make you less of a dick? How does evolutionary psychology bear on these questions? Plus, Dave horrifies Ta... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Jul-25)
405.thumbnailEp20 - Is the Cross Examined Life Worth Living?
In this twentieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Chris Tatem, a Clerk of Courts in Wyoming and the host of the Cross Examined Life podcast. Chris has always been interested in philosophical questions. Early on, he asked his teachers and parents endless questions. At an early age, he wrote Socratic dialo... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-22)
406.thumbnailEpisode 18, Albert Camus (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 18 (Part I of II) on Albert Camus. Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea tha... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-May-21)
407.thumbnail435: Driverless Cars at the Moral Crossroads
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/driverless-cars-moral-crossroads. Autonomous vehicles are quickly emerging as the next innovation that will change society in radical ways. Champions of this new technology say that driverless cars, which are programed to obey the law and avoid collisions, will be safer than human controlled vehicles. But how do we program these vehicles to a... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Jul-26)
408.thumbnailEpisode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 17 (Part II of II) on Jean-Paul Sartre. Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates ... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-May-14)
409.thumbnailOn prison sentencing: what matters?
A philosopher receives a 12-year jail sentence for having sex with someone who can’t speak. Then things get interesting. Peter Singer and Marcia Baron on suffering as a guide to sentencing. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jun-18)
410.thumbnailEpisode 24 - David Baker
On Episode 24, Nick chats with David Baker, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan, about the importance of having an intellectual peer group across one's life and career, studying philosophy of physics at Princeton, the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics, his work on supersymmetry, disagreements among philosophers of science concerning metaphys... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Jul-31)
411.thumbnailRationally Speaking #192 - Jesse Singal on “The problems with implicit bias tests”
This episode features science journalist Jesse Singal, who argues that the Implicit Associations Test (IAT) has been massively overhyped, and that in fact there's little evidence that it's measuring real-life bias. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Sep-03)
412.thumbnailEpisode 170: Guy Debord's "Society of the Spectacle" (Part One)
What is culture? In modern capitalism, Debord’s 1967 book describes it as all about the economy. It’s not just our jobs that keep us trapped, but our life outside of working hours is also demanded by “the system” via our activity as consumers, and this commoditization infiltrates every corner of our lives. Debord wants us to WAKE UP, break our chains, and live lives of immediacy, vitality,... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-14)
413.thumbnailEpisode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part I)
Welcome to Episode 17 (Part I of II) on Jean-Paul Sartre. Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates t... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-May-07)
414.thumbnailEp19 - On Anger and Forgiveness
In this nineteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Martha Nussbaum of the University of Chicago on the topic of "Anger and Forgiveness," the subject of her recent book by that name, which is available both as a printed book and as an audio book. Dr. Nussbaum has been named one of the most influential ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-14)
415.thumbnailEpisode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part III)
Welcome to Episode 16 (Part III of III) on Søren Kierkegaard. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed distain to the rigid academic syst... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Apr-30)
416.thumbnailEpisode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part II)
Welcome to Episode 16 (Part II of III) on Søren Kierkegaard. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed distain to the rigid academic syste... (@ThePanpsycast, 2017-Apr-23)
417.thumbnailTEASER-Episode 169: Analyzing Hitchcock's "Vertigo" (Part Two)
Some audio tidbits to hint at the analytic glories in the second half of our discussion, getting deeper into the psychoanalytic/existential interpretations of the film. Get the discussion at patreon.com/partiallyexaminedlife or with a PEL Citizenship. (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-12)
418.thumbnailCarlo Rovelli and his quantum problem
Carlo Rovelli on the desperate need for some conceptual engineering to dig quantum thinking out of a deep black hole. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jun-11)
419.thumbnailEpisode 028: David Livingstone Smith on Dehumanization
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher David Livingstone Smith about dehumanization, it’s history, the role of race in dehumanizing practices, how monsters are made, and more. (@myishacherry, 2017-Aug-31)
420.thumbnailEp18 - Creating Community through Dialogue
In this eighteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Chris Long of Michigan State University on the topic of "Creating Community through Dialogue." Chris is a co-founder of The Public Philosophy Journal and is Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State. Dr. Long's research has focused on ... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Jun-05)
421.thumbnailWilliam Godwin: rebel for love, happiness, and anarchy
The Utilitarians have given us a big idea to live by, transforming life in ways we take for granted today. One of their number challenges us to take it further. (@RadioNational, 2017-Jun-04)
422.thumbnailEpisode 23 - Heather Douglas
On Episode 22, Nick chats with Heather Douglas, the Waterloo Chair in Science and Society at the University of Waterloo, about her early work on Millikan's famous oil drop experiment and how he cheated his graduate student out of a Nobel prize, idiosyncrasies in academic culture, differences in Canadian and US science policy, how democratic societies, scientists, and philosophers of... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Jul-24)
423.thumbnail434: Cognitive Bias
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/cognitive-bias. Aristotle thought that rationality was the faculty that distinguished humans from other animals. However, psychological research shows that our judgments are plagued by systematic, irrational, unconscious errors known as ‘cognitive biases.’ In light of this research, can we really be confident in the superiority of human rationa... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Jul-17)
424.thumbnailEp17 - The Wisdom in Humor
In this seventeenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview the New York Times Best-selling authors of Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar, Tom Cathcart and Daniel Klein. Danny Klein has written comedy for Lily Tomlin, Flip Wilson, and others, and published scores of fiction and non-fiction books—from thril... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-May-31)
425.thumbnailEpisode 119: A Brief History of Values
What happens when we discover why we believe the things we believe? What if we discover that our values are the product of our cultural tradition, or personal experience, or natural selection? Should we be more skeptical of our values once we learn their history? Plus, data on Google porn searches reveal that you're all a bunch of sick fucks. (@verybadwizards, 2017-Jul-12)
426.thumbnailPEL Special: Combat & Classics on Rousseau's "Discourse on the Arts and Sciences"
A new podcast for the PEL Podcast Network! Meet Jeff, Lise, and Brian, who are joined by Wes and Dylan to discuss Rousseau's claim that the arts and sciences lead to "moral corruption." Get more C&C on the PEL site or at combatandclassics.org. Become a PEL Citizen to attend a C&C online seminar on Nietzsche's ”Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense” on Aug. 14, 8pm EST. Your support for PE... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-07)
427.thumbnailMottainai: a philosophy of waste
Mottainai combines elements of Buddhism and Shinto to create a nuanced approach to the environment and wasteful practices. (@RadioNational, 2017-May-28)
428.thumbnailEp16 - On Disability and American Philosophy
This sixteenth episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread aired on WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM, on Monday, April 17th of 2017, and was a special episode on the subject of disability and American philosophy. It was another special episode recorded on location at a conference, except for Eric Weber, who skyped in from a closet in Ohio. This episode features four guests who were all on a panel at the annual gathe... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-May-24)
429.thumbnailEpisode #109 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 2 - The Enlightenment
Today we talk about the Frankfurt School critique of enlightenment style thinking and Herbert Marcuse's book One Dimensional Man. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Aug-26)
430.thumbnailNEM Ep 51: Andy Powell (Wishbone Ash): The Privilege of a Legacy
Britain's Wishbone Ash started in 1969 and has released 25+ albums, with guitarist/singer Andy the sole member left from the original band. We discuss "American Century" from Blue Horizon (2014), "Master of Disguise" from Bare Bones (1999), and "Roads of Day to Day" (1970, released on First Light (2007). End song: “In Crisis” from The Power of Eternity (2007). Intro music: "Blowin' Free" from ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Aug-04)
431.thumbnailAwesome ethics and the art of mushroom blading
Forget the meaning of life; an ethical definition of awesome is far more important. (@RadioNational, 2017-May-21)
432.thumbnailStones rolling and the joy of ordinary objects
The structure of the universe is written in stone—maybe. Dana Goswick talks metaphysics. (@RadioNational, 2017-May-14)
433.thumbnailA deathly conversation: Part 3
When I die will I be dead? Sam Baron with a final look at the ultimate mystery (@RadioNational, 2017-May-07)
434.thumbnailEp15 - Part II of II on Teaching Philosophy to First-Gen College Students
This fifteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. Jackie Kegley of California State University Bakersfield and Dr. Bertha Alvarez Manninen of Arizona State University, on the topic of the value of and challenges for Teaching philosophy to first generation college students. Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in on... (@PhilosophyBB, 2017-Apr-26)
435.thumbnailConfucius says …
Roger Ames on what Confucius might say to the modern world. (@RadioNational, 2017-Apr-30)
436.thumbnailThe other L word
The topic that’s sure to crash a conversation; the existentialists had a crack at it, but it might not be the best approach. (@RadioNational, 2017-Apr-23)
437.thumbnailDo victims have obligations too?
Are you a victim of crime? What are YOUR obligations? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Aug-13)
438.thumbnailEpisode 169: Analyzing Hitchcock's "Vertigo" (Part One)
On the 1958 film and articles including Laura Mulvey's "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" (1975) and Robin Wood's "Vertigo" (1965). What's the nature of love/lust? Are we really just loving an image we've built while remaining fundamentally isolated? And is it just an illusionary social construct that keeps us all from feeling fundamental vertigo? Lacan, existentialism, and more! Part 2 is for... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-31)
439.thumbnail433: Summer Reading List
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/summer-reading-list-2017. Summer is the perfect time to dig in to deep reading. Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism may be a bit much for the beach, but there are lots of readable classics and new titles that could make your summer reading a transformative experience. • Stanford literature professor Josh Landy on Toni Morrison's... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Jul-05)
440.thumbnailRationally Speaking #191 - Seth Stephens-Davidowitz on "What the internet can tell us about human nature" (Fixed)
Seth Stephens-Davidowitz and Julia discuss the insights new research gives us into which parts of the USA are more racist, what kinds of strategies reduce racism, and whether the internet is making political polarization worse. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Aug-21)
441.thumbnailNEM Ep 50: Anton Barbeau's Neo-Psychedelic Musings
Californian-turned-British singer-songwriter Anton has released over 25 albums since 1993, generally moving from alterna-guitar-pop to colorful-pychedelic, but remaining tuneful. We discuss “High Noon” and (and listen to “Swindon”) from Magic Act (2016), “Dust Beneath My Wings” by Three Minute Tease (2011) and its subsequent incarnations, and the title track from In the Village of the ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-29)
442.thumbnailEpisode 118: We Don't Love Them Hoax
David and Tamler try to put the topic of campus politics to bed once and for all – with limited success. First, we get into a big fight about the prevalence and danger of political correctness in American universities. We junked that recording, and tried to distill our best points into a new one. (Trust us – it was for the best.) We also narrow down all the topic recommendations from our belov... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Jun-28)
443.thumbnailEpisode #108 ... The Frankfurt School pt. 1 - Introduction
Today we talk about The Frankfurt School. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Aug-17)
444.thumbnailEpisode 168: Darwin's "Origin of Species" (Part Two)
More on Darwin's famous book. Why does it matter for philosophy, beyond providing an alternative to intelligent design? Is it really anti-religious? How can well tell if it's really a scientific theory? Talking about a species evolving trait X to enable survival sounds teleological; is it really, and is that bad? Why would the mind develop through natural selection? Continues from part 1, or just ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-24)
445.thumbnail432: Habermas and Democracy
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/habermas-and-democracy. Jürgen Habermas is regarded as one of the last great public intellectuals of Europe and a major contributor to the philosophy of democracy. A member of the Frankfurt School, Habermas argues that humans can have rational communication that will lead to the democratization of society and consensus. But should we be so optimis... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Jun-25)
446.thumbnailThe Morality of "Economic Anxiety"
In the crescendoing finale of a three-part series on "economy anxiety", Zach argues that pleading economic anxiety is akin to "slapping you and then telling you that you should empathize with my choice to slap you." It's moral harm 'justifying' moral harm. Not uncontroversial stuff. Read the article this episode is based on: https://thevimblog.com/2017/03/31/my-myth-of-economic-anxiety/ ... (@thevimblog, 2017-Jul-29)
447.thumbnailNEM Ep 49: Scott McCaughey Minus 5 Plus Young Fresh Fellows Equals Magic
Scott established himself fronting Seattle’s Young Fresh Fellows staring in 1981 and then around 1994 joined R.E.M. as a recording/touring member and started The Minus 5 with R.E.M.’s Peter Buck. We discuss The Minus 5’s “In the Ground” from Dungeon Golds (2015), “All the Time” from their Old Liquidator (1995), and “Weymer Never Dies” from their Of Monkees and Men(2016). We concl... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-20)
448.thumbnailEpisode 117: Extended Minds, Extended Foreskins
David and Tamler break down a recent classic in the philosophy of mind: "The Extended Mind" by Andy Clark and David Chalmers. What is boundary of your mind? Is it contained with your body, or does it extend to the external environment--to your laptop, notebook, smartphone and more? Is this a purely terminological question, or one with practical and moral significance? And what is the role of ... (@verybadwizards, 2017-Jun-13)
449.thumbnail356: Racial Profiling and Implicit Bias
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/racial-profiling-and-implicit-bias. Whether for counterterrorism measures, street level crime, or immigration, racial profiling of minorities occurs frequently. However, racial profiling is illegal under many jurisdictions and many might say ineffective. Is racial profiling ever moral or is it always an unjustified form of racism? Is there any evid... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Jun-19)
450.thumbnailEpisode 168: Darwin's "Origin of Species" (Part One)
On Charles Darwin's 1859 book, ch. 1-4, 6, and 14. What are the philosophical ramifications of Darwin's theory of evolution? We go through Darwin's arguments, compare his views to other theories of evolution like Lamarck's, and talk about how an evolutionary way of looking at things has influenced philosophers. Continue with part 2 or get your unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-17)
451.thumbnailThe Origins of "Economic Anxiety"
Origins stories are in vogue. Economic Anxiety needs its origin story. Where does it come from? What's its appeal? What's its basis? Spoiler: it's probably not reality. Justin and Zach explore the aspects of economic anxiety that made this Manichean meme into the punditocracy's go-to explanation of the 2016 election. Read the article this episode is based on: https://thevimblog.com/2017... (@thevimblog, 2017-Jul-23)
452.thumbnailEpisode 116: Pain, Pleasure, and Peer-Reviewed Penises
David and Tamler break down the latest small-stakes academic controversy--yes the one about conceptual penises. Does the recent "Sokal-like" hoax expose the ideological extremism of gender studies? Or does it show that certain portions of the "skeptic" community are susceptible to the same biases as their opponents? In the main segment they discuss the problems with measuring pain, pleasure, and ... (@verybadwizards, 2017-May-31)
453.thumbnailRationally Speaking #190 - Amanda Askell on "Pascal's Wager and other low risks with high stakes"
This episode features philosopher Amanda Askell, who (though not religious herself) argues that it's much trickier to rebut Pascal's Wager than most people think. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Aug-06)
454.thumbnailEpisode 167: Hume on Intelligent Design (Part Two)
Continuing on David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779), with guest Stephen West. We get further into what’s wrong with the design argument and why Hume thinks that it’s merely a verbal dispute whether we want to say that God designed the orderly universe or just say that the universe is orderly. Also, the problem of evil! Listen to part 1 first, or get the ad-free, unbroken ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-10)
455.thumbnailThe Myth of "Economic Anxiety"
Economic Anxiety? Economic Anxiety. Economic Anxiety! The meme-cum-trope came hard and took op-ed columns by storm in 2016. Two Vimmers open up a three-part series in which they peel back the layers of this specious analysis. In this first episode, they discuss Zach's thesis that economic anxiety is a mere front-cum-pretext for something nefarious. Tune in to find out... Read the article this... (@thevimblog, 2017-Jul-17)
456.thumbnailNEM Ep 48: Thalia Zedek's Slow Burn Memory Games
Most famous for her 90s New York grunge band Come, Thalia has since 2001 put out six albums and some EPs, with a stripped-down yet not acoustic sound that makes good use of her low, smoky voice and tasteful electric guitar, often accompanied by viola and/or piano with prominent drums. We discuss “Northwest Branch” by The Thalia Zedek Band from Eve (2016); opening music is “Afloat,” also fr... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-09)
457.thumbnailEpisode 22 - Colin Klein
On Episode 22, Nick chats with Colin Klein, Australian Research Council Future Fellow and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at Macquarie University in Sydney, about engaging in pre-Reddit philosophical debates over the early internet, his humbling experience going from from a small liberal arts college to graduate study at Princeton, idealizing explanations in scienc... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Jun-15)
458.thumbnail431: Nonhuman Rights
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/nonhuman-rights. Human rights—like freedom from discrimination and slavery— are fundamental rights and freedoms that every person enjoys simply because they're human. But what about other animals, like monkeys, elephants, and dolphins? Should they enjoy similar fundamental rights? If we can extend the legal notion of personhood to inanima... (@philtalkradio, 2017-May-29)
459.thumbnailEpisode 115: Which Field is More [email protected]%ed: Philosophy or Psychology?
David and Tamler go ambulance chasing for scandals in their own fields. Inspired by a tweet from Jay Van Bavel, they argue about which of their disciplines--philosophy or psychology--is more completely and irredeemably fucked. Is the recent controversy at the feminist philosophy journal Hypatia diagnostic of larger problems in philosophy? Can the replication crisis ever be solved? Can philosophy r... (@verybadwizards, 2017-May-16)
460.thumbnailEpisode 114: Great Vengeance and Furious Anger (Top 5 Movies About Revenge)
Somehow, after 113 episodes David and Tamler have never done a top 5 movie episode about revenge (so unbelievable that we had to double-check). That changes today. Among the things we learned: good revenge movies are harder to find than we thought, revenge (at least, movie revenge) is messy, and David knows at least one movie that Tamler has never heard of. Plus, should Jews be celebrating the kil... (@verybadwizards, 2017-May-04)
461.thumbnail353: Babies and the Birth of Morality
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/babies-and-birth-morality. Doing the right thing is often an extremely difficult task. Yet psychological research indicates that infants as young as 21 months old have a crude sense of what is right and wrong. This capacity is reflected by infants' decisions to reward or punish characters in social scenarios. But surely a genuine, robust, mature mo... (@philtalkradio, 2017-May-22)
462.thumbnailEpisode 167: Hume on Intelligent Design (Philosophize This! Crossover) (Part One)
On David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779). How would a scientifically minded person argue for the existence of God? In Hume’s dialogue, a character named Cleanthes argues from this point of view for God’s existence based on the complexity and order apparent in nature: It looks designed. But how good is that argument, and is it enough to prove an infinite God of the traditi... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jul-03)
463.thumbnail430: Should Beliefs Aim at Truth?
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/should-beliefs-aim-truth. If beliefs can be described as having a goal or purpose, then surely that is something like aiming at the truth. Yet we all hold many false beliefs too. Do these false beliefs fail to meet their goal? Or are there some things we believe simply because they make us feel good? Could the goal of beliefs sometimes be to provid... (@philtalkradio, 2017-May-15)
464.thumbnailEpisode 21 - Roman Frigg
On Episode 21, Nick chats with Roman Frigg, Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic, and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics and Political Science, about growing up in Basel, Switzerland playing in the youth symphony orchestra, studying quantum and statistical mechanics to understand "what makes physics tick," working with his PhD advisor Nancy... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Jun-01)
465.thumbnailEpisode #107 ... Simone De Beauvoir pt .3 - Responsibility
Today we talk about part three of Simone De Beauvoir's work The Ethics of Ambiguity. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Jul-29)
466.thumbnail429: The Limits of Medical Consent
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/limits-medical-consent. In our healthcare system, parents normally make medical decisions for their kids because, we think, children are not competent to make such decisions for themselves. Similarly, we permit doctors to violate or defer consent for mentally incompetent adults. But where do we draw the line for what constitutes ‘incompetence’?... (@philtalkradio, 2017-May-08)
467.thumbnail354: Machiavelli
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/machiavelli. Niccolò Machiavelli is best known for arguing that people in power should use deception, force, and manipulation if those tactics are necessary to achieve their ends. In an age of unscrupulous politics and ruthless business practice, shouldn't we be encouraging a move away from Machiavellian thinking? Then again, are we even sure that... (@philtalkradio, 2017-May-01)
468.thumbnail428: The Phenomenology of Lived Experience
More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/phenomenology-lived-experience. Phenomenology is the philosophical study of experience and consciousness, performed by philosophers ranging from Sartre and Heidegger to contemporary analytic philosophers of mind. But what methods do phenomenologists use to study the mind and experience in general? How can phenomenology help us understand a range of... (@philtalkradio, 2017-Apr-24)
469.thumbnailEpisode 20 - Dominic Murphy
On Episode 20, Nick chats with Dominic Murphy, Associate Professor & Director of the Unit for History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Sydney, about his early days as a naturalistic philosopher of mind, his pioneering work in the philosophy of psychiatry, his new work on self-representation in the cognitive neurosciences, the problem of cultural variation in psychiatry... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-May-26)
470.thumbnailEpisode 166: Spinoza on Politics and Religion (Part Two)
Concluding on the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670) and Tractatus Politicus (1677). What's the relationship between ethics, reason, and revelation? What could "faith" possibly mean to a hard-core rationalist like Spinoza? Is it possible to buy into the non-denominational "true religion" without believing any of the dogmas of traditional religion at all? And what kinds of limits on free speech ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-26)
471.thumbnailEpisode 19 - Jason Robert
On Episode 19, Nick chats with Jason Robert, the Lincoln Chair in Ethics and Dean's Distinguished Professor in the Life Sciences at Arizona State University, about his early work on the "selling" of the Human Genome Project, philosophical issues in human genetics, doing philosophy of biology in order to do better bioethics, and his ongoing ambition to contribute to debates about the... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-May-18)
472.thumbnailRationally Speaking #189 - Stephan Guyenet on "What causes obesity?"
In this episode Julia sits down with neuroscientist and obesity researcher Stephan Guyenet, to talk about what scientists know so far about the causes of obesity, and in particular the brain's role in regulating weight gain. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Jul-23)
473.thumbnailProfiling
Profiling is commonplace? But is it ethical? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Jul-10)
474.thumbnailEpisode 18 - Richard Dawid
On Episode 18, Nick chats with Richard Dawid, Professor of Philosophy at Stockholm University in Sweden, about his research connecting general philosophy of science and the philosophy of physics, theories of high energy physics and cosmology, and his book, 'String Theory and the Scientific Method', which aims to understand 'the trust physicists have in contemporary theories despite ... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-May-10)
475.thumbnailEpisode 166: Spinoza on Politics and Religion (Part One)
On Benedict de Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670), ch. 12-20 and the Tractatus Politicus (1677). What’s the relationship between ethics and political power? Given that religious factions tend to create strife, what’s the optimal role of the government in mitigating that damage? Is theocracy in any way a good idea? Don’t wait for the rest of the discussion! Get the ad-free, unb... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-19)
476.thumbnailNEM Ep 47: Jason Falkner: Mid-Fi One-Man Moments
After stints with The Three O'Clock and Jellyfish, Jason co-fronted The Grays and then worked solo, also playing with Beck, Aimee Mann, Paul McCartney, etc. and acting as one-man-backing-band/producer for other artists. Songs: "Sincero Amore" and (ending with) "Horror Show" from Make It Be (2017) with R. Stevie Moore, "The Lie in Me" from All Quiet on the Noise Floor (2009), and "Both Belong," by ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-19)
477.thumbnailEpisode 17 - Alex Rosenberg
On Episode 17, Nick talks with Alex Rosenberg, the R. Taylor Cole Professor of Philosophy at Duke University, about his pioneering work in the philosophy of economics, reconciling molecular biology with evolutionary theory, and examining philosophical questions by means of historical fiction in his best-selling novel, "The Girl From Krakow", a thriller that explores how a young woma... (@SciPhiPod, 2017-Apr-28)
478.thumbnailEpisode #106 ... Simone De Beauvoir pt. 2 - The Ethics of Ambiguity
Today we talk about the first half of The Ethics of Ambiguity by Simone De Beauvoir. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Jul-19)
479.thumbnailEpisode 165: Spinoza on Biblical Criticism (Part Two)
Continuing on the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670), ch. 1–11. We go more into natural laws vs. ordinances; does it make sense to say that God makes rules for people? Also, how does Spinoza deal with alleged miracles given that natural laws are absolute regularities? Continued from part 1, or get the ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Get The Rise and Fall of Dodo at nealstephe... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-12)
480.thumbnailNEM Ep 46: Chandler Travis: Strongman of North America
Chandler was a comedian in the ’70s, launched a rock group in the ’80s, and has released dozens of albums, fronting multiple bands at a time. We discuss “The Strongman of North America” by The Chandler Travis Philharmonic from Waving Kissyhead Vol. 2 & 1 (2017), “The Crutch of Music” by the Catbirds from Catbirds Say Yeah (2012), and “Fluffy” by the Philharmonic from Llama Rhymes (... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-12)
481.thumbnailEpisode 165: Spinoza on Biblical Criticism (Part One)
On Benedict de Spinoza's Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670), ch. 1–11. For Spinoza, the Bible was a political issue, and he was interested in a way to read it that didn't lead to people fighting wars and persecuting each other. Spinoza argues that a respectful reading is one that looks for the central message and doesn't paper over many places where the text was tailored to its original audie... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Jun-05)
482.thumbnailNakedly Examined Music: Steve Hackett, Nik Kershaw, Ken Stringfellow, Robbie Fulks
PEL Network crossover magic, featuring clips (a full song plus explanation) from four recent episodes of Mark's other podcast. Hear the full episodes and many more at nakedlyexaminedmusic.com. Steve was the guitarist for Genesis in the 70s, Nik wrote 80s hits like "Wouldn't It Be Good," Ken played with The Posies, Big Star, and R.E.M., and Robbie will change the way you think about country music. ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-26)
483.thumbnailRationally Speaking #188 - Robert Kurzban on "Being strategically wrong"
In this episode, recorded live at the Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism, Julia interviews evolutionary psychologist Rob Kurzban, author of "Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite." (@Rspodcast, 2017-Jul-09)
484.thumbnailEpisode #105 ... Sartre and Camus pt. 6 - The Self
Today a cloudy, muddled brain weary from fighting off sickness talks about Sartre's view on the self. Thank you for your patience. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Jul-09)
485.thumbnailEpisode 164: Dostoyevsky’s “The Idiot” on Perfection (Part Two)
More on the novel with guest Corey Mohler, considering Dostoyevsky qua existentialist in terms of his analysis of the crisis of meaning and his consequent views on religion. Listen to part 1 first, or get the unbroken, ad-free Citizen Edition. Get a Dostoyevsky T-shirt! End song: "Don Quixote" by Nik Kershaw, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #37. Please visit Talkspace.com/examined (use co... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-22)
486.thumbnailNEM Ep 45: Steve Hackett: Visualize the Music (with 300+ tracks!)
Steve released six studio albums with Genesis between 1971 and 1977 and twenty-five solo albums that feature his virtuosic guitar and the spirit of ’70s prog rock. He now works with producer/keyboardist Roger King to create dense, cinematic soundscapes. We discuss “In the Skeleton Gallery” (and listen to “Anything but Love”) from The Night Siren (2017), “Love Song to a Vampire” from ... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-22)
487.thumbnailEpisode 164: Dostoyevsky’s “The Idiot” on Perfection (Part One)
On Fyodor Dostoyevsky's philosophical novel from 1869. Could a morally perfect person survive in the modern world? Is all this "modernity," which so efficiently computes our desires and provides mechanisms to fulfill them, actually suited to achieve human flourishing? Dostoyevsky's Russian existentialism says no! Visit Talkspace.com/examined; use code "EXAMINED" for 30% off your first month of onl... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-15)
488.thumbnailWho can join the political community?
Not everyone has access to the same rights in a democratic country. Are our ideas of political membership changing in a globalised world? With Seyla Benhabib. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Jun-19)
489.thumbnailEpisode 163: Guest Stewart Umphrey on Natural Kinds (Part Two)
Continuing our interview about Natural Kinds and Genesis: The Classification of Material Entities. Buy Stewart's book at www.rowman.com and use the code LEX30AUTH17 to get 30% off. (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-08)
490.thumbnailNEM Ep 44: Lys Guillorn: Freedom from Explanation
Lys is a Connecticut singer/guitarist with an eccentric country twang who’s put out two albums, plus EPs and other stuff since 2003. We discuss “M.K.” from the I’m a Boy EP and also get to hear “Nothing to It” and a bit of the title track from that EP. We also address “Silver” from Winged Victory (2013), and “When I Was a Tiger Lily” from Three Songs (2006). Opening music: “L... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-07)
491.thumbnailA Better Love
On our season finale, we follow a mother's love through the stages of life to seek wisdom about what love is, what love does, and why love happens. We follow five mothers at five different stages of motherhood, from the joys and anxieties of birth, letting go, coming back, being proud, and saying goodbye. We then turn to the philosophy of love and life, to figure out the role of love in the shape ... (@HiPhiNation, 2017-May-03)
492.thumbnailEpisode 163: Guest Stewart Umphrey on Natural Kinds (Part One)
On Natural Kinds and Genesis: The Classification of Material Entities (2016). Are general terms like "water" or "dog" just things that we made up to order the world? Aristotle thought that some universals constitute natural kinds, with a nature that explains their behavior. "Kinds" were replaced with "laws," but Stewart wants us to reconsider, and bring back "natural philosophy" in the process. (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-May-01)
493.thumbnailNEM Ep 43: Steve Wynn: Coming Up 7's
Starting with the Dream Syndicate in the early ’80s in L.A. and then going solo in 1990, Steve has released over 35 albums of lyrically driven rock. We discuss “Resolution” from Northern Aggression (2010), “Punching Holes in the Sky” from Crossing Dragon Bridge (2008), and “There Will Come a Day” from Here Come the Miracles (2001). We wrap up with “I’m Not Listening,” a 2007 re... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Apr-30)
494.thumbnailNEM Ep 42: Karla Kane: Don't Choose Princess
Karla has put out four albums since 2006 with the Corner Laughers, a Bay Area band that has been categorized as “twee” given Karla’s ukulele, sparkly Brit-pop ornamentation, and similarly colorful lyrics. We discuss “Queen of the Meadow” from Matilda Effect (2015), the Nov. 2016 single “Don’t Hush, Darling,” and “Grasshopper Clock” from Poppy Seeds (2012). We also listen to “... (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Apr-23)
495.thumbnailPEL Special: Phi Fic on James Baldwin’s Fiction
On the short stories "This Morning, This Evening, So Soon" (1960) and "Sonny’s Blues" (1957). Mark joins the Phi Fic crew (go subscribe at phificpodcast.com!) to supplement PEL ep. 162 by delving into Baldwin's fiction, which is actually pretty similar to his biographical essays. (@PartiallyExLife, 2017-Apr-24)
496.thumbnailLying to the Whole World (pt. 2)
The second half(ish) of our episode on Dylan’s article, “How to Apologize for a Lie.” We discuss dirty hands in politics, politicians’ lies, utilitarianism, strict liability, and Trump even makes a cameo. Everything one would want from a podcast Read the article here: https://thevimblog.com/2017/04/18/how-to-apologize-for-a-lie/ www.thevimblog.com ▽ (@thevimblog, 2017-May-28)
497.thumbnailLying to the Whole World (pt. 1)
This is the first half(ish) of our session dedicated to lying and the logistics of making amends via apology. And who do you need to apologize to? The Bowling Green Massacre, Tricky Dick, and an adumbration of more utilitarianism to come in Part II. Special shout out to our listener KellyAnne C, our number one Beltway babe. Read the article here: https://thevimblog.com/2017/04/18/how-to-apolo... (@thevimblog, 2017-May-21)
498.thumbnailSeven Ways to 'Rig' an Election
An episode dedicated to our number-one listener, Vladdy Pu. Herein we take a philosopher's scapel to the term 'rigged' and see what rhetorical anatomy comes of it. We are sorry that the eighth episode is about seven things. If only 'rigged' had eight senses. Приятного прослушивания! Read the original article here: https://thevimblog.com/2016/12/05/the-7-mea... (@thevimblog, 2017-May-14)
499.thumbnailRationally Speaking #187 - Jason Weeden on "Do people vote based on self-interest?"
This episode features psychologist Jason Weeden, arguing that self-interest is a much bigger determinant of voter behavior than most political scientists think it is. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Jun-26)
500.thumbnailWhy Care about Privacy?
Is privacy really a fundamental value? With Annabelle Lever. (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-Jun-04)
501.thumbnailDignifying Our Neighbors Pt. 2: Objections and Replies (and More Objections)
Kevin, Ally, and Zach return to finish their discussion of Kevin’s article, “On Dignifying One’s Neighbor” (https://thevimblog.com/2017/02/23/on-dignifying-ones-neighbor/). For starters, you’d best take a listen to Part 1, especially the explainer that starts at 49:39. In this episode Kevin, Ally, and Zach explore some objections to Kevin’s theory of dignity—and then some repli... (@thevimblog, 2017-May-07)
502.thumbnailDignifying Our Neighbors Pt. 1: the Economy of Moral Value
Kevin, Ally, and Zach gather to discuss Kevin’s masterful article, “On Dignifying One’s Neighbor”(https://thevimblog.com/2017/02/23/on-dignifying-ones-neighbor/). In the first of two parts, they try to unpack Kevin’s abstract but uplifting ideas. They explore questions about where value comes from and what we can do to create it in each other. What does it mean to dignify our neighbors? ... (@thevimblog, 2017-Apr-30)
503.thumbnailHow to Talk to Trump Supporters Pt. 4: Appealing to the Constitution
In the last conversation on talking to Trump supporters, Zach, Adam and Justin discuss the role of the Constitution in across-the-aisle conversations. Must this be a case of 'conservatives telling conservatives how to be better conservatives', or can a self-proclaimed liberal make common cause with the principled conservative in seeing Trump's actions as violations of the Constitution? Read t... (@thevimblog, 2017-Apr-24)
504.thumbnailRobots and Retribution
Who will we blame in the future? (@DavidEdmonds100, 2017-May-17)
505.thumbnailEpisode 027: Lori Gruen on Prisons
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Lori Gruen about carceral spaces, teaching philosophy in prisons, the animal, prisoner, and blacks analogy, is animal rights for white people, and much more. (@myishacherry, 2017-Jun-14)
506.thumbnailRationally Speaking #186 - Tania Lombrozo on "Why we evolved the urge to explain"
Humans have an innate urge to reach for explanations of the world around us. This episode features psychologist and philosopher Tania Lombrozo, discussing her research on what purpose explanation serves. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Jun-11)
507.thumbnailEpisode #104 ... Sartre and Camus pt. 5 - Consciousness is Freedom
Today we talk about Sartre's view of consciousness and the notion of radical freedom. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Jun-01)
508.thumbnailRationally Speaking #185 - Hans Noel on "The role of ideology in politics"
Julia talks with political scientist Hans Noel about why the Democrats became the party of liberalism and the Republicans the party of conservatism. (@Rspodcast, 2017-May-28)
509.thumbnailEpisode #103 ... Sartre and Camus pt. 4 - The Quest For Certainty
Today we tell a story from the history of philosophy in an attempt to prepare us for understanding the Phenomenology of Sartre. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-May-24)
510.thumbnailEpisode 026: Elizabeth Barnes on Disability and Well-Being
Myisha Cherry chats with philosopher Elizabeth Barnes about theories of disability, abnormal bodies and a flourishing life, diabilty pride, valuing disability, and much more. (@myishacherry, 2017-May-17)
511.thumbnailRationally Speaking #184 - Gregory Clark on "What caused the industrial revolution?"
This episode features economic historian Gregory Clark, author of A Farewell to Alms and one of the leading scholars of the industrial revolution. (@Rspodcast, 2017-May-14)
512.thumbnailEpisode #102 ... Heidegger pt. 3 - Authenticity
Today we talk about Martin Heidegger and his concept of Authenticity. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-May-12)
513.thumbnailEpisode #101 ... Heidegger pt. 2 - Science and Technology
Today we discuss Martin Heidegger and his views on Modern Technology. (@iamstephenwest, 2017-Apr-30)
514.thumbnailRationally Speaking #183 - L. A. Paul on "Transformative Experiences"
In this episode, philosopher L. A. Paul and Julia discuss real life examples of transformative experiences -- such as having children -- and debate how to deal with them. (@Rspodcast, 2017-Apr-30)

Questions in Podcast Episode Descriptions

(ordered as in episode list above; click/tap question to jump to episode entry)

How can we best help other people?
Might philosophy be as old as humankind as we know it?
What does it mean when beauty moves from aesthetic choice to ethical ideal?
How does this colour our notion of what constitutes a 'desirable' or 'undesirable' human subject?
Why are we always attracted to people who mock us, resist our advances, and play hard to get?
Are these questions as relevant now as they were 200 years ago?
... What insights, if any, should today’s technologists and disrupters glean from Shelley's story?
So why study philosophy?
... And could a good dose of scientific method help to solve the problem—if indeed there is one?
Do you ever get the feeling that life is meaningless?
How might the same sentence or idea be used in different speech acts, some of which might be legitimately censured but others not?
Do states have a moral right to exclude people from their territory?
Why are we so bad at predicting what will make us happy?
Children are natural philosophers—so why don’t we routinely teach them how to do philosophy?
Will technology, and our tech leaders, bring about utopia?
... Or are their promises just another marketing gimmick?
... Can we trust the richest of the rich to look out for the rest of us?
What's your favorite movie?
... Did you watch that season finale last night?
... But what if pop culture was actually more pernicious than we ordinarily think?
... Could it be systematically deceiving us—eroding our ability to think for ourselves and fight for change?
What are the legitimate limits on free speech?
What does this mean?
... Should we evaluate our governmental, and personal, budgets ethically?
... Does the way we spend money reveal our true ethical commitments?
We talk about one of the most famous critiques of utilitarian theories from Bernard Williams. Does utilitarianism annihilate our integrity--our unity--as people?
What's the relationship between language and the world?
What's it like when someone with superpowers begins to age?
... What does it say about our own views on aging and mortality?
can you push an otherwise normal person to the point of killing someone?
How do I know I'm not dreaming?
Has the outrage changed now that we express so much of it online?
It might affect how the child grows up, but how to work that out?
Did Indian ideas play a role in shaping ancient Greek philosophy?
Does this story of "heroes" have anything to teach us about ethics?
But what exactly is misogyny?
... And how does it differ from sexism?
... What set of beliefs or attitudes makes someone a misogynist?
Is it rational to believe in our friend of the forest?
But what is anti-intellectualism?
... Why is it brought up so often?
... Why is it as prevalent as it is?
The universe has been around for billions of years, so why haven't we seen any signs of alien civilizations?
Why not just be a skeptic?
... Is Pascal right that people suck?
What about the real-life choices you actually have to make every day?
... How bad is it to steal from the self check-out line?
... Can you lie to kids to make them behave?
... What about googling someone before a first date?
Should you have kids?
Is it rational to have religious faith?
Why did James Baldwin, a prominent Civil Rights-era intellectual and novelist, believe that telling the truth about ourselves is not only difficult but can also be dangerous?
Is being dead a bad thing?
... If so, what makes it bad?
... How can anything be bad for a subject that no longer exists?
... We didn't have a problem with oblivion for the thirteen billion years before we were born, why fear it now?
... Why is it so infuriating in some works but not others?
What is a robustly demanding good, and what has that got to do with friendship and love?
If we disapprove of certain behaviors, when is it okay to prohibit them legally?
... What about just shaming people?
... But what constitutes "harm"?
... And how can we discourage someone from, e.g., just being drunk all the time?
Why are there so many books, apps, and systems devoted to self-optimization?
... Are they helping us improvement where it matters?
... If we're getting better, why does it feel so bad?
What's the best way to build self-control, patience, productivity, and delayed marshmallow eating?
To what extent has our podcast changed in reaction to current politics?
what's so creepy about pick up artistry?
... Can an AI be a person?
... Can you enslave yourself?
... Would it be ethical to "block" someone in real life like we do on social media?
How do people rationalize this?
... What can we apply from this to ourselves?
... Also, how was genocide a new type of crime, and what's the best rationale for punishing it?
Next we talk about "Black Museum" - could it be the final episode of Black Mirror?
... Should it be?
But what exactly is retirement and why do we retire?
... Does retirement always mean an end to work, or can it sometimes just mean a shift to a different kind of work?
But what is involved in knowing a person?
Are we still morally culpable if our entire society is corrupt?
would you accept a duel on the moon?
How much should tech companies be actively moderating their users' speech?
Can robots fall in love?
must we avenge the ones we love?
... Does pursuing vengeance make your a life a blue ruin?
... Is violence outside of self-defense ever justified?
Is it really the case that we dehumanize in order to harm others?
... Or does most violence actually require us to view others as fundamentally human, agentic, and capable of true suffering?
What ideas and events took shape over the past twelve months that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways?
what does philosophical education for children look like?
... How does it change students?
... What would a world be like where everyone was a little more philosophical?
Case closed?
how does our relationship to art change when we know its creator did bad things?
... Are we allowed to enjoy the works?
... Are we allowed to purchase them?
wait what?
... You want me to take that pill?
Can we talk about the mind in a way that is both scientific and also does justice to our everyday experiences?
a case of the irrelevant versus the impractical?
What makes Taylor Swift so interesting?
... Is she, actually, interesting?
... How does she relate to Guy Fieri, America, and...ourselves?
But what is it really about?
... Is it a sense of our mortality, the fear of not achieving what we hoped to, or the sinking feeling that we’ve been spending our whole adult lives chasing our tails?
Then who was it?
Is there any ground from which we could judge life as a whole to be good or bad?
... more about saying "yes" to life or saying "no" to all the numerous things that piss him off?
How should we address our fragmented moral landscape, with multiple sources of value that can't be reduced or systematically ordered?
... Does this make all of our moral decisions arbitrary?
Is Guy Fieri authentic?
... Is authenticity admirable, even if someone is authentically unappealing?
... What does Guy Fieri’s character and celebrity say about America?
Why do some animals behave in altruistic ways?
Would we actually like him?
What’s the philosophical significance of Mean Girls?
... How can gossip change a culture?
Are human beings fundamentally different from the rest of the animal world?
... Can what we essentially are be captured in a biological or evolutionary description?
Or are they?
lists of symptoms. Who creates these lists, and based on what criteria?
Is it just a coincidence that the five-hundredth anniversary of the Reformation falls on the same year that Britain is trying to 'Brexit'?
Should we sacrifice ourselves to the machine of the economy?
... How does Smith's idea of virtue and talk of the "impartial spectator" line up with economic growth?
Why do we blame drunk drivers who hit someone more than drunk drivers who make it home OK?
... Why do we judge people for things that are beyond their control (when we have strong intuitions that uncontrollable acts don't deserve blame)?
... Does moral luck ultimately swallow all of our behavior?
Is gossip good after all?
... What does gossip get for us and what's the moral cost?
So where does that leave some humans we know?
Is the economy more like a machine or a garden or what?
Who is Hannah Arendt and why should we care?
... How would Arendt feel about being the subject of partisan think pieces?
... Should we read her work—the Origins of Totalitarianism or Eichmann in Jerusalem—to get a better handle on the age of Trump?
What counts as good evidence for ghosts?
... Is it a matter of faith?
... How do we approach the uncertain?
But what makes something trash to begin with?
Would you trust a killer robot more than a banker?
The medievals were too firm in their beliefs to entertain skeptical worries, right?
Do ghosts exist?
... Should a person believe in them?
Is political compromise different from other kinds of compromise?
... When values and ethics are involved, is any compromise morally permissible?
... Is centrism pragmatic or lacking in principles?
We’re told it’s a post-truth world—so what’s left of the philosophy of knowledge?
Does the Jain theory of seven predications (saptabhaṇgī) land them in self-contradiction, or help them to avoid it?
Do you want the WHOLE discussion on the new Blade Runner 2049, the original 1982 film, and the idea packed Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
... Dick?
Do difficult situations make good people act badly?
... Are there really "good" and "bad" people, or are we all about the same, but put in different situations?
Is life meaningless?
... Are humans just glorified dung beetles, pushing around our piles of poop with no greater purpose?
... What would it take for life to actually be meaningful?
How can we learn from failure?
Who am I?
What is Hannity's style?
... Does he present arguments, or is it all on-screen graphics, rapid-fire non-sequiturs and facial expressions?
Why does apparently trivial ritual play such an important part in some ancient Chinese philosophy?
Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
... What makes us human?
How will this augmented connectivity affect the way we live?
What is Art?
What do we mean when we say someone is angry?
... Can we identify anger (or any other emotion) via facial expressions, physiological changes, or neural markers?
... Is anger simply a feeling, something that happens to us, or does it involve a judgment?
... How much control do we have over our emotions, and can we be responsible for them?
is there such a thing as an immoral fantasy?
How does the division of labor and our instinct to exchange lead to the growth of wealth?
... Is the economy sufficiently machine-like to enable us to manipulate its output, or at least to tell us how not to screw it up?
But is it the real thing?
Do you think of your life as a story?
... Does your life have a narrative structure or form?
... Do you identify with your past selves and your future selves?
... If not, can you live a good life, a moral life, an authentic life?
... Can you feel guilt, regret, and resentment?
Should we view this inevitability with hope or with despair?
But is it philosophy?
How are guns different from the death app, OK Reaper?
What is wisdom?
Can discrimination be subtle and indirect, as in Aesop's fable of the fox and the stork?
Confused about time?
Is it always better to be just than unjust?
Are there reliable differences in IQ across races?
But what about "legitimate" news, one might still ask?
... Well, do you want the "liberal truth" or the "conservative truth"?
... Just stick to the facts?
... What if my "facts" differ from yours?
... Listen to science?
The rituals of remembrance can be powerful and moving, but what moral lesson lies beneath?
But is it the wrong end of the stick?
Should we make Nazi analogies?
... If so, when should we make Nazi analogies?
The focus is "theory of mind"; how do we develop the ability to impute thoughts and intentions to others?
... What in our upbringing can interfere with this development?
Is intelligence a meaningful, definable concept?
... Can we reliably test for it?
... How much of the variability in IQ across individuals is due to heritable factors?
What are the ethical implications, and do we really need meditation to achieve its alleged ethical benefits?
For instance, is Trump the natural conclusion of regular GOP politics or is he an aberration?
... And what about the practical, day to day stuff?
But what is it exactly?
What’s real and what’s illusion?
... What happens when our illusions unravel?
... How do expectations affect our experience?
... How can artists use our expectations to manipulate our emotions?
Should we ban male circumcision?
But what if our physical laws changed?
... Could that even be possible?
Do we buy Debord's critique?
... no revolution) just more spectacle?
... Is technology inherently dehumanizing?
... Don't these passivity/anti-technology arguments even apply to books?
... Could Debord's model of authenticity catch on in society as a whole?
What is the Buddhist conception of not-self?
... When we become aware that the boundaries between us and the world are fluid, what is the “we” that arrives at this insight?
... Can daily meditation make you less of a dick?
... How does evolutionary psychology bear on these questions?
What is culture?
What happens when we discover why we believe the things we believe?
... What if we discover that our values are the product of our cultural tradition, or personal experience, or natural selection?
... Should we be more skeptical of our values once we learn their history?
When I die will I be dead?
Are you a victim of crime?
... What are YOUR obligations?
What's the nature of love/lust?
... Are we really just loving an image we've built while remaining fundamentally isolated?
... And is it just an illusionary social construct that keeps us all from feeling fundamental vertigo?
Why does it matter for philosophy, beyond providing an alternative to intelligent design?
... Is it really anti-religious?
... How can well tell if it's really a scientific theory?
... Talking about a species evolving trait X to enable survival sounds teleological; is it really, and is that bad?
... Why would the mind develop through natural selection?
What is boundary of your mind?
... Is it contained with your body, or does it extend to the external environment--to your laptop, notebook, smartphone and more?
... Is this a purely terminological question, or one with practical and moral significance?
Is racial profiling ever moral or is it always an unjustified form of racism?
What are the philosophical ramifications of Darwin's theory of evolution?
Where does it come from?
... What's its appeal?
... What's its basis?
Does the recent "Sokal-like" hoax expose the ideological extremism of gender studies?
... Or does it show that certain portions of the "skeptic" community are susceptible to the same biases as their opponents?
Economic Anxiety?
But what about other animals, like monkeys, elephants, and dolphins?
... Should they enjoy similar fundamental rights?
Is the recent controversy at the feminist philosophy journal Hypatia diagnostic of larger problems in philosophy?
... Can the replication crisis ever be solved?
How would a scientifically minded person argue for the existence of God?
Do these false beliefs fail to meet their goal?
... Or are there some things we believe simply because they make us feel good?
In an age of unscrupulous politics and ruthless business practice, shouldn't we be encouraging a move away from Machiavellian thinking?
But what methods do phenomenologists use to study the mind and experience in general?
What's the relationship between ethics, reason, and revelation?
... What could "faith" possibly mean to a hard-core rationalist like Spinoza?
... Is it possible to buy into the non-denominational "true religion" without believing any of the dogmas of traditional religion at all?
Profiling is commonplace?
... But is it ethical?
What’s the relationship between ethics and political power?
... Given that religious factions tend to create strife, what’s the optimal role of the government in mitigating that damage?
... Is theocracy in any way a good idea?
ordinances; does it make sense to say that God makes rules for people?
... Also, how does Spinoza deal with alleged miracles given that natural laws are absolute regularities?
Could a morally perfect person survive in the modern world?
... Is all this "modernity," which so efficiently computes our desires and provides mechanisms to fulfill them, actually suited to achieve human flourishing?
Are our ideas of political membership changing in a globalised world?
Are general terms like "water" or "dog" just things that we made up to order the world?
And who do you need to apologize to?
Is privacy really a fundamental value?
What does it mean to dignify our neighbors?
Must this be a case of 'conservatives telling conservatives how to be better conservatives', or can a self-proclaimed liberal make common cause with the principled conservative in seeing Trump's actions as violations of the Constitution?
Who will we blame in the future?